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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Bakti Budaya     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access  
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Groupwork     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access  
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 277)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access  
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access  
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 110)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Social Work / Maatskaplike Werk     Open Access  
Social Work and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Social Work With Groups     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Socialinė teorija, empirija, politika ir praktika     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  

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Journal Cover
Race and Social Problems
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.827
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1867-1756 - ISSN (Online) 1867-1748
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Racially Charged: The Impact of Ambivalent Sexism on Black and White Women
           Arrested for Prostitution

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      Abstract: Abstract Many scholars investigating sexism distinguish between two related, but distinct, forms of sexism aimed at women: hostile sexism and benevolent sexism (Glick & Fiske, 1996). These sexist beliefs can seem contradictory, with hostile sexism (HS) reflecting more contempt for women and benevolent sexism (BS) offering protection and care to women, but both serve to maintain the gender status hierarchy. However, these concepts may have been created based on the white feminine ideal and may not apply to women of color. For example, expectations about female sexual purity may be different across race and may lead to differential treatment of women who violate purity norms. In the current research, participants (N = 410) read a news article about a black or white woman arrested for prostitution, and answered questions about convicting, punishing, and helping the woman. Participants high in HS and high in BS were more likely to convict and punish the sex worker than those low in HS and BS, but HS and BS did not interact with race when predicting conviction and punishment. For helping those high in HS were less likely to recommend immediate interventions and those high in BS were more likely to recommend dependency-oriented interventions, but none of the two-way interactions with sexism and race was significant. It is possible that sex work is such a strong violation of the female purity norm that punishment of women who violate this norm does not vary based on the characteristics of the woman but more intersectional research on race and sexism is needed.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Racial Invariance or Asian Advantage: Comparing the Macro-Level Predictors
           of Violence Across Asian, White, and Black Populations

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      Abstract: Abstract Research shows that structural disadvantage is a key source of violent crime rates across racial/ethnic groups, a finding that has become more commonly known as “racial invariance.” However, this literature has focused primarily on white, black and Latino comparisons, with little attention to Asian populations. This omission is problematic considering that (1) Asians are the fastest growing minority group in the U.S. and (2) the sources of Asian crime could differ from those of white and black populations. Drawing on the racial invariance hypothesis, the current study uses 2010 city-level data to compare the structural predictors of violent crime arrest rates (homicide, robbery, rape, and aggravated assault) for white, black, and Asian populations. Findings reveal that disadvantage contributes to violence for all three racial/ethnic groups, but the magnitude of these effects and effects of other structural predictors differ. Findings from the current study offer implications for the racial invariance debate.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Racial and Ethnic Residential Segregation by Family Structure and the
           Presence of Children in Metropolitan America

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      Abstract: Abstract Little research has examined the residential segregation of blacks, Hispanics, and Asians from whites disaggregated by family structure and the presence of children in metropolitan America. Using data from the 2010 Census and the 2006–2010 American Community Survey, we find that, net of controls, among blacks, single-mother families are significantly more segregated from whites than married couples, regardless of the presence of children. However, these same differences in segregation are not found among Hispanics and Asians. Among those groups, married families with children under 18 are more segregated from whites than married families without children under 18, suggesting that married Hispanics and Asians with children desire closer proximity to their co-ethnics. The results suggest that racial and ethnic segregation by family structure and the presence of children varies by the racial and ethnic group considered and is, therefore, important to understanding overall racial and ethnic segregation in metropolitan America.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Racial/Ethnic Residential Segregation, Poor Self-rated Health, and the
           Moderating Role of Immigration

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      Abstract: Abstract Previous research has demonstrated a relationship between black residential segregation and poor health outcomes. However, this association is less clear for the segregation of other racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States, such as Latinos and Asians. We argue that immigration may moderate this relationship, and that this could help explain these disparate results. We test this using multilevel statistical models of individual-level health data nested within Census tracts in a study of the Houston area using the 2009–2014 Kinder Houston Area Survey, the 2010 U.S. Census, and the 2006–2010 American Community Survey. We find that black and Latino residential segregation is associated with greater poor health reporting, though not for Asian segregation. Further, we find that immigration moderates this relationship for Latino segregation, such that where tract-level immigration is low, Latino segregation is positively related to poor health, but that this slope becomes flatter as immigration increases.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Historical Redlining and Resident Exposure to COVID-19: A Study of New
           York City

