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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 243 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 399)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 237)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 214)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)

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Mental Health and Social Inclusion
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.223
Number of Followers: 43  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2042-8308 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8316
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • “” – a values-based approach to supporting recovery in
           Japan

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Takashi Iseda, Kazuo Ogawa, Kenichi Hasegawa, Syudo Yamasaki, Atsushi Nishida, Geoff Shepherd
      Abstract: This paper aims to introduce Seikatsu Rinsho, a values-based approach to supporting recovery based on identifying service user values and aspirations that have been developed since 1958 in Japan where mental health services are still hospital-based and user involvement is not well-developed. This paper believes this will be of great implications for future practices around the world. Hope is essential to recovery and that hope is dependent on identifying what service users really want for themselves (aspirations) and then ensuring that these are communicated to – and supported by – professionals and carers. This is achieved through examining the life events, which are likely to trigger relapse for a specific individual, the important choices that the person has made throughout his/her life course and the reasons behind them. Through a process of “co-production”, an attempt is made to understand the values expressed in these choices in the context of family history over several generations. The attempt to examine both life events throughout the life course and family history over generations was found to be an effective way to understand a service user and his/her family and then support recovery. The cases where even people with severe and persistent mental health problems have successfully achieved full recovery have been accumulated. The limitations of the approach in the context of Japanese mental health services, and the necessity of additional evidence are acknowledged and some thoughts shall be given to future development. Seikatsu Rinsho approach can provide a new angle to understand service users and family and a new way to support recovery.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-06-24
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2021-0016
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Impact of Covid-19 pandemic on female health care workers in Odisha
           (India)

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      Authors: Shiba Shankar Pattayat, Prasanta Patri, Silan Das, Rajesh Barik
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of Covid-19 on female health workers (FHWs) in Odisha (India). Here, this study discusses the economic hardship of the FHWs during the pandemic time. Additionally, this study also identifies the various socio-economic factors responsible for the increasing mental stress level of FHWs in Odisha. The study is based on a telephonic survey method. Overall the study has collected 80 samples of FHWs from Odisha (India). Additionally, the study uses a logistic regression model to measure the impact of various socio-economic factors affecting the mental health status of FHWs during the pandemic time. The findings of this study depict that FHWs working as a Covid warrior during the pandemic time are facing severe economic vulnerability in their life. It is found that though the FHWs have worked tirelessly to save millions of human lives, but irregularity in salary payment and temporary jobs position have caused more mental distress to them. Moreover, the empirical findings have shown that factors such as joint family, social isolation, having an elderly member in their family, duty in Covid ward, staying in staff quarter and temporary job position are responsible for increasing the mental stress of FHWs in Odisha during the Covid-19 pandemic time. This study is a first attempt to explain the life struggle, economic vulnerability and mental stress of Indian (Odisha) FHWs working during the Covid-19 pandemic period to save millions of human lives.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-06-24
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2020-0092
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Recovery colleges: long-term impact and mechanisms of change

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      Authors: Holly Thompson, Laura Simonds, Sylvie Barr, Sara Meddings
      Abstract: Recovery Colleges are an innovative approach which adopt an educational paradigm and use clinician and lived experience to support students with their personal recovery. They demonstrate recovery-orientated practice and their transformative role has been evidenced within mental health services. The purpose of this study is to explore how past students understand the influence of the Recovery College on their on-going recovery journey. An exploratory, qualitative design was used and semi-structured interviews took place with 15 participants. Data was analysed using the “framework method” and inductive processes. All participants discussed gains made following Recovery College attendance that were sustained at one year follow-up. Three themes emerged from the data: Ethos of recovery and equality; Springboard to opportunities; and Intrapersonal changes. This research explores students’ experiences a year after attendance. This contrasts to most research which is completed immediately post course. This study contributes to the emergent evidence base highlighting the longitudinal positive impact of Recovery Colleges. This study is of value to those interested in recovery-oriented models within mental health. Recovery Colleges are gaining traction nationally and internationally and this research highlights processes underlying this intervention which is of importance to those developing new Recovery Colleges.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-06-15
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2021-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Depressive symptoms, developing friendships, and social support through
           online gaming: a mixed-method analysis of online gaming network
           communication

