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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Bakti Budaya     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access  
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Groupwork     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access  
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 320)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 146)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access  
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access  
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 140)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Social Work / Maatskaplike Werk     Open Access  
Social Work and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Social Work With Groups     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Socialinė teorija, empirija, politika ir praktika     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
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Mental Health and Social Inclusion
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.223
Number of Followers: 36  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2042-8308 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8316
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Research protocol for a preliminary evaluation of a gamified tool for
           adult wellbeing

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jacob Gavin, Steven Barnes
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to outline a research protocol for an initial investigation into the efficacy of an early-development gamified intervention (“Wellbeing Town”) designed with potential end-users with the aim of improving adult wellbeing. Rationale for the proposed research is discussed along with a summary of the planned methodological approach. Preliminary evaluation of “Wellbeing Town” is proposed to begin using a quasi-experiment, pre- vs post-intervention repeated-measures design with follow-up. Evaluation of changes in self-reported wellbeing will be supplemented with an investigation into the extent of self-directed play between post-intervention and follow-up, and its implications for follow-up outcome. As this paper represents a protocol for future evaluation, no data is reported presently. The authors present the protocol for data analysis. Once concluded, this study represents an initial evaluation of a gamified tool for adult wellbeing designed in conjunction with potential end-users. Should the game elicit significant improvements to wellbeing when played, proposals for further evaluation and possible future scalability are presented.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-27
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2023-0001
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Laughter, mental health and cancer: a case study of Ros Ben-Moshe

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      Authors: Ros Ben-Moshe, Freda Gonot-Schoupinsky
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to meet Ros Ben-Moshe, a cancer survivor – or rather thriver – and lecturer in positive psychology at La Trobe University, describes how she uses laughter to boost levity and mental health. This case study is divided into two parts: an autoethnographic life story of Ros Ben-Moshe, followed by 10 questions and answers. Regular laughter is an enjoyable way to stimulate the feel-good chemicals dopamine, oxytocin, serotonin and endorphins. A laughter mindset is an important tool for overall wellbeing. It can help build connections and re-frame negative situations. This is a personal narrative and gives the perspective of one person who harnessed the benefits of laughter following a cancer diagnosis. Laughter can be used strategically to reset our internal mindset and prime ourselves towards optimal mental health and wellbeing, even while struggling with serious health issues. Research into how and when to prescribe laughter for mental health and overall wellbeing is therefore of interest. Social laughter is important and rewarding. For those anxious about social laughter, finding people to laugh with who do not judge you is recommended, as are affirmations to lessen anxiety. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case study and interview with a cancer survivor on the topic of laughter, cancer and mental health.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-26
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2022-0071
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Positive addiction recovery for an online audience: implementation design
           and user evaluation

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      Authors: Lisa Ogilvie, Julie Prescott
      Abstract: The positive addiction recovery website (https://positiveaddictionrecovery.com) has been created following a successful pilot study of a programme of work known as positive addiction recovery therapy (PART). The aim of the website is to disseminate PART to an online audience, extending its reach to a larger population. The purpose of this study is to explain the process of creating this online resource and to conduct a user evaluation to understand how well received the website is likely to be to its target audience. An implementation framework cognisant of positive computing, positive technology, contemporary understanding of human–computer interaction and knowledge acquired from the delivery of eHealth interventions from the past decade was used to create the website. To understand user opinion of the resultant website, data were collected using the mobile application ratings scale user version. By adopting a tailored implementation framework, with appropriate determinant factors of wellbeing and evidenced theoretical input, a website resource was created that users considered engaging and informative. The findings also suggest that participants appreciated the importance of intended behavioural change, having interacted with the interventions on the website. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the website is the first online version of PART, a new programme of work aimed at people in addiction recovery.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-26
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2022-0072
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Suicide attempts as turning points

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      Authors: David Lester
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine why an attempt at suicide does not always indicate the beginning of a life with poor mental health. Case studies, supplemented by follow-up studies of attempted suicides. One of the strongest predictors of a healthy life after the suicide attempt was found to be improvement in the appropriateness of behavior toward others and improved adult functioning. The results suggest that behavioral coaching, in addition to traditional psychiatric treatment, could help attempted suicides move on with their lives productively.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-25
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2022-0092
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The career of a suicidologist

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      Authors: David Lester
      Abstract: This essay aims to describe how the author began his career as a suicidologist and his style that made him so productive. The author used autobiographical details to illustrate the elements of his career. Childhood experiences include sleeping in air raid shelter from 1942 to 1945 in London (UK), while his style includes obsessiveness in reading everything on suicide, applying ideas from other fields (such as economics) to the study of suicide and obtaining academic freedom early in his career. The essay offers guidelines for others who are in the early stages of a career as a researcher.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-20
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-12-2022-0084
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Homelessness: partnerships and approaches to tackling complex needs

