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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Third World Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Race and Social Problems
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.827
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1867-1756 - ISSN (Online) 1867-1748
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Correction to: Unequal Opportunity: School and Neighborhood Segregation in
           the USA

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      Abstract: The original version of this article unfortunately contained an error. The author would like to correct the error with this erratum.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Correction to: Intersecting Race and Gender Across Hardships and Mental
           Health During COVID 19: A Moderated Mediation Model of Graduate Students
           at Two Universities

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      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Correction to: The Criminalization of Young Children and
           Overrepresentation of Black Youth in the Juvenile Justice System

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      Abstract: A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12552-021-09324-5
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Real Estate Platforms, the Housing Search Process, and Racial Residential
           Stratification

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      Abstract: Abstract Recent theoretical arguments suggest that, in addition to ongoing, overt racial housing discrimination and unequal access to resources, multiple subtle housing search processes are racially stratified and contribute to persistent racial segregation. Yet, little prior research has examined these processes. The present paper helps to fill this gap by investigating the racialized differences in the subtle ways that individuals use online housing search tools and identify real estate agents to assist them through the housing search process. To do so, we rely on novel survey data collected by Redfin from 2647 housing consumers using multiple online platforms to search for housing in markets across the United States and examine racialized differences in the likelihood of homebuyers attempting various types of activities using online housing search tools, successfully using the online search tools, and methods of identifying real estate agents with whom to work. While the nature of the data preclude definitive conclusions, our findings point to significant racialized differences in attempting, and successfully completing, online activities across three different ‘types’ of online tool engagement—early search, neighborhood search, and housing unit—as well as in identifying real estate agents. After reviewing our results, we discuss the implications of these findings for persistent racial residential stratification, and directions for future research.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Smoking at the Intersections of Race/Ethnicity and Sexual Orientation

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      Abstract: Abstract Research has tended to document smoking disparities separately by race/ethnicity and sexual orientation, with relatively less work examining the intersections of both identities. As such, we draw on data from the 2010 Social Justice Sexuality Project to demonstrate how cigarette smoking disparities manifest across detailed intersections of race/ethnicity and sexual orientation among a sample of U.S. adults. Findings from logistic regression models that adjust for demographic, socioeconomic, and social support confounders across groups reveal that risk of current cigarette smoking tends to distribute multiplicatively across identity groups. For example, findings show that racial/ethnic minority adults do not have equally lower likelihood of current cigarette smoking compared to white adults among heterosexual adults. Furthermore, while sexual minority adults generally have a higher likelihood of current cigarette smoking relative to their heterosexual counterparts, their levels of risk are not uniformly shared but instead are critically shaped by race/ethnicity. Overall, results underscore the need to consider both within- and between-group differences in assessments of health inequities across identity categories.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Examining Racial and Ethnic Disparity in Prosecutor’s Bail Requests and
           Downstream Decision-making

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      Abstract: Abstract Although research into prosecutorial and judicial decision-making has been conducted for the past three decades, a great deal still remains unknown. Most research focuses on the ‘back end’ of the adjudication process, leaving decision points prior to the final phases unanalyzed. Drawing on unique data from the New York County District Attorney’s Office that tracks 43,971 felony complaints, this research explores racial and ethnic disparity at multiple decision points during case processing, with a focus on the prosecutor’s initial bail request. A combination of regression modeling and path analysis were applied, revealing that the effects of race and ethnicity vary by decision point. Black defendants demonstrated increased bail requests and likelihood of indictment. However, together with Latino defendants, they were less likely to be detained prior to trial compared with White defendants. Despite identifying a mix of positive and negative cumulative effects, we found significant indirect effects of black defendants via bail request that contribute to the unwarranted racial disparities in both pre-trial detention and indictment outcomes. Insights gleaned from this research help prosecutors understand how their initial actions influence final outcomes, as well as contributing to the national conversation on the use of cash bail.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Cops and Counselors: How School Staffing Decisions Relate to Exclusionary
           Discipline Rates and Racial/Ethnic Disparities