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      Authors: Tyler Prochnow, Logan Hartnell, Megan S. Patterson
      Abstract: Online gaming offers avenue to connect with others producing social capital especially for individuals lacking in-real-life (IRL) social support; however, there is concerns related to mental health and depressive symptoms (DS). Virtually mediated social connections are particularly important during times of social distancing. This paper aims to investigate discussant networks established through an online gaming site and their possible association with DS and social support. Participants (n = 40) recruited from an online gaming site reported DS, online and IRL social support, and site members with whom they discussed important life matters. Participants also reported topics of conversation discussed and reason for communication. Quadratic assignment procedure multiple regression was used to determined significant associations between network structure, DS and social support. DS were significantly associated with online (ß = 0.39) and IRL social support (ß = −0.44). Online social support was significantly associated with network structural factors. Topics reported by members most often were bridging capital topics while topics reported by members in most recent conversation were bonding capital topics. Members mentioned bonding social capital concepts as motivation for conversation. Building online relationships to provide bonding social capital could supply buffering effects for those feeling socially isolated during social distancing. This paper is among the first to approach online gaming communication through social network analysis and qualitative analysis mixed method approach.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-06-10
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-02-2021-0011
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Restraint and confinement of psychiatric patients in community: a scoping
           review of in Indonesia

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      Authors: Dahniar Dahniar , Rini Asnurianti , Nurul Amna , Marthoenis Marthoenis
      Abstract: The practice of restraint and confinement of patients with mental disorders is common in Indonesia. This practice is known as pasung and is usually carried out by the family or the villagers in community settings. The previous separated studies have investigated the reasons for, methods, duration and consequences of applying pasung to the patients. A scoping review is needed to study the existing practice of restraint and confinement in Indonesian communities. This study aims to review the published studies on the practice of restraint and confinement of people with mental illness (PWMI) in Indonesia. A scoping review method was used to identify studies on the practices of restraint and confinement of PWMI. A search of Science Direct, PubMed database and Google Scholar for articles was conducted. There is an increasing interest in studying the pasung-related aspects among Indonesian mental health practitioners. The studies included the patients, family, caregivers and community as the research subjects. Various elements of pasung; the actors, duration, reason, the consequences and the challenges in releasing pasung have been reported. Stakeholders should consider many factors related to pasung to achieve the free pasung program in Indonesia. Pasung is a practice that exists in a significant number in Indonesia. Although researchers have sounded the importance of the pasung as a problem in the community, much has to be done to alleviate the inhuman treatment of PWMI. This paper adds to the literature on the research concerning the practice of restraint and confinement of PWMI. The findings could be uses as the basis of the improvement of policy on mental health services, not only in Indonesia but also in other countries where the practice of restraint and confinements of PWMI in the community settings is existing.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2021-0058
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The risk of risk management: adopting critical theories to explore
           clinical risk concerns in mental health care

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      Authors: Kris Deering , Jo Williams , Rob Williams
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to outline several critical risk theories and explore their application to risk concerns in mental health care. This will contribute to the on-going debate about risk management practices and the impact these might have on recovery and social inclusion. Notably, while risks like suicide can be therapeutically addressed, risk management may involve paternalistic practices that exclude the participation needed for recovery. A viewpoint of key risk theories will be presented to provide a critical eye about some clinical risk concerns in mental health care. Implications for recovery and social inclusion will then be discussed alongside direction for practice and research. Clinical concerns seemed to involve difficulties with uncertainty, holding onto expertise, and the othering of patients through risk. These concerns suggest the patient voice might become lost, particularly within the backdrop of clinical fears about blame. Alternatively, a relational approach to risk management could have merit, while patient expertise may develop understanding in how to improve risk management practices. Clinical concerns appear more than managing potential harms; it can involve appraising behaviours around societal norms, explaining to an extent why mental illness might be addressed in terms of risks. While the points raised in the paper support existing findings about risk management, the underlying reasons drawing on the critical risk theories are less explored.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2021-0061
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Research watch: routes to marginalised students’ increased inclusion
           and empowerment