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      Abstract: Abstract The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been reported to disproportionately impact racial/ethnic minorities in the USA, both in terms of infections and deaths. This racial disparity in the COVID-19 outcomes may result from the segregation of minorities in neighborhoods with health-compromising conditions. We, thus, anticipate that neighborhoods would be especially vulnerable to COVID-19 if they are of present-day economic and racial disadvantage and were redlined historically. To test this expectation, we examined the change of both confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths from April to July, 2020, in zip code tabulation areas (ZCTAs) in the New York City using multilevel regression analysis. The results indicate that ZCTAs with a higher proportion of black and Hispanic populations are associated with a higher percentage of COVID-19 infection. Historically low-graded neighborhoods show a higher risk for COVID-19 infection, even for ZCTAs with present-day economic and racial privilege. These associations change over time as the pandemic unfolds. Racial/ethnic minorities are bearing the brunt of the COVID-19 pandemic’s health impact. The current evidence shows that the pre-existing social structure in the form of racial residential segregation could be partially responsible for the disparities observed, highlighting an urgent need to stress historical segregation and to build a less segregated and more equal society.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Setting the Tone: An Investigation of Skin Color Bias in Asia

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      Abstract: Abstract Social stratification by skin color is evident across the globe. In Asia, the origins of colorism are more obscure, and contemporary patterns are less studied. This paper examines the presence and patterns of colorism in an Asian context. Using data from Project Implicit, Study 1 investigated the extent to which participants associated dark skin color with negative concepts and light skin color with positive concepts. East Asia emerged as the world region with the highest level of skin color bias. Using experiments conducted in Singapore, Studies 2–4 investigated how manipulating skin color impacted the evaluations of job applicants. Studies 2 and 4 documented a modestly sized bias against dark- and medium-skinned applicants relative to light-skinned applicants, driven primarily by female participants. Study 3, which increased the range of applicant credentials, documented an attenuation of skin color bias. Furthermore, stratified models indicated participants from lower socioeconomic status families displayed higher levels of bias.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Discrimination in Context: Examining Neighborhood-Level Variation in the
           Incidence and Adverse Effects of Perceived Racial and Ethnic
           Discrimination Among Chicago Youth

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      Abstract: Abstract A growing body of research links interpersonal racial and ethnic discrimination to adverse youth outcomes. Yet, studies examining the relevance of neighborhood context for discrimination are sparse. This study examines neighborhood-level variation in the incidence and impact of perceived racial and ethnic discrimination on depressive symptoms, suicidal behavior, violent behavior, and substance use. Hierarchical regression models on a sample of 1333 African American and Hispanic youth (52.44% female; x̄ = 13.03 years, SD = 3.25 at wave 1) residing in 238 Chicago neighborhoods from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods indicated little to no neighborhood-level variation in the incidence and impact of discrimination. Findings suggest that the experience of discrimination among youth of color is ubiquitous.
      PubDate: 2022-05-14
       
  • Correction to: What’s in a Name' Symbolic Racism, Public Opinion,
           and the Controversy over the NFL’s Washington Football Team Name

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-05-10
       
  • Understanding Collective Efficacy as a Racialized Process: Examining the
           Relationship Between Discrimination and Perceptions of Collective Efficacy
           

