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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Journal of Public Mental Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.3
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1746-5729 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8731
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Facilitating free and paid vaccine acceptance in Malaysia: effectiveness
           of vaccine and fear of COVID-19

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      Authors: Soon Li Lee
      Abstract: This study aims to examine how demographic and psychological predictors of free and paid vaccine acceptance operate within an infectious environment. The psychological predictors were derived from the protection motivation theory (PMT), including the appraised effectiveness of vaccine in containing the pandemic and the fear of COVID-19. A representative data set that consists of responses from 2,850 Malaysians was used in this study. Multi-level modelling was used to analyse the data. Results indicated that the acceptance of free and paid vaccination did not differ by region. This suggests that the effects of the included psychological predictors on vaccine acceptance are independent from the environment. Malaysians are more likely to endorse both free and paid vaccination when it is perceived as effective in controlling the pandemic. When the vaccine is deemed as an effective preventive of COVID-19, Malaysians tend to seek free vaccination. Although fear of COVID-19 did significantly predict the endorsement of vaccination, it is a weaker predictor than the perceived effectiveness of vaccine. This research used a large representative data set and the PMT framework in addressing vaccine acceptance in Malaysia.
      Citation: Journal of Public Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-04-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMH-06-2021-0076
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Editorial

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      Authors: Neil Quinn , Julian Ashton
      Abstract: Editorial
      Citation: Journal of Public Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMH-06-2022-156
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Impact on community members of a culturally appropriate adaptation of a
           social and emotional well-being intervention in an aboriginal community

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      Authors: Julia Anwar-McHenry , Lesley Murray , Catherine F. Drane , Julie Owen , Amberlee Nicholas , Robert J. Donovan
      Abstract: Indigenous Australians report mental health problems at a much higher rate than non-Indigenous Australians. However, rather than more services, it has been proposed that there should be a positive, socially based approach to improving mental health in Indigenous communities. The population-wide Western Australian Act-Belong-Commit mental health promotion campaign appeared to be consistent with such an approach. Hence, after consultation with Indigenous community members, a culturally adapted version of the campaign was developed and launched in a largely Indigenous remote Australian community. A survey of Indigenous community members was conducted two years later to assess campaign impact. The aim of this paper is to report on the impact on community members of this cultural adaptation. Intercept interviews were conducted with Indigenous community members (n = 31) to assess respondents’ awareness of the campaign elements and activities, understanding of campaign messages and whether respondents had undertaken activities to improve their own or their family’s social and emotional well-being as a result of the campaign. There was universal awareness of the adapted campaign in this sample, with 81% reporting doing something for their own social and emotional well-being, 74% reporting doing something for the social and emotional well-being of their family or friends and 48% reporting doing something for community well-being, as a result of campaign exposure. The cultural adaptation of the Act-Belong-Commit campaign in the Australian Roebourne community is the first reported Indigenous adaptation of a population-wide mental health promotion campaign.
      Citation: Journal of Public Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-04-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMH-09-2021-0109
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Ethnic mental health inequalities and mental health policies in England
           1999-2020

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      Authors: Basharat Hussain , Ada Hui , Stephen Timmons , Kennedy Nkhoma
      Abstract: This paper presents a thematic synthesis of mental health policies published in England from 1999 to 2020. This paper aims to present a thematic synthesis of mental health policies published in England from 1999 to 2020. The authors specifically focus on ethnicity-related mental health issues highlighted in policies, policy recommendations and performance measurements of policy implementation. Findings from this synthesis demonstrate that ethnic mental health inequalities remain comparable over the past two decades. Ongoing issues include a lack of data on the ethnicity of mental health services users. Where data is available, these highlight ethnic inequalities in access to, experiences of and outcomes of mental health services, as well as a lack of cultural capability in health-care professionals. Policy recommendations have also remained the same during this time and include: collecting data on the ethnicity of service users, raising awareness of the cultural needs of Black and Minority ethnic populations amongst health-care professionals, recruiting BME staff into mental health care services and improving community engagement. The synthesis identified poor indicators of performance measurement on policy implementation and weak monitoring regimes. The synthesis identified poor indicators of performance measurement on policy implementation and weak monitoring regimes. This paper presents a thematic synthesis of mental health policies published in England from 1999 to 2020.
      Citation: Journal of Public Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-03-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMH-06-2021-0080
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Gender differences in use of suicide crisis hotlines: a scoping review of
           current literature