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      Authors: Sue Holttum
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper was to report on recent research about how students belonging to marginalised groups can be empowered. The author searched for articles that covered the topic of empowerment, published in the past two years. The author selected two papers that each focus on a different group and illustrate processes of empowerment applicable in their contexts. The first paper deals sensitively with the topic of in-fighting amongst Indigenous students at Canadian universities and how Canada’s colonisation history contributes to this. It also illustrates how Indigenous students are working together to improve universities’ recognition of their needs and rights. The second paper describes a consciousness-raising programme for Black girls in secondary schools in Pennsylvania, USA. Black girls attending the programme valued it and felt more connected with other Black girls. There was some dropout from the programme, but those who remained appeared to benefit. These two papers represent important illustrations of some complex challenges facing marginalised groups and how their empowerment and inclusion can increase, with implications for their mental and physical well-being.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-09-29
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2021-0055
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Professionals harnessing experiential knowledge in Dutch mental health
           settings

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      Authors: Simona Karbouniaris , Alie Weerman , Bea Dunnewind , Jean Pierre Wilken , Tineke A. Abma
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the perspectives of mental health professionals who are in a process of integrating their own experiential knowledge in their professional role. This study considers implications for identity, dilemmas and challenges within the broader organization, when bringing experiential knowledge to practice. As part of a participatory action research approach, qualitative methods have been used, such as in-depth interviews, discussions and observations during training and project team. The actual use of experiential knowledge by mental health care professionals in their work affected four levels: their personal–professional development; the relation with service users; the relation with colleagues; and their position in the organization. Because of its limited context, this study may lack generalisability and further research with regard to psychologists and psychiatrists, as well as perceptions from users, is desirable. According to this study, social change starts from a bottom-up movement and synchronously should be facilitated by top-down policy. A dialogue with academic mental health professionals seems crucial to integrate this source of knowledge. Active collaboration with peer workers and supervisors is desired as well. Professionals with lived experiences play an important role in working recovery-oriented, demonstrating bravery and resilience. Having dealt with mental health distress, they risked stigma and rejections when introducing this as a type of knowledge in current mental health service culture. Next to trainings to facilitate the personal–professional process, investments in the entire organization are needed to transform governance, policy and ethics.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-09-16
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2021-0054
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Online resilience support groups during the COVID-19 pandemic: the
           Philippine experience

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      Authors: Maria Regina Hechanova , Arsenio S. Alianan; Jr , Rosanne M. Jocson , Angelique P. Villasanta
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the outcomes of an online resilience support group during the COVID-19 pandemic in the Philippines. Specifically, it described the extent to which the program improved adaptive coping, non-reactivity, resilience and well-being and decreased stress, depression and anxiety symptoms of participants. This study used a pretest–posttest design with 53 participants. A majority of participants were female (74%) who participated in the program for 6–8 weeks. Scales measuring adaptive coping, non-reactivity, resilience, well-being, stress, depression and anxiety were administered before and after the completion of the modules. Results revealed significant improvements in adaptive coping particularly seeking emotional and instrumental support, active coping, and religious coping. The results also showed significant improvements in nonreactivity, psychological well-being and resilience and decrease in depression symptoms. Effect size estimates indicate medium effect sizes for well-being and nonreactivity with the other outcomes having small effect sizes. A limitation of this study is the lack of a randomized control trial design and the lack of control for extraneous variables. Future studies using rigorous and longitudinal designs are recommended. Future studies may also examine program implementation factors such as using homogenous groups. In most low-income countries, the provision of mental health and psychosocial support during the COVID-19 pandemic has been hampered by the lack of mental health professionals, issues of internet connectivity and a lack of resources and access. Online resilience support groups may provide a means to address these challenges by making mental health support more accessible and available. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused isolation and a means to bridge this is through peer support groups. This may be especially important in collectivist cultures where social relationships serve as recovery capital. Although there has been a rise in the use of technology, most are in the form of individual or self-help interventions. This paper examines the feasibility of an online structured peer support group that focuses on building resilience skills. It fills a gap in the literature on online peer support groups that may be most relevant for low-income countries with a dearth of mental health specialists.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0038
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Hosting persons with mental illness: narrative study on the experiences of
           a female caregiver managing a mental home in Ghana

