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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Bakti Budaya     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access  
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access  
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 279)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 132)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access  
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access  
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access  
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 113)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Social Work / Maatskaplike Werk     Open Access  
Social Work and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Social Work With Groups     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Socialinė teorija, empirija, politika ir praktika     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 97)
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal of Integrated Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.275
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 18  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 4 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1476-9018 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8685
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Auditing integrated stroke care to support quality improvement
           activities: development of a peer-to-peer audit framework

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      Authors: Bianca Buijck , Bert Vrijhoef , Monique Bergsma , Diederik Dippel
      Abstract: To organize stroke care, multiple stakeholders work closely together in integrated stroke care services (ISCS). However, even a well-developed integrated care program needs a continuous quality improvement (CQI) cycle. The current paper aims to describe the development of a unique peer-to-peer audit framework, the development model for integrated care (DMIC), the Dutch stroke care standard and benchmark indicators for stroke. A group of experts was brought together in 2016 to discuss the aims and principles of a national audit framework. The steering group quality assurance (SGQA) consisted of representatives of a diversity of professions in the field of stroke care in the Netherlands, including managers, nurses, medical specialists and paramedics. Auditors, coordinators and professionals evaluated the framework, agreed on that the framework was easy to use and valued the interesting and enjoyable audits, the compliments, feedback and fruitful insights. Participants consider that a quality label may help to overcome necessity issues and have health care insurers on board. Finally, a structured improvement plan after the audit is needed. An audit offers fruitful insights into the functioning of an ISCS and the collaboration therein. Best practices and points of improvement are revealed and can fuel collaboration and the development of partnerships. Innovative cure and care may lead to an increasing area of support among professionals in the ISCS and consequently lead to improved quality of delivered stroke care.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2022-01-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-06-2021-0033
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Editorial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...
      Editorial
      Axel Kaehne
      Journal of Integrated Care, Vol. 30, No. 1, pp.1-2 Journal of Integrated Care 2022-01-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-01-2022-083
      Issue No: Vol. 30 , No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Homelessness and integrated care: an application of integrated care
           knowledge to understanding services for wicked issues

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      Authors: Michael Clark, Michelle Cornes, Martin Whiteford, Robert Aldridge, Elizabeth Biswell, Richard Byng, Graham Foster, James Sebastian Fuller, Andrew Hayward, Nigel Hewett, Alan Kilminster, Jill Manthorpe, Joanne Neale, Michela Tinelli
      Abstract: People experiencing homelessness often have complex needs requiring a range of support. These may include health problems (physical illness, mental health and/or substance misuse) as well as social, financial and housing needs. Addressing these issues requires a high degree of coordination amongst services. It is, thus, an example of a wicked policy issue. The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenge of integrating care in this context using evidence from an evaluation of English hospital discharge services for people experiencing homelessness. The paper undertakes secondary analysis of qualitative data from a mixed methods evaluation of hospital discharge schemes and uses an established framework for understanding integrated care, the Rainbow Model of Integrated Care (RMIC), to help examine the complexities of integration in this area. Supporting people experiencing homelessness to have a good discharge from hospital was confirmed as a wicked policy issue. The RMIC provided a strong framework for exploring the concept of integration, demonstrating how intertwined the elements of the framework are and, hence, that solutions need to be holistically organised across the RMIC. Limitations to integration were also highlighted, such as shortages of suitable accommodation and the impacts of policies in aligned areas of the welfare state. The data for this secondary analysis were not specifically focussed on integration which meant the themes in the RMIC could not be explored directly nor in as much depth. However, important issues raised in the data directly related to integration of support, and the RMIC emerged as a helpful organising framework for understanding integration in this wicked policy context. Integration is happening in services directly concerned with the discharge from hospital of people experiencing homelessness. Key challenges to this integration are reported in terms of the RMIC, which would be a helpful framework for planning better integrated care for this area of practice. Addressing homelessness not only requires careful planning of integration of services at specific pathway points, such as hospital discharge, but also integration across wider systems. A complex set of challenges are discussed to help with planning the better integration desired, and the RMIC was seen as a helpful framework for thinking about key issues and their interactions. This paper examines an application of integrated care knowledge to a key complex, or wicked policy issue.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2021-06-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-03-2021-0012
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Leadership challenge: lateral systems integration for healthcare

