A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Integrated Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.275
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 18  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 5 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1476-9018 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8685
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Shared leadership in integrated care networks: the case of “hub
           and spoke” networks in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) in the
           English NHS

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Steve Willcocks, Edward Joshua Willcocks
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore leadership in the context of the hub and spoke network in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) in the English National Health Service (NHS). This paper is a conceptual paper using literature relating to the antecedents of shared leadership and relevant policy documents pertaining to both NHS policy and the development of OMFS. The paper is informed, theoretically by the conceptual lens of shared leadership. The paper identifies the challenges that may be faced by policymakers and those involved in the hub and spoke network in developing shared leadership. It also reveals the implications for policymakers in developing shared leadership. The paper is conceptual. It is acknowledged that this is a preliminary study and further work will be required to test the conceptual framework empirically. The paper discusses the policy implications of developing leadership in the hub and spoke network. As networks are of interest internationally this has wider relevance to other countries. There is limited research on the antecedents of shared leadership. In addition, the conceptual framework is applied to a new policy context.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2023-01-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-11-2022-0058
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • A co-production approach to exploring an integrated service model in UK
           local authorities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Parisa Diba, Jonathan Bowden, Andrew Divers, Beth Taylor, Dorothy Newbury-Birch, Jonathan Ling
      Abstract: Integrated service models aim to simplify access, enable effective delivery, remove duplication and provide a holistic and person-centred approach. This project explored the development of integrated well-being services in two local authorities in North-East England. The purpose of this paper is to address this issue. Underpinned by public health and co-production approaches, the project utilised a mixed-methods approach. Data were collected via online surveys (n = 95), virtual interviews with members of the local population (n = 8) and practitioners and commissioners (n = 8) to explore needs for a new service. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes and issues. Several benefits of an integrated service were highlighted by both staff and service users, with a central anticipated benefit being the provision of holistic care. Improvement in information sharing was also seen to increase the efficiency of services and communication barriers between services. Beneficial aspects and barriers related to the COVID-19 pandemic on current service provision were reported that have informed our future recommendations. The authors’ findings provide a much deeper insight into function, care, social inclusion and ongoing support needs, from both the perspectives of staff and service users. Service users and staff saw value in an integrated model for themselves, as well as the wider community. The authors’ findings indicate that the integrated service model is a promising one for the development of services within local authorities.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2023-01-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-06-2022-0031
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Knowledge management in a regional integrated health and social care
           system

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tuomas Hujala, Harri Laihonen
      Abstract: This article analyses a major healthcare and social welfare reform establishing new regional and integrated wellbeing services counties in Finland. The authors approach the reform and service integration as a knowledge management (KM) issue and analyse how KM appears and contributes in the context of integrated care, specifically in the process of integrating social and health care. The article analyses the case organisation's KM initiatives in light of the integrated care literature and recognises the tasks and requirements for effective KM when building integrated health and social care system. The empirical research material for this qualitative study consisted of the case organisation's strategy documents, the results of an external maturity assessment, KM workshop materials and publicly available documentation of the Finnish health and social care reform. This study identifies the mechanisms by which KM can support health and social services integration. At the macro level, national coordination and regional co-operation require common information structures. At the meso level, a shared regional strategy with shared objectives guides both organisational decision-making and collaboration between professionals. At the micro level, technology supported and data-driven planning of service chains complements the experiences of professionals and may help remove obstacles to integration. This study contributes to the literature on integrated care by providing a more comprehensive view of the role and tasks of knowledge and KM when reforming health and social services than approaches focussing solely on health informatics and internal efficiency.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2023-01-02
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-06-2022-0032
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Priorities in integrating primary and secondary care: a multimethod study
           of GPs