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      Authors: Salome Amissah-Essel , Nancy Innocentia Ebu Enyan , Christiana Asiedu
      Abstract: Persons with mental illness (PWMI) need to be housed and cared for properly. Providing this support can be physically, financially and psychologically exhausting for the caregiver. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of a caregiver managing a mental home in Ghana and to get a deeper understanding of what it really takes to host and care for PWMI. A narrative research design was used. The narrative approach was used to gather the stories of the caregiver. Data was collected through in-depth face-to-face interview, informal conversations and field notes. Thematic analysis was performed focusing on both the personal and social experiences of the participant. Three main themes emerged from the participant’s experience as follows: stigma and rejection, burden of hosting and support from others. The study also found that what it takes to host and care for PWMI is psychological resilience as follows: determination and love. An appeal is made to individuals to also support PWMI instead of the government alone. The outcomes of this study indicate that the life of a caregiver managing a mental home is a journey characterized by stigma, rejection and financial burden. It highlights the importance of support from others for the caregiver to keep providing optimal care. This paper contributes to the literature on carer resilience by providing evidence that once there is determination and love, PWMI can be housed and cared for in Ghana.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2021-0041
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Syd Barrett took a left turn and never came back, Andrew Voyce did.
           Why'

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      Authors: Patrick Hopkinson , Andrew Voyce , Jerome Carson
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to compare the stories of Syd Barrett musician, with Andrew Voyce, and their respective recovery journeys. The authors use collaborative autoethnography to share their own perspectives on Syd Barrett and to contrast his story with that of Andrew, a co-author. Both Syd and Andrew experienced serious mental distress. While Syd had only limited contact with mental health services, Andrew’s contact was extensive, with a 20-year history of admissions and discharges. In the end, when the psychiatric services listened to Andrew’s concerns and acted on them, he was able to enter into the journey of recovery. The authors are restricted in the amount of available information on Syd Barrett, especially that related to mental health problems. The story of Andrew shows how recovery is possible even after years of serious mental illness. Andrew’s story shows why professionals should never give up on people, with even the most seemingly severe and intractable problems. Could services have done more for Syd' Mental illness still attracts huge stigma. Today there is a much more open culture. Would Syd have come out about his own struggles with mental health had society been more open' Bringing together two stories of mental distress enables the authors to explore the concept of recovery.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-28
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0031
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Recovery colleges in mental health-care services: an Australian
           feasibility and acceptability study

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      Authors: Liza Hopkins , Andrew Foster , Sue Belmore , Shelley Anderson , Di Wiseman
      Abstract: This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of establishing a recovery college in an Australian acute and community adult mental health service. Very little has been published on efforts to incorporate recovery colleges in inpatient settings other than forensic. This study offers an evaluation of feasibility and acceptability of this service model within a health-care setting. Participant feedback and qualitative implementation data, from an acute mental health-care inpatient ward and adult community care were used. Participants were mental health service consumers and staff. The intervention involved a co-produced, co-designed, co-delivered and co-received educational opportunity for mental health consumers, carers, staff and the community. Feedback from course participants indicates that learning objectives were met by the majority of participants, while stakeholders identified that establishing a recovery college within both the inpatient and community health-care service was feasible at a service level and broadly acceptable to consumers. Establishing an adult recovery college in inpatient and community care is likely to be effective re-orientating mental health-care services as well as improving outcomes for consumers.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-28
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0035
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Depressive symptoms and health-related quality of life in patients
           attending government – owned psychiatric clinics in Nigeria

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      Authors: Deborah O. Aluh , Maxwell O. Adibe , Abubakar Abba , Chukwudi E. Sam-Eze , Abdulmuminu Isah
      Abstract: Depression and its symptoms negatively influence the health-related quality of life of patients. This paper aims to explore the occurrence of depressive symptoms and their relationship with health-related quality of life and sociodemographic characteristics. It was a cross-sectional study conducted among patients attending the outpatient psychiatric clinics of two Nigerian hospitals. Data were collected using sociodemographic, PHQ-9 and 15 D questionnaires from a convenience sample of patients. Statistical Product and Services Solution Software (SPSS) version 21.0 was used to evaluate depressive symptoms, health-related quality of life, sociodemographic characteristics and the associations among them. The mean depressive symptoms and health-related quality of life scores were found to be 12.118 ± 4.373 and 0.829 ± 0.141, respectively. The result showed a significant negative correlation (r = −0.318, p 
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2021-0024
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Perspective of volunteer staff on the effectiveness of peer-support
           programs: a case study