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      Authors: Livia Martin
      Abstract: Government imperatives that drive integrated care are challenging corporate executive leadership. Conspicuous by its absence in both government's imperatives and the literature, is any reference to corporate executive leadership in transitioning a hierarchically oriented health system to a laterally integrated health system referred to, in this paper, as an integrated health system. This lack of reference to executive leadership involvement conveys either significant consequences or opportunities for corporate healthcare executives. The purpose of this qualitative, multi-case study is to explore corporate executive leadership in transitioning a hierarchically oriented health system to an integrated health system. Between December 2017 and February 2018, a qualitative methodology and multi-case study design facilitated one hour telephone interviews with 11 presidents and four senior vice presidents. Critical case sampling was used to select the study sample from a target population of 246 corporate healthcare executives representing Ontario's major acute healthcare organizations/systems. Corporate healthcare executives possess the requisite skills and knowledge to transition a hierarchically oriented to a laterally integrated the health system but are constrained by an undefined partnership role with government and fear of government changes. This paper provides corporate executive leaders with a systematic leadership approach to organizational readiness, in transitioning to an integrated health system. Features and outcomes of the approach are illustrated.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2021-04-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-12-2020-0074
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Multiagency working between children's social care and schools during
           COVID-19: case study experiences from English local authorities and
           international reflections

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      Authors: Mary Baginsky, Jill Manthorpe
      Abstract: A multiagency approach to supporting and enhancing child welfare lies at the heart of policies and practice in England and many other countries. The assumption is that if professionals together from different disciplines share their knowledge and skills this will lead to better outcomes for children and their families. The COVID-19 pandemic interrupted the “normal practice” of such arrangements. This research explored how the pandemic's disruption led to new ways of communicating and professional behaviour, while exploring the potential for longer-term impact in England and other jurisdictions. Case studies were conducted in 2020 in five English local authorities to explore how schools worked with Children's Social Care and other professionals during the COVID-19 period. It was supplemented by a survey of schools and discussions with and reflections from those with relevant experience in five other countries. Many schools played an extended role in supporting vulnerable and “in need” families during this period. Children's Social Care recognised their contributions and the improved communication achieved, although schools were divided over whether relationships had improved. Most communication and meetings were online; while benefits were noted there were concerns for families who were digitally disadvantaged. The work provides a contemporary picture of multiagency work during the 2020 pandemic and identifies factors which may shape this work in the future in England and internationally.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2021-04-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-01-2021-0004
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Making a difference: workforce skills and capacity for integrated care
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Joy Akehurst, Paul Stronge, Karen Giles, Jonathon Ling
      Abstract: The aim of this action research was to explore, from a workforce and a patient/carer perspective, the skills and the capacity required to deliver integrated care and to inform future workforce development and planning in a new integrated care system in England. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups with primary, community, acute care, social care and voluntary care, frontline and managerial staff and with patients and carers receiving these services were undertaken. Data were explored using framework analysis. Analysis revealed three overarching themes: achieving teamwork and integration, managing demands on capacity and capability and delivering holistic and user-centred care. An organisational development (OD) process was developed as part of the action research process to facilitate the large-scale workforce changes taking place. This study did not consider workforce development and planning challenges for nursing and care staff in residential, nursing care homes or domiciliary services. This part of the workforce is integral to the care pathways for many patients, and in line with the current emerging national focus on this sector, these groups require further examination. Further, data explore service users' and carers' perspectives on workforce skills. It proved challenging to recruit patient and carer respondents for the research due to the nature of their illnesses. Many of the required skills already existed within the workforce. The OD process facilitated collaborative learning to enhance skills; however, workforce planning across a whole system has challenges in relation to data gathering and management. Ensuring a focus on workforce development and planning is an important part of integrated care development. This study has implications for social and voluntary sector organisations in respect of inter-agency working practices, as well as the identification of workforce development needs and potential for informing subsequent cross-sector workforce planning arrangements and communication. This paper helps to identify the issues and benefits of implementing person-centred, integrated teamworking and the implications for workforce planning and OD approaches.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2021-03-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-05-2020-0030
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Bumpy road: implementing integrated psychiatric and somatic care in
           joint-specialty emergency departments: a mixed-method study using
           Normalization Process Theory

