A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.79
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 37  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0037-8046 - ISSN (Online) 1545-6846
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Social Work’s Role in Rebuilding the Child Welfare Workforce

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dunnigan A; Scheyett A.
      Pages: 205 - 206
      Abstract: There has been a great deal of discussion in academia and the media about how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the workforce. Many question whether these changes are permanent shifts in who is working, how we work, and how we balance work and the rest of our lives. These are important conversations at all levels. At the individual level it is an opportunity to reprioritize and engage in self-reflection. At the organizational level it is an opportunity to rethink expectations about in-office versus remote work. Some initial consequences of this individual and organizational shift have been called the “Great Resignation” or the “Turnover Tsunami” (Maurer, 2021). What remains to be seen is where those who leave their jobs go; whether they remain in the workforce; and how, if at all, organizations modify their recruitment and retention efforts.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac019
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Effects of Trauma and Postmigration Stress on Refugee Women’s Health: A
           Life Course Perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sangalang C; Vang C, Kim B, et al.
      Pages: 207 - 217
      Abstract: AbstractTrauma exposure and postmigration stress are associated with adverse health outcomes among refugees, yet the relative effect of these factors for subgroups of refugees and those resettled long-term remains unclear. Drawing on life course theory, this study evaluated the associations between war trauma, postmigration stress, and health among Southeast Asian refugee women in the United States, and whether these patterns differ across the life span. A community sample of Vietnamese and Cambodian refugee women aged 30–72 years (N = 293) reported mental and physical health outcomes, conflict-based trauma exposure, and postmigration measures of discrimination and community violence. Both trauma exposure and discrimination were associated with mental and physical health problems, with the relative effect of each stressor varying across specific health outcomes; community violence was associated with poorer mental health. Age moderated the effect of trauma exposure across health outcomes, with stronger associations between trauma and health for older women in particular. Findings provide support for the influence of trauma exposure and the importance of postmigration stressors on health across the life span for refugees. Attending to age group differences in the effects of these stressors, and to subgroups such as women, has implications for interventions addressing the long-term health of refugee populations.
      PubDate: Mon, 06 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac026
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The COVID-19 Pandemic: Health Impact on Unaccompanied Migrant Children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Siegel J.
      Pages: 218 - 227
      Abstract: AbstractFrom the point of apprehension by U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the U.S.–Mexican border to their reunification with sponsors in U.S. communities, unaccompanied children (UC) face political, social, and economic conditions, heightening their risk for mental and physical health burdens that may be exacerbated during the COVID-19 pandemic. Such risk underscores the importance of social work practice and advocacy for the improved treatment and experiences of UC. This article uses a structural vulnerability conceptual lens to summarize the existing literature regarding UC and argues that UC’s liminal immigration status, economic precarity, and lack of healthcare access place this group at high structural vulnerability during the pandemic. Further, this article identifies and describes three contexts of structural vulnerability of UC that are important points of social work intervention: (1) at the border, where migrant children are denied their legal right to seek protection; (2) in detention and shelter facilities; and (3) during reunification with sponsors. This article concludes with important practice and policy opportunities for social workers to pursue to obtain social justice for an important and highly vulnerable migrant child population.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac014
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The Impact of Psychological Capital on Well-Being of Social Workers:
           A Mixed-Methods Investigation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ho H; Chan Y.
      Pages: 228 - 238
      Abstract: AbstractSocial workers are often faced with long working hours, high job demands, and poor work–life balance, which can have detrimental effects on their well-being. It is therefore important to identify the protective factors that enable social workers to flourish and thrive. Psychological capital (PsyCap) is conceptualized as a higher-order core construct that encompasses hope, efficacy, resilience, and optimism. This study aims to investigate the impact of PsyCap on social workers’ well-being and explore the underlying mechanisms of this relationship. It expands the literature by adopting a multifaceted model of well-being, accounting for the temporal order of variables, including a qualitative component, and examining the effects of PsyCap in an at-risk occupation. A two-wave prospective survey with a three-month interval was conducted with a sample of 400 full-time social workers in Hong Kong, followed by individual in-depth interviews. The quantitative results showed that PsyCap was positively associated with job satisfaction and positive affect, and negatively associated with negative affect and psychological and physical distress. The qualitative results showed that the components of PsyCap share problem-focused processes with cognitive, conative, and affective functions. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed in relation to the social services industry.
      PubDate: Tue, 10 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac020
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • A U.S. Truth and Reconciliation Commission: Social Work’s Role in
           Racial Healing