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      Authors: Angela Woods, Ben Hughes, Rebecca Lace, Joanne Dickinson
      Abstract: This paper – the first of three – aims to explore some of the complex physical and mental health needs of those experiencing homelessness. It will act as a leader to the other articles by establishing the nature of the problem and offer a rationale for carrying out a service user needs assessment as part of a review of local service provision in the North West of England against the backdrop of the current COVID-19 epidemic. There are a number of complex social and health inequalities often experienced by those who are homeless. Effectively tackling these requires a co-ordinated multi-agency response to both prevent and tackle the harms associated with being and becoming homeless. Partnership working offers the best opportunity to meet the complex needs of those experiencing homelessness. The current delivery model being actioned in the North West of England highlights the importance of the links between statutory and non-statutory services. An ongoing service user needs assessment will further help to highlight contemporary issues faced by those experiencing homelessness and those providing services in the context of the COVID-19 epidemic. Future papers as part of this series of three will consider the implications of social exclusion and barriers to accessing services faced on a day-to-day basis by those experiencing homelessness. The opportunity to reflect on established views in relation to the nature and scope of homelessness. It will consider the implications exclusion from society and service provision that this group face on a day-to-day basis. The paper will describe a contemporary approach to tackling current issues faced by those experiencing homelessness in the current context of the COVID-19 epidemic.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-16
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2022-0081
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Editorial

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      Authors: Jerome Carson
      Abstract: Editorial
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2023-01-11
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-02-2023-101
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Help over harm: practical and ethical considerations for the evaluation
           and deployment of therapeutic games

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      Authors: Steven Barnes, Tara Chandler, Mishell Granda-Salazar
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to collate and discuss a number of key issues regarding the development, deployment and monitoring of games designed for therapeutic purposes. The authors collate a number of core areas for consideration and offer suggestions regarding the challenges facing the field of therapeutic gaming. In this paper, four major areas of interest are presented: ensuring and communicating therapeutic game effectiveness; data-security and management; effective game design; and barriers to therapeutic game uptake and engagement. Present implications of these issues are discussed and suggestions are provided for further research and to help move the field toward establishing consensus regarding standards of practice. This paper represents, to best of the authors’ knowledge, the first of its kind in the field of therapeutic games to collate and address the core issues facing the development, deployment and growth of this potentially valuable medium.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-12-26
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2022-0080
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Remarkable lives – Ella Vadasz in conversation with Robert Hurst

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      Authors: Ella Vadasz, Robert Hurst
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to share Ella Vadasz’s story. Ella wrote a biography of her experiences, including two poems. Robert then asked a series of questions from the perspective of a mental health academic. Ella shared stories from her life and how her experiences have shaped her. She talked about the emotional impact of a custody battle. Recovery narratives such as this give us an overview of only a single person’s experiences. However, they allow the person with lived experiences to explore their story in depth. What Ella has written is very emotional. Her story will give readers an insight into her life and experiences. There is so much to learn from stories such as Ella’s, in particular from her critique of social services in Scotland and England. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first time that Ella has chosen to share her unique story. This paper features two poems written by her – a first for Remarkable Lives. The value of Ella sharing her story is apparent upon reading it.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-12-16
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2022-0074
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Initial evaluation of a mobile therapeutic game for adolescent anxiety
           disorders

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      Authors: Steven Barnes, Julie Prescott, Joseph Adams
      Abstract: This study aims to evaluate a novel mobile therapeutic videogame for adolescents with anxiety disorders (ADs), combining elements of cognitive-behavioural therapy and attention-bias modification, in terms of both its therapeutic efficacy over a controlled intervention and two-month follow-up, as well as the extent and implications of self-directed play. A within-groups design with two parallel conditions [clinical anxiety (N = 16) and subclinical/at-risk (N = 15)] were measured on both self-reported anxiety and threat-detection bias (TDB) across three timepoints (pre- and post-intervention and two-month follow-up). Significant reductions were observed in both self-reported state and trait anxiety and TDB over the course of the two-week intervention, which were maintained at follow-up. Engagement in self-directed play during the follow-up period significantly predicted outcomes at two-month follow-up for clinical participants. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper represents the first of its kind to evaluate a mobile therapeutic game designed with and solely for adolescents with ADs. This study also represents the first of its kind to examine the extent and implications of self-directed play for outcomes.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-12-15
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2022-0076
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The role of student peers in HE student mental health and well-being

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      Authors: Joanne Smith, Gareth Hughes, Leigh Spanner
      Abstract: There is evidence that students’ experiences in higher education can be adversely affected by mental health issues, whilst well-being can be bolstered through a sense of belonging. This study aims to draw from Student Minds research into student mental health to consider the importance of peers to constructing a sense of belonging. This paper draws from a thematic review of 12 focus groups – involving student services staff in six UK universities (69 participants) – conducted as part of the consultation and creation of the Student Minds University Mental Health Charter. The schedule considered student support, service structures and developments to enhance student well-being and manage mental health risks. A significant theme explored here is the positionality of student peers in terms of relatability, and the importance of orientation and belonging for student mental health and well-being. The findings also consider types of peer involvement (formal/informal) and the influence of structure, training and boundaries in interventions. Findings reveal the importance of feeling a sense of belonging in the university community to achieve well-being and good mental health. Peer support is an important contributor that supports transitions into university and creates a sense of belonging, which is important to all students, but more so to those less familiar with university, who lack role models and more easily feel isolated. The research has implications for higher education providers, which should inform the promotion of peer support within student services, based on the recognised contribution to well-being and mental health. This is important for student success and related opportunities. Success in higher education will open opportunities and create improved future prospects for individuals. This will not be realised for individuals who face boundaries and barriers to successful transition through university. The importance of belonging and role of peer support has implications for those who find themselves excluded in society. This is a qualitative study which gives voice to individuals in universities across the UK. The theme of peer support within this context and linked with mental health and well-being is underexplored.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-12-13
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2022-0070
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Writing happy memories to soothe a troubled mind