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      Abstract: Abstract The presence of school-based law enforcement (SBLE) and school counselors is likely to shape how schools punish students. This study examines how schools’ addition or removal of both types of school staff shapes both out-of-school suspension rates and expulsion rates, with a particular focus on differences among white, black, and Hispanic students. It also examines how these relationships differ by school racial composition. Using the 2013–2014 and 2017–2018 waves of the Civil Rights Data Collection, (N = 81,933 schools), this study creates a two-wave panel data set to use a difference-in-differences approach to examine change over time. The results of a series of two-way fixed effects models indicated that changes in the presence of SBLE shaped exclusionary discipline rates—including racial disparities—in multiple, sometimes surprising ways, and that these effects were often strongest in schools with larger proportions of white students. Changes in the presence of school counselors had fewer and less consistent impacts.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • What Are We Fighting For' Lay Theories About the Goals and Motivations
           of Anti-Racism Activism

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      Abstract: Abstract Social psychology has primarily focused on activism as action toward social change; little is known about how laypeople think about activism. The present research sought to investigate lay theories about the goals (N = 434) and motivations (N = 428) of anti-racism activism produced by U.S. participants in an online survey. Using the Meaning Extraction Method and a qualitative-inductive approach, six anti-racism activism goals were identified: challenging the status quo, tackling systemic racism, reducing interpersonal racism, addressing police brutality, promoting equality, and raising public awareness of racism. In addition, participants attributed engagement in anti-racism activism to six motivations: caring for close others, media influence, understanding racial disparities, fighting for a better world, personal experience of discrimination, and witnessing racialized violence. The present study is the first to shed light on lay beliefs of anti-racism activism goals and motivations with implications for how to encourage anti-racism activism.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • The Impact of Community Belongingness on Mental Health and Well-Being
           Among Black LGBTQ Adults

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      Abstract: Abstract The impact of racial and sexual minority stigma and discrimination on the mental health and well-being of Black and LGBTQ individuals, respectively, has been well documented in the literature. Research on these relationships for Black LGBTQ individuals who are multiply marginalized due to their position at the social intersections of gender identity, sexual orientation and race/ethnicity is less common. Belongingness to identity-based communities can protect against the negative impact of these minority stressors for Black and LGBTQ individuals and aid coping processes. However, Black LGBTQ individuals often experience stigma and discrimination in their racial, sexual, and gender minority communities due to their multiple minority identities. They may choose instead to create Black LGBTQ communities as a strategy to access the group- level coping resources needed to support their mental health and well-being in the face of compounded minority stress. Thus, the present study aimed to explore the relationships between identity-based community belongingness, coping, minority stress, mental health and well-being for Black LGBTQ individuals. Path and multiple regression analyses were conducted to test the hypothesized relationships between these variables in a sample (n = 345) of Black LGBTQ adults living in the United States. Study results found that: (1) community belongingness was associated with better mental health and well-being; (2) coping partially explained the relationships between community belongingness and well-being, but did not explain the relationship between community belongingness and mental health; (3) Black community belongingness was associated with better mental health; and (4) Black LGBTQ community belongingness was associated with better well-being. Implications for social work practice and education, and future research, are discussed.
      PubDate: 2024-03-01
       
  • Beyond Homophily: The Boundary-Specific Effects of Interracial Contact

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      Abstract: Abstract Decades of research have confirmed and delimited the effects of interracial contact on racial attitudes. A shortcoming of this literature is its framing of interracial contact as a counterweight to homophily. Accordingly, researchers often measure interracial contact at the same-race/different-race boundary, such as in friendships and dating relationships. Rather than asking whether any interracial friendship leads to any interracial dating, I ask how much crossing a specific boundary actually leads to crossing other boundaries. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), I investigate the consequences of early interracial friendship for later interracial dating across six racial boundaries. The results show that interracial contact with a specific group increases the likelihood of interracial contact primarily with that same group and rarely with other groups. I conclude with implications for future research as well as social policy that relies on interracial contact.
      PubDate: 2024-02-05
       
