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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Third World Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Adoption & Fostering
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.313
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0308-5759 - ISSN (Online) 1740-469X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Corrigendum to “A heavy weight, yet empowering: Grandparent Special
           Guardians’ lived experiences of the role and family dynamics – An
           Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA)”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Adoption & Fostering, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Adoption & Fostering
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T11:42:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03085759241228249
       
  • Corrigendum to “‘I probably wouldn’t want to talk about anything too
           personal’: A qualitative exploration of how issues of privacy,
           confidentiality and surveillance in the home impact on access and
           engagement with online services and spaces for care-experienced young
           people”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Adoption & Fostering, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Adoption & Fostering
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T08:51:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03085759231223980
       
  • Deinstitutionalisation: A global effort to improve developmental outcomes
           for children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dennis Golm
      Pages: 375 - 378
      Abstract: Adoption & Fostering, Volume 47, Issue 4, Page 375-378, December 2023.

      Citation: Adoption & Fostering
      PubDate: 2023-12-08T08:04:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03085759231217673
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Interrupting a cycle of placement instability with short-term residential
           care: Trauma-informed family-like relational practice in one specialist
           unit

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      Authors: Mandi MacDonald, Kathryn Gillespie
      Pages: 379 - 399
      Abstract: Adoption & Fostering, Volume 47, Issue 4, Page 379-399, December 2023.
      Continuous caring relationships are crucial to the wellbeing of children living in out-of-home care, with the family environment of long-term foster care usually the preferred placement for achieving relational permanence. Some children, however, experience a cycle of instability with the impact of placement disruption exacerbating emotional and behavioural difficulties and thereby undermining subsequent foster relationships. This paper reports on a service evaluation of a residential facility specialising in short-term placements for children who have experienced disruption, with the aim of interrupting the cycle of placement instability. Overview of 34 children’s placement trajectories show that most were enabled to re-enter foster care and of those who are now aged over 18 years (n = 29), over half (n = 16) remained in family placements until adulthood. For four children, detailed individualised assessment indicated residential care as the most appropriate option for avoiding future disruption. The paper gives cause for optimism that relationships in the residential setting have the potential to build emotional resilience and capacity for connection. There is paucity of information on how residential staff achieve these relationships in practice. Focus groups and interviews with ten staff and managers illuminate relational practices in the residential setting that are simultaneously family-like and trauma-informed.Plain Language SummaryLong-term caring relationships in stable placements are important to the wellbeing of children who are not living with their parents. However, some children experience repeated instability and disruption when successive foster care placements end prematurely, sometimes under difficult circumstances. This can be a very upsetting experience and may have a serious impact on children. Emotions and behaviours that they struggle with can worsen, which may make things harder for them with their next foster family, leading to a cycle of instability, with fewer opportunities for continuous long-term caring relationships.This paper looks at an approach used by a residential facility, Children’s House, where children who have experienced many foster placement endings can temporarily live. The goal is to stop the cycle of premature placement endings and to offer an experience of stability. The paper notes the journeys of 34 children who spent a period living at this specialist residential unit. Many (29 children) are now aged over 18 years, and over half of these (16 children) were able to stay in family placements until reaching adulthood. For four children, assessments recommended that residential care was the best option for avoiding future disruption in their lives.The findings of this paper suggest that relationships with staff in residential settings may offer children opportunities for genuine connection, as well as building emotional resilience. There is limited information available on how staff develop caring relationships with children in residential settings. This paper includes data from focus groups and interviews with ten staff and managers from Children’s House. This helps to explain how relationships are built, in a way that is similar to family life but also shaped by staff’s knowledge about how trauma can affect children’s ability to form relationships.
      Citation: Adoption & Fostering
      PubDate: 2023-12-08T08:04:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03085759231212499
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • When people adopted from severely depriving institutions become parents:
           The experiences of young adult mothers from the ERA study and their
           adoptive parents