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      Authors: Pia Vedel Ankersen, Rikke Grynderup Steffensen, Emely Ek Blæhr, Kirsten Beedholm
      Abstract: Life expectancy is 15–20 years shorter for individuals with than for people without mental illness. Assuming that undiagnosed and undertreated somatic conditions are significant causes, the Central Denmark Region set out to implement joint psychiatric and somatic emergency departments (EDs) to support integrated psychiatric/somatic care as an effort to prolong the lifetime of individuals with mental illness. Through the lens of Normalization Process Theory, the authors examine healthcare frontline staff’s perceptions of and work with the implementation of integrated psychiatric/somatic care in the first joint-specialty ED in Denmark. A single-case mixed-methods study using Normalization Process Theory (NPT) as an analytic framework to evaluate implementation of psychiatric/somatic integrated care (IC) in a joint-specialty emergency department. Data were generated from observations, qualitative interviews and questionnaires distributed to the frontline staff. Implementation was characterized by a diffuse normalization leading to an adaption of the IC in a fuzzy alignment with existing practice. Especially, confusion among the staff regarding how somatic examination in the ED would ensure prolonged lifetime for people with mental illness was a barrier to sense-making and development of coherence among the staff. The staff questioned the accuracy of IC in the ED even though they recognized the need for better somatic care for individuals with mental illness. This study highlights that a focus on outcomes (prolonging lifetime for people with mental illness and reducing stigmatization) can be counterproductive. Replacing the outcome focus with an output focus, in terms of how to develop and implement psychiatric/somatic IC with the patient perspective at the center, would probably be more productive. In 2020, the Danish Health Authorities published new whole-system recommendations for emergency medicine (EM) highlighting the need for intensifying integrated intra and interorganizational care including psychiatric/somatic IC (ref). Even though this study is not conclusive, it points to subjects that can help to identify resources needed to implement psychiatric/somatic IC and to pitfalls. The authors argue that the outcome focus, prolonging the lifetime for individuals with mental illness by identifying somatic illness, was counterproductive. In accordance with the recommendations of contemporary implementation studies, the authors recommend a shift in focus from outcome to output focus; how to develop and implement psychiatric/somatic IC.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2021-03-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-07-2020-0047
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Coordination of paediatric oncology care: an explorative Swedish case
           study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Christian Gadolin, Erik Eriksson, Patrik Alexandersson
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to empirically describe and analyze factors deemed to be relevant for the successful provision of coordinated paediatric oncology care by physicians and nurses involved. A qualitative case study primarily consisting of interviews. The paper's findings indicate that certain factors (i.e. distinct mission, clear treatment protocols and support from external stakeholders) relevant for the provision of coordinated paediatric oncology care have not received sufficient attention in previous research. In addition, emphasis is placed on the necessity of facilitating constructive working relationships and a bottom-up perspective when pursuing improved care coordination. The factors described and analyzed may act as insights for how paediatric oncology might be improved in terms of care coordination and thus facilitate care integration. In addition, the paper's findings identify factors relevant for further empirical studies in order to delineate their generalizability.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2021-03-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-10-2020-0063
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Measuring integrated care at the interface between primary care and
           secondary care: a scoping review