  • Patterns of Cultural and Coping Factors Among Minoritized Youth:
           Associations with Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms

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      Abstract: Abstract Models of resilience in minoritized youth posit that youth need to draw upon multiple different cultural (e.g., identity, values, etc.) and general factors (e.g., coping) to thrive in the face of discrimination. Nonetheless, the integration of these factors in empirical scholarship is lacking, as scholars have typically focused on single factors within these models in isolation. To provide a more holistic test of these theoretical models, we utilized latent profile analysis, a technique well-suited to examine the simultaneous impact of multiple factors, to identify patterns of cultural promotive factors (ethnic-racial identity, religious coping, and familism) and a general coping factor (shift-&-persist) in 694 minoritized (Mage = 17.24, 73.5% women, 46.1% black) youth. We observed four profiles: High Cultural High Coping, Average Cultural Average Coping, Low Religious Low Coping, and Low Cultural Low Coping. Despite a lack of developmental differences, several profile differences emerged with respect to gender, race, and socioeconomic status. Additionally, Average Promotive Average Coping youth experienced the greatest amount of discrimination. Finally, after accounting for the effects of discrimination and covariates, those in the High Cultural High Coping profile displayed fewer depressive symptoms than those in the Average Cultural Average Coping and Low Religious Low Coping profiles.
      PubDate: 2024-02-04
       
  • Unpacking Appropriation: Examining the Effect of Actor-Related Factors on
           Perceptions of Cultural Appropriation in Culinary Scenarios

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite its presence in everyday life, cultural appropriation is not well understood, perhaps because its definition, bounds, and conditions have not been clearly unpacked. The present study uses a between-subjects, mixed-methods approach and culinary-related scenarios to address possible factors that constitute appropriation (e.g., actor background and intent). Utilizing a sample of emerging adults from a small, liberal arts university (N = 167, 52% female, 65% white), results suggest that an actor’s background is not the sole factor in deeming an act appropriative. Rather, intent appears to be an even more pertinent factor to examine. Participants believe that it is possible to engage with cultural products or practices in a respectful manner, further emphasizing the role intent plays in perceptions of appropriation. Although our results help define the bounds of cultural appropriation, future research should consider connections between authenticity and appropriation as well as how observer background might impact perceptions of appropriation.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25
       
  • The Penalty of Party on Black Homeownership: The Impacts of Judicial
           Institutional Settings on the Black Political Economy

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      Abstract: Abstract Black homeownership declines across the U.S.A. at significantly higher rates than white, Hispanic, or Asian homeownership. Although the cost to own a home is lower in Republican states, Black Americans are much less likely to maintain homeownership in those areas. This article attempts to gain leverage on the following question: “what is the penalty of political parties on Black homeownership in America'” The findings presented here provide support to the notion that there is a nationwide penalty of political parties on Black homeownership. The variation in this penalty is dependent on a given state’s opportunity structure for institutional racism, which changes based on the state’s foreclosure laws and partisan leanings. To support the nationwide findings, this article provides a case study on Black homeownership across the state of New York’s judicial districts with 221 partisan-elected judges, revealing that there remains a penalty in Republican judicial districts. Previous scholarship has analyzed the relationship between parties and foreclosures, as well as the relationship between race and foreclosures. This article assesses the intertwined relationship of parties, race, and foreclosures.
      PubDate: 2024-01-07
       
  • White American Historical Memory and Support for Native Appropriation

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      Abstract: Abstract Research demonstrates that appropriation of aspects of American Indian cultures, pseudo-culture, and ethno-national identities is harmful to American Indians. Yet, when American Indians strive to eliminate this appropriation, they are often met with resistance from White Americans who are attached to the appropriation. Using a survey of 517 White Americans, we explored whether settler colonial collective memory was associated with this attachment. More specifically, we examined the associations between five ideologies that are part of this memory—glorification of U.S. colonialism, nationalism, militarism, masculine toughness, and White identity pride—and support for American Indian mascots and other types of appropriation. We found that these five ideologies are associated with each other, as well as with support for American Indian mascots and the other types of appropriation. In addition, we found that glorification of U.S. colonialism mediated between belief in each of the other four ideologies and support for appropriation. We situate our findings in the context of settler colonial collective memory and discuss how our findings can inform change.
      PubDate: 2023-12-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-023-09407-5
       