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      Authors: Christopher Edwards, Mark Kennedy, Nicky Knights, Hanna Kovshoff, Jana Kreppner, Barbara Maughan, Edmund JS Sonuga-Barke
      Pages: 415 - 433
      Abstract: Adoption & Fostering, Volume 47, Issue 4, Page 415-433, December 2023.
      It has been reported that adult adoptees with histories of maltreatment face particular challenges when they become parents. Here we explore this issue using a qualitative analysis of the views of 14 adoptee mothers, who suffered severe institutional deprivation in the Romanian orphanages of the late 1980s before being adopted into the UK, and their adoptive parents. Following a thematic analysis, we report several perceived benefits of becoming a parent, as well as co-occurring difficulties and challenges. Benefits included a sense of accomplishment and fulfilment, feeling more motivated personally and professionally and the positive experience of having a relationship with a biological relative. Challenges related, in particular, to some adoptee parents’ abilities to appraise risk relating to their children and to difficulties in organising day-to-day activities. Practical and emotional support from adoptive grandparents was very often crucial for adoptee parents’ success and wellbeing. Implications for research and practice are discussed, emphasising that deprivation-related difficulties expand into adulthood and for some can impact their ability to parent.Plain Language SummaryCare-experienced individuals are at an increased risk of having their own children taken into care. The reasons for this are currently not clear, but questions have been raised about the importance of early adversity versus a continuation of adversity, unfortunately commonly experienced by care leavers. The English and Romanian Adoptees (ERA) study has followed the progress of individuals who were adopted into high functioning homes following a period of early deprivation. Last assessed in young adulthood, 20% have become parents and in the current study, these parents, and their adoptive (grand)parents, were interviewed. Most parents reported no areas of difficulty and for them, becoming a parent had been a globally positive experience, which included a closer sense of connectivity, a sense of fulfilment and a greater sense of motivation. However, significant difficulties in providing childcare were experienced by around a fifth of the group, often resulting in care proceedings. Areas of difficulties appeared to revolve around appraising and responding to risk. Consequently, the adoptive grandparents were an important source of day-to-day support. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.
      Citation: Adoption & Fostering
      PubDate: 2023-12-08T08:04:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03085759231212500
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • A heavy weight, yet empowering: Grandparent Special Guardians’ lived
           experiences of the role and family dynamics - An Interpretative
           Phenomenological Analysis (IPA)

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      Authors: Stacey Rose O’ Sullivan-Hayes, Yvonne Melia, Faiza Nazir
      Pages: 434 - 452
      Abstract: Adoption & Fostering, Volume 47, Issue 4, Page 434-452, December 2023.
      Almost half of Special Guardians are grandparents, typically single grandmothers, who are required to facilitate and maintain relationships between parents and children if deemed in the child’s best interests. Current literature suggests that Special Guardians navigate complex family situations, support children with developmental trauma histories and receive scant support. Only limited research has examined the lived experiences of Special Guardians, especially using qualitative methods. Further exploration into such experiences may allow for better understanding and more specialised support for Special Guardians and the children they care for. The current research involved semi-structured interviews with six grandparent Special Guardians. Using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) five themes were constructed that highlighted some of the social, emotional, relational and financial difficulties they experienced from taking on the role. Compared to foster or adoptive carers, Special Guardians felt undervalued and abandoned by services. After a Special Guardianship Order (SGO) has been awarded, to encourage positive relationships Special Guardians may benefit from trauma training, peer and therapeutic support, as well as more whole family support.Plain Language SummaryThis study aimed to develop further insights into the experiences of grandparents taking on the role of Special Guardianship and the subsequent impact on relationships within the family. Interviews with six grandmothers were used to create space for grandparent Special Guardians to share and reflect on their experiences. Using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), interviews identified five key themes that appeared particularly meaningful or common across those who took part.The findings suggest that grandparent Special Guardians are navigating a complex role in the absence of support around them. This can lead to or increase difficulties in relationships with their own children and can affect relationships and dynamics in the wider family. Many grandparent Special Guardians had experienced social, emotional, relational and financial difficulties since taking on the role, supporting their grandchildren alongside managing these difficulties, often alone. This can increase the likelihood of negative outcomes for themselves, their children, their grandchildren and the wider family.While grandparent Special Guardians are responsible for caring for their grandchildren under a Special Guardianship Order (SGO), local authorities (LAs) have a shared responsibility to provide families with relevant support. The findings suggest that LAs are largely failing in their duty to do so. Support with facilitating contact, trauma and attachment training, support around the family unit and respite opportunities could lead to more positive outcomes for such families and their wider relationships.
      Citation: Adoption & Fostering
      PubDate: 2023-12-08T08:04:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03085759231211611
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Fostering wellbeing: Placing foster carers centre stage

