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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Safer Communities
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.155
Number of Followers: 50  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1757-8043 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8774
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Perceptions of police use of surveillance cameras in Ghana; does
           procedural justice matter'

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      Authors: Stewart Selase Hevi , Ebenezer Malcalm , Gifty Enyonam Ketemepi , Akorfa Wuttor , Clemence Dupey Agbenorxevi
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the effect of perception of police use of surveillance cameras (POP-S), perception of police legitimacy (POP-L) and community well-being. The study further explores the mediating effect of procedural justice between POP-S and police legitimacy. A convenience sampling technique was used in the selection of 388 participants, who answered questions relating to police use of surveillance cameras, legitimacy, procedural justice and community well-being. Structural equation modeling was used to test the effects of the hypothesized paths. The findings showed that POP-L was positively related to community well-being. In addition, procedural fairness partially mediates between POP-S and police legitimacy. The study sample was limited to only motorists within the city of Accra. Hence, the study does not consider other potential offenses that may be uncovered by police-deployed surveillance cameras. The study optimizes the relevance of technology use in contemporary policing for the elimination of road traffic carnage. In this research, the academic scope of technology-based policing was scholarly advanced by drawing links between police use of surveillance cameras, police legitimacy, procedural justice and community well-being within the context of emerging economies.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-11-16
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-04-2022-0015
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Examination of a community-based, multifaceted program for juvenile
           offenders and their families

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      Authors: David A. Scott
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the results of a community-based program addressing the mental health needs of at-risk youth (n = 196) and their families. The program served as an alternative to secure detention for youth residing in several rural counties in the southeastern part of the country. Several measures were used to evaluate the program’s effectiveness over a four-year timeframe. The multifaceted program produced favorable results in reducing delinquent behaviors and improving relationships within their family. This study demonstrated that using a multifaceted intervention can be beneficial to juveniles in the juvenile justice system and their families. This study set out to provide services and interventions aimed at reducing re-offending, exploring career development and improving overall family functioning. This study is original work and is not being submitted elsewhere.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-10-05
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-03-2022-0011
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Searching for context: a review of “what works” reviews of
           interventions to prevent youth offending using the EMMIE Framework

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      Authors: Stephen Case , Charlie E. Sutton , Joanne Greenhalgh , Mark Monaghan , Judy Wright
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the extent to which “What Works” reviews in youth justice enable understanding of the features of effectiveness (what works, for whom, in what circumstances and why') specified in the Effects–Mechanisms–Moderators–Implementation–Economic cost (EMMIE) framework. The EMMIE framework examined findings within a sample of “What Works” style reviews of preventative youth justice intervention effectiveness. “What Works” style reviews of evaluations of preventative youth justice interventions often omit the requisite details required to examine all of the necessary elements of effectiveness contained within the EMMIE framework. While effectiveness measures were typically provided, the dominant evaluation evidence-base struggles to consider moderators of effect, mechanisms of change, implementation differences and cost-effectiveness. Therefore, “What Works” samples cannot facilitate sufficient understanding of “what works for whom, in what circumstances and why'”. The authors argue that Realist Synthesis can fill this gap and shed light on the contexts that shape the mechanisms through which youth justice interventions work. The authors extended the approach adopted by an earlier review of effectiveness reviews (Tompson et al., 2020), considering more recent reviews of the effectiveness of preventative interventions using the EMMIE framework. Unlike previous reviews, the authors prioritised the utility of the EMMIE framework for assessing the factors affecting the effectiveness of preventative interventions in youth justice.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-04-2022-0014
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Teen firearm access during COVID: a repeated cross-sectional analysis of
           Pennsylvania families

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      Authors: Lacey Nicole Wallace
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate patterns in adolescent gun access and household gun storage in 2021 and 2022. Data were collected from two cross-sectional surveys of Pennsylvania parents with a teenage child at home. The results indicated that about 20% of gun owners in each survey stored their guns loaded; a similar percentage stored their guns unlocked. Very few gun owners reported that their children could access their guns without adult supervision. This study found no change in gun storage practices between 2021 and 2022, but higher rates of gun ownership in 2022. The factors associated with gun storage behaviors did change between the two time points. COVID-related uncertainties and transitions in the household were linked to gun ownership and less safe storage practices in 2021, but not in 2022. This study identified factors associated with teen gun access at distinct points during the pandemic. This study found little evidence of any association between child mental health and household firearm storage.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-07-27
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-05-2022-0018
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Retailers’ perceptions of the effectiveness of CPTED-based techniques in
           reducing shoplifting: the case of Istanbul

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      Authors: Mine Özaşçılar
      Abstract: Shoplifting has become a widespread crime problem worldwide. The study aims to investigate retailers’ perceptions of the effectiveness of crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED)-based techniques to prevent shoplifting in Istanbul. Data collection involved 370 face-to-face interviews with store managers at shopping malls in Istanbul by using a structured, self-explanatory questionnaire. The current study applies CPTED approach to measure the effectiveness of informal and formal surveillance techniques. The results revealed that store managers perceived awareness of sales staff as the most effective CPTED-based approach to prevent shoplifting. The study identified six factors underlying perceived effectiveness of CPTED-based techniques: surveillance (informal surveillance), image/maintenance and surveillance (formal surveillance), territoriality, surveillance (formal surveillance), surveillance (mechanical surveillance) and target hardening. No research to date has addressed the effectiveness of CPTED-based techniques in Turkey at shopping malls. Given the limited number of prior research, the results provide important insights regarding the perceived effectiveness of CPTED-based techniques.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-07-21
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-08-2021-0035
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Perceived neighborhood crime and health: a multilevel analysis for Turkey

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      Authors: Tekin Kose , Nur Orak
      Abstract: Crime has notable impacts on health outcomes of individuals through various pathways. This study aims to explore relationships between perceived neighborhood crime and health statuses of individuals in Turkey. This study combines individual- and household-level data from a national household survey and regional-level data for empirical analyses. A multilevel estimation framework is used for quantification of associations between a perceived neighborhood crime indicator and an individual-level health status index. Empirical findings indicate that perceived neighborhood crime level has a negative relationship with health indexes of Turkish individuals. Additionally, health index is significantly associated with individual- and household-level covariates. Public policies for health and safety improvements should consider heterogeneities in characteristics of individuals and households in developing regions of the world. Earlier findings on associations of crime and health measures mostly rely on evidence from developed regions of the world. This research complements the related literature by providing empirical analysis of associations between perceived neighborhood crime and health outcomes for a developing country, Turkey.
      Citation: Safer Communities
      PubDate: 2022-07-21
      DOI: 10.1108/SC-08-2021-0034
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Safer Communities

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