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      Authors: Vanessa Dudley-Miller , Jeff Radel
      Abstract: This study aims to explore perceived effectiveness in the Warriors' Ascent program through interviews of volunteer staff, to leverage improvements in the design and delivery of programs through peer-volunteers. Focused interviews were conducted to explore peer-volunteer perspectives on program effectiveness. The alignment of themes and statements emerging from interviews was explored in detail relative to the program curriculum. Five main themes emerged, with alignment for 86% of the peer-volunteers’ commentary and program curriculum. Areas of non-alignment may present opportunities for program growth. Analysis of peer-volunteer perspectives on practical activities and overall program effectiveness identified options to enhance program delivery. Warriors’ Ascent and both existing and emerging organizations (such as those who will serve distressed frontline pandemic workers) are essential social resources poised to evolve by encompassing appreciation and more effective use of non-professional volunteer support staff. Peer-volunteers supporting behavior change programs are an emerging focus for research. Peer-volunteers contribute unique perspectives, common experiences and building of relations with a program’s participants serving as an effective agent of change contributing toward healthier lifestyles. Considering the influences of peer-volunteers during program evaluation allows triangulation among sources of information and offers additional opportunities for influencing program growth.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0027
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Choice, voice and collaboration: using preference accommodation and
           feedback in trauma therapy

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      Authors: Daryl Mahon
      Abstract: Organisations are increasingly understanding the need to be trauma informed. However, how trauma therapies in such organisations apply the principles of choice and collaboration is less understood. The present paper applies two trans-theoretical methods for involving clients in their therapy through preference accommodation and feedback-informed treatment (FIT). A case vignette is provided demonstrating how to involve clients in trauma therapy by listening to their preferences, needs and by providing them with a voice on their experience of the process and outcome of care. A focused review of the literature was conducted, with relevant randomised control trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses sourced. The resulting information informed the design and this model for working with those in trauma therapy. The research regarding trauma-specific therapies being more effective is far from conclusive. At the same time, early attrition and negative outcomes make up a large percentage of those seeking therapy. Using preference accommodation and FIT is one possibly way to mitigate against these experiences in therapy and to provide choice, preference and collaboration consisting with the principles of trauma-informed approaches. Methods to improve the experiences of those seeking trauma therapy have been identified and discussed. According to the author’s knowledge, this is the first known paper aligning trauma therapy and trauma-informed approaches with preference accommodation and FIT. Future empirical studies may wish to examine the relative effectiveness of this approach. Methods to improve outcomes for those seeking trauma therapy are at the disposal of practitioners. Improving outcomes, while also providing choice, voice and collaboration is a clinical setting. This is a novel paper adding to value and extending how practitioners can use principles of trauma-informed approaches within trauma therapy.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0032
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Challenging leisure activities and mental health: are they more beneficial
           for some people than for others'

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      Authors: Ziggi Ivan Santini , Vibeke Koushede , Carsten Hinrichsen , Malene Kubstrup Nelausen , Katrine Rich Madsen , Charlotte Meilstrup , Ai Koyanagi , Line Nielsen
      Abstract: Previous studies have shown a positive association between being engaged or challenged through a leisure activity and good mental health; however, this relationship may vary by the extent to which individuals feel challenged at work or school. This study aims to examine whether a challenging work/study (or the lack of it) moderates the relationship between engaging in challenging leisure activity and mental health. Data from 2,406 adults 16–64 years old from The Danish Mental Health and Well-Being Survey 2016 were linked to Danish national register-based data. Mental well-being (outcome) was assessed using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale and depression/anxiety symptoms (outcome) were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-4. Multivariable linear regressions were performed to estimate the association between challenging leisure activity (predictor) and challenging work/study (potential moderator). Overall, engaging in a challenging leisure activity was positively associated with mental well-being and negatively associated with anxiety symptoms. For these two, a challenging work/study significantly moderated the relationships. The positive association between a challenging activity and mental well-being was strongest among individuals not employed or studying as well as individuals feeling less challenged at work/school. Similarly, the negative association between a challenging activity and anxiety symptoms was strongest among individuals not employed or studying as well as individuals feeling less challenged at work/school. Among individuals with a very challenging work/study, challenging leisure activity was not associated with anxiety symptoms. Finally, engaging in a challenging leisure activity did not significantly predict depression symptoms. Mental health promotion strategies may focus on promoting challenging leisure activities especially among groups not employed or enrolled in education or among individuals that do not feel challenged through their work or studies. The results may further have implications for efforts to address and protect employee/student mental health at workplaces or schools.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0033
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Remarkable lives: Dave Morrison in conversation with Jerome Carson