  • Credit Scoring as a Carceral Practice: An Abolitionist Framework

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      Abstract: Abstract The practice of credit scoring is ubiquitous in today’s economy. Three-digit credit scores or their underlying data are applied well beyond the lending decisions for which they were originally designed and are routinely used in the contexts of employment, housing, and more. Drawing on carceral logics and abolitionist politics, we develop a framework to critically interpret the practice of credit scoring. We theorize credit scoring as a carceral practice and technology in the afterlife of slavery that expands anti-black discipline and punishment. We suggest that credit scoring is incapable of objectively assessing risk and that claims of objectivity legitimize an exploitative system of evaluation that mediates people’s access to the means of survival. Moreover, credit scoring expands the scope of how people are conscripted into consumerism and disciplined and punished under racial capitalism. We review research literature on credit scoring as a step toward applying this framework and demonstrate how research provides an alibi for anti-black racism embedded in contemporary credit scores. We conclude with a call to abolish the practice of credit scoring and imagine new, abolitionist alternatives for people to live safely and with dignity.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-023-09406-6
       
  • Drivers of Race Crime and the Impact of Bridging Gaps: A Dynamic Empirical
           Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Hate crimes in the US have reached their highest recorded levels in more than a decade. Greater understanding of the factors contributing to violence toward minority groups is needed to support evidence-based policies to curb race crime. This study analyzes the causes of race crime in the US using a state-level dynamic empirical model derived from the combination of well-recognized criminological theories. To our knowledge, the study provides the only empirical analyses of race crimes across the US. The paper applies a dynamic panel model to better use crime data at the aggregate level by taking advantage of the longitudinal data structure to account for unobservable factors across states. It also draws upon the dynamic panel structure to integrate the theoretical framework of social learning of crime, together with strain theory and theory of doing difference, to identify potential causal factors. The findings confirm implications derived from strain theory, theories of doing difference, and social learning theory of crime, respectively, indicating the value of an integrated framework. The results suggest “closing gaps” is key in deterring race crime. Over the recent decade, a 1% annual change in key factors that would close the economic gap, increase understanding of cultural difference, incorporate seniors into communities, and stop cascading effects of race crime would, individually, have lowered the 2019 race crime rate by an estimated 12–21% and, in combination, by approximately 28%. Potential policy interventions that merit testing include increasing cultural awareness education, improving access to credit, supporting inter-generational community programs, and appropriate training and resources to support law enforcement personnel to collect, manage, and report race crime data.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-022-09382-3
       
  • Native Appropriation in Sport: Cultivating Bias Toward American Indians

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      Abstract: Abstract Supporters of American Indian mascots claim that these mascots honor American Indians. If this is the case, then those who have more contact with, and are more supportive of, these mascots would logically demonstrate support for American Indian Peoples in other ways. In this study, we break new ground by employing a cultivation and social learning approach to examine possible associations between greater exposure to American Indian mascots and prejudice toward American Indians, as well as support for their rights. We used an online survey of 903 White Americans to examine associations between long-term exposure to American Indian mascots, attitudes toward Native appropriation, and support for American Indian Peoples. We found that greater exposure to sport media and more contact with American Indian mascots were associated with more prejudice toward and less support for American Indian rights, via double mediators—first via less opposition to American Indian mascots, and second via less opposition to other types of Native appropriation. These findings provide further evidence that American Indian mascots are harmful to American Indians, in this case via their association with higher levels of modern prejudice, less feelings of warmth, and less support for American Indian Nation sovereignty and trust relationship with the United States government. Further, our findings suggest that this harm may be related to lessons learned from the general phenomenon of Native appropriation, which includes acceptance of objectification and dehumanization of American Indians, disregard for their feelings, and legitimation of White settler colonial power.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-022-09370-7
       
