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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Health and Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.388
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 64  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0360-7283 - ISSN (Online) 1545-6854
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [424 journals]
  • Social Policy Priorities to Promote Health and Social Work

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      Pages: 5 - 6
      Abstract: At the start of the Biden–Harris administration and the 117th Congress, the National Association of Social Workers (NASW, 2021) outlined critical policy recommendations across an array of topics in the 2021 Blueprint of Federal Social Policy Priorities. These resolutions were developed through an evidence-based lens closely aligned with the Grand Challenges for Social Work supported by the profession (American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare, 2017). These policy priorities recognize that social workers perform essential functions in mental, behavioral, and physical healthcare within varied settings and among diverse populations across the country. The 2021 blueprint frames health in a comprehensive manner wherein mental and behavioral health are regarded as essential elements in one’s overall health and wellness.
      PubDate: Sat, 10 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hsw/hlac039
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Universal Basic Income: A Synopsis for Social Work

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      Pages: 7 - 10
      Abstract: Whenever changes to “economic production and social reproduction” hamper effectiveness of existing ways to satisfying society’s needs, welfare states are expected to respond (Zutavern & Kohli, 2010). However, the welfare state in the United States has been characterized as reluctant and exceptional due to the extent that it leaves basic needs unmet. Recently, even welfare states in other leading global nations have shown signs of faltering; for instance, Shahidi and colleagues (2019) found that social welfare is associated with adverse health outcomes and that social assistance recipients exhibit worse health outcomes relative to similar nonrecipients in many countries. Like other systems, welfare states and even their flagship programs must evolve with macro socioeconomic changes. In this column, I introduce an intervention strategy gaining traction through a growing number of pilot projects across the United States, universal basic income (UBI). Then, I discuss early research that is linking UBI to beneficial health outcomes. Finally, I address the question, “How might social work think about UBI'”
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hsw/hlac040
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Education Moderates the Association between Depressive Symptoms and
           Self-Rated Health among Older Adults with Cancer

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      Pages: 11 - 20
      Abstract: AbstractThis study examined the association between depressive symptoms and self-rated health (SRH) and whether and how such association varies by education among older adults with cancer. Data came from the 2019 National Health Interview Survey. A total of 2,470 participants aged 65 or older who had been diagnosed with cancer by a doctor or other health professional were included in this study. Ordinal logistic regression was used to examine the association between depressive symptoms and SRH and whether and how such association varies by education among older adults with cancer. More depressive symptoms were associated with worse SRH. Such association became stronger with higher education among older adults with cancer. Findings confirm the associations between depressive symptoms and SRH among older adults with cancer. The differential impact of education on SRH and on the association between depressive symptoms and SRH highlights the importance of considering patients’ educational attainment in a more comprehensive way when working with older adults with cancer. When conducting distress screening among cancer survivors, oncology social workers should be aware of the complex relationship between education and depression in relation to cancer survivors’ SRH.
      PubDate: Tue, 06 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hsw/hlac031
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Design Thinking for Health Disparities and Interdisciplinary Knowledge
           Translation: An LGBTQ+ Youth Health Literacy Project

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      Pages: 21 - 32
      Abstract: AbstractThis article discusses the use of codesign, design thinking (DT), and design jams in collaboration with interdisciplinary scholars, service providers, and community-based stakeholders as an approach to social work intervention development—specifically, to tackle health inequities and timely knowledge translation (KT). An application of these methods to the problem of sexual health disparities and lack of access to inclusive sexual health education in school-based settings for LGBTQ+ youth is discussed. LGBTQ+ Youth HeLP (Health Literacy Project) is a holistic online sexual health resource providing evidence-based information to LGBTQ+ youth in an accessible and age-appropriate format. This article considers potential opportunities and obstacles for utilizing DT to develop responsive solutions to health inequities and health-related KT learned from the project. Codesign offers effective options for generating collaborations that may increase cross-stakeholder perspective taking in group settings and produce high-quality outputs with increased likelihood of uptake.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hsw/hlac035
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Stress and Depression in Ohio Social Workers during the COVID-19 Pandemic:
           The Buffering Role of Social Connectedness

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      Pages: 33 - 42
      Abstract: AbstractAlthough social workers have an elevated risk of infection with COVID-19, no previous studies have investigated the virus’s impact on practitioners. Using survey data (N = 441), this study identified associations between stress, depression, and COVID-related factors and explored the role of social connectedness as a moderator for mental health among Ohio social workers. The results of the study showed that among social workers with a positive COVID-19 diagnosis, 70 percent experienced moderate/high levels of stress, and 37 percent met the criteria for clinical depressive symptoms. Results from the multiple regression analyses showed that perceived stress was positively associated with a positive COVID-19 diagnosis for social workers, and depression was positively associated with working with a client with a positive COVID-19 diagnosis. An interaction effect was also identified between social connectedness and social workers’ mental health. These findings suggest that the provision of individual or organizational interventions that emphasize social connectedness can help to protect social workers’ mental health.
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hsw/hlac033
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Oral Health and Social Work Integration: Advancing Social Workers’
           Roles in Dental Education