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      Authors: Aimee O'Farrell, Geoff McCombe, John Broughan, Áine Carroll, Mary Casey, Ronan Fawsitt, Walter Cullen
      Abstract: In many healthcare systems, health policy has committed to delivering an integrated model of care to address the increasing burden of disease. The interface between primary and secondary care has been identified as a problem area. This paper aims to undertake a scoping review to gain a deeper understanding of the markers of integration across the primary–secondary interface. A search was conducted of PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane Library and the grey literature for papers published in English using the framework described by Arksey and O'Malley. The search process was guided by the “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses” (PRISMA). The initial database search identified 112 articles, which were screened by title and abstract. A total of 26 articles were selected for full-text review, after which nine articles were excluded as they were not relevant to the research question or the full text was not available. In total, 17 studies were included in the review. A range of study designs were identified including a systematic review (n = 3), mixed methods study (n = 5), qualitative (n = 6) and quantitative (n = 3). The included studies documented integration across the primary–secondary interface; integration measurement and factors affecting care coordination. Many studies examine individual aspects of integration. However, this study is unique as it provides a comprehensive overview of the many perspectives and methodological approaches involved with evaluating integration within the primary–secondary care interface and primary care itself. Further research is required to establish valid reliable tools for measurement and implementation.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2021-03-19
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-11-2020-0073
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Preconditions to implementation of an integrated care process programme

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      Authors: Angela Bångsbo, Anna Dunér, Synneve Dahlin Ivanoff, Eva Lidén
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the preconditions of a full-scale implementation of an integrated care process programme for frail older people from the staff's understanding, commitment and ability to change their work procedures with comparisons over time and between organisations. A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted in a hospital, municipal health and social care setting. Staff commitment decreased to the importance of a permanent municipal contact from baseline compared to the 12-months follow-up (p = 0.02) and the six- and 12-months follow-up (p = 0.05), to the information transfer from emergency department from the six- to the 12-months follow-up (p = 0.04), to discharge planning at the hospital at six- and 12-months follow-up (p = 0.04) and towards discharge planning at home from baseline to the six-month follow-up (p = 0.04). Significant differences occurred between the organisations about information transfer from the emergency department (p = 0.01) and discharge planning at home (p = 0.03). The hospital staff were the most committed. The results can guide the implementation of complex interventions in organisations with high-employee turnover and heavy workload. The study design, allowing the comparison of implementation results over time and between organisations in a later phase, gives this study a unique perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2021-02-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-06-2020-0035
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Enablers and barriers in adopting a reablement model of domiciliary care

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      Authors: Erin King, Alys Young
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore the effectiveness of reablement as an outcome-focussed commissioning model within the English domiciliary care market from the perspective of two private domiciliary care agency (PDCA) managers/owners within one local authority (LA) in the North West of England. Specifically, it focusses on owner/managers' perceived ability to effect change from a dependency to a reablement model within the English domiciliary care market. Qualitative interviews with two contrasting owners/managers of PDCAs within one LA in the North West of England were carried out. Explorative analysis followed a constructionist grounded theory methodology. Findings revealed how two main factors interacted to effect change from a dependency model to a reablement model of domiciliary care: internal organisational structure and individual emotional investment of the owners/managers. Additionally, fiscal and external organisational systems impact on these drivers, and are perceived to act as potential barriers to the adoption of a reablement model of domiciliary care by PDCAs. Although based on only two idiographic accounts, the findings shed light on the policy and practice of commissioning models of domiciliary care within England and suggest further studies in this area of practice.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2021-02-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-07-2020-0045
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The impact of structural changes to community nursing services on the rate
           of emergency hospital use of older people: a longitudinal ecological study
           of based on 140 primary care trusts in England

