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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.79
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 39  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0037-8046 - ISSN (Online) 1545-6846
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [423 journals]
  • Action and Thanks: A Two-Part Editorial

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      Pages: 309 - 310
      Abstract: This issue’s editorial is a bit atypical. I had planned to focus on gratitude, particularly our gratitude for outgoing book review editor, Alexa Smith-Osborne, and incoming book review editor, George Leibowitz. Then, on June 24, Roe v. Wade (1973) was overturned by the Supreme Court. As a social worker, I believe it is important to speak out on this decision and its implications.
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac037
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • When Pandemic Interferes with Work: Psychological Capital and Mental
           Health of Social Workers during COVID-19

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      Pages: 311 - 320
      Abstract: AbstractThe impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is not only limited to physical health but also extends to various aspects of everyday life. The present study proposes that the prolonged pandemic can lead to pandemic–work conflict (PWC). The article examines how the pandemic interferes with work, the association between PWC and mental health, and the underlying mechanism of this process. A total of 303 full-time social workers in Hong Kong responded to measures on PWC, psychological capital (PsyCap), and anxiety and depressive symptoms. Data were collected between February and April 2020, when the COVID-19 outbreak was beginning to worsen; 15.8 percent and 14.9 percent of the participants reported mild to severe anxiety and depression, respectively. Time-based PWC was positively associated and strain-based PWC was negatively associated with PsyCap, which was in turn negatively associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms. PsyCap was a significant mediator of these relationships. The findings suggest that the relationship between strain-based PWC and psychological distress can be explained by PsyCap, whereby the depletion of psychological resources may contribute to anxiety and depressive symptoms. Positive psychological resources may be an intervening point for promoting mental health among the social services workforce.
      PubDate: Wed, 03 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac035
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Coping and Resilience: PTSD Screening and Brief Intervention for
           Underrepresented Students at a Public University

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      Pages: 321 - 330
      Abstract: AbstractThe undetected and untreated PTSD symptoms (difficulty paying attention, nightmares and difficulty sleeping, irritability or aggression, flashbacks, diminished interest in activities, self-destructive behavior, and feeling isolated) of college students may interfere with their relationships, well-being, learning, and academic success. To examine the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of providing a short-term trauma-specific evidence-based group intervention, Coping & Resilience (C&R), an adaptation of Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS) was implemented at a large urban public university. Fifty college students (54 percent male, 90 percent students of color), with a mean PTSD symptom score of 34 at pretest (considered in the moderate range of symptom severity) participated in C&R groups. As expected, student PTSD symptoms improved after group participation. A Quade test showed a significant decrease in the scores from pretest to follow-up for PTSD and two subscales (intrusion and avoidance). Large public universities serving underrepresented students are uniquely positioned to become trauma- and resilience-informed systems and to provide trauma support services to promote student well-being.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac029
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • The Social Construction of Cannabis in Social Work

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      Pages: 331 - 340
      Abstract: AbstractThe social construction of cannabis has important implications for policy, research, practice, and education in social work. The objective of this article is to chart the construction of cannabis in articles published in social work journals across the past half century. The author critically reviews empirical articles with references to cannabis published in 15 key social work journals between 1970 and 2018. Systematic searches resulted in a combined set of 510 articles, of which 244 matched the inclusion criteria for this study. A content and thematic analysis of the corpus identified the dominant construction of cannabis in social work research literature as a harmful substance undifferentiated from other drugs. This construction was challenged by a minority of the articles in three ways: (1) by differentiating between use and abuse and between cannabis as a soft drug and a hard drug; (2) by highlighting social inequality as an important component of any consideration of social work policy and practice with regard to cannabis use; and (3) by considering the possible positive effects of cannabis use. This article calls for a revision of the construction of cannabis use in social work.
      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac030
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Anti-Asian Hatred and Japanese Parents’ Support of Their Children’s
           Acculturation to the United States

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      Pages: 341 - 350
      Abstract: This ethnographic study explores how Japanese immigrant and temporary resident parents support their children’s acculturation to U.S. society. Anti-Asian hatred is a neglected social justice issue with a long history extending to hate crimes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet the U.S. population includes an increasing number of Asian immigrants. Some of them, such as recent Japanese immigrants and temporary residents, are from majority groups in their countries of origin, and do not have cultural socialization practices to protect their children from racism and xenophobia. This article focuses on in-depth, individual interviews with 14 Japanese immigrant and temporary resident parents of children attending U.S. local schools. Parents described their cultural socialization as centering on developing a Japanese cultural self, for example, through participation in a Japanese supplementary school. Parents also reported experiences of anti-Asian racism and xenophobia, including social exclusion. However, they typically did not describe preparing children directly for responding to and coping with anti-Asian bias. Rather, they and their children took responsibility for bias directed against them, and avoided drawing attention to their differences.
      Authors discuss implications for how social workers can recognize distress in Japanese children and effectively support them and others experiencing similar acculturation challenges.
      PubDate: Sat, 23 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac033
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Social Workers as Information Navigators: Insights into the Use of the Web
           for Serving Clients

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      Pages: 351 - 361
      Abstract: AbstractSocial workers’ critical role as service navigators on behalf of their clients is expanding in the online space at a faster pace than ever before. This study examined the process and outcome of online information navigation through the lens of service providers and service users based on observational and interactive surveys. T tests and correlation results showed that human services providers demonstrated a higher capacity to visit more websites and yield more accurate search outcomes in a similar duration of time compared with general service users. Results suggest that digital literacy for navigating information online can be improved through educational opportunities. At the same time, both groups shared some common feedback on desired features for future service navigation online, including but not limited to an open search bar, search filters, instruction videos, live chat, and discussion forums for seeking mutual help and networking. The findings bear implications for formulating the roles, responsibilities, and desired competencies of social workers for online service navigation in the digital and postpandemic future.
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac028
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Social Workers’ Views of Ways to Engage Communities in Refugee
           Resettlement

