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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 243 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 399)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 237)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 214)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)

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Race and Social Problems
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.827
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1867-1756 - ISSN (Online) 1867-1748
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2658 journals]
  • Prevalence and Correlates of Suicidal Ideation and Attempt According to
           Prisoners’ Race/Ethnicity: An Exploratory Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Suicide is a serious public health issue and prisoners represent a particularly high-risk group. Though there is consensus that suicide is embedded within culture, there have been limited empirical investigations into racial/ethnic variability concerning suicidal ideation and behavior among prisoners. The present study aimed to address this gap, increasing insight into the prevalence and correlates of suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide according to prisoners’ racial/ethnic background. Cross-sectional data were drawn from a nationally representative sample of 17,891 prisoners housed within 326 prisons across the United States. Analyses revealed that prisoners who identify as White were more likely to report a lifetime history of suicidal thoughts (13%) and attempts (19%) as compared to those who identify as Black (8% and 10%, respectively) and Hispanic/Other (8% and 13%, respectively). Data also highlight some similarities and differences in correlates of suicidal thoughts and attempts across racial/ethnic groups. Collectively, there is preliminary evidence to suggest that prisoners’ racial/ethnic background may shape whether and why they think about, and engage in, suicide. More research is needed on racial/ethnic variability in prevalence and correlates of suicidal ideation and behavior among prisoners, especially with respect to culturally relevant factors that might explain this variability.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Racial Disparities and COVID-19: Exploring the Relationship Between
           Race/Ethnicity, Personal Factors, Health Access/Affordability, and
           Conditions Associated with an Increased Severity of COVID-19

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      Abstract: COVID-19 was recognized as a pandemic in the United States in March 2020. Since the emergence, research has explored conditions associated with the illness; however, racial disparities remain underexplored. The purpose of this paper is to explore disparities in conditions associated with an increased severity risk of COVID-19 including race, personal factors, healthcare accessibility, and affordability. Using data from the 2018 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), univariate and multivariate analysis were performed. More Non-Hispanic (NH) Blacks (61.1%) and NH Whites (61.2%) had conditions associated with increased severity risk of COVID-19 compared to Hispanics (47.1%) (p < .001). Racial differences revealed a higher proportion of NH Blacks with increased severity risk of COVID-19 were female (p < .001), not married (p < .001), not employed for wages (p < .001), had accessibility issues with transportation (p < .001), and had affordability issues with paying for medicine (p < .001). A higher proportion of Hispanic persons had a health place change (p = .020), had accessibility issues (e.g. telephone (p < .001), longer wait times (p < .001), closed facility (p = .038)) and had affordability issue with worrying about pay (p < .001). Significant predictors that were positively associated with increased severity risk of COVID-19 for all racial/ethnic groups were being NH Black, older age, having appointment issues, and affordability issues with medicine. Differences in magnitude across racial group dynamics were observed. Racial disparities exist in conditions associated with increased severity risk of COVID-19. As future policies and interventions are developed, it is important to consider differentials across racial group dynamics.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Responses to the Unite the Right Rally: Perceptions, Stress, and the
           Moderating Role of Interpersonal Proximity

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      Abstract: Demonstrations led by right-wing extremist groups and racially motivated hate crimes have increased significantly since the 2016 election of Donald Trump (Edwards and Rushin in The effect of Trump’s election on hate crimes. Retrieved from: https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3102652, 2018). However, few studies have examined racially marginalized (RM) persons’ perceptions of such events or their potential impact on mental health for this population. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the association between RM individuals’ perceptions of the 2017 Unite the Right rally as a racially motivated hate crime and subsequent perceived stress. Additionally, we investigated the moderating role of interpersonal proximity (i.e., direct or indirect knowledge of someone personally affected by the events that occurred at the rally) in the relationship between hate crime perceptions and stress. Survey data were collected from 388 RM adults living in Virginia at the time of the rally. Our results suggest that perceiving the rally as a hate crime was positively associated with greater levels of stress. Moreover, interpersonal proximity moderated this association, such that the relationship between hate crime perceptions and stress was significant and positive for those who knew someone affected by the rally, but unrelated for RM people who did not know someone affected by the rally. Implications and future directions are discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Media Framing of Color-Blind Racism: A Content Analysis of the
           Charlottesville Rally*

