A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Safer Communities
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.155
Number of Followers: 52  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1757-8043 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8774
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Teen firearm access during COVID: a repeated cross-sectional analysis of
           Pennsylvania families

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lacey Nicole Wallace
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate patterns in adolescent gun access and household gun storage in 2021 and 2022. Data were collected from two cross-sectional surveys of Pennsylvania parents with a teenage child at home. The results indicated that about 20% of gun owners in each survey stored their guns loaded; a similar percentage stored their guns unlocked. Very few gun owners reported that their children could access their guns without adult supervision. This study found no change in gun storage practices between 2021 and 2022, but higher rates of gun ownership in 2022. The factors associated with gun storage behaviors did change between the two time points. COVID-related uncertainties and transitions in the household were linked to gun ownership and less safe storage practices in 2021, but not in 2022. This study identified factors associated with teen gun access at distinct points during the pandemic. This study found little evidence of any association between child mental health and household firearm storage.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-07-27
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-05-2022-0018
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Perceived neighborhood crime and health: a multilevel analysis for Turkey

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tekin Kose , Nur Orak
      Abstract: Crime has notable impacts on health outcomes of individuals through various pathways. This study aims to explore relationships between perceived neighborhood crime and health statuses of individuals in Turkey. This study combines individual- and household-level data from a national household survey and regional-level data for empirical analyses. A multilevel estimation framework is used for quantification of associations between a perceived neighborhood crime indicator and an individual-level health status index. Empirical findings indicate that perceived neighborhood crime level has a negative relationship with health indexes of Turkish individuals. Additionally, health index is significantly associated with individual- and household-level covariates. Public policies for health and safety improvements should consider heterogeneities in characteristics of individuals and households in developing regions of the world. Earlier findings on associations of crime and health measures mostly rely on evidence from developed regions of the world. This research complements the related literature by providing empirical analysis of associations between perceived neighborhood crime and health outcomes for a developing country, Turkey.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-07-21
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-08-2021-0034
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Retailers’ perceptions of the effectiveness of CPTED-based techniques in
           reducing shoplifting: the case of Istanbul

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mine Özaşçılar
      Abstract: Shoplifting has become a widespread crime problem worldwide. The study aims to investigate retailers’ perceptions of the effectiveness of crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED)-based techniques to prevent shoplifting in Istanbul. Data collection involved 370 face-to-face interviews with store managers at shopping malls in Istanbul by using a structured, self-explanatory questionnaire. The current study applies CPTED approach to measure the effectiveness of informal and formal surveillance techniques. The results revealed that store managers perceived awareness of sales staff as the most effective CPTED-based approach to prevent shoplifting. The study identified six factors underlying perceived effectiveness of CPTED-based techniques: surveillance (informal surveillance), image/maintenance and surveillance (formal surveillance), territoriality, surveillance (formal surveillance), surveillance (mechanical surveillance) and target hardening. No research to date has addressed the effectiveness of CPTED-based techniques in Turkey at shopping malls. Given the limited number of prior research, the results provide important insights regarding the perceived effectiveness of CPTED-based techniques.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-07-21
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-08-2021-0035
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Is faith and “on road” youth work intertwined' Examining the
           experiences of “on road” practitioners