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      Pages: 362 - 370
      Abstract: AbstractThe refugee crisis has been keenly felt by communities as they perceive the new arrivals as threats to the community’s resources. Preparing the community for future arrivals can help, as can involving the community in the welcoming of refugees. This study explores how social workers engage communities to support refugee resettlement programs. Social workers are on the frontlines of providing services to refugees while also managing the fears and needs of the community members. A community that was once welcoming can become reactionary and xenophobic. This is a qualitative study using the content analysis of 32 social workers in four countries: the United States, Iceland, Switzerland, and Germany. Key factors influenced social workers’ facilitation of community integration among new arrivals and community members: prior experiences with displaced populations, social workers’ expectations, and strengths within the community. Social workers need training and support to include communities in resettlement services. Training and policy implications are discussed. Communities can be a partner in the resettlement process if care is given to work with the community before the arrival of new refugees.
      PubDate: Fri, 12 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac038
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • The Nature of Social Work: An Ecocentered Analysis of Key Social Work
           Statements

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      Pages: 371 - 380
      Abstract: AbstractThis article addresses references to people’s natural environments in some of the central declarative statements that shape social work worldwide. Four types of documents were analyzed, including statements associated with the Global Definition of Social Work, the Global Standards for Social Work Education and Training, the Global Social Work Statement of Ethical Principles, and the Grand Challenges for Social Work initiative. The analysis was driven by a critical-interpretive approach, seeking explicit and possibly implied references to nature and the environment across documents, with special attention to themes concerning the relationship between micro and macro perspectives, disciplinarity and inter- or transdisciplinarity, and relations between humankind and nature. In general, direct references to social work’s possible intersections with issues related to nature and the natural environment were scarce in the materials examined. That having been said, our analysis did find that ecocentered interpretations enable locating prospective “bridges” for the incorporation of deeper ecological perceptions of social work into statements. Such findings constitute a call to action, and the possible implications of continuing to broadly disregard ecological aspects of social work in core materials published by influential professional institutions are discussed.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac027
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Social Work Licensure Portability: A Necessity in a Post-COVID-19 World

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      Pages: 381 - 390
      Abstract: AbstractCOVID-19 highlights the need for portability of social work licensure to be a priority. The Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) spearheaded some initiatives, such as the creation and promotion of the Social Work Registry and Model Social Work Practice Act, with the hope that these efforts would enhance the ability of social workers to be licensed in multiple states. Neither has solved the portability problem. Licensure endorsement, an approach historically supported by ASWB, does not have the advantages of mutual recognition that is being supported by other professions to facilitate interstate practice. This article, the first written on licensure portability in the social work scholarly literature, examines existing licensure portability models and supports the establishment of a social work interstate compact to overcome barriers to social work mobility and access to client care.
      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac031
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Advancing Sex-Positive Social Work Research and Practice

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      Pages: 391 - 393
      Abstract: There is a growing concern within social work about the absence or lack of human sexuality training and education that social workers receive, specifically about sex-positive and pleasure-inclusive sexual wellness (Dodd & Tolman, 2017; Williams et al., 2016). As Dodd (2020) described in her book Sex-Positive Social Work, “a sex-positive perspective encourages agency in sexual decision making and embraces consensual sexual activity as healthy, something to be enjoyed without stigma or shame. It embraces sexuality as a human right” (p. 3). However, the scarce training that many social workers receive regarding a limited range of sexuality issues, such as sexual assault, HIV, and pregnancy, has traditionally followed a deficit-based framework that comes from a medicalized model of conceptualizing, pathologizing, and diagnosing sexual health as a problem in need of professional evaluation, control, and treatment (Myers & Milner, 2007). A deficit-based and medicalized model of sexuality in many ways directly conflicts with national and global aims toward the advancement of holistic sexual wellness, particularly for people with marginalized identities, such as children, women, sexual and gender minority people, sex workers, people living with disabilities, and people of color (Chmielewski et al., 2020; Fritsch et al., 2016; Harden, 2014). In response to these growing demands, social workers must examine how to develop a sex-positive framework within clinical practice as well as research.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac036
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Still Matters: A Social
           Work Perspective

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      Pages: 394 - 397
      Abstract: It has been more than two decades since the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA, also referred to as “welfare reform”) replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (or AFDC) with Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) as the nation’s “welfare” program for low-income families with children. PRWORA ended entitlement to cash aid for families, added time limits and work requirements to cash assistance receipt, and converted the program into a federal block grant to the states, giving states discretion in policy design and implementation. Cash aid is now functionally inaccessible in many places, even leading commenters to declare that “welfare is dead” (Edin & Shaefer, 2015).
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac034
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Multicultural Perspectives on Race, Ethnicity, and Identity. Elizabeth
           Pathy Salett and Diane R. Koslow, Editors

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      Pages: 398 - 398
      Abstract: Multicultural Perspectives on Race, Ethnicity, and Identity.SalettElizabeth PathyKoslowDiane R., Editors. NASW Press, 2015. 212 pages. ISBN: 978-0-87101-460-3. $42.99 paperback.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac032
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Social Work Vol. 67, Nos. 1–4, January 2022–October 2022

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      Pages: 399 - 404
      Abstract: In this index, the following abbreviations are used: Jan. for January, Apr. for April, Oct. for October, C for Commentary, E for Editorial, and PU for practice update.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/sw/swac039
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 4 (2022)
       
 
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