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Androff D.
      Pages: 239 - 248
      Abstract: AbstractA U.S. truth and reconciliation commission (TRC) can advance racial justice by acknowledging the historical trauma tied to the United States’ legacy of slavery and subsequent racism. This truth telling can facilitate a national reckoning with the past and set the stage for social transformation. This article aims to present insights into how such a U.S. TRC might work. It begins by defining TRCs and exploring their theoretical foundation of restorative justice. It connects TRCs to aspects of social work practice, including human rights-based approaches, trauma-informed care, and community practice. Then each of a TRC's core functions is analyzed: truth seeking, reconciliation, education, and engagement. Related topics of healing, accountability, and reparations are also discussed. The article draws from a diverse range of global experiences to emphasize lessons learned. It also highlights where local precedents in the United States have started this work, which can be drawn upon and developed further. The article concludes by noting the limitations of TRCs and calling on social workers to advocate for such a TRC to further racial justice.
      PubDate: Thu, 12 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac018
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Professional Social Work and Public Libraries in the United States: A
           Scoping Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lee S; Bae J, Sharkey C, et al.
      Pages: 249 - 265
      Abstract: AbstractThis study aims to investigate how professional social work is practiced in U.S. public libraries using a scoping review method. Following Arksey and O’Malley’s framework for conducting a scoping review, the research team undertook a scoping review of academic literature, such as peer-reviewed studies, academic conference presentations, and dissertations/theses, as well as so-called gray literature, including news articles and web search results. After every author’s review, a total of 53 materials were included in the review. The findings from this study provide evidence that collaborations between social work and libraries are documented in the academic and gray literatures, and the collaborations have been rapidly increasing since 2015. The findings also show that these collaborations tend to operate in three main ways: (1) professional social workers and social work interns directly working with library patrons, (2) professional social workers providing consultation with or training to library staff, and (3) social workers providing linkages between library staff and community-based social services agencies.
      PubDate: Thu, 19 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac025
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Finding Joy in Social Work: Practical Strategies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wolfer T; Pooler D, Graves B.
      Pages: 266 - 275
      Abstract: AbstractBased on the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotion, this article suggests that efforts by social workers to find joy in the profession may help them broaden their scope of attention, cognition, and action; build physical, intellectual, and social resources for future use; and increase resilience. This article explains Fredrickson’s broaden-and-build theory as a basis for exploring and seeking positivity and outlines several practical strategies that social workers or their leaders can adopt to promote joy and other positive emotions. The strategies can be implemented at individual or group levels in classrooms or agencies. Finally, this article considers how these strategies may contribute to social worker self-care, self-awareness, and ongoing growth and development.
      PubDate: Tue, 10 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac021
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Striving for Organizational Impact through Individual Impact: A Humanistic
           Management Approach Involving Social Work Supervisors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zheng G; Lyu X, Wang Y.
      Pages: 276 - 285
      Abstract: In today’s era of new public management, respecting the dignity and worth of social workers in organizational management poses a challenge to social work agencies. This research explores whether individual self-actualization can be integrated with organizational development by using a humanistic management approach.
      Authors sampled 672 supervisors from Chinese social work agencies. A structural equation model was built and tested to examine the relationships between four latent variables: (1) professional competence (PC), (2) organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), (3) individual impact, and (4) organizational impact, taking into account the moderating effect of professional associations. The results indicate that individual impact is a mediator between supervisors’ PC/OCBs and organizational impact. Meanwhile, professional associations play a moderating role in the relationship between supervisors’ PC and organizational impact. Findings provide the basis for a humanistic management strategy for social work agencies that focuses on the individual impact of key people to maximize organizational impact. Moreover, professional associations should strengthen the link between individual impact and organizational impact.
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac015
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Social Work and Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR): Past, Present,
           and Future