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      Authors: Lauren Sealy Krishnamurti , Lindsey L. Monteith , Ian McCoy , Melissa E. Dichter
      Abstract: Little is known about the gender profile of callers to crisis hotlines, despite distinct gender differences in suicide risk and behavior. The authors assessed current knowledge of the role of caller gender in the use of crisis hotlines for suicide, specifically whether there are differences in frequency, reason for call and caller outcomes by gender. The authors conducted a scoping literature review of peer-reviewed studies published since 2000 in Medline, PubMed and PsychInfo, examining a total of 18 articles based on 16 studies. Overall, women represent a higher percentage of calls to crisis hotlines worldwide, despite men having higher rates of suicide. Primary reasons for calling hotlines were the same for men and women, regardless of geography or culture. When gender differences in reason for call were reported, they were consistent with literature documenting gender differences in the prevalence of risk factors for suicide, including higher rates of substance use among men and higher instances of domestic violence/abuse among women. There was variability in the studies the authors examined. This review was limited to research on crisis telephone hotlines and did not include text or chat services. Due to data reporting, the findings are constrained to reporting on a male/female gender binary. Findings on gender differences in crisis line use suggest a need for continued research in this area to determine how to best meet the needs of callers of all genders.
      Citation: Journal of Public Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-03-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMH-10-2021-0136
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Content analysis of reports of student suicide deaths in South African
           print medium newspapers

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      Authors: Lieketseng Yvonne Ned , Willie Tafadzwa Chinyamurindi , Jason Bantjes
      Abstract: The aim was to assess the quality of newspaper reporting of university student suicides in South Africa, using the World Health Organisation guidelines. Suicide among university students is a growing public health problem. The media has an important role to play in preventing student suicides by adhering to international best practice guidelines on ethical reporting of suicides. This study conducted a content analysis of print medium newspaper articles in the 13 most widely read English language South African newspapers from the period of January 2017 to January 2020. The initial search yielded a total of 28 news reports, of which 19 met this study’s inclusion criteria and were analysed using content analysis. The quality of reporting showed both potentially harmful and helpful characteristics. Poor adherence to international reporting guidelines were found in the description of method and location of suicide, sensational headlines, publishing photos of the deceased, linking suicide to criminality, simplistic narration of the life events leading to the suicide and use of sensational and potentially triggering language. No reports adhered to all reporting guidelines. Findings suggests that there are widespread potentially unhelpful practices in the reporting of student suicides and a need for suicide prevention experts to work with journalists to promote critical reflexivity and ethical reasoning when writing about student suicides. This study only included news reports published in English in the most widely read newspapers. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study of its kind to systematically examine media reporting on suicide in South Africa.
      Citation: Journal of Public Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMH-10-2021-0129
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • What do we know about the mental health of porn performers' A
           systematic literature review

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      Authors: Hannes Jarke
      Abstract: Much has been debated about the impact pornography has on the health of those who consume it. But how is it affecting the people starring in it' Performing in porn is a unique profession which requires a person to have sex with other–often unfamiliar–people in front of a camera for a living comes with various kinds of stigma, and is accompanied by several health risks for professionals and amateurs. This brief report aims to compile available evidence on the mental health of performers in porn. This paper uses the PRISMA approach to systematically review existing research from health sciences and psychology to provide an overview of what is known about mental health in porn performers. Only three US studies examine the topic and none of them are recent, which may be because of porn performers being a population which has been described as hard to reach for researchers. The existing knowledge on performers’ mental health is inconclusive at best, but points towards significantly poorer mental health and higher prevalence of mental disorders in some, but not others. New general research on the topic is needed to close this gap; more importantly, granular investigation into which populations are at risk of developing poor mental health and because of which circumstances are needed as a basis to support vulnerable performers. The lack of insights into the mental health of performers may be related to prevailing stigma. This should be investigated. No sufficient evidence exists to inform policy which could improve performers’ mental health or prevent mental ill-health. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first systematic review compiling existing evidence on mental health of porn performers. An approach to address the lack of research is proposed.
      Citation: Journal of Public Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-01-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMH-07-2021-0083
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Suicide as a medical education curricular topic: a documentary analysis of
           Brazilian federal medical schools