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      Abstract: Abstract The current project examines whether perceptions of collective efficacy are racialized. Using a sample of Black and Latinx young adults in Chicago, we first investigate whether perceptions of discrimination vary across Chicago’s neighborhoods and whether neighborhood-level structural characteristics (concentrated disadvantage, immigrant concentration, residential stability) or neighborhood social processes (neighborhood-level collective efficacy) are related to their perceptions of discrimination. Our estimations show that perceptions of discrimination are endemic to Chicago’s neighborhoods and are not related with neighborhood-level structural characteristics. Second, we examine whether perceptions of discrimination predict perceiving less collective efficacy while controlling for neighborhood characteristics. Overall, individuals perceive less collective efficacy when they perceive being discriminated against. Third, we analyze the sources of perceptions of collective efficacy separately for Black and Latinx individuals. These results suggest that discrimination shapes Black individuals’ perceptions of their neighbors but do not hold for Latinx individuals. Supplemental analyses reveal that for Latinx individuals, discrimination undermines perceptions of collective efficacy only when is framed as related to their race. Taken together, our results suggest that racism is embedded in the way racialized individuals perceive their neighbors’ agreement regarding norms of intervention. In short, the results suggest that the formation of collective efficacy is racialized.
      PubDate: 2022-05-04
       
  • Values and Attitudes Toward Immigrants Among School Children in
           Switzerland and Poland

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      Abstract: Abstract Research on key determinants of negative attitudes toward immigration has often suggested that values held by individuals systematically explain such sentiments. Universalists appear to have more positive and conservatives more negative attitudes. So far, however, these insights are based on studies using adult samples. In our study, we analyze these relations among children and adolescents. For the analysis, we utilized a Swiss-Polish panel dataset (2015–2017, N = 5,332) with three time points collected among school children aged 8–19 years. We employed autoregressive cross-lagged models. The results indicated that while universalism decreased negative attitudes toward immigrants, the expected effect for conformity-tradition was not found.
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
       
  • White Students’ Perceptions of the Costs and Consequences of Being
           Black

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      Abstract: Abstract Many whites explicitly believe that their race has had no impact on their accomplishments in life. The current study used the contingent valuation method to implicitly measure the value of being white—or alternatively, the cost of being black—among a sample of white college students. Participants were presented with a hypothetical scenario in which their racial appearance was altered due to a medical mishap, and then asked to identify the negative consequences they would experience as a result of this change. Participants also assigned a dollar value to their race by reporting the smallest financial settlement they would accept as compensation for the mishap. Results revealed that white students who imagined being black anticipated financial consequences significantly more often than black students who imaged being white, but they anticipated psychosocial consequences significantly less often. The median financial settlement for whiteness was relatively low, while the mean value was quite large and highlighted the importance of whiteness among certain respondents. These findings are discussed, with suggestions for future research.
      PubDate: 2022-04-17
       
  • The Influence of Indigenous Identity and Gender in Perceptions of Behavior
           in Response to Racialized Police Communication

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      Abstract: Abstract The current studies examined whether the race and gender of a person under suspicion (Studies 1 and 2), as well as the race of the person who called the police (Study 2) influences perceptions of police conduct. Participants read a summary in which the police were called on individuals waiting in a coffee shop (Study 1; N = 133) or sleeping in their dorm common room (Study 2; N = 247). Suspect race (Indigenous vs. White) and gender (male vs. female) were varied in both studies. In Study 2, the race of the person who called the police also varied (Indigenous vs. White). Participants in Study 1 believed race influenced the call to police and the arrest when the suspect was Indigenous (vs. White). Additionally, in both studies, participants were more likely to think that gender influenced the call to police and the arrest when the suspect was described as male (vs. female). The current studies provide new insight regarding public perception of racialized police communication.
      PubDate: 2022-04-02
       
  • Emotional Response and Behavioral Coping Associated with Experienced and
           Media Discrimination Among Asians and Asian Americans in the United States
           

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper examined how sources (experienced and media) and forms (overt and subtle) of discrimination were associated with emotional response and behavioral coping among Asians and Asian Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected in June 2020 from 249 Asian and Asian American adults living in 20 U.S. states. We used hierarchical regression for data analysis, controlling for age, gender, and the length of residence in the U.S. Results showed that experienced discrimination, especially in the overt form, was associated with both emotional responses (i.e., emotional distress and vigilance) and behavioral coping (i.e., using avoidant behavior to protect oneself). Media discrimination was associated only with emotional response. The relationship between experienced discrimination and emotional response was less pronounced among those who frequently observed discrimination in the media. Notably, subtle discrimination through personal experience or media exposure was positively associated with behavioral coping. The results suggest the need to address the rising anti-Asian acts with more initiatives in policy and practice, with special attention paid to the parallel influences from personal experience and media exposure to violence.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
       