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shane Dunlea, Geoff McCombe, John Broughan, Áine Carroll, Ronan Fawsitt, Joe Gallagher, Kyle Melin, Walter Cullen
      Abstract: Throughout the world, healthcare policy has committed to delivering integrated models of care. The interface between primary–secondary care has been identified as a particularly challenging area in this regard. To that end, this study aimed to examine the issue of integrated care from general practitioners’ (GPs) perspectives in Ireland. This multimethod study involved a cross-sectional survey and semi-structured interviews with GPs in the Ireland East region. A total of 1,274 GPs were identified from publicly available data as practising in the region, of whom the study team were able to identify 430 GPs with email addresses. An email invite was sent to 430 potential participants asking them to complete a 34-item online questionnaire and, for those who were willing, an in-depth interview was conducted with a member of the study team. In total, 116 GPs completed the survey. Most GPs felt that enhancing integration between primary and secondary care in Ireland was a priority (n = 109, 93.9%). Five themes concerning the state of integrated care and initiatives to improve matters were identified from semi-structured interviews with 12 GPs. The uniqueness of this study is that it uses a multimethod approach to provide insight into current GP views on the state of integrated care in Ireland, as well as their perspectives on how to improve integration within the Irish healthcare system.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-12-16
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-06-2022-0030
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Perceptions towards integrated care through the narrative of practicing
           social workers and psychologists in PHC: a cross-case analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nadezhda Ryapolova, Jerome T. Galea, Karah Y. Greene
      Abstract: In a collective effort to build a patient-centered and coordinated health care system, social workers and psychologists are being progressively introduced to primary health care (PHC) settings worldwide. The present study aims to explore the current status of integration through the narrative of social workers and psychologists in PHC settings in Kazakhstan. In this paper purposive snowball sampling was utilized to recruit social workers and psychologists who work, or used to work, in PHC settings since the onset of integration in Nur-Sultan for participation in an in-depth interview. A semistructured interview guide was based on normalization process theory (NPT). Interviews were conducted via video conference, in Russian language, lasted no more than 50 min, and transcribed verbatim. Cross-case analysis of eight cases was performed using NPT constructs. Cross-case analysis included findings from the interviews from five social workers and three psychologists. Four major constructs of implementation process from NPT were reflected in the findings: coherence (believes integration improves patient care, functions within integrated care), cognitive participation (individual changes to role performance, mechanisms of work), collective action (status of support from stakeholders, cooperation within a multidisciplinary team) and reflective monitoring (existing mechanisms for monitoring the integration). Despite organizational integration, there is a lack of successful clinical integration of social workers and psychologists in PHC settings of Kazakhstan, which is manifested by a lack of understanding of responsibilities and functions of these mental health care specialists. Consensus was reached by all participants that both social workers and psychologists are valuable assets in a multidisciplinary team. The present study contributes to the current knowledge of integrated PHC service delivery by addressing the status of integrated care in Kazakhstan from interviews with key stakeholders in social work and mental health. Moving forward, improvements are needed to (1) establish the monitoring mechanism to evaluate the status of integration, (2) enhance effective collaboration within multidisciplinary teams in PHC settings and (3) increase awareness among medical workers and community members on mental health issues and the available support offered by social workers and psychologists to promote quality of life in a holistic, integrated manner.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-12-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-08-2022-0042
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Women living with HIV, diabetes and/or hypertension multi-morbidity in
           Uganda: a qualitative exploration of experiences accessing an integrated
           care service