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      Authors: David Morrison , Jerome Carson
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a profile of Dave Morrison. In this case study, Dave provides a short biography of his background and is then interviewed by Jerome. Dave has had two careers. The first as a scaffolder. The second as a nursing assistant in mental health services. He has ended up bruised and battered in both. Every case study tells a different story. The effects of stress can be cumulative. There are many accounts of how hospitalisation has traumatised service users. Yet, working in these services can also be traumatic for the care staff. Professor Tony Butterworth used to say “Happy nurse equals happy patient”. If you look after staff needs, they will provide better care. Have we ever really looked after the needs of mental health-care staff' Dave’s story is unique. As Nicola Adams says, “Fall down eight times, get up nine”. Dave has fallen down many more times than this. Eventually, it gets harder to get back up.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0034
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Remarkable lives: Zoe Riley in conversation with Jerome Carson

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      Authors: Zoe Riley , Jerome Carson
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a profile of Zoe Riley. Using a case study approach, Zoe provides an account of her background and is then interviewed by Jerome. Zoe’s account reveals a remarkable resilience developed through adversity but nurtured by the love of her grandparents. Mental illness surrounded Zoe when she was growing up. Her own mother experienced years of distress. Her grandfather effectively was her father. Despite the childhood adversity and her own teenage problems, she came through it all. These are the stories you read about in textbooks. Zoe reminds us that people in distress want to find connection. They do not want us sitting there writing notes and not even looking at them! The authors talk about “wounded healers”. Dr Glenn Roberts said that his own bouts of depression made it easier for him to sit with people in similar turmoil. The value of peer support has been underrated by many. It is of course a truism to say that everyone’s journey of recovery is unique. The author knows Zoe has already touched the lives of many people. The author is sure she has so much more to contribute.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2021-0040
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • “Something feels different..” delivering skills from dialectical
           behaviour therapy in a recovery college

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      Authors: Toni King , Joanna Dawson , Francess SmilleyAnderson , Richard Taylor
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore why a course with similar content feels different when delivered in a Recovery College as compared to an NHS therapy. It is offered as a case study based on reflections from several perspectives. This novel approach emphasises predictable factors such as the educational and recovery focussed environment. It also contributes further to thinking around how relationships are differently navigated and developed in Recovery Colleges compared to NHS settings. The reflections are offered to act as a stimulus to promote wider conversations about how Recovery Colleges effect change, with an emphasis on comparing how relationships and power are influenced for those involved. This paper considers this in relation to the Mechanisms of Action identified in Toney et al., 2018 paper.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-04
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0030
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Translation and validation of the Arabic version of the barrier to access
           to care evaluation (BACE) scale

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      Authors: Ahmad F. Alenezi , Ahmed Aljowder , Mohamed J. Almarzooqi , Marya Alsayed , Rashed Aldoseri , Omar Alhaj , Sally Souraya , Graham Thornicroft , Haitham Jahrami
      Abstract: This paper aims to translate and validate an Arabic version of the Barriers to Access to Care Evaluation (BACE) BACE scale to make it appropriate for the targeted socio-cultural and linguistic context. This psychometric study has two main compounds: translating the BACE into Arabic and validating it. Using the back-translation method, the authors involved seven professional individuals to maximize the efficacy of the translated version. The authors began with the process of translating the scale from English into Arabic and vice versa followed by evaluation, compression and matching. Later, a pilot study with a sample size of 35 participants was conducted to receive feedback on the Arabic version of the scale. Finally, an online survey was generated and distributed among Arabic-speaking countries; a total of 630 participants were voluntarily involved in this study. A total of 630 participants completed the survey with a mean age of 31.4 ± 12.9, and 402 (63.8%) were females. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and McDonald's Omega coefficient were both greater than 0.9. The confirmatory factor analysis was found to fit highly satisfactory with the stigma-related barriers. The BACE was validated in Arabic and its psychometric properties were examined in-depth and found to be strong. This paper fulfils an identified need to translate tools to make mental health more accessible to patients in need.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-07-29
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2021-0022
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Participation in social leisure activities may benefit mental health
           particularly among individuals that lack social connectedness at work or
           school

