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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.79
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 39  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0037-8046 - ISSN (Online) 1545-6846
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [424 journals]
  • Quiet Quitting

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      Pages: 5 - 7
      Abstract: Over the past few months, I have heard more and more in the media about quiet quitting. Headlines in the news include questions such as “What Is ‘Quiet Quitting’' and Why It’s Trending on Social Media” (Bretous, 2022), “Is Quiet Quitting Real'” (Harter, 2022), and “What Is ‘Quiet Quitting’ and How It May Be a Misnomer for Setting Boundaries at Work” (Kilpatrick, 2022).
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac051
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Examining Historical and Contemporary Policing Disparities in the Black
           Community: Implications for Social Work

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      Pages: 8 - 17
      Abstract: AbstractAn alarming number of unarmed Black men and women have been killed by police in the United States. Though research suggests that police violence is not a new phenomenon in Black communities in the United States, several shocking high-profile incidents of unarmed Black people killed by police in recent years have catapulted this problem more sharply into our nation’s consciousness. Despite recent efforts to engage in critical discourse about police violence against unarmed Black people in mainstream media and across multiple disciplines, limited research exists on the connection between historical and contemporary acts of police violence in Black communities. This article conducts a critical analysis of the extant literature on historical and contemporary policing in the Black community and identifies linkages between these time periods using critical race theory. This article concludes with implications for social work to combat the issue of police violence in Black communities.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac049
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • An Examination of Suicidal Behavior among Black College Students with
           Exposure to Police Violence

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      Pages: 18 - 27
      Abstract: AbstractThere is limited research about suicidal behaviors among Black emerging adults (peak age of suicide risk) who report exposure to police violence. The current study applies an integrated approach to examine individual, immediate environment, and community-based risk and protective factors of suicide among Black college students who reported previous exposure to police violence. A purposive sample of Black college students (N = 300) was analyzed using bivariate analyses and binary logistic regression. Outcome variables investigated were lifetime suicidal ideation and suicide attempt. Twenty-eight percent of participants reported lifetime suicidal ideation and 14 percent reported lifetime attempts. Female students were significantly more likely to report lifetime suicidal ideation and recent symptoms of anxiety and to engage in emotional social support than male peers. Logistic regression results demonstrated that higher income and greater depression symptoms were associated with lower reporting of lifetime suicidal ideation. Reporting of more grit, the trait of perseverance and passion for long-term goals, was associated with a lower reporting of both lifetime suicidal ideation and suicide attempt. Findings have implications for how social workers in higher education are encouraged to address suicidal behavior among Black students, including the cultivation of grit.
      PubDate: Fri, 11 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac046
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • African-Centered Social Work in the 21st Century: A Content Analysis

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      Pages: 28 - 37
      Abstract: AbstractEndorsement of African-centered theory and practice are widespread within Black communities across the United States. The usage of African-centered frameworks is also common among many Black social workers. However, past research suggests that African-centered theory and subsequent models of practice are marginalized within social work literature and curricula. Since advocacy began for the inclusion of African-centered approaches to practice during the mid to late 1990s, there have been no strategic analyses tracing how African-centered scholarship has advanced within social work. This study sought to examine to what extent the African-centered framework is included within scholarship among prominent social work journals. A content analysis was conducted of articles in six major social work journals published between 2000 and 2019. A total of 42 articles met the criteria for inclusion. While there has been a level of change in the number of published articles of African-centered social work, findings suggest that relative to other practice modalities/models, African-centered scholarship is noticeably lacking in social work literature. The article concludes with implications to advance culturally responsive research and practice with communities of African descent.
      PubDate: Sat, 29 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac041
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Social Work and Social Justice: A Conceptual Review

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      Pages: 38 - 46
      Abstract: AbstractAs a profession, social work has codified within its ethical guidance and educational policies a commitment to social justice. While a commitment to social justice is asserted in several of our profession’s guiding documents, social work continues to lack consensus on both the meaning and merit of social justice, resulting is disparate and sometimes discriminatory practice even under a “social justice” label. This study examines how social justice has been operationalized in social work via a conceptual review of the literature. Findings show that social work leans heavily on John Rawls’s definition of social justice, Martha Nussbaum’s and Amartya Sen’s capabilities approach, and the definition of social justice included in The Social Work Dictionary. Unfortunately, none of these adequately align with the National Association of Social Workers’ Code of Ethics, which drives the profession. This conceptual review is a call to social workers to join together in defining the guiding principle of the profession.
      PubDate: Wed, 02 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac042
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • The Experiences of Caretaking and Financial Stress among Social Workers
           during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Pages: 47 - 56
      Abstract: AbstractSocial workers have engaged in promotive, preventive, and intervention work throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Given that social workers are disproportionately women, and the essential nature of practice during the pandemic, how social workers experience caretaking and financial stressors warrants examination. Data are drawn from a larger cross-sectional survey of U.S.-based social workers (N = 3,118) conducted from June to August 2020. A convergent mixed-methods design included thematic content analysis and univariate, ordinal, and linear regression models. The sample was 90 percent female; average age was 46.4 years. Although 44 percent indicated moderate or significant caretaking stress, results varied by race/ethnicity, workplace setting, and age. Social workers of color were more likely to report caretaking (p < .001) and financial stress (p < .001) compared with White counterparts. Social workers in children/family services were more likely to report increased financial stress (p < .004). Older age was protective for both caretaking (p < .001) and financial stress (p < .001). Three distinct subthemes were found in caretaking stress (work/life balance, safety concerns, and positionality) and two in financial stress (uncertainty and absence of workplace recognition). Understanding workforce stressors may help organizations and policymakers better support an essential workforce integral to the United States’ COVID-19 response and recovery.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac040
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Brokering Resources during a Pandemic: Exploring How Organizations and
           Clinics Responded to the Needs of Immigrant Communities during COVID-19