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marie Claire Annette Van Hout, Flavia Zalwango, Mathias Akugizibwe, Moreen Namulundu Chaka, Charlotte Bigland, Josephine Birungi, Shabbar Jaffar, Max Bachmann, Jamie Murdoch
      Abstract: Women experience a triple burden of ill-health spanning non-communicable diseases (NCDs), reproductive and maternal health conditions and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa. Whilst there is research on integrated service experiences of women living with HIV (WLHIV) and cancer, little is known regarding those of WLHIV, diabetes and/or hypertension when accessing integrated care. Our research responds to this gap. The INTE-AFRICA project conducted a pragmatic parallel arm cluster randomised trial to scale up and evaluate “one-stop” integrated care clinics for HIV-infection, diabetes and hypertension at selected primary care centres in Uganda. A qualitative process evaluation explored and documented patient experiences of integrated care for HIV, diabetes and/or hypertension. In-depth interviews were conducted using a phenomenological approach with six WLHIV with diabetes and/or hypertension accessing a “one stop” clinic. Thematic analysis of narratives revealed five themes: lay health knowledge and alternative medicine, community stigma, experiences of integrated care, navigating personal challenges and health service constraints. WLHIV described patient pathways navigating HIV and diabetes/hypertension, with caregiving responsibilities, poverty, travel time and cost and personal ill health impacting on their ability to adhere to multi-morbid integrated treatment. Health service barriers to optimal integrated care included unreliable drug supply for diabetes/hypertension and HIV linked stigma. Comprehensive integrated care is recommended to further consider gender sensitive aspects of care. This study whilst small scale, provides a unique insight into the lived experience of WLHIV navigating care for HIV and diabetes and/or hypertension, and how a “one stop” integrated care clinic can support them (and their children) in their treatment journeys.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-12-02
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-06-2022-0033
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • An evaluation of speech and language therapy services for people with long
           COVID in the UK: a call for integrated care

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katie Chadd, Sophie Chalmers, Kate Harrall, Kathryn Moyse, Gemma Clunie
      Abstract: Long COVID is a complex and highly heterogeneous condition with a variable symptom profile, and calls have been made for an integrated care approach to be taken for its management. To date, no studies have explored speech and language therapy services or needs associated with long COVID. This service evaluation aimed to gauge the level of demand on speech and language therapy services for individuals with long COVID in the UK; their clinical needs, the organisational arrangements of services and the barriers and facilitators of delivering quality care. A service evaluation was undertaken via distribution of an online survey to speech and language therapists (SLTs) receiving referrals for individuals with long COVID. Analysis was completed using descriptive statistics, with thematic analysis to evaluate qualitative data. One hundred and eleven SLTs responded. Eighty-six percent were seeing individuals with long COVID in their “everyday” service, in uni- or multi-disciplinary teams, without any “dedicated” resource. Dysphagia and dysphonia were the most reported symptoms. Most respondents (66.7%) indicated the individuals they were seeing were of working age, and that an individuals' speech and language therapy needs were impacting their wellbeing. Perceived barriers to quality care included fragmented and non-integrated care pathways. Multi-disciplinary and integrated working was a key enabler. This study provides novel insights into the current speech and language therapy needs of and care pathways for individuals with long COVID in the UK SLTs have unique expertise and are integral to supporting individuals with long COVID and should be a part of integrated care teams.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-11-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-07-2022-0038
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • “Unchaining the doctor from the desk”: deliberate
           team-based care in action