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      Authors: Thiago Aguiar Jesuino , Mariana Camelier-Mascarenhas , Thaiane Santos Ferreira , Júlia Barreto de Farias , Leticia de Oliveira Lima , Ivete Maria Santos Oliveira
      Abstract: Physicians worldwide need to be able to identify and assess suicide risk or behavior in their consults. The proper training of medical staff is an important form of suicide prevention, especially because 80% of the patients who died by suicide were in contact with a health-care service in the year of their death. The purpose of this study is to verify if some of the most important Brazilian medical schools includes discussions regarding suicide in their curricula, and describe them. The study performed a documentary analysis of all Brazilian federal higher education institutions. The analysis involved selecting the institutions that approached the topic of suicide in their curricula, and sorting it by keywords. The curricula that contained such keywords were then entirely read, analyzed and all components found were described regarding course period, workload and approach. Within the 68 analyzed institutions, 19 (28%) included suicide in their curricula with a total of 31 components approaching suicide among them. Those components belonged to different stages of the course and had different workloads and approaches. A total of seven different approaches were identified: Clinical (54.8%); Emergency (16.1%); Medical Psychology (9.7%); Ethics (6.5%); Social (6.5%); Occupational (3.2%) and Forensic (3.2%). To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the study is the first to address medical education regarding suicide in a large number of Brazilian institutions. It is also one of the few studies worldwide to quantify suicide discussion on a large number of institutions using documentary analysis.
      Citation: Journal of Public Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-01-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMH-07-2021-0087
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • “You cannot pour from an empty cup!”: child well-being service
           providers’ and policymakers’ professional supervision, coping and
           well-being during COVID-19

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      Authors: Dimitar Karadzhov , Jennifer C. Davidson , Graham Wilson
      Abstract: This paper aims to present findings from 440 responses regarding the experiences of supervision, coping and well-being of 83 service providers and policymakers from eight countries working to support children’s well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. A smartphone survey hosted on a custom-built app was used. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The data were gathered in the last quarter of 2020. While most respondents described the supervision they received as “useful” – both personally and professionally – and reported several characteristics of effective supervision practices, concerns about not receiving optimal support were also voiced. Respondents shared a range of stress management and other self-care practices they used but also revealed their difficulties optimally managing the stresses and anxieties during the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, some respondents shared they were feeling helpless, unmotivated and unproductive. Yet, overall, responses were imbued with messages about hope, perseverance and self-compassion. Using a bespoke smartphone app, rich and intimate insights were generated in real time from a wide range of professionals across high- and low- and middle-income countries – indicating the need to better support their well-being and service delivery.
      Citation: Journal of Public Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-01-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMH-08-2021-0095
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The impact of mental health information overload on community education
           programs to enhance mental health-care seeking

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      Authors: Andrea B. Bink , Patrick Corrigan
      Abstract: Education programs seek to increase the public’s mental health literacy so they are better able to, among other things, help others engage in care when in need. This task may be diminished when such programs overwhelm participants with too much information. In addition, participants might arrive to the program with information overload related to the covered health topic. Information overload about health topics has been shown to influence attitudes and behavioral intentions. The overall purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between mental health information overload, topic interest, and care seeking recommendations. The current study tested a path suggesting high mental health information overload diminishes interest in learning about mental health, which in turn reduces recommendations to others to seek appropriate help when in need. Participants completed online measures of mental health information overload, topic interest and recommendations for care seeking. The data set analyzed represents valid responses from 221 participants. Structural equation modeling was completed to confirm the path model hypothesized for this study. Structural equation modeling showed satisfactory fit and significant betas for the hypothesized path. This study adds to the emerging literature on the impact of health information overload and is the first to the best of the authors’ knowledge to measure mental health information overload. Program developers should consider information overload in the ongoing development of public mental health education programs.
      Citation: Journal of Public Mental Health
      PubDate: 2021-11-19
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMH-06-2021-0077
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of interventions to reducing screen time in
           children: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

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      Authors: Duygu Akçay , Nuray Barış
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of interventions focused on reducing screen time in children. Studies that aim to investigate the effects of interventions aimed at reducing the time spent in front of the screen (i.e. screen time). A Random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled standard mean differences. The outcome was to evaluate the screen time in children in the 0–18 age range. A subgroup analysis was performed to reveal the extent to which the overall effect size varied by subgroups (participant age, duration of intervention and follow). For the outcome, the meta-analysis included 21 studies, and the standard difference in mean change in screen time in the intervention group compared with the control group was −0.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], −0.21 to −0.12) (p < 0.001). The effect size was found to be higher in long-term (=7 months) interventions and follow-ups (p < 0.05). Subgroup analysis showed that a significant effect of screen time reduction was observed in studies in which the duration of intervention and follow-up was =7 months. As the evidence base grows, future researchers can contribute to these findings by conducting a more comprehensive analysis of effect modifiers and optimizing interventions to reduce screen time.
      Citation: Journal of Public Mental Health
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMH-03-2021-0039
      Issue No: Vol. 21 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Journal of Public Mental Health

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