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      Authors: Kirsty Lilley
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore how revisiting happy and pleasant memories might bring some peace to the minds of those who struggle with the ongoing impact of early life relational trauma. The author explores previously forgotten but important memories of happier times and safe relationships which have been outweighed by other traumatic memories. The author writes about the impact of revisiting the past through a different lens and how this helped reshape and redefine the future. The author has written about revisiting happy and pleasant memories from lived experience. The writing is rich and evocative and gives voice to previously forgotten memories of pleasant life events and how soothing this has been. The author concludes that it has been a helpful and soothing experience to spend time recreating memories of previously happy experiences. It is noted that this brings some balance and perspective to an early life which was dominated by traumatic events. The author suggests that it is possible to lever these pleasant memories to improve self-confidence and to bring about a reduction in harsh self-criticism. The author concludes that the stories we tell ourselves about our early life experiences impact greatly on our sense of self and the future ability to create a meaningful life moving forward. Whilst it is important for many to revisit painful experiences to process them fully and move forward, it is also important to focus on more pleasant experiences and relational contacts to bring about a fresh perspective and increased confidence. This helps to move a person from threat-centred behaviour to a more soothed and contented state. The author has found that revisiting soothing and pleasant memories can serve to bring balance and a fresh perspective to early life experiences. It is also noted that the process of writing about these happy memoires has been beneficial in terms of successfully reliving them and savouring the helpful feelings they bring forth. By exploring the helpfulness of revising a life that has been greatly impacted by traumatic experiences and focusing on the more pleasant and happier times, the author has shown that it is possible to think and feel differently about the past. It is also noted that it is beneficial to feel the happiness these memories bring within the body and mind, and they can bring a sense of calm. This embeds the importance of also asking trauma survivors about the times that were more pleasant and happier for them within the therapeutic process. This is the author’s first hand and unique testimony of how helpful it was to revisit happier memories in terms of how soothing it was to focus on these amid other more problematic memories. It is noted that this helped the author to regain a sense of hope and agency in terms of moving forward. This opinion piece contains moving and evocative stories about memories of supportive and warm relationships in the life of the author. The author also notes how helpful the writing process has been in terms of slowing down and being able to fully inhabit and savour these more pleasant memories.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-11-25
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-11-2022-0069
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The development and pilot evaluation of a mental health mobile app in the
           Philippines

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      Authors: Ma. Regina Hechanova-Alampay, Patrick Louis Angeles, Antover Tuliao, Edgar Hilario, Amadeus Fernando Pagente, Carol Villegas Narra
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to test a mobile application for mental health created for Filipinos. Specifically, it tested the Lusog-Isip mobile app vis-à-vis a mental health workbook as they affect psychosocial well-being and coping strategies of users. This study used a randomized control trial design. Participants were assigned to two conditions: a treatment group using the mobile app and a control group that used an existing mental health workbook. Pre- and post-tests were conducted before and two weeks after. Results revealed improved psychological well-being and use of cognitive reappraisal for both mobile app and workbook users. Users of the mobile app reported higher scores compared to those who used the workbook for emotional release. This study adds to the dearth of knowledge on the use of a mobile application for mental health in low-resource countries. It highlights the potential of using digital technologies to provide access to mental health resources in underserved populations.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-11-16
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-04-2022-0024
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • What happens after psychosis' The support I have received

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      Authors: Paul Makin
      Abstract: The aim of the paper is to describe Paul Makin’s psychiatric treatment after he developed a psychosis. Paul describes how, after an acute episode of psychosis, he ended up in a psychiatric unit. This is his narrative account of his recovery and the support he had in the community. Paul’s story shows how mental health services are stretched both in hospital and also in the community. This is only one story. It is unusual in that Paul’s first diagnosis was alcohol dependence. It was a few years, after he had stopped drinking completely, that he developed a psychosis. One man, two recoveries. Reading his story, Paul had problems getting any continuity of care. He does not blame the staff who were all doing their best, but a mental health system that has insufficient resources. While mental health is constantly in the news, resources seem as stretched as they always have been. They remain underfunded and undervalued. Paul’s is one story of many, but it will find resonance with others who have accessed mental health services in recent years.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-11-08
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2022-0038
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The second COVID-19 coronavirus wave and its implications for stress,
           anxiety, and depression among Indian adults