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Caroline Robertson, Tabitha Jones, Philippa Southwell
      Abstract: As a model of integrated care (IC), deliberate team-based care (DTBC) can help address workforce shortages facing rural communities by improving the health and wellbeing of healthcare providers. This study focuses on a GP practice implementing DTBC in rural Australia. The aim of this research was to understand the perspectives of the healthcare workers involved and to ascertain factors impacting on the day to day running of the model, patient care and clinician work-life. The authors conducted a qualitative study on the experiences of the DTBC workers. Team members were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews (n = 9). Interviews were analysed using an iterative thematic analysis, summarised, collated and explored for emergent themes. Key themes included: creating change from old ways of doing things, development and implementation processes outlining how the model evolved and how it ran from day to day, model outcomes for patients and clinicians, as well as practical considerations like funding, technology and time. Building DTBC from the ground up has produced a high functioning team who demonstrate trust and equality, share information freely and all have a voice which is heard and respected. By acting as a champion and a leader, the GP has created a psychologically safe environment allowing the team to share knowledge, collaborate in problem solving and provide effective patient care which is holistic and community grounded. This work environment holds promise for creating improved work-life for rural clinicians and potential for workforce retention.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-03-2022-0020
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A qualitative exploratory study of training requirements for general
           practitioners attending older people resident in care homes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sarah Ruaux, Neil Chadborn
      Abstract: Older people who reside in care homes have varying access and quality of medical care; in the UK, this is provided by general practitioners (GPs). The authors aimed to explore the experiences of trainee GPs in delivering integrated care and discuss, with senior GPs, opportunities to improve training. Two trainees and thirteen senior GPs were recruited through professional networks and participated in semi-structured interviews. Transcriptions were analysed using thematic analysis, and the theory of negotiated order was used to interpret findings. Trainees received no specific training on working with care homes. Exposure to the care home setting was variable, and could be negligible, depending on the GP practice placement. Senior GPs expressed concerns about patient safety, due to practical challenges of the consultation and a sense of lack of control. Considering the theory of negotiated order, where GPs had trusting relationships with care home staff, the input of the staff could mitigate the sense of risk. Care plans could communicate needs and preferences within the team and may be a way of extending the negotiated order, for example giving care homes authority to implement end-of-life care when the GP is not present. The authors identified a need for trainees to engage with the organisational aspect of the care home to deliver integrated care. Trusted relationships with staff led to improved consultations, care plans, and better management of risk. This is the first study of learning needs for GP trainees to provide integrated care for older care home residents.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-11-2021-0060
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Interdependencies or integration' A qualitative evaluation of a
           national emergency department improvement programme

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katie Jones, Jaynie Y. Rance
      Abstract: In Wales (United Kingdom (UK)), a programme known as the emergency department quality and delivery framework (EDQDF) was launched in 2018 with the purpose of designing a framework of what good looks like for emergency care and then implementing this framework in a measurable and sustainable way. A gatekeeper emailed attendees of the EDQDF launch event (n = 70), providing recipients with an information sheet and inviting them to contact the researcher (KJ) if they agreed to be interviewed. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with all respondents (n = 8) after three invitation rounds sent between August and October 2021. The authors used a thematic analysis approach (Braun and Clarke, 2006). Participants agreed with the aims and design of the framework, and the authors identified four themes relating to barriers and to facilitators of implementation. Participants perceive a softening of geographical boundaries through the project, but findings correspond with evidence generated elsewhere regarding emergency departments’ (EDs') system-wide interdependencies and a need for cross-organisational collaboration. A quality improvement method for health services known as CAREMORE® is found to be a useful approach for the collaborative design of service improvements. Participants perceive a softening of geographical boundaries through the project, but the interviews correspond with evidence generated elsewhere regarding EDs' system-wide interdependencies and a need for cross-organisational collaboration. This evaluation relies on a relatively small number of participants, but as a qualitative evaluation it does not aim towards broadly generalisable findings but rather contributes to broad field concerned with the production of knowledge on the implementation of health service improvements. The project under evaluation is also on-going, and the findings reflect the period from inception to December 2021, but not beyond that date. This evaluation builds upon previous work in relation to the application of CAREMORE to design a quality improvement framework in a complex area (see Nelson et al., 2018), but this evaluation considers the implementation process. The findings echo research elsewhere and add to a growing body of research that underlines system interconnectivities that impact upon the emergency department.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-04-2022-0026
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Crisis and mental health of working women: risk factors and integrated
           care interventions based on organizational, individual, and institutional
           partnership