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      Authors: Alyson Rees, Nina Maxwell, Jillian Powell, Cindy Corliss, Asma Khan, Chloe O’Donnell
      Abstract: Adoption & Fostering, Ahead of Print.
      This article reports on an evaluation of the Fostering Wellbeing programme, a set of five themed masterclasses delivered in two local authorities to a group of multi-disciplinary professionals in the team around the foster child. The programme also included the development of the role of the foster carer Pioneer. The evaluation found benefits of the multi-disciplinary training, but attendance and commitment from some professionals were limited. The programme demonstrated some traction in bringing the foster carer into the team around the child and strengthening their ability to advocate for the child. The Pioneer role showed promise but was yet to be fully embedded.Plain Language SummaryThis article reports on an evaluation of the Fostering Wellbeing programme. The programme involved foster carers being trained along with other professionals working with the child in care. It also involved the development of a Pioneer foster carer role. The training with other professionals aimed to bring the foster carer into the team as a valued member. The Pioneer role aimed to help other professionals to understand the foster carer role. The evaluation found benefits of the training, but attendance by some professionals was limited. The programme demonstrated some success in bringing the foster carer into the team around the child, strengthening their ability to ensure the child’s voice is heard. The Pioneer role showed promise but has yet to be fully developed.
      Citation: Adoption & Fostering
      PubDate: 2023-11-29T03:57:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03085759231208460
       
  • Ascertaining risk of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder at initial health
           assessments for children in care

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      Authors: Layla Beckett, Michelle Bond
      Abstract: Adoption & Fostering, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Adoption & Fostering
      PubDate: 2023-11-29T03:57:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03085759231211703
       
  • A Compassion-Focused Therapy group for young people who live in foster,
           adoptive or kinship care: Initial development, reflections, and ways
           forward

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      Authors: Alex Lau-Zhu, Lydia Vella
      Abstract: Adoption & Fostering, Ahead of Print.
      Care-experienced youth are more likely than their peers to present with earlier, more severe and more chronic mental health difficulties. This case study presents the development of a Compassion-Focused Therapy (CFT) group for young people who do not live with their birth families due to an early history of abuse and neglect, delivered by psychologists in a social care service. Eight adolescent girls (aged 12–16), who lived in foster, adoptive or kinship care, attended eight face-to-face weekly sessions of a ‘Building Your Self-Confidence’ group. Most of them attended all sessions, found the group ‘enjoyable’ and ‘interesting’, and reported finding it helpful to improve their self-confidence at least to some extent (‘a little’ or ‘yes’). On standardised measures, half of the caregivers reported improvements in their child’s mental health but none of the adolescents did themselves. These initial data pave the way to further optimise the application of group CFT for care-experienced youth and inform psychological treatment innovation in youth more generally.Plain Language SummaryYoung people who grow up with significant trauma such as abuse and neglect, are often taken into the care of the local authority at some point in their lives when they cannot remain at home. These young people tend to experience high levels of mental health difficulties such as depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress. Innovative approaches to improve mental health in this population are therefore crucial. In this paper, we describe a therapy group called ‘Building Your Self-Confidence’, based on a therapy model called Compassion-Focused Therapy (CFT). This group was attended by eight adolescent girls aged between 12 and 16 who lived in foster, adoptive or kinship care. There were eight weekly face-to-face sessions in total, delivered by psychologists within a social care service in the UK. We found that most of the adolescents attended all the sessions and commented that they found the group ‘enjoyable’ and ‘interesting’, and that their self-confidence was somehow improved. On questionnaires measuring mental health difficulties, half of the caregivers reported that their adolescents’ mental health improved. However, adolescents themselves did not report improvements in mental health in these questionnaires. Overall, this therapeutic group is promising but needs to be refined so that its benefits can be maximised.
      Citation: Adoption & Fostering
      PubDate: 2023-11-29T03:56:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03085759231207397
       
  • England and Wales

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      Abstract: Adoption & Fostering, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Adoption & Fostering
      PubDate: 2023-11-25T09:11:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03085759231216058
       
  • Sir Michael Rutter: A tribute

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      Authors: Roger Bullock
      Abstract: Adoption & Fostering, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Adoption & Fostering
      PubDate: 2021-12-07T04:37:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03085759211061892
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 201 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Third World Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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