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      Authors: Praveen Kumar Sharma, Rajeev Kumra
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper was to investigate the prevalence rates of stress, depression and anxiety and their sociodemographic factors linked with the Indian population following the second round of COVID-19 in India. A cross-sectional study was carried out using an online questionnaire. In total, 505 individuals participated through convenience sampling. To measure anxiety, depression and stress, the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21), a 21-statement self-reported questionnaire, was used. Multiple regression analyses were performed to evaluate the sociodemographic characteristics associated with depression, stress and anxiety. Results indicated salary/allowances reduction and alcohol consumption were associated with depression. Multiple regression also indicated that salary/allowances reduction, smoking status and alcohol consumption were associated with stress. In addition, this research also showed that chronic disease, salary/allowances reduction, smoking status and alcohol consumption were associated with anxiety. During the second COVID-19 wave in India, various individuals were affected. Anxiety, depression and stress were common among Indians after the second wave of COVID-19. Along with other actions to restrict the development of COVID-19, the Indian Government and mental health specialists must pay close attention to the inhabitants' mental health. More large-scale studies on various occupations should be conducted, and new mental health factors should be included. This study provides empirical insights related the sociodemographic factors and stress, anxiety and depression.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-11-08
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2022-0054
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Exploring the living experience of shame; protector or persecutor'

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      Authors: Kirsty Lilley
      Abstract: The purpose of this opinion piece is to give voice to the living experience of shame within myself as the author, both psychologically and physically. This is in the hope to increase awareness among others who experience shame and mental health professionals tasked with supporting people in emotional distress. The author has written a biographical piece outlining her experiences of living with shame and used rich, provocative and metaphorical language in describing the events which led to this and the impact this has had on my quality of life. The author has positioned shame as a character playing a role in her life. This piece reveals the inner turmoil experienced when living alongside shame and the resilience and fortitude needed to understand the role of shame and how it developed. With this knowledge and awareness, the author has found it is possible to move forward in life. The author has lived through adverse and challenging early life experiences within a difficult family environment. The author has shown that it is possible to undertake a healing journey and to come to an acceptance of shame within my own life and still move forward to create supportive relationships with others and a life worth living. These are often the stories of those people who survive great difficulty and still go on to help and support other people. The author has found and experienced that loving and supportive relationships give the best chance of healing from early life adversities. The author has also found that shame plays an interesting role as both necessary and painful. Moving forward from the distress often associated with shame is a long journey but one that is possible. The author has aimed to make clear that exploration and education about the lived experience of shame is both helpful for those who suffer and those who intend to help within the mental health professions. Listening to the stories of people with living experiences is vital and plays as important a role as academic theory and learning. This is a subjective living experience of shame and, in that way, adds to the helpful canon of stories that can inform our understanding of distress and the ability to help. The author has described shame as a character playing a role in her life and belief that this is an interesting way to view this. This piece also contains stories regarding the genesis of shame which are unique to her. The author understands and makes clear that his experience does not necessarily translate or relate to anyone else but stands on its own merit. The author hopes to have much more to contribute in terms of others’ understanding of emotional distress and shame, especially considering its transdiagnostic nature.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-11-01
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-10-2022-0066
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Wellbeing and pedagogical role of higher education academics in the
           COVID-19 pandemic: a systematized review

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      Authors: Melissa Husbands, Julie Prescott
      Abstract: The purpose of this study resolved to evidence worldwide studies addressing the effects of the global COVID-19 pandemic on higher education (HE) academic staff. Particularly in relation to wellbeing and pedagogical role, as part of a parallel study exploring the impact of COVID-19 on academics’ pastoral role. The systematized review identified eight relevant studies that shed light on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on university academics’ well-being. The review highlights the paucity of research in this area, with no studies, at the time of the review, considering how academics responded to a broadening of their pastoral role amidst an evolving academic landscape, and how are universities supporting them. Firstly, only eight relevant studies were included, affecting generalisability of results owing to uneven distribution between geographic regions. Secondly, participants across the eight studies accounted for less than 0.05% of a population of 6 million university academics worldwide (Price, 2011). Thirdly, most of the studies used cross-sectional design, limiting assessment of the longer-term impact of an evolving HE landscape. The findings of this systematized review can be placed in the context of illuminating research deficits within a shifting HE landscape. Specifically, no studies that the authors are aware of have investigated how academics are responding to a broadening of their pastoral role amidst an evolving academic landscape, and how are universities supporting them. In providing pastoral support to students, the mental well-being of academics is frequently ignored (Urbina-Garcia, 2020). The provision of well-being support by university management for academics appears to be “limited to non-existent” (Hughes et al., 2018, p. 49). Critically, the Coronavirus pandemic appears to have both accelerated and precipitated a step-change to pastoral care within the HE teaching ecosystem. The impact of a broadening pastoral role on academics' well-being has yet to be fully realized and understood. The authors have subsequently conducted an empirical study to address this embryonic area of research.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-10-28
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2022-0065
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A tale of two Peters: an analysis of the life of Peter Green using
           collaborative/community autoethnography and digital team ethnography