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shona Robinson-Edwards , Craig Pinkney
      Abstract: Research pertaining to young people, frontline work and faith is fairly limited. This qualitative article proposes that often faith and “on road” youth work are intertwined. This paper aims to explore the experiences of nine frontline practitioners, those who work with young people in a range of settings. The crux of the discussion is focused on how the religious and cultural views of practitioners impact their frontline practice, as it relates to supporting the young person’s needs. The authors suggest that understanding frontline practice as it relates to faith is imperative to our ability to effectively engage with young people “on road”. This paper took a qualitative approach, where semi-structured interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. This allowed the formation of the following three core themes: incarceration, religiosity and “on road” youth work; the nuances of religion and identity “on road”; and the “pains of ‘on road’ youth work”. The findings within this paper suggest that faith and “on road” youth work are intertwined. In that frontline practitioners’ personal religious views, and importantly the understanding they have regarding the array of religious identities adopted by young people (YP) is helpful in engaging YP across the board. This paper highlights the complexities between identity, faith, faith-based support and hard-to-reach communities. This paper explores the complexities between faith on “on road” criminology/“on road” youth work. This area of study is fairly under-researched. This paper seeks to build on existing research surrounding YP, further exploring religiosity from a UK context. This paper aimed to explore the lived experiences of frontline practitioners in Birmingham UK, many of whom work with YP from Black, Asian or minority backgrounds. Therefore the findings cannot be generalised. This paper’s intention is not to stereotype YP, but to raise awareness of the subjective experience of faith and religiosity on the frontline. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there are few studies that explore the concept of “on road” criminology and “on road” youth work. Therefore, findings from this study are important to develop further understanding.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-04-2022-0013
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Offender treatment program limitations with those who have complex needs:
           exploring the role for music therapy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Louise A. Sicard , Philip Birch
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate the perspectives and experiences of treatment facilitators regarding the effectiveness of treatment they delivered for high-risk offenders with complex needs. Within this study, the term complex needs refers to an individual who is managing several issues, such as physical illness, mental health issues and addiction disorders. There was a total of 18 semi-structured qualitative interviews conducted with treatment facilitators from Australia and the UK. This study presents two key themes that emerged from the thematic analysis: “the importance of responsivity and active/creative activities in practice” and “the practitioner’s core concerns: issues with high-risk offenders treatment accessibility”. The findings revealed that treatment facilitators considered treatment responsivity as core to treatment for high-risk offenders with complex needs and that active/creative activities were beneficial in achieving this. Additionally, treatment facilitators expressed concerns around the inaccessibility of treatment, including the barriers of talk therapy and the inability for offenders to receive the level of support necessary. Considering these findings, this study offers a discussion on the potential value of music therapy as a component of treatment for such offending populations. The empirical data yielded from the interviewed treatment facilitators highlight that music therapy can play a role in supporting the beneficial components of treatment programs. Further implications centre on addressing the limitations of treatment that were identified through the interviews. This study focusses on exploring the role of music therapy with high-risk offenders and who have complex needs when engaging in treatment programs. This paper recognises that the application and use of music therapy with this cohort has been neglected in the academic literature and research until recently.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-07-11
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-12-2021-0052
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Evaluating hate crime third party reporting services: perspectives from
           voluntary advisors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Henry Charles Fitch-Bartlett , Jane Healy
      Abstract: Third party reporting (TPR) services provide a route for victims of hate crime to report their experiences to an organisation other than the police. There is repeated evidence of under-reporting of hate crimes within the UK, and many victims of hate crime are unaware of the existence of TPR mechanisms. Little research attention has been given to understanding of the merits of TPR, beyond evaluating how often they are used. This study aims to explore the delivery of TPR from an advisor perspective. The research evaluated a small TPR centre based within a charitable organisation. The research, part of an undergraduate study, analysed the experiences of volunteer advisors working on the service through a semi-structured questionnaire. Results were mixed. Findings indicated the service contributed to an enhanced awareness of hate crimes in the community; however, greater promotion of the TPR centre was advocated. The results also indicated a significant lack of understanding and knowledge by trained volunteer advisors about hate crimes. A lack of informed awareness of what hate crimes are could result in victims of hate crime not being recognised or supported as such. Most hate crime research is victim centred, and this study is innovative in looking at those receiving hate crime reports. There is limited evidence on TPR service provision in the UK, particularly on service delivery staff, and this research contributes to the gap in knowledge.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-07-08
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-04-2021-0012
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Trust in the police and policing by consent in turbulent times

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Clare Torrible
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the potential impact on policing by consent and trust in the police of diminished political and generalised trust. This paper draws on a range of academic literature on trust, the legal foundations of policing by consent, police occupational culture, disproportionality and neighbourhood policing. An analytical framework is developed by recognising that policing by consent can be conceived as comprising two complementary facets, police state consent and police citizen consent and drawing lose mappings between police state consent and political trust and police citizen consent and generalised trust. This supports the argument that the importance of tackling disproportionality in policing practices and an increased emphasis on neighbourhood policing are not only valuable for reasons recognised in existing literature but also because they may bolster policing by consent in circumstances of reduced political trust and contribute to increased generalised trust across society. This paper builds upon existing work on trust in the police and policing by consent to give novel insights into the importance of neighbourhood policing and tackling disproportionality. The analytical frame developed also highlights new areas for nuanced research questions in the field of trust and provides grounding from which policy objectives for policing can be developed.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-08-2021-0036
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The dark and desolate campus: what can be done to enhance students’
           perceptions of safety on-campus'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicola Roberts
      Abstract: Given their young age, students are at a heightened risk of violent victimisation. Yet few studies have considered students’ perceptions of safety and the impact of these, on a British university campus. The purpose of this research was to close this gap. From late 2019–2020, using an online university wide survey, data was gathered over a three-month period from 550 students studying at a university in the north of England on “city” campuses about their perceptions of safety and security on-campus. Students, particularly women students, felt unsafe on the university campuses because of poor lighting, limited CCTV, security patrols and the presences of others. They felt unsafe in and around teaching buildings, moving around the campuses and in transport locations. The response rate of the survey was 6%. Consequently, the findings are not representative of the wider student population on the campuses. Campus Security should consider enhancing surveillance on the campuses. Students, particularly women, limited the time they spent on-campus studying because they felt unsafe. Their choices about when and how to engage in their university education were therefore restricted. This study addresses the gap in research on students’ perceptions of safety and the impact of these, on a British university campus. In doing so, it forefronts the responsibility of higher education institutions to enhance students’ safety, including their perceptions of safety, on-campus.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-05-25
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-01-2022-0006
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Safer Communities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 18.204.56.185
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-