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Salima Hamouche
      Abstract: Crises can weigh heavily on individuals' mental health. COVID-19 is a crisis that has shaken humanity, plunging it into a great wave of fear, ambiguity and uncertainty, due to its novelty and rapid spread, as well as lethality. Mental health disparities between women and men have widened as a result of this pandemic. Stress factors have multiplied, especially among working women, making them more psychologically vulnerable than they were before this pandemic and easy prey to psychological distress. This emphasized the importance of having integrated care interventions that take into consideration the organizational context, with gendered lenses. This paper discusses the relationship between COVID-19 and psychological distress among women in the workforce. It presents the main sources of stress and addresses integrated care interventions that can help to prevent psychological distress among women. This paper is a viewpoint and critique of the recent literature. Interventions based on a partnership between employers, employees, and government, including health and social services are needed to prevent mental health problems among women in the workplace that can result from crises. In this case, a gendered approach as well as an optimization of the use of new technologies should be favored. There is little focus on the development of integrated care approaches to address psychological distress among working women in times of crisis and beyond. This paper helps to expand the scope of integrated care to work-related mental health research by exploring the impact of an unprecedented health crisis on a vulnerable group that suffers from disparities in mental health. It also provides insights into preventive interventions, built upon an integrated care approach, based on a tripartite partnership between working women, employing organizations, and governmental institutions, facilitated by the integration of new technologies. By doing this, the author aims to contribute to the prevention of mental health issues that can result from this crisis.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-06-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-02-2022-0014
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Healthcare provider selection for elderly patients suffering from NCD's:
           an analysis with the combined approach of DEMATEL and AHP

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ankit Singh, Ajeya Jha, Shankar Purbey, Priya Ravi
      Abstract: Elderly patients suffering from non-communicable disease face a dilemma in the selection of healthcare providers. This study attempts to identify the key variables playing a crucial role and identify the appropriate healthcare destination with the help of a combination of Decision-making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) and analytic hierarchy process (AHP) techniques. The primary objective is to introduce the DEMATEL and AHP as efficient decision-making methods to choose the right healthcare provider for elderly patients suffering from non-communicable diseases. An integrative approach utilizing DEMATEL and AHP is used to reach the ideal solution for healthcare provider selection decisions. The DEMATEL approach is used to segregate the cause and effect variables. Similarly, the AHP is used to identify the weights of the top five cause-inducing variables, and the paired comparison method is used to select the healthcare provider. The variables such as dependency on family members, easily accessible services, and patient autonomy play a vital role in the selection decision of healthcare providers in elderly patients suffering from non-communicable diseases. In terms of priority, home healthcare should be considered the preferred provider for elderly patients suffering from non-communicable diseases followed by neighbourhood registered medical practitioners and hospitals. This is the first of its kind study which has attempted to solve the healthcare provider selection decision with the combined approach of DEMATEL and AHP.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-11-2021-0056
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Does a discharge to assess programme introduced in England meet the
           quadruple aim of service improvement'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stuart Jeffery, Julie MacInnes, Lavinia Bertini, Susie Walker
      Abstract: This paper intends to examine and evaluate the implementation and delivery of a discharge to assess pathway based on the UK Department of Health and Social Care Hospital Discharge Policy in relation to the quadruple aim of healthcare improvement: improving patient experience, reducing costs, benefiting the wider population and improving the work life of staff. Using a place based partnership in the south of England, 18 staff involved the delivery of discharge to assess and four patients who had recently been through the pathway were interviewed and the narratives analysed using a framework method. All four dimensions of the quadruple aim were felt to be positively impacted by the discharge to assess pathway in varying degrees. Staff described improvements to working lives; patients described a positive experience. There was no evidence of reduced costs and wider benefit through reduced length of stay was suggested rather than demonstrated. The study showed a need to ensure both information flows and discharge process are smooth, that there is sufficient community capacity and capability, a need for strong relationships and shared goals, for clarity of pathway and empowered staff, and for an avoidance of the over prescription of care. The revised discharge to assess pathway in England has been in place since 2020 and no other assessments of the pathway were found that related the changes to the quadruple aim framework.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-06-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-02-2022-0018
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A delicate balance: how physicians manage change towards collaborative
           care within their institutions