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      Authors: Patrick Hopkinson, Peter Bryngelsson, Andrew Voyce, Mats Niklasson, Jerome Carson
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to mirror the late guitarist Peter Green’s life experiences through insights from Andrew Voyce, who recovered from mental illness, and expertise from Peter Bryngelsson, a Swedish professional musician and author. The authors used a mixed method of collaborative autoethnography, psychobiography and digital team ethnography. Despite having not previously attracted academic interest, Peter Green’s experiences of mental health problems and his return to recording and performance provide a rich data source when mirrored and compared to the lives and experiences of Andrew Voyce and Peter Bryngelsson. The main limitation of this piece of work is that Peter Green died in 2020. During the process of writing, the authors have had to follow different, mostly unacademic, sources that have described various parts of Peter Green’s life. The authors have given examples and drawn conclusions from their own lives as well as from academic sources, which they have found appropriate. Both Andrew Voyce and Peter Bryngelsson’s stories would be helpful when it comes to a deeper understanding as to why Peter Green “took a left turn”, i.e., turned his back on an accepted lifestyle. Acid casualty is a problem connected to both mental distress and to the music industry. Peter Bryngelsson’s story tells us that one can remain sane and drug free and still be an influential and creative musician. The analysis has brought together two stories of mental distress in combination with insights.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-10-25
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2022-0062
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Lived experience perspectives of factors that influence mental health
           recovery in Singapore: a thematic analysis

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      Authors: Jonathan Han Loong Kuek, Toby Raeburn, Melissa Yan Zhi Chow, Timothy Wand
      Abstract: Contemporary interpretations of mental health recovery emphasize the need to understand better the lived experience of people with mental health conditions and how they define the idea of recovery. While traction for such ideas has been building in many western countries, the recovery movement is still in its early stages within most Asian countries. Hence, this study aims to add to this growing effort by understanding various factors that influence the recovery of people with mental health conditions in Singapore. Braun and Clarke’s thematic analysis was used on the qualitative data provided by 21 participants. Four themes were revealed: double-edged nature of social support, challenges accessing mental health support, personalized coping strategies and societal influences. As a result, the authors could better understand various factors that influenced the recovery process of people with mental health conditions in Singapore, such as the high costs and low levels of literacy regarding pathways to mental health services. In addition, the importance of societal influences on mental health recovery was highlighted, and their impact could be seen through the participants’ sharing. These findings form a foundation from which future research and recovery-oriented interventions can work from to provide more tailored approaches to supporting people with mental health conditions. This study identified cultural nuances to notions of recovery that are commonly found in personal recovery constructs that need to be considered when working within culturally diverse populations.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-10-14
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2022-0063
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Post-traumatic growth from grief – a narrative literature review

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      Authors: Robert Hurst, Chathurika Kannangara
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of existing literature on post-traumatic growth (PTG), particularly in the ways that it relates to grief. This narrative literature review brings together 125 sources and presents them in a readable way. There is a great deal of evidence to suggest that PTG can come from grief. This is not always the case, however. This review presents only a selection of the existing literature – the review is not systematic. However, this allows for a narrative to be crafted, to aid readability. Suggestions for future research are made throughout, and potential therapeutic applications are mentioned. This paper discusses stigma, in the form of “disenfranchised grief”. In this, social pressures and expectations affect how a person processes their grief psychologically. While movements to increase discourse and reduce stigma are on the rise, more is needed. This review guides readers through existing literature, providing a wide overview of the topic of PTG in grief.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-10-13
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2022-0059
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Remarkable lives – Kirsty Lilley in conversation with Robert Hurst

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      Authors: Kirsty Lilley, Robert Hurst
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to share Kirsty Lilley’s story. Kirsty wrote a biographic piece detailing her journey, then shared a creative piece of writing about trust before being interviewed by Robert. Kirsty shared stories from her life and how her experiences have shaped who she is. In Trust, she gives the reader an intimate insight into her internal and psychological experiences. Recovery narratives such as this give us an overview of only a single person’s experiences. However, they allow the person with lived experience to explore their story in depth. Kirsty writes evocatively – her stories will connect with readers. There is so much to learn from stories such as Kirsty’s. For those who have had similar experiences and for those who work in mental health services. This is the first time that Kirsty has chosen to share her unique story. It is also the first time in Remarkable Lives that a piece of creative writing has been included alongside a biography.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-10-04
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-09-2022-0061
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The primary mental health care nurse specialist practice experience in
           primary care centers in Saudi Arabia: a qualitative study