  • “Crime” in Context: Racialized Physical Space Shifts
           Person-Perception

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      Abstract: Abstract People often assume areas where black people live are dangerous, impoverished, and rundown, whereas they assume White areas to be safe, wealthy, and well-maintained (Bonam et al. in J Exp Psychol Gen 145(11):1561–1582, 2016). These space-focused racial stereotypes shape how people perceive, evaluate, and treat physical space, such as houses and neighborhoods. Further, people often associate specific types of spaces with certain races (e.g., inner-city is Black; suburb is White), making them racial exemplar spaces (Bonam, in Devaluing Black space: Black locations as targets of housing and environmental discrimination, Unpublished doctoral dissertation. Stanford University, Stanford, 2010). The present work expands insight into racialized physical space by showing how Black and White exemplar spaces and White space-focused racial stereotypes shape person-perception. Specifically, we report findings from a vignette study examining how “black” and “criminal” people perceived a target person. This target was black or white and was in a suburban or inner-city neighborhood. We also measured people’s generalized stereotypes about white areas. People thought of the Black versus White person as being more black, which in turn made the target seem more criminal. This relationship was stronger in a suburban versus inner-city neighborhood—likely because being in an inner-city area made the White target seem more black, whereas the black target seemed black no matter where he was. Additionally, the more people thought of white areas as generally safe, wealthy, and well-maintained, the more they criminalized the black—but not white—target in a suburban neighborhood. This study highlights the need to further explore how racialized physical space shapes social perception, and it provides insight into the criminalization and policing of black bodies in white spaces.
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
       
  • Old Southern Codes in New Legal Bottles' Sexual Harassment, Race, and
           Masculinity

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      Abstract: Abstract Historically, old southern codes were used to regulate the interactions between black males and white females. We draw parallels between these codes and current sexual harassment laws to examine the perceptions of sexual behavior that crosses racial lines. Specifically, we examine how white and black female targets perceived and reacted to the behavior of males of the same and different race than their own. Our results indicate that white women perceive the behavior committed by a man of another race as more sexually harassing than when a white male commits the behavior. Conversely, black women perceive the behavior committed by black men as more sexually harassing than when a man of a different race engages in the same behavior. Further, a similar pattern emerges for reporting sexual harassment. Implications for research and the management of sexual harassment are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-03-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-022-09355-6
       
  • Xenophobia, Partisanship, and Support for Donald Trump and the Republican
           Party

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      Abstract: Abstract During his 2016 presidential campaign, Donald Trump distinguished himself from other candidates via his hardline stances on issues of immigration. Using data from national surveys conducted between 2014 and 2019, we identify three key findings about views of immigrants among the American public during the Trump era. First, xenophobia was the strongest predictor of Americans’ feelings—anger, fear, pride, and hope—about Donald Trump during his time in office, and the second strongest predictor of feelings about the Republican party (after partisan identification). Second, the influence of Americans’ levels of xenophobia on their feelings about the Republican Party were significantly mediated by their feelings about Trump, especially for negative affect (anger and fear). Third, there has been a backlash against xenophobia, such that political independents and Democrats became significantly more favorable toward immigrants after 2016. As a result, views of immigrants have become more favorable overall, but also more politically polarized. These findings support and extend immigration backlash theory, contribute to research on affective polarization, and document consequential trends in contemporary American politics.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09337-0
       
  • Examining Multiracial Pride, Identity-Based Challenges, and
           Discrimination: An Exploratory Investigation Among Biracial Emerging
           Adults