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      Abstract: This study investigates how major media outlets, particularly CNN and Fox News, presented the “Unite the Right Rally” in Charlottesville Virginia. A computer-assisted content analysis was conducted on 1-week online news articles about the rally from the two networks. Evidence from Topic Modeling and Sentiment analysis suggests that CNN and Fox News share similarities in reporting the rally regardless of their target audiences. The findings demonstrate the efforts made by the media to uphold color-blindness ideology, underplay racial conflict, and subtly normalize white supremacy. The main contribution of this paper lies in (a) offering empirical evidence of media effect, (b) extending the examination of media effect from traditional forms to the online platform, (c) reexamining the political leaning the media posits, and (d) bridging media study and color-blind racism.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Measuring Anti-Indigenous Attitudes: The Indigenous Resentment Scale

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This paper presents a novel Indigenous resentment scale to measure anti-Indigenous attitudes in settler-colonial societies. I draw from existing quantitative research on measuring outgroup attitudes, Indigenous philosophy, and settler-colonial scholarship to develop a concept and measure of settlers’ resentment toward Indigenous peoples (settlers’ “Indigenous resentment”) with high construct validity. I test the Indigenous resentment scale using original and nationally representative survey data. I conduct a reliability analysis and use statistical learning techniques to show that the Indigenous resentment scale is internally consistent and unidimensional, and has high theoretical construct validity. As I show, the Indigenous resentment scale is a strong predictor of social avoidance behaviors and significantly predicts opposition to government policies designed to help Indigenous peoples. I explain how the Indigenous resentment scale improves upon existing attempts to measure anti-Indigenous attitudes and discuss the usefulness of the scale in social scientific research.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Stable School Integration'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: As public school districts across the country are released from their mandatory school desegregation orders, there has been increasing examination of the re-segregation of public schools. By contrast, little attention has been paid to schools that are becoming more integrated and whether stable racial integration exists in public schools. Using National Center for Education Statistics Data on school demographic composition of all schools across the country, we identify racially integrated schools, examine the stability of the integrated composition of these schools across a twenty-year period (1995–2015), and then describe the characteristics of these integrated schools. We find that an increasing share of schools are integrated, but that this is driven by an increase in Asian/White and Hispanic/White integrated schools, while the number of Black/White integrated schools declines.
      PubDate: 2021-09-27
       
  • White Americans’ Attitudes Toward Reparations for Slavery:
           Definitions and Determinants

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      Abstract: The issue of reparations to the descendants of persons enslaved in the United States is receiving increasing attention in both the public sphere (e.g., 2020 Presidential campaigns) and in academic circles. However, the term “reparations” often goes undefined in such discussions, despite the fact that different types of government action (e.g., an apology versus financial payments) are associated with varying levels of public opposition (or support). We also know little about how attitudes toward reparations explicitly targeting the consequences of slavery differ from attitudes toward more generic race-targeted policies. Drawing on data from an online survey of white Americans conducted in 2016, we examine how levels of opposition to a range of different race-targeted government actions varies by (1) the type and aims of the intervention, and (2) whites’ social locations and political orientations. Regarding policy type, whites are least opposed to selected symbolic reparations (e.g., a memorial to enslaved persons) and to policies designed to ensure “fair treatment” of black Americans in the workplace. Whites are most opposed to reparations in the form of direct financial payments to black Americans and to policies involving “preferential treatment” of blacks in the workplace. In addition, whites who are older, more conservative, and who view race relations as unimportant are most opposed to the reparations and other race-based policies we examine. We conclude with suggestions for future work on this timely topic.
      PubDate: 2021-09-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09348-x
       
  • Race and the Probability of Police Injury

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      Abstract: Although research finds that police are more apt to employ force against black criminal suspects, empirical evidence for this relationship is derived entirely from analyses that only account for factors associated with the police-citizen encounter. If racial disparities exist in how citizens view the police prior to the citizen-police encounter, then any observed nexus between a criminal suspect’s race and police use of force will suffer omitted variable bias. We indirectly test this thesis by examining whether a black criminal suspect has an enhanced proclivity to injure either a black or white police officer during an assault. Results show that black suspects are no more likely than white suspects to injure black or white police officers.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-020-09300-5
       