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      Authors: Sami Abdullrahman Alhamidi, Seham Mansour Alyousef
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the value that care from a primary mental health care nurse (PMHCN) can bring to people with mental health (MH) problems in health-care delivery. This study used a focus group of 20 PMHCNs working in primary care (PC) health settings in Saudi Arabia before using thematic content analysis to describe and explore their views and experiences of the integration of MH care into PC units. The researchers used a semi-structured interview format, which began with open-ended probes and proceeded to use of theoretical sampling based on emerging data related to their experiences and perceptions in the integration process. Four main themes were derived from the thematic analysis of interviews: collaboration, knowledge and experience, awareness and orientation care and influential role. This study’s use of qualitative research methods has certain limitations, including the small sample size of 20 participants, which means that it may not be representative of all primary MH nurses in primary health-care centers in Saudi Arabia. To make the results applicable to a broader audience, the researcher sought to moderate this limitation by including participants with extensive experience in multiple settings and nurses of different ages. The cost implications of the PMHCN service are not yet comprehensively understood, but it is apparent that this model is not only regarded extremely positively by MH practitioners but may also have significant benefits in terms of patient outcomes. The configuration of local services and relevant patient demographics will affect the extent to which this study’s findings are transferable. Meanwhile, further research in this area could seek to provide further evidence about the aspects of the PMHCN service model, such as secondary care referrals and waiting times, accident and emergency attendances and patient recovery rates and the impact of providing such a service on health-care practitioners as well as its cost-effectiveness. This study’s findings suggest that PMHCNs believe that their care improves the quality of PC for patients in PC settings. Elements of the PC placement that professionals particularly valued include their ability to assist patients in their own community and the inclusion of volunteer stakeholders who act as preceptors. The participants expressed a need for improvement of policy related to referrals within the clinics.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2022-0041
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Forgiveness and mental Well-being: a transnational comparison

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      Authors: Reginald U. Amanze, Jerome Carson
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate forgiveness and mental well-being amongst Forgiveness and mental well-being were investigated amongst British European and Nigerian African samples to compare and determine the similarities and differences in dispositional forgiveness levels between the two populations conducted in terms of their general samples, gender and age and the difference in mental well-being scores between the two samples. Finally, the relationship between forgiveness and mental well-being in both groups was examined. The Bolton Forgiveness Scale and the Short Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale were administered to the participants (Nigerian n = 1,164, British n = 855). SPSS was used to analyse data; a series of t-test was conducted; and Eta-squared and Z-value were calculated to determine the magnitude of each significant difference among variables and the magnitude of the difference in the correlation coefficient among variables, respectively. Statistically significant results suggested significant differences in the way and manner dispositional forgiveness is conceptualised and practised within one group relative to the other, whereas non-significant results indicated similarities in forgiveness opinions and practises between the two groups. Overall British sample, men and those aged 36–55 reported higher levels of forgiveness than their Nigerian counterparts. However, Nigerians under the age of 35 reported higher levels of forgiveness than their British counterparts, and there was no statistically significant difference between the forgiveness levels of British and Nigerian women. Furthermore, the British total sample, men and women, all had higher well-being scores than their Nigerian counterparts. Forgiveness varies according to culture. The findings of this study suggest that the individualistic/collectivistic cultural arguments long held by some authors may not adequately explain the differences and similarities in forgiveness conceptualization and practise across cultures. As a result, research may focus on a variety of factors such as educational background, income, socioeconomic level and religion, among others. Second, consistent with previous studies, this research suggests that forgiveness is positively related to mental health and well-being. Finally, one of the limitations of this study is its exclusive focus on two countries, namely, the UK and Nigeria. Future research could include more countries with both individualistic and collectivistic societies. This paper, which is, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, the first to examine forgiveness and mental well-being in a comparative perspective between British European and Nigerian African samples, has made a unique contribution to the forgiveness and mental well-being literature and in particular, has provided a solid foundation and resources for future research of a similar nature in Africa, where little or no research had been conducted previously.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-09-19
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2022-0048
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Remarkable lives – Laura Scranage in conversation with Robert Hurst

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      Authors: Laura Scranage, Robert Hurst
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to share Laura Scranage’s story. Laura wrote a short piece detailing her journey and was then interviewed by Robert. Laura spoke about the difficulties she has faced in life and how her experiences with horses have been deeply therapeutic. Recovery narratives such as this give us an overview of only a single person’s experiences. However, they allow the person with lived experience to explore their story in depth. Laura advocates for more research into how horses can be used in therapeutic interventions. There is so much to learn from a story such as Laura’s, for those who have had similar experiences and for those who work in mental health services. This is the first time that Laura has chosen to share her unique story.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-09-12
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2022-0050
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Humour and mental health: a case study of Arthur Asa Berger

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      Authors: Arthur Asa Berger, Freda Gonot-Schoupinsky
      Abstract: This paper aims to elicit insight on how humour may support mental health from Arthur Asa Berger, Professor Emeritus at San Francisco State University, author of more than 150 articles and 90 books, many on humour and humorous artist. This case study, followed by a 10-question interview, intentionally embraces visual autobiography to present Arthur’s creative humorous contributions. Arthur conveys the importance of humour, not so much from joke-telling, which can be problematic, but in fun conversations, witty remarks and puns. We learn of his 45 humour techniques, and ways to apply humour in teaching, writing and drawing for therapeutic benefit. This is a personal narrative, albeit from someone who has been academically and personally involved with humour for over 60 years. Evidence of the benefits of humour for mental health is mounting. Appreciating and harnessing humour, including with the 45 humour techniques, whenever you can, is recommended. Humour supports relationship building and social inclusion. Social humour is best when it amuses others, offers positive insights into social relationships and is life affirming to both the humourist and their audience. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, Arthur was the first to publish a PhD dissertation on a comic strip and has been at the vanguard of humour application in teaching, academic writing, drawing, popular comedy and humorous murder mysteries for decades. Arthur will be 90 years old in 2023.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-09-06
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-08-2022-0051
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Explorations on the use of lived experiences by psychiatrists:
           facilitators and barriers