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      Abstract: Abstract This study investigated the main and interactive effects of identity-based challenges, discrimination, and Multiracial pride on psychological distress in Biracial emerging adults. Additionally, we examined whether these associations may differ by Biracial sub-group (e.g., black–white, Asian–white, Latinx–white, and minority–minority) given their unique racial experiences. Participants were 326 Biracial emerging adults (Mage = 19.57 years old; 75.2% female) recruited from three public universities in the United States for an online survey. For all Biracial groups, identity-based challenges were associated with greater psychological distress. After testing a series of competing multi-group regression models, results indicated that the relations between distress and our predictors: identity-based challenges, discrimination, and Multiracial pride do indeed differ across Biracial sub-group. The most apparent and unique differences were displayed by the black–white Biracial sub-group. These findings highlight identity-based challenges as a unique risk in the Biracial population and suggest that a principled comparison between Biracial sub-groups is necessary to tease apart group-specific associations between these constructs and psychological distress.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09325-4
       
  • U.S. Infant Mortality Rates: An Exploration of Black/White Disparities,
           Current Trends, and Social Inequalities

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this paper is to explore 10-year trends in infant mortality rates (IMRs) from 2007 to 2016 for non-Hispanic (NH) blacks and NH whites by levels of sociodemographic characteristics such as maternal age, marital status, education, and access to prenatal care. Using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Wonder Online database, descriptive statistics were performed, and a measure of disparity was calculated to illustrate racial differences in IMRs. Between 2007 and 2016, IMRs for NH blacks have declined at a faster rate (15.8%) compared to NH whites (13.5%). As for the selected sociodemographic indicators, reductions were observed for both racial groups for most age categories assessed, married and unmarried women, and for women with early or no access to prenatal care. For educational attainment levels, declines were observed for both racial groups for all levels except for high school graduate or GED and some college, in which increases were observed for NH white women. The measure of disparity illustrates the large racial gap in IMRs persists between NH blacks and NH whites. More structural and systemic mechanisms, including research and policies, are needed to address the disparities in IMRs.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09328-1
       
  • What Did You Call Me' An Analysis of Online Harassment Towards Black
           and Latinx Women

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      Abstract: Abstract Online harassment is a growing societal problem. Although online harassment, or cyber aggression, has begun to receive attention, little research systematically explores the common themes found in hostile messages. In this project, we focused on online harassment directed towards women of color. We applied social network methodology and text clustering (topic analysis) to messages posted on the social media platform Twitter. We examined the occurrence of aggressive, harmful Twitter messages directed towards two groups—Hispanic/Latinx women and Black women. Next, we uncovered common themes that emerged within the communications. Messages towards both groups of women contained themes of racial stereotypes. In tweets that targeted Black women, one emergent theme concerned charges of promiscuity, where messages included slurs that accused Black women of being overly sexual. In messages containing Latinx slurs, on the other hand, xenophobia was one recurring topic, with common terms related to menial labor and political comments invoking the need to “build a wall.” Both groups of women also were subjected to feminine, attractiveness insults. Findings suggest that these negative communications are not idiosyncratic in nature, but instead routinely reinforce traditional, negative, race and gender stereotypes. As a result, these hostile messages contribute to the maintenance of race and gender inequality.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09330-7
       
  • Racial Stratification Among Latinos in the Mortgage Market

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      Abstract: Abstract Studies of the mortgage industry’s impact on racial stratification have long focused on racial disparities found between white and black homeowners. Ample research demonstrates that unequal access and treatment between white and black home seekers has created major differences in the type of loan products they are offered in the marketplace. While numerous studies also document disadvantaged Latino homebuyers, studies have yet to examine racial variation within the Latino population. This paper draws on annual data from the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) from 2010 to 2017 to assess variation in racial disparities among Latinos in loan outcomes and compares them to Non-Latino whites, blacks, Asians, and Others. I show that loan rejections and high cost originations are highest among black Latinos and lowest among white and Asian Latinos. Other Latinos perform somewhere in the middle. These trends are particularly true when examining mortgage denials. When comparing Latino racial groups to Non-Latinos, the observed lending patterns provide evidence of a tri-racial hierarchy in the mortgage market.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12552-021-09326-3
       
 
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