  • The Legacies of Tennis Champions Althea Gibson, Arthur Ashe, and the
           Williams Sisters Show the Persistence of America’s Race Obstacles

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      Abstract: Black athletes have had to express a double consciousness of being American and being Black. By exploring the biographies of pioneering tennis figures—Althea Gibson, Arthur Ashe, and the Williams sisters—Venus and Serena—one can look at their encounters with racism and their quests for self-respect and explore the social implications of race in the USA. To understand race and its complications on the world in which black tennis players navigate, we broadly look at racial discrimination in their lives using the lens of sociological concepts such as “the color line” hypersegregation and “American Apartheid;” the controlling image thesis and respectability politics, and class mobility in and outside the black community. The concepts connect to illuminate the racial constructs and structures the players operated in and which shaped in the process of becoming a sports champion. Through their biographies, we argue that it is possible to interrogate the ways in which America’s longstanding racial policies, prejudices, and perspectives have had a persistent impact on not only the lives of black tennis players, but the lives of black Americans.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09334-3
       
  • Religiosity and Attitudes Toward Treatment for Mental Health in the Black
           Church

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      Abstract: To investigate the relationship between dimensions of religiosity and attitudes toward the professional treatment of mental health among African American church attendees. In 2018, surveys were administered to African American attendees of four churches in northeastern Pennsylvania and central New Jersey (n = 435). The independent variables assessed were three dimensions of religiosity: subjective (perceptions and attitudes), organizational (public displays), and non-organizational (private practices). The Multidimensional Measure of Religious Involvement for African Americans scale assessed each dimension of religiosity. The dependent variable was measured through the 20-item scale, Attitudes Toward Mental Health Treatment Scale. We conducted multivariate linear regression with robust standard errors to adjust for clustering effects by church. Covariates adjusted for in the analysis were age, sex, denomination, education, marital status, depressive symptoms, location, and support. Most participants were aged 50 and older (79.3%). They resided in urban (9.89%), rural (2.3%), or suburban (87.8%) settings. Participants who reported high subjective religiosity endorsed less positive attitudes toward professional mental health treatment in comparison with participants reporting low subjective religiosity (β = − 1.36, 95% confidence interval [− 2.35, − 0.39], p < 0.05). No association was found between organizational or non-organizational religiosity in relation to attitudes toward professional mental health service use. Our findings suggest that greater subjective religiosity may be related to lower engagement in and utilization of professional mental health services among African Americans in the northeastern United States.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-020-09311-2
       
  • The Interaction of Race and Place: Predictors of Fatal Police Shootings of
           Black Victims at the Incident, Census Tract, City, and State Levels,
           2013–2018

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      Abstract: We develop and analyze a multilevel model of fatal police shootings to better understand the interplay between individual-level and contextual-level factors in incidents of police use of deadly force. We use a three-level hierarchical logistic regression model to identify Census tract-, city-, and state-level predictors of fatal police shootings and a four-level model to identify predictors of fatal police shootings of black victims at the incident, Census tract, city, and state levels. We find that higher levels of concentrated disadvantage and interpersonal firearm violence in a Census tract are significant predictors of the likelihood of any fatal police shooting occurring in that tract. We also find that conditional upon a fatal police shooting having occurred in a Census tract, knowing that the victim was unarmed is a significant predictor of the likelihood that the victim was black. Three other predictors of a police shooting victim being black were a higher proportion of black residents in the Census tract, a greater presence of police officers in the city, and a higher level of black-white residential segregation in the state. We conclude that reducing excessive police use of deadly force requires consideration of not only the individual interactions between officers and citizens, but also the quantity of interactions and the characteristics of the place in which these interactions occur. Special consideration must be given to ameliorating the consequences of structural racism, including racial segregation, over-policing of predominantly black neighborhoods, concentrated disadvantage in segregated neighborhoods, and racial inequalities in income and wealth.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-020-09307-y
       