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      Authors: Simona Karbouniaris, Marjolein Boomsma-van Holten, Antoinet Oostindiër, Pascal Raats, Cecil C. Prins-Aardema, Alie Weerman, Jean Pierre Wilken, Tineke A. Abma
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the perspectives of psychiatrists with lived experiences and what their considerations are upon integrating the personal into the professional realm. As part of a qualitative participatory research approach, participant observations during two years in peer supervision sessions (15 sessions with 8 psychiatrists with lived experiences), additional interviews as part of member feedback and a focus group were thematically analysed. Although the decision to become a psychiatrist was often related to personal experiences with mental distress and some feel the need to integrate the personal into the professional, the actual use of lived experiences appears still in its early stages of development. Findings reveal three main considerations related to the personal (3.1), professionality (3.2) and clinical relevance (3.3) comprising 11 facilitators and 9 barriers to harness lived experiences. This study was conducted locally and there are no similar comparable studies known. It was small in its size due to its qualitative nature and with a homogeneous group and therefore may lack generalisability. Future directions to further overcome shame and stigma and discover the potential of lived experiences are directed to practice, education and research. Psychiatrists with lived experiences valued the integration of experiential knowledge into the professional realm, even though being still under development. The peer supervision setting in this study was experienced as a safe space to share personal experiences with vulnerability and suffering rather than a technical disclosure. It re-sensitised participants to their personal narratives, unleashing its demystifying, destigmatising and humanising potential.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-08-18
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2022-0049
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Reductive mechanisms for unwanted intrusive thoughts: exploring
           affectivity in clinical and non-clinical samples

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      Authors: Jesse Omoregie, Jerome Carson
      Abstract: Unwanted intrusive thoughts (UITs) are a major public health concern (Nock et al., 2008; Bentum et al., 2017), and they are key to the development of a variety of dysregulated behaviours (Jungmann et al., 2016; Bergen et al., 2012). Thus, this study aims to investigate reductive mechanisms for unwanted intrusive thoughts by analysing aspects of affectivity in clinical and non-clinical samples. Quantitative means of data collection and analysis were used to explore UITs and affectivity. In total, 530 adults took part in this study (236 males, 253 females and 15 transgenders). Participants consisted of clinical (N = 168) and non-clinical samples (N = 336) who completed the Midlife in the United States sense of control scale (Lachman and Weaver, 1998), 20-item neuroticism scale (Goldberg, 1999), self-compassion scale (Neff, 2003a), flourishing scale (Diener et al., 2009), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule - Negative Scale (Watson et al., 1988), generalised anxiety disorder seven-item (Spitzer et al., 2006) and repetitive thinking questionnaire-10 (McEvoy et al., 2010). Participants who experienced high levels of psychological flourishing, emotional stability, self-compassion, perceived control and affective well-being were prone to experience minimal UITs. Anxiety was positively related to UITs. These findings suggest that these aspects of affectivity may aid the reduction or management of clinical and non-clinical unwanted intrusive thoughts. This study has addressed gaps in knowledge and the literature on UITs by demonstrating that psychological flourishing, emotional stability, self-compassion, perceived control and affective well-being as aspects of affectivity can be implemented as a reductive mechanism for UITs, and such implementation may have a high probability of effective reduction or management of clinical and non-clinical unwanted intrusive thoughts.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2022-0040
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Evaluating the need for supervision of advanced mental health
           practitioners in psychiatric practices in Saudi Arabia

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      Authors: Seham Mansour Alyousef, Sami Abdullrahman Alhamidi
      Abstract: Research supports the value of clinical supervision as an essential aspect of mental health nursing. Despite the need for this, there appears to be a deficit in qualified supervision in the mental health field, although efforts have been made toward advanced mental health practitioner nursing. This study aims to characterize the ideas that advanced mental health nurse practitioners hold about supervision in practice and to consider what is required to support changes to advanced mental health nursing in Saudi Arabia. This study adopted a qualitative exploratory design that applied a phenomenological approach as the research method. Twelve postgraduate mental health nurses were recruited through purposive sampling. The data analysis generated the central theme, which indicates the attributes of a competent supervisor of advanced mental health nurse practitioners. The components of a supervisor’s competence had the following three main themes: nursing competencies, professional characteristics and communication. A limitation of this study is that the data was collected from practicing advanced care mental health practitioners in Saudi Arabia. Further research conducted in different geographical areas and with different categories of staff is warranted. The results of those studies could be compared against the results presented here. Best practice measures indicated that mental health nurse practitioners working in mental health settings and private practice should receive supervision to help them reflect upon their daily nursing practice challenges. The findings of this study indicate that to support mental health practitioners and advanced mental health practitioners working in private practice, competent supervisors need to be on hand and willing to invest in creating a supportive culture in practice.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2022-0043
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Loneliness and community mental health