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      Pages: 43 - 53
      Abstract: AbstractOral health remains underutilized within both integrated service delivery and educational settings. Advancing social workers’ roles in the education of oral health providers is one strategic way to expand oral health and social work integration. Although the involvement of social workers in dental education is not new, fewer than 18 percent of the country’s 68 accredited dental schools have active social work departments or services. This exploratory study sought to determine how, as of 2021, social work has been integrated into U.S. dental education programs (N = 13). Findings offer an overview of current social work programs in existence, roles social workers have in addressing social and behavioral health needs in dental education settings, and barriers to and facilitators in developing and sustaining integrated partnerships. This article discusses ways social work and oral health educational settings can mutually benefit from developing and/or strengthening their integrated collaborations. It also addresses a comparison of educational missions, clinical learning opportunities across both professions, and how patient care can be improved by expanding oral health and social work integration.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hsw/hlac038
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Ensuring Safety of Patients in Complex Health Systems: A Focus on Primary
           Healthcare Service Relations in Nigeria

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      Pages: 54 - 63
      Abstract: AbstractPatient-centered healthcare is a goal for all health systems. However, given the inherent complexities of the health system as one with many nonlinear and dynamic components, the safety of patients could be affected. Therefore, there is the need to study these complexities to manage them toward optimal service delivery. The present study is a qualitative inquiry into the complexities of primary healthcare (PHC) in Nigeria and effects on patients’ safety across four PHC facilities in Enugu state in southeast Nigeria. It utilizes a framework that draws on the components of interprofessional collaboration, inclusive of health financing and health workforce satisfaction, to understand the complex PHC system and patient safety. The study findings show that the PHC system in the study area performs suboptimally on the three counts, which implies poor management of the complexities of the system such that patients are highly susceptible to harm. Making a commitment to addressing the shortcomings present in each of the three components will help to decomplexify PHC in line with the World Health Organization agenda of achieving resilient and strong health systems. Importantly, optimizing the psychosocial space in Nigeria’s PHC by employing qualified social workers and other psychosocial professionals is crucial for patient safety and a range of psychosocial activities that can enhance job satisfaction of health workers.
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hsw/hlac041
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking: Applying a Trauma-Informed Approach in
           Healthcare Settings

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      Pages: 65 - 67
      Abstract: The original Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-386) defined human trafficking as(A) sex trafficking in which a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such an act has not attained 18 years of age; or (B) the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for labor or services, through the use of force, fraud, or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery. (§ 103[8][A–B])
      PubDate: Wed, 07 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hsw/hlac037
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Accounting for Social Workers’ Emotions during and after the
           Pandemic

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      Pages: 69 - 71
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has increased demand for social workers to provide services for families and communities who experience disparities in health outcomes, healthcare, and education. Generally, social workers are at the forefront of addressing health disparities by providing comprehensive services to the most disadvantaged groups. However, turnover in the profession is a major concern, particularly because of the pandemic. The annual rate of turnover among social workers nationwide during nonpandemic times is 30 percent, with some agencies reporting as much as 65 percent (Chang, 2017). Moreover, there is a shortage of social workers despite the projected need over the next 10 years for growth of 13 percent (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2020). These growth figures may be premature, as the number of social workers leaving the field may rise because of added stress caused by the pandemic.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hsw/hlac032
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • The Financial Social Work Connection to Healthcare Productivity: An
           Intervention to Improve Quality of Care

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      Pages: 72 - 74
      Abstract: Healthcare costs that impact quality-of-care outcomes ultimately affect healthcare productivity (Moffatt et al., 2014). Examples of quality-of-care outcomes include mortality rates, patient safety, readmissions, patient experience, and effectiveness and timeliness of care (Moffatt et al., 2014). However, these quality-of-care outcomes are rarely examined in the context of patient finances or financial social work. The connection between quality-of-care outcomes and patient finances is important for social workers employed in healthcare settings to consider. Financial social work may be an effective intervention to positively impact patient financial situations and thus, improve quality-of-care outcomes for patients and improve healthcare productivity.
      PubDate: Wed, 07 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hsw/hlac036
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Social Workers and Physical Health: Imperative Medical Issues and COVID-19

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      Pages: 75 - 78
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented disruptions to the workforce, most notably necessitating a more distanced work environment, which may have negative repercussions for physical health. In our prepandemic study of licensed social workers (Straussner et al., 2015), we found that many professionals were already experiencing significant physical health problems that impacted their work; these have likely been exacerbated as a result of COVID-19. This column presents the literature on physical health among social workers, findings from our study of social workers, and COVID-related implications for the social work workforce.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/hsw/hlac034
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 1 (2022)
       
 
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