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      Pages: 57 - 67
      Abstract: AbstractThough COVID-19 has had sweeping implications, many immigrant groups in the United States have been disproportionately affected. The purpose of the present study is to explore the impact of COVID-19 on immigrant communities and how local immigrant-serving organizations (ISOs) have responded during the pandemic. The authors conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with executive directors and program coordinators of 31 ISOs and health clinics in Kentucky, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Findings highlight the needs of immigrants and refugees during the pandemic, including economic burden, lack of information, and limited access to testing and treatment for COVID-19. The authors find that ISOs have responded to these needs by providing basic supports, partnering with other local organizations to channel needed resources to immigrant communities, and collaborating with state-level entities to improve outreach, testing, and treatment. The authors also identify mechanisms that enabled the organizations to make nimble accommodations during the pandemic as well as the burden and compromises that these organizations have experienced. The authors argue that ISOs represent an important aspect of safety nets available for immigrants and provide insights into how other organizations can prepare for public health crises like COVID-19 in the future.
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac048
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • On the Frontlines: The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Social
           Workers’ Well-Being

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      Pages: 69 - 80
      Abstract: AbstractThe crisis created by the spread of COVID-19 brought increasing needs and referrals to social welfare services in many countries. However, at the same time, social services suffered from staff cutbacks and service closures, resulting in significant workload increases to address the hardships associated with the pandemic. This article investigates the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Israeli social workers’ well-being, using a mixed-methods design with a sample of 2,542 licensed social workers. Findings show that over 70 percent of social workers suffered from at least one health problem related to their work. Path analysis findings indicated that social workers who experienced greater service restrictions reported a greater decrease in job satisfaction and experienced higher levels of stress and work-related problems. Machine learning emotion-detection analysis revealed that the pandemic affected their lives, causing feelings of fear, frustration, and sadness. This article demonstrates how social workers whose work was characterized by greater service restrictions were less satisfied with their jobs, more stressed, and experienced greater job-related health problems, and concludes with a discussion of the implications for social work practice in times of crisis.
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac050
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Predicting Intimate Partner Violence Reassault and Homicide: A
           Practitioner’s Guide to Making Sense of Predictive Validity Statistics

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      Pages: 81 - 85
      Abstract: A key issue for social workers intervening with clients who use or experience intimate partner violence (IPV) is understanding the likelihood of future reassault and potential lethality. IPV risk assessments (IPVRAs) have been developed to predict future assault among people who have perpetrated IPV (for a review of IPVRAs see Graham et al., 2019). Although IPV survivors can accurately predict future IPV (Cattaneo & Goodman, 2003), they are less likely to accurately predict lethal IPV (Campbell et al., 2009), and IPVRAs are more accurate than practitioner judgment (Dayan et al., 2013). Social workers should consider incorporating IPVRAs as part of an evidence-based practice (Messing, 2019). Yet, the research behind IPVRAs can be hard to decipher. Therefore, after briefly discussing factors to consider in IPVRA selection, this practice update aims to help social work practitioners make sense of IPVRA predictive validity using intimate partner homicide as an example outcome.
      PubDate: Fri, 11 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac044
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Forget the “Five Stages”: Ask the Five Questions of Grief

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      Pages: 86 - 88
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has inflicted widespread loss, most notably as the result of over 1 million deaths; however, we are also mourning lost jobs, relationships, schooling, security, rituals of transition (e.g., graduations, marriages, funerals), and a sense of security. Now more than ever, social workers must be prepared to assist grievers compassionately and competently.
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac047
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Beyond Ramps, Curb Cuts, and Captions: A Call for Disability Justice in
           Social Work

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      Pages: 89 - 92
      Abstract: In the United States and Canada, the adult disability community numbers 27 percent and 16 percent to 33 percent of the population, respectively (Statistics Canada, 2017; Varadaraj et al., 2019). Despite decades of advocacy, Disabled people continue to experience ableism—such as inaccessibility, stigma, and exclusion—in all realms of social work (Slayter & Johnson, 2022). In this Commentary, we use a mix of identity-first disability language and person-first disability language. In keeping with the guidelines of the American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines, we acknowledge that different members of the disability community may have different choices about how they wish to be referred to; APA (n.d.) offers a discussion on the subject. Additionally, when we speak of “Disability culture,” it is inclusive of neurodivergence, chronic illness, chronic pain, mental illness, madness, and so forth. As Disabled social work professionals and accomplices, we call on our nondisabled colleagues to develop their Disability cultural competence and to make inclusion and antiableism priorities in our field.
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac045
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Reenvisioning Therapy with Women of Color: A Black Feminist Healing
           Perspective. Lani V. Jones

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      Pages: 93 - 94
      Abstract: Reenvisioning Therapy with Women of Color: A Black Feminist Healing Perspective. JonesLani V.. NASW Press, 2020. 160 pages. ISBN: 978-0-87101-552-5. $32.99, paperback ($28.00 eBook).
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac043
      Issue No: Vol. 68, No. 1 (2022)
       
 
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