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      Authors: Melvin Bradley
      Abstract: In this paper I will discuss loneliness in the community. Finding a non-medical way to support people who feel lonely is really important. Many will never have considered joining groups of identity like the offer briefly discussed. In future community mental health features, the author will consider topics such as community mental health advocacy, debt, benefits and finance, housing and self-help. In this column, the author briefly considers the concepts of loneliness, social isolation and solitude; review some research; and offer ideas about how help may be given in community settings.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-08-05
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2022-0045
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The social construction of mental illness in contrast to medical models

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      Authors: Melvin Bradley
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to discuss a social constructionist point of view about mental health in contrast to the medical model. This is a discussion paper bringing together two systems of thought concerning mental health and its origins. It is not clear that there is any substantive evidence to support the medical model of mental illness. Researchers may be helped to consider a qualitative approach to knowledge rather than the traditional positivist approach. This paper will help people to think about mental health in a way that is not orthodox. It will bring an understanding that even though mental illness is not an illness in the traditional sense, there is still no blame or shame associated with it. The author is an active operational senior manager at a user-led community mental health organisation with over 20 years’ experience in the field. The organisation and its services track a social constructionist philosophy.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2022-0042
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Recovery college intervention for people living with BPD

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      Authors: Colette Lane
      Abstract: Literature regarding recovery has focussed on diagnoses such as schizophrenia, with few papers focussing on borderline personality disorder (BPD). This is a significant area in need of change because a lack of research concentrating on recovery from BPD could be seen to perpetuate the view that recovery from this condition may not be possible. Recovery Colleges (RCs) in the UK began in 2009and aim to offer co-produced and co-facilitated psychoeducational courses to encourage recovery and enable people to develop skills and knowledge so they become experts in the self-management of their difficulties. Given the gaps within the recovery literature, it is unclear how Recovery Colleges can support recovery for people diagnosed with BPD. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of a Recovery College course for people diagnosed with BPD. Using participatory methods, this paper aims to explore the question of what personal recovery looks like for people with BPD and how this may prove useful in developing future practice in RCs. Qualitative feedback data was collected from 51 managing intense emotions courses delivered to 309 students using a patient reported experience measure between Autumn 2015 and Autumn 2021. The results of this study indicate that people with BPD can experience recovery, whilst still experiencing symptoms, as long as they receive appropriate co-produced, recovery-orientated support and services. Further research in this area could help shape future clinical practice by embedding a recovery-focussed programme into community services. Literature regarding recovery has focussed on diagnoses such as schizophrenia withfew papers focussing on BPD. This is an area in need of change because a lack of research on recovery from BPD could be seen to perpetuate the view that recovery from this condition may not be possible. RCs offer co-produced and co-facilitated psychoeducational courses around recovery, enabling people to develop skills and knowledge to become experts in the self-management of their difficulties. Given the gaps within the recovery literature it is unclear how RCs can support recovery for this group of service users.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-07-29
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-07-2022-0044
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Laughter and mental health: a case study of Merv Neal

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      Authors: Merv Neal, Freda Gonot-Schoupinsky
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to engage with, and elicit insights from, Merv Neal, a laughter professional, on the use of laughter to benefit mental health. This case study is presented in two sections: a biography of Merv Neal, followed by a ten-question interview with him. Many insights on laughter are shared. Merv lists five benefits for mental health: laughter brings you into the present moment; laughter is a distraction; laughter breaks negative thought patterns; laughter silences the inner critical voice; and laughter brings joy. This is a personal narrative, albeit from someone who has professionally used laughter to support mental health issues for over 15 years. Laughter can be beneficial to support mental health. More evidence for its impact on mental health is needed. Prescribing laughter has been largely overlooked as a way to harness laughter for mental health to date. Investigating how and when to prescribe laughter for mental health is recommended. Mental health issues can vary enormously, but loneliness is often involved. Encouraging social laughter is therefore important, including, surprisingly perhaps, by also practicing laughing alone. Laughter, accessible to all, presents itself as a free and easy way to support community mental health. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case study and interview with a long-standing laughter professional on the topic of laughter and mental health.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-07-21
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-06-2022-0039
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Ideas of how peer support workers facilitate interprofessional learning in
           mental health care teamwork: conceptual paper

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Tuija Viking, Lena Nilsson
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to contribute theoretical ideas of how peer support workers (PSWs) bring added value to interprofessional learning (IPL) in mental health care teamwork. The question is: How can we theoretically understand the value of PSWs’ expertise for IPL in mental health care teamwork' Initially, the authors formulate a hypothesis. Then, the authors describe the focus and context in IPL and PSWs, respectively, and the PSWs’ and mental health professions’ different roles, expertise and perspectives. The authors also refer to some peer provided programs related to IPL. Finally, the authors construct an outline and apply ideas from Wenger’s Communities of Practice (CoP). Using CoP, the PSWs as newcomers can by their perspectives change mental health professions’ perspectives and stimulate IPL in teamwork. The paper gives theoretical insights of how PSWs can facilitate IPL in mental health care teamwork.
      Citation: Mental Health and Social Inclusion
      PubDate: 2022-05-26
      DOI: 10.1108/MHSI-01-2022-0004
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
 
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