  • How Do Non-Black U.S. College Students Think They Would Feel After
           Committing a Race-Related Interpersonal Transgression'

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      Abstract: Abstract Debate over the appropriateness of discussing racism in U.S. educational settings is ongoing. Whereas some believe discussing racism will improve race relations, others argue that such discussions are divisive and cause unnecessary distress, especially among White students. In a preregistered study, we investigated whether people who do not identify as Black or African American indeed experience emotional distress in response to the suggestion that they may have acted in a manner indicating subtle anti-Black bias. Non-Black U.S. college students (N = 326; mean age = 18.86; 69.0% women, 30.4% men, and 0.6% reported another gender; 56.1% White, 16.9% Asian/Pacific Islander, 16.6% Hispanic, 2.1% reported another race/ethnicity, and 5.7% reported multiple racial/ethnic identities) imagined committing two interpersonal transgressions, one of which was race-related. For each transgression, participants reported their feelings about the situation, including how responsible they would feel for perpetrating the transgression and whether they would feel negatively about themselves. Overall, many participants reported feeling responsible and negatively about themselves when imagining committing a race-related transgression. However, this response was more common among participants who scored higher on measures of habitual concern about behaving in nonprejudiced ways, and these participants also tended to report on an open-ended measure that they would react by apologizing and correcting their behavior. Our results suggest that, when discussing racism, those most likely to experience distress are people who are already concerned about expressing prejudice. Accordingly, discussions of racism may benefit from mentioning ways to reduce prejudice.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-023-09392-9
       
  • The Early Emergence of SES Achievement Gaps: Disparities Across Race,
           Ethnicity, and Immigrant Status

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      Abstract: Abstract Research documents positive associations between socioeconomic factors and children’s cognitive development. However, the benefits of socioeconomic advantage may not accrue similarly to all children. In this study, we explored whether the relation between socioeconomic factors and early child cognitive outcomes differs as a function of children’s racial/ethnic identity and family immigration status in a nationally representative sample of children (Early Childhood Longitudinal Study – Birth Cohort). The associations of family income with cognitive outcomes were weaker for Black and Hispanic children with U.S. born parents compared with White children with U.S. born parents and Hispanic and Asian children in immigrant families. Associations between parental education and cognitive outcomes were weaker for Hispanic children in immigrant families compared to White and Hispanic children with U.S. born parents. Findings suggest that benefits of socioeconomic factors for early cognitive development are uneven across social identities in the earliest years of development and invite further exploration into the mechanisms underlying differential patterns.
      PubDate: 2023-11-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-023-09402-w
       
  • Examining the Validity of Financial Knowledge Measures in a Context of
           Racialized Financial Market

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      Abstract: Abstract Research shows that U.S. racial minority groups have lower levels of financial knowledge than whites, yet an explanation for the knowledge gap remains elusive. Financial knowledge measures are generally constructed by summing respondents’ correct answers on a series of factual items and collapsing incorrect answers and “don’t know” (DK) responses into a single category. However, studies demonstrate that DK responses and incorrect answers have different antecedents and may not reflect absence of knowledge in the same way, and racial minorities are more likely to choose DK responses. In addition, questions on commonly used knowledge tests ignore the underlying racialization of the current financial market regarding financial experience, which shapes financial knowledge. This study investigates the roles of financial experience and DK response in shaping the racial difference in financial knowledge. Based on multinomial logit models of data from the 2018 National Financial Capability Study, we find that racial minorities were more likely to provide both DK and incorrect responses than whites across financial knowledge questions. Ownership of a savings account, a home, and investment products is negatively associated with giving DK and incorrect responses. Findings suggest that the financial knowledge of racial minorities can be substantially higher than previous studies suggest. Levels of financial knowledge assessed by current measures are shaped by financial experiences that racial minorities are less likely to have. Findings imply that the content validity of financial knowledge measures is problematic, and financial knowledge based on these measures likely yields less return for racial minorities than whites.
      PubDate: 2023-10-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-023-09398-3
       
 
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  First | 1 2        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Third World Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Heriot-Watt University
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Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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