  • Neighborhood Racial/Ethnic Composition and Medical Discrimination’s
           Relation to Mammograms: A Philadelphia Case Study

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      Abstract: Late-stage breast cancer diagnosis is common for women of color even though cancer screening rates in this group have increased over time. Perceived medical discrimination from health care providers is a key culprit of this inconsistency, discouraging women of color from seeking out timely preventative care. Non-white neighborhoods offer social support structures that mitigate discrimination. However, it is not clear whether this mitigation applies to the chance women of color get timely mammograms. This study addresses that question, applying Hierarchical Linear Modeling methods onto the Public Health Management Corporation’s 2006 and 2008 survey, as well as the 2005–2009 American Community Survey. Findings indicate that while neighborhood racial/ethnic composition does not directly reduce medical discrimination’s association to screening, factors closely connected to place, like health care access, do have a mitigating influence on this association. Also, neighborhood racial/ethnic composition and social support have a positive direct relation with screening.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09312-9
       
  • Collective Racial Bias and the Black-White Test Score Gap

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      Abstract: Anti-black bias is an important focal point in conversations about the sources of racial inequality in schools. Much of the empirical research on this issue has focused on the racial biases of individual teachers, finding that racial inequality in student outcomes is generally worse when teachers have more racial bias. Less is known, however, about how racial inequality in schools relates to anti-black biases that play out at a larger scale within communities. This study begins to fill this gap by examining the relationship between county-level estimates of racial bias and black-white test score gaps in U.S. schools. Data from over 1 million respondents from across the United States who completed an online survey of explicit and implicit racial attitudes were combined with data from the Education Opportunity Project covering over 300 million test scores from U.S. schoolchildren in grades 3 through 8. Results indicated that counties with higher levels of racial bias had larger black-white test score disparities. The magnitude of these associations was on par with other widely accepted predictors of racial test score gaps, including racial gaps in family income and racial gaps in single parenthood. This study also found that the observed relation between collective rates of racial bias and racial test score gaps was largely accounted for when controlling for between-school segregation and racial gaps in discipline, gifted assignment, and special education placement. This pattern is consistent with a theoretical model in which collective rates of racial bias relate to educational opportunity through sorting mechanisms that operate both within and beyond schools.
      PubDate: 2021-08-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09347-y
       
  • Same-Sex and Different-Sex Interracial Couples: The Importance of
           Demographic and Religious Context

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      Abstract: How does demographic and religious context relate to interracial relationships among same-sex and different-sex couples' Using couple data from the 2012 to 2014 American Community Surveys matched to aggregate data from the 2010 Census and 2010 Religious Congregations and Membership Study, we test how heterogamy patterns for same-sex and different-sex couples vary by the demographic and religious makeup of cities, using multinomial logistic regressions to compare interracial and same-race couples. We find that same-sex couples are more likely to be in a White/Black interracial pairing than different-sex couples. White partners are more likely to be in an interracial relationship if they are in a city with a large minority group population. In addition, context is differently associated with interracial unions for same-sex and different-sex couples, varying for each racial combination.
      PubDate: 2021-08-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09340-5
       
  • Debt Stress, College Stress: Implications for Black and Latinx
           Students’ Mental Health

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      Abstract: Educational debt is an economic stressor that is harmful to mental health and disproportionately experienced by African American and Latinx youth. In this paper, we use a daily diary design to explore the link between mental health, context specific factors like “college stress” and time use, and educational debt stress, or stress incurred from thinking about educational debt and college affordability. This paper utilizes data from a sample of predominately African American and Latinx college students who provided over 1000 unique time observations. Results show that debt-induced stress is predictive of greater self-reported hostility, guilt, sadness, fatigue, and general negative emotion. Moreover, the relationship may be partly mediated by “college stress” reflecting course loads and post-graduation job expectations. For enrolled students then, educational debt may influence mental health directly through concerns over affordability, or indirectly by shaping facets of college life. The window that our granular data provides into college experiences suggest that the consequences of student debt are manifest and immediate. Further, the documented day-to-day mental health burden for minority students may contribute to downstream processes such as matriculation.
      PubDate: 2021-08-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09346-z
       