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Teixeira S; Kennedy H.
      Pages: 286 - 295
      Abstract: AbstractThe social work profession has made tremendous contributions to youth well-being, laying the foundation for social welfare systems and child protection laws. However, deficit-based constructions of youth are deeply engrained in the profession. Social work researchers have called for attention to critical approaches like youth participatory action research (YPAR). YPAR has an action-oriented epistemology and engages youth as coresearchers, providing an opportunity to shift social work research and practice paradigms. Yet, social work scholars lag behind cognate disciplines in adopting YPAR. This article examines challenges that have stymied YPAR in social work. The authors review the historical roots of the profession and its relationship to youth; examine present challenges, including social work’s training and career progression; and make suggestions for the future, calling social work to affirm our values by reevaluating the way we do research on youth, the way we train future social workers, and the paradigms driving our practice.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac016
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • It’s Time to Terminate Social Work’s Relationship with the
           Impact Factor

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dunleavy D.
      Pages: 296 - 297
      Abstract: Around this time each year stakeholders from across the publishing landscape receive the most recent data on the journal impact factor (IF). This is often followed by celebratory and congratulatory messages from journal editors and board members—who proudly announce how much their journal’s IF increased and where it now ranks relative to their disciplinary peers. These updated figures are then prominently displayed on the homepages of most journals. What’s more, these increases are often viewed as an indicator of increased quality, rigor, and merit. The discipline of social work is no exception. This is problematic, given the numerous limitations of the IF.
      PubDate: Sun, 08 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac017
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Mental Health Literacy in Sport: The Role of the Social Work Profession

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Moore M; Gorczynski P, Miller Aron C.
      Pages: 298 - 300
      Abstract: Jorm and colleagues (1997) define mental health literacy as “knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders, which aid their recognition, management, and prevention” (p. 182). In essence, mental health literacy has three main areas of concentration: (1) knowledge of mental health symptoms and disorders and strategies of self-care, (2) strategies to address public and self-stigma, and (3) pathways to improve help-seeking behaviors (Gorczynski et al., 2021; Jorm et al., 1997). Over the years, mental health literacy, like the concept of health literacy, has evolved. For much of the 20th century, mental health literacy was very reactive and solely focused on basic literacy skills, as individuals were taught to read and understand simple diagnostic information about various mental health symptoms and disorders and know where to go to access help (Gorczynski et al., 2021). Since then, mental health literacy has become proactive, as individuals are not only taught about basic diagnostic information, but also instructed on how to develop social and cognitive skills necessary to address the various determinants of mental health and advocate for change within their communities (Gorczynski et al., 2021).
      PubDate: Thu, 12 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac022
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Addiction, Stress, and Pain.
           Eric L. Garland

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Martin K; LMSW.
      Pages: 301 - 302
      Abstract: Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Addiction, Stress, and Pain. GarlandEric L.. NASW Press, 2013. 214 pages. ISBN: 978-0-87101-445-0. $40.99 paperback.
      PubDate: Tue, 10 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac024
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The Parent Effect. How Parenting Style Affects Adolescent Behavior and
           Personality Development. Joanne E. Carlson

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Smith N.
      Pages: 302 - 303
      Abstract: The Parent Effect: How Parenting Style Affects Adolescent Behavior and Personality Development.CarlsonJoanne E.. NASW Press, 2011, 242 pages. ISBN: 978-0-87101-417-7. $39.99 paperback.
      PubDate: Sun, 08 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac023
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2022)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 18.204.56.185
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-