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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Journal of Public Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.719
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 142  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1741-3842 - ISSN (Online) 1741-3850
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Years of life lost associated with COVID-19 deaths in the USA during the
           first 2 years of the pandemic

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      Abstract: BackgroundPrior estimates of the years of life lost (YLLs) in the USA associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were 1.2 million through 11 July 2020 and 3.9 million through 31 January 2021 (which roughly coincides with the first full year of the pandemic). The aim of this study is to update YLL estimates through the first 2 years of the pandemic.MethodsWe employed data regarding COVID-19 deaths through 5 February 2022 by jurisdiction, gender and age group. We used actuarial life expectancy tables by gender and age to estimate YLLs.ResultsWe estimated roughly 9.7 million YLLs due to COVID-19 deaths. The number of YLLs per 10 000 capita was 297.5, with the highest rate in Mississippi (482.7) and the lowest in Vermont (61.4). There was substantial interstate variation in the timing of YLLs and differences in YLLs by gender. YLLs per death increased from 9.2 in the first year of the pandemic to 10.8 through the first 2 years.ConclusionsOur findings improve our understanding of how the mortality effects of COVID-19 have evolved. This insight can be valuable to public health officials as the disease moves to an endemic phase.
      PubDate: Mon, 30 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdac057
      Issue No: Vol. 44, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • COVID-19 among Amazonian indigenous in Peru: mortality, incidence, and
           clinical characteristics

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      Abstract: BackgroundFew studies have described the clinical characteristics of patients with COVID-19 from ethnic minority groups. Our objective was to evaluate the mortality and incidence rates, clinical characteristics and factors associated with mortality in cases with COVID-19 belonging to the Amazonian indigenous ethnic group in Peru.MethodsWe performed a retrospective cohort study including all cases from COVID-19 among Peruvian people identified as Amazonian indigenous from 07 March to 31 October 2020. We calculated the standardized mortality and incidence ratios using the indirect age-adjusted method to determine the differences between Amazonian Indigenous and the general population. In addition, we used multivariable logistic regression to determine the risk factors for death.ResultsA total of 19 018 laboratory confirmed COVID-19 cases were analyzed. Indigenous people had 3.18 (95% CI, 3.13–3.23) times the risk of infection and 0.34 (0.31–0.37) times the mortality risk of the general Peruvian population. Males had 1.29 (1.04–1.61) times the odds of death compared with females and for each year of age, the odds of mortality increased 1.03 (1.03–1.04) times. Cases with respiratory distress had 2.47 (1.96–3.10) times more likely to die. Having an immunodeficiency was 18.7 (6.12–57.00) times more likely to die.DiscussionThe Amazonian indigenous population in Peru was strongly affected by COVID-19 compared with the general Peruvian population.
      PubDate: Mon, 30 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdac058
      Issue No: Vol. 44, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Spotlight on tobacco guidance: NICE public health guidance update

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      Abstract: The updated NICE guidelines on tobacco recommend cost-effective and evidence-based interventions to prevent smoking initiation and promote smoking cessation across the life course.E-cigarettes are a cost-effective adjunct to support smoking cessation in adults, but their long-term effects are yet to be fully understood.Concerted efforts from healthcare and public health providers are required to reach underserved groups and hence address stark and longstanding inequalities in smoking prevalence and associated ill health in England.
      PubDate: Sun, 03 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdac043
      Issue No: Vol. 44, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Do recommended interventions widen or narrow inequalities in
           musculoskeletal health' An equity-focussed systematic review of
           differential effectiveness

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      Abstract: BackgroundIt is unclear whether seven interventions recommended by Public Health England for preventing and managing common musculoskeletal conditions reduce or widen health inequalities in adults with musculoskeletal conditions.MethodsWe used citation searches of Web of Science (date of ‘parent publication’ for each intervention to April 2021) to identify original research articles reporting subgroup or moderator analyses of intervention effects by social stratifiers defined using the PROGRESS-Plus frameworks. Randomized controlled trials, controlled before-after studies, interrupted time series, systematic reviews presenting subgroup/stratified analyses or meta-regressions, individual participant data meta-analyses and modelling studies were eligible. Two reviewers independently assessed the credibility of effect moderation claims using Instrument to assess the Credibility of Effect Moderation Analyses. A narrative approach to synthesis was used (PROSPERO registration number: CRD42019140018).ResultsOf 1480 potentially relevant studies, seven eligible analyses of single trials and five meta-analyses were included. Among these, we found eight claims of potential differential effectiveness according to social characteristics, but none that were judged to have high credibility.ConclusionsIn the absence of highly credible evidence of differential effectiveness in different social groups, and given ongoing national implementation, equity concerns may be best served by investing in monitoring and action aimed at ensuring fair access to these interventions.
      PubDate: Sun, 06 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdac014
      Issue No: Vol. 44, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The ‘cost of living crisis’

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      Pages: 475 - 476
      Abstract: Dreading that climax of all human ills,
      PubDate: Thu, 25 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdac080
      Issue No: Vol. 44, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Correction to: What can the UK learn from the impact of migrant
           populations on national life expectancy'

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      Pages: 724 - 724
      Abstract: In the originally published version of this manuscript, the first note had been set as the second line of text in the Introduction: “Here, we are referring to period life expectancy rather than cohort life expectancy. Period life expectancy is the number of years a newborn might be expected to live, on average, assuming the current death rates do not change. It does not consider future changes in mortality rates. Period life expectancies are used to compare trends over time, and the UK and other national life tables are period life tables for this reason.”
      PubDate: Sat, 23 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdac050
      Issue No: Vol. 44, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Correction to: Tackling barriers to COVID-19 vaccine uptake in London: a
           mixed-methods evaluation

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      Pages: 725 - 725
      Abstract: In the originally published version of this manuscript, the following authors were identified as affiliated to UK Health Security Agency in error: Jennifer L Y Yip, Cyril Eshareturi, Julie Billett, and Joanna Inskip.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdac059
      Issue No: Vol. 44, No. 3 (2022)
       
 
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