  • Racial Invariance or Asian Advantage: Comparing the Macro-Level Predictors
           of Violence Across Asian, White, and Black Populations

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      Abstract: Research shows that structural disadvantage is a key source of violent crime rates across racial/ethnic groups, a finding that has become more commonly known as “racial invariance.” However, this literature has focused primarily on white, black and Latino comparisons, with little attention to Asian populations. This omission is problematic considering that (1) Asians are the fastest growing minority group in the U.S. and (2) the sources of Asian crime could differ from those of white and black populations. Drawing on the racial invariance hypothesis, the current study uses 2010 city-level data to compare the structural predictors of violent crime arrest rates (homicide, robbery, rape, and aggravated assault) for white, black, and Asian populations. Findings reveal that disadvantage contributes to violence for all three racial/ethnic groups, but the magnitude of these effects and effects of other structural predictors differ. Findings from the current study offer implications for the racial invariance debate.
      PubDate: 2021-07-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09344-1
       
  • Reflections on African Americans in Baseball: No Longer the Vanguard of
           Change

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      Abstract: During the last decade, a number of athletes began engaging in social activism. In the aftermath of George Floyd’s death, that wave of protest became a tsunami, energizing collegiate and professional athletes and reverberating across society. But baseball, once in the vanguard of sports activism, remained on the sidelines. As the national pastime, it reflected the country’s turn toward social Darwinism and segregation at the turn of the 20th century. After World War II, when Jackie Robinson reintegrated the major leagues, it was a catalyst to change off the field. This essay addresses that politicized past and its more quiescent present.
      PubDate: 2021-07-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09333-4
       
  • Racial Stacking Among Special Teams Units in American College Football

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      Abstract: Racial stacking refers to a form of racial discrimination structured within the organization of sports teams and franchises. It is a persistent and pervasive social problem. The concept, first introduced in the 1970s, documents the active process of selecting and assigning players to particular positions on the field of competition based on a players’ racial or ethnic background. The concept extends to the selection of positions of governance and oversight within sports organizations, such as coaches, managers, scouts, and front office staff. Although there has been a breadth of research on offensive and defensive positions of American football teams, no studies to date have examined Special Teams, a unit or collection of positions on a football team tasked with kicking (including field goals), punting and kick-off, and punt returns. The current study fills a gap in the literature and utilizes visual analysis of media guides and game film of all twelve football teams in the Pacific-12 intercollegiate athletic conference for three consecutive seasons (2016–2018), analyzing the racial demographics of all positions within these Special Team units. Findings from this study confirm the persistent presence of spatial centrality and racial stacking within Special Teams units of American college football, reproducing racial discrimination within college sports and American higher education today. Findings also contribute to a more nuanced understanding of figurative centrality within the racial stacking literature.
      PubDate: 2021-06-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09339-y
       
  • Prologue

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      PubDate: 2021-06-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09335-2
       
  • The Episodic Kneel: Racial Neoliberalism, Civility, and the Media
           Circulation of Colin Kaepernick, 2017–2020

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      Abstract: Despite his absence from National Football League (NFL) fields, Colin Kaepernick has exerted an ongoing resonance in American sport-media discourse over the last few years. This article addresses such resonance through three “flashpoints”: President Donald Trump’s inflammatory comments on Kaepernick at a 2017 rally, Nike’s Kaepernick advertising campaign in 2018, and the 2020 resurgence of Black Lives Matter within which Kaepernick, and the act of kneeling, remained central. It is argued that these flashpoints indicate, in varied ways, the hegemony of racial neoliberalism and civility as structuring ideologies in the twenty-first-century United States. Kaepernick amplified his voice through the endorsement of racial-neoliberal discourse (Nike ad), while Trump’s comments and the recent wave of high-profile killings of Black Americans generated condemnation largely focused on acts of (in)civility rather than deeper roots of systemic inequality. Yet recent events also point to signs of the cracking, if not fundamentally de-hegemonizing, of racial neoliberalism, particularly through a turn (if only temporary) away from colorblind “antiracialism” in sport.
      PubDate: 2021-06-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09331-6
       
 
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