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      Authors: Line Nielsen , Carsten Hinrichsen , Katrine Rich Madsen , Malene Kubstrup Nelausen , Charlotte Meilstrup , Ai Koyanagi , Vibeke Koushede , Ziggi Ivan Santini
      Abstract: Workplace and study environments generally provide opportunities for social connectedness, however, not all individuals in such settings are equally well connected. It is possible that potential mental health benefits of participation in social leisure activities may be greater for individuals that lack social connectedness through a workplace or study environment. This study aims to examine if the association between social leisure activities and mental health is moderated by the degree of social connectedness at work/school. Data stem from 2,406 adults (age range 16-64 years old) from The Danish Mental Health and Well-Being Survey 2016. Validated scales were used to measure mental well-being and depression/anxiety symptoms. Multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted. Participation in social leisure activities (i.e. participation in community/social groups such as a sports association, art club, book club, running group, card game club, cultural or political group) was positively associated with mental well-being and negatively associated with depression/anxiety symptoms. The associations were stronger among individuals feeling less socially connected at work/school and strongest among individuals that were unemployed or not enrolled in education. Mental health promotion strategies may focus on promoting social leisure activities especially among unemployed or otherwise socially isolated groups, as well as among individuals that are not well connected at their workplace or school. Workplaces and schools may also monitor employee/student social connectedness and potentially intervene accordingly.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-07-29
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0026
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Servant leadership informed trauma peer support

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      Authors: Daryl Mahon
      Abstract: Peer support has gained increasing attention within the mental health literature, including the trauma informed approaches research where peer support is a key principle. The purpose of this paper is to outline a servant leadership model of trauma peer support. A targeted literature search that incorporated systematic reviews, meta-analyses and randomised control trials in the areas of servant leadership, peer support and trauma informed approaches were sourced. Servant leadership can be used to provide a theoretical model of trauma peer support. All three constructs share the idea of empowerment as a core principle. An ideographic model of servant leadership trauma peer support is put forward based on eight characteristics from the extant literature. As with all conceptual papers, a lack of empirical data means the findings need to be investigated using primary data. Future research may wish to use this theoretical model to test effectiveness in equivalence studies. A theoretical model of trauma informed peer support based on servant leadership theory, with a clear guide to its utilisation. This is a novel approach, a new addition to the literature.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-07-22
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2021-0029
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Editorial: Reframing the placebo effect. The importance of meaning

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      Authors: Rachel Perkins , Julie Repper
      Abstract: Editorial: Reframing the placebo effect. The importance of meaning
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-08-10
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2021-095
      Issue No: Vol. 25 , No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Research watch: comment on a report on “race” and ethnic
           disparities in the UK

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      Authors: Sue Holttum
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore the contents of the 2021 UK document called Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities: The Report, convey some of its key messages and understand why it sparked controversy when its publication was announced. The author read the 258-page report, made notes, looked up some of the papers and documents to which it refers to get a more complete understanding and conducted her own limited searches on some topics. The author sought comments on an early draft of the article. After reading The Report and other relevant documents, the author feels that she has gained new insights into some challenges and opportunities facing members of different ethnic groups in the UK. However, the author felt that The Report plays down some realities of racism and its effects. This is one viewpoint on The Report and is original. The Report looks at the circumstances of a range of specific ethnic groups in the UK. Its argument for greater interest and focus on these different experiences rather than thinking of all non-White groups as a single mass seems valuable. It also enables an understanding of some things that people can achieve in the face of adversity. However, the author hopes there is also value in my effort to understand why some aspects of The Report have been seen as controversial.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-07-22
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2021-0020
      Issue No: Vol. 25 , No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Wellness, blaming and coping during a pandemic: an analysis of perceptions
           on reddit

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      Authors: Sarah Callaghan , Maureen T.B. Drysdale , Jessica Lee
      Abstract: This study aims to examine Reddit posts regarding the COVID-19 pandemic from a subreddit dedicated to the campus community of a large, research-intensive Canadian University. The goal was to determine what users were sharing regarding their mental health, well-being, problems, coping strategies and perceptions about the health measures taken to prevent further spread. A total of 1,096 paragraphs were analyzed using the qualitative methodology of thematic analysis. Many users expressed struggling with their mental health and well-being during the pandemic. Difficulties with online learning, finding paid study and affording the costs of living were also reported. Coping was largely conducted through online means and included sharing advice, emphasizing connectedness and communicating information. The mixed perceptions regarding health measures focused on responsibility and fairness, with many users blaming the university and public health units. This study contributes to the evolving understanding of how different populations are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada, specifically, university students. Implications for providing assistance to university students during the current pandemic and future waves are also discussed.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-07-22
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2021-0021
      Issue No: Vol. 25 , No. 3 (2021)
       