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Steven Wyatt, Robin Miller, Peter Spilsbury, Mohammed Amin Mohammed
      Abstract: In 2011, community nursing services were reorganised in England in response to a national policy initiative, but little is known about the impact of these changes. A total of three dominant approaches emerged: (1) integration of community nursing services with an acute hospital provider, (2) integration with a mental health provider and (3) the establishment of a stand-alone organisation, i.e. without structural integration. The authors explored how these approaches influenced the trends in emergency hospital admissions and bed day use for older people. The methodology was a longitudinal ecological study using panel data over a ten-year period from April 2006 to March 2016. This study’s outcome measures were (1) emergency hospital admissions and (2) emergency hospital bed use, for people aged 65+ years in 140 primary care trusts (PCTs) in England. The authors found no statistically significant difference in the post-intervention trend in emergency hospital admissions between those PCTS that integrated community nursing services with an acute care provider and those integrated with a mental health provider (IRR 0.999, 95% CI 0.986–1.013) or those that did not structurally integrate services (IRR 0.996, 95% CI 0.982–1.010). The authors similarly found no difference in the trends for emergency hospital bed use. PCTs were abolished in 2011 and replaced by clinical commissioning groups in 2013, but the functions remain. The authors found no evidence that any one structural approach to the integration of community nursing services was superior in terms of reducing emergency hospital use in older people. As far as the authors are aware, previous studies have not examined the impact of alternative approaches to integrating community nursing services on healthcare use.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2021-01-20
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-09-2020-0056
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Challenges and chances for local health and social care integration –
           Lessons from Greater Manchester, England

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      Authors: Ming-Fang Chang
      Abstract: Sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs) were introduced to England, asking 44 local areas to submit their health and social care plans for the period from October 2016 to March 2021. This study aims to offer a deeper understanding of the complex structure in the local practice, and to discuss the associated challenges and chances. Documentary analysis, qualitative interviews and questionnaire survey are used for this study. Findings have been compared and analysed thematically. The study participants reported that apart from pooled budgets, past collaborative experience and local leadership are crucial elements for transforming health and social care integration in Greater Manchester (GM). Also, this study provides policy recommendations to promote effective collaborative partnerships in local practices and mitigate local inequity of funding progress. The findings of this paper cannot be extrapolated to all stakeholders due to the limited samples. Meanwhile, some of the discussions about the case of GM may not be transferrable to other STPs. This study argues that the success of pooled budgets is the result, rather than the cause, of effective negotiations between various stakeholders; and therefore, there is no evidence suggesting that pooled budgets can resolve the discoordination of health and social care. Moreover, due to the bottom-up approach adopted by STPs, more effective boroughs tend to receive additional funding, resulting in an increasing gap of development between effective and ineffective boroughs.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2021-12-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-07-2021-0040
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • What are the priorities for the future development of integrated care'
           A scoping review

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Corey Burke , John Broughan , Geoff McCombe , Ronan Fawsitt , Áine Carroll , Walter Cullen
      Abstract: “Integrated care” (IC) is an approach to health and social care delivery that aims to prevent problems arising from fragmented care systems. The collective content of the IC literature, whilst valuable, has become extensive and wide-ranging to such a degree that knowing what is most important in IC is a challenge. This study aims to address this issue. A scoping review was conducted using Arksey and O'Malley's framework to determine IC priority areas. Twenty-one papers relevant to the research question were identified. These included studies from many geographical regions, encompassing several study designs and a range of populations and sample sizes. The findings identified four priority areas that should be considered when designing and implementing IC models: (1) communication, (2) coordination, collaboration and cooperation (CCC), (3) responsibility and accountability and (4) a population approach. Multiple elements were identified within these priorities, all of which are important to ensuring successful and sustained integration of care. These included education, efficiency, patient centredness, safety, trust and time. The study's findings bring clarity and definition to what has become an increasingly extensive and wide-ranging body of work on the topic of IC. Future research should evaluate the implementation of these priorities in care settings.
      Citation: Journal of Integrated Care
      PubDate: 2021-08-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JICA-01-2021-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Journal of Integrated Care

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