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Debbie Vermond, Esther de Groot, Niek de Wit, Dorien Zwart
      Abstract: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, in 2020–2022, the immutable and fragmented character of our healthcare system changed. Healthcare professionals and their institutional leads proved remarkably agile and managed to change toward collaborative care. The purpose of this paper is to examine experiences with collaborative practice in healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic in two regions in the Netherlands, to explore and understand the relationship between policy and practice and the potential development of new collaborative care routines. Using a methodology informed by theories that have a focus on professional working practice (so called “activity theory”) or the institutional decision-makers (discursive institutionalism), respectively, the perspective of physicians on the relationship between policy and practice was explored. Transcripts of meetings with physicians from different institutions and medical specialities about their collaborative COVID-19 care were qualitatively analysed. The findings show how change during COVID-19 was primarily initiated from the bottom-up. Cultural-cognitive and normative forces in professional, collaborative working practice triggered the creation of new relationships and sharing of resources and capacity. The importance of top-down regulatory forces from institutional leads was less evident. Yet, both (bottom-up) professional legitimacy and (top-down) institutional support are mentioned as necessary by healthcare professionals to develop and sustain new collaborative routines. The COVID-19 crisis provided opportunity to build better healthcare infrastructure by learning from the responses to this pandemic. Now is the time to find ways to integrate new ways of working initiated from the bottom-up with those longstanding ones initiated from top-down. This paper presents a combination of theories for understanding collaboration in healthcare, which can inform future research into collaborative care initiatives.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-09-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-04-2022-0027
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Integration, population commissioning and prison health and well-being –
           an exploration of benefits and challenges through the study of
           telemedicine

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chantal Edge, Nikki Luffingham, Georgia Black, Julie George
      Abstract: This paper seeks to understand relationships between prison healthcare and integrated care systems (ICS), including how these affect the delivery of new healthcare interventions. It also aims to understand how closer integration between prison and ICS could improve cross system working between community and prison healthcare teams, and highlights challenges that exist to integration between prison healthcare and ICS. The study uses evidence from research on the implementation of a pilot study to establish telemedicine secondary care appointments between prisons and an acute trust in one English region (a cross-system intervention). Qualitative interview data were collected from prison (n = 12) and community (n = 8) healthcare staff related to the experience of implementing a cross-system telemedicine initiative. Thematic analysis was undertaken on interview data, guided by an implementation theory and framework. The research found four main themes related to the closer integration between prison healthcare and ICS: (1) Recognition of prison health as a priority; (2) Finding a way to reconcile networks and finances between community and prison commissioning; (3) Awareness of prison service influence on NHS healthcare planning and delivery; and (4) Shared investment in prison health can lead to benefits. This is the first article to provide research evidence to support or challenge the integration of specialist health and justice (H&J) commissioning into local population health.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-06-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-11-2021-0055
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Link workers, activities and target groups in social prescribing:
           a literature review

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Denis Rothe, Raffael Heiss
      Abstract: Social prescribing is a model of integrated care, in which primary healthcare staff can link patients to the social care sector. However, social prescribing can occur in different forms. To better understand the concept of social prescribing, this literature review examines the role of the link workers, activities and target groups. A literature review was conducted. Studies before May 2020 were considered. In total, 1,700 studies were identified using the databases Pubmed, PsycInfo, Cinahl, Web of Science and Cochrane Library. After eligibility checks, 16 studies were included in the final analysis. A few studies warned of a deeper engagement of the link worker due to service dependency, but most studies encouraged an active and supportive role of the link worker. Participants engaged in social, physical and counseling activities. The majority of studies emphasized the importance of linking group activities with personal preferences and identity needs. The main target groups were composed of individuals with psychosocial needs, but some studies also included patients with physical or mental illnesses. Social prescribing is widely advocated as an innovative model of integrated care. However, few studies have looked into the complex system of social prescribing. This study analyzes the linking processes, activities and target groups in extant social prescribing programs.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-02-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-09-2021-0047
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 5 (2022)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.212.99.248
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-