  • A redesigned training and staff support programme to enhance job retention
           in employees with moderate-severe depression

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      Authors: Nicola Walker , Rachel Dobbing
      Abstract: Closing the treatment gap in depression is vital to prevent people from losing their jobs. Delivering group-based interventions at work could reach more employees than delivering 1:1 interventions in a clinical setting. This study aims to redesign a Treatment Programme to make it more acceptable and accessible for employees with depression. A mixed-methods exploratory sequential design with a high level of stakeholder consultation was used to redesign an interdisciplinary Work-focussed Relational Group CBT Treatment Programme for moderate-severe depression. Qualitative data from focus groups and quantitative data from a small feasibility study were integrated to develop the new Training (and Staff Support) Programme (TSSP), which was fully specified and manualised in line with the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) for future delivery. Focus groups identified a need for improved acceptability and accessibility of the tertiary preventative Work-focussed Relational Group CBT Treatment Programme. This programme was, therefore, simplified for delivery by peer facilitators at the worksite as an intervention for all employees rather than an indicated/targeted intervention for only those with symptoms/risk of depression. The TSSP comprised a compulsory trauma-informed educational/experiential workshop over four days plus optional open-ended, peer-led base groups set up and run by volunteer peer facilitators. The focus groups comprised a convenience sample who knew the researchers as a colleague or therapist, so there is a risk of selection or relationship bias. They were not involved in the data analysis which undermines the element of co-production and increases the risk of analytic or confirmation bias. Delivering the new intervention in a group format will require peer facilitators to acquire skills in co-facilitation using a structured-directive leadership style and an awareness of the potential side effects of group-based interventions. The worksite TSSP provides a democratic learning space and empowers employees to stay at work by self-managing their symptoms and by challenging the interpersonal dynamics and organisational structures that might precipitate and perpetuate depression. This intervention is fully specified and manualised with an explicit programme theory, unlike most universal worksite-based CBT programmes.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-07-22
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2020-0089
      Issue No: Vol. 25 , No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Trauma-informed servant leadership in health and social care settings

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      Authors: Daryl Mahon
      Abstract: Practitioners, organisations and policy makers in health and social care settings are increasingly recognising the need for trauma-informed approaches in organisational settings, with morbidity and financial burdens a growing concern over the past few years. Servant leadership has a unique focus on emotional healing, service to others as the first priority, in addition to the growth, well-being and personal and professional development of key stakeholders. This paper aims to discuss Trauma Informed Servant Leadership (TISL). A targeted review of the servant leadership and trauma-informed care literature was conducted. Relevant studies, including systematic review and meta-analysis, were sourced, with the resulting interpretation informing the conceptual model. Although there are general guidelines regarding how to go about instituting trauma-informed approaches, with calls for organisational leadership to adapt the often cited six trauma-informed principles, to date there has not been a leadership approach elucidated which takes as its starting point and core feature to be trauma informed. At the same time, there is a paucity of research elucidating trauma outcomes for service users or employees in the literature when a trauma-informed approach is used. However, there is a large body of evidence indicating that servant leadership has many of the outcomes at the employee level that trauma-informed approaches are attempting to attain. Thus, the author builds on a previous conceptual paper in which a model of servant leadership and servant leadership supervision are proposed to mitigate against compassion fatigue and secondary trauma in the health and social care sector. The author extends that research to this paper by recasting servant leadership as a trauma-informed model of leadership that naturally operationalises trauma-informed principles. A lack of primary data limits the extent to which conclusions can be drawn on the effectiveness of this conceptual model. However, the model is based on robust research across the differential components used; therefore, it can act as a framework for future empirical research designs to be studies at the organisational level. Both the servant leadership and trauma-informed literatures have been extended with the addition of this model. TISL can complement the trauma-informed approach and may also be viable as an alternative to trauma-informed approaches. This paper offers guidelines to practitioners and organisations in health and social care on how to operationalise important trauma-informed principles through leadership. This conceptual model may help reduce the burden of trauma and re-traumatisation encountered by practitioners and service users in health and social care settings, impacting on morbidity. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is a novel approach, the first of its kind.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2021-07-22
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-05-2021-0023
      Issue No: Vol. 25 , No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Mental Health and Social Inclusion

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

       
 
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