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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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British Journal of Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.019
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 74  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0045-3102 - ISSN (Online) 1468-263X
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [424 journals]
  • A Call for Support: Social Worker Health, Well-being and Working
           Conditions

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      Pages: 1 - 4
      Abstract: Social workers love doing…social work. Making a difference and providing support to some of the most vulnerable people in the country. However, the UK social work workforce is under increasing pressure. Since 2018, researchers have been warning that the social work workforce is on the verge of huge numbers leaving the profession (Ravalier, 2019). Indeed, these dire warnings have come true—the children’s social work sector has the highest level of attrition (i.e. social workers leaving the profession altogether—and this is not to mention those who migrate from one role within children’s social care to another) and the highest number of vacancies in five years (gov.uk, 2022). This undoubtedly has an impact on the service users that social workers work most closely with, who can be some of the most vulnerable people in this country. All of this whilst working through a once-in-a-generation pandemic, under ongoing and chronically poor working conditions, with little in terms of support for their health and well-being. In this editorial, I make a case—and an overall plea for support—for the social work workforce to have emergent and ongoing support at a governmental, organisational and team level for their psychological health, well-being and working conditions.
      PubDate: Fri, 20 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac246
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • How Can Research and Theory Enhance Understanding of Professional
           Decision-Making in Reviews of Cases of Child Death and Serious Injury'
           

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      Pages: 5 - 22
      Abstract: AbstractIn most child protection jurisdictions, a case of child death or serious injury through the actions or inaction of a parent or carer is responded to with an inquiry into the circumstances that led to the death of the child. A key objective of such inquiries is to discern what may have been done by public agencies to prevent the child’s death or serious injury and this may, in turn, lead to changes in existing policies or the development of new policies. Such changes have, at times, been criticised as ‘knee jerk’ reactions and can lead to well-meaning but possibly counter-productive initiatives. A general observation is that, in some inquiry reports, there is little, if any, reference to research and theory about child protection practice and policy. In this article, an anonymised case study of a child death inquiry is used to analyse the decision-making processes of child protection practitioners using a range of theory and research. The aim is to demonstrate how the use of insights from theory and research can lead to an enhanced understanding of the circumstances that led to a child death or serious injury, one which is grounded in current knowledge and evidence.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac116
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • In Search of Social justice-informed Services: A Research Agenda for the
           Study of Resistance to Neo-managerialism

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      Pages: 23 - 39
      Abstract: AbstractOne of the main characteristics of social work is the fundamental tension between the profession’s conservative and critical rationales. In the last three decades, this tension has informed the development of critical resistance to the deprofessionalisation effects of neo-managerial rationality, which establishes cost reduction and fiscal accountability as the basis for professional practice. However, the theoretical conceptualisation of such critical resistance is caught between minor and major operations, both of which are considered insufficient. Addressing this gap, this article builds on the theoretical framework of radical incrementalism to develop a research agenda for the future study of resistance processes, which we conceptualise as operating in the middle range of a power exertion scale, between minor and major forms of operation. We portray the operation of resistance in the middle range of such a power exertion scale and offer a research agenda that includes relevant research directions and methodological considerations. In this way, the article suggests new ways of understanding, conceptualising and operating resistance to enable further development of the social justice-informed professionalisation of social work.
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac131
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • No Knowledge of ‘Public Funds’' An Investigation into Social Work
           Practitioners’ Confidence and Knowledge When Working with Adults with
           ‘No Recourse to Public Funds’

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      Pages: 40 - 59
      Abstract: AbstractLiterature suggests health and social care professionals lack the knowledge and confidence required to work effectively with those subject to immigration control. However, thus far few studies have focused on the social work profession. Using quantitative methods, this study explored social work practitioners’ knowledge and confidence of the entitlements of adults with ‘no recourse to public funds’ (NRPF) to adult social care services, through an anonymous, online, national survey (n = 113). Using statistical tests for parametric data, several significant results were found. Training attendance had a statistically significant relationship with knowledge and confidence. Seniority level, years of experience and number of adults with NRPF worked with had statistically significant relationships with confidence but not knowledge. Findings suggest that respondents had adequate knowledge of Care Act assessments. However, confidence was low and knowledge was poor around the entitlements of asylum seekers specifically, access to advocacy and use of human rights assessments. Hence, it is suggested that social work employers should prioritise training on NRPF entitlements, focusing on the areas of poor knowledge found in this study. Moreover, further research with adults with NRPF is needed to better understand their experiences of accessing adult social care.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac108
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Dynamics of Change in Poverty Measures amongst Social Service Users in
           Israel: A Comparison of Standard Care and a Poverty-Aware Programme

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      Pages: 60 - 80
      Abstract: AbstractAlthough social service departments (SSDs) in Israel are the main institutions through which social workers provide social care to people in poverty, the dynamics between the multiple dimensions of poverty amongst service users (SUs) and the consequences of social care to these dynamics have not been systematically explored. The current study is the first study that aims to fill this gap by comparing multidimensional poverty amongst 159 SUs. The study compared two kinds of social care provided by the same SSDs: standard social care and a poverty-aware programme. Data were collected at two time points by telephone interviews and was analysed using independent samples t test, the paired-sample t test, the exact McNemar test for dichotomous variables, the Tukey test, the χ2 test and linear regression. Findings indicate that SUs who were treated in the poverty-aware programme received more assistance in a larger range of areas and a significantly positive change was found amongst them in a variety of measures. The discussion explores the importance of expanding research on the contribution of SSD’s social care in order to adapt public services to the needs of SUs and to make them a vehicle in the fight against poverty.
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac142
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Responding to Domestic and Family Violence: The Role of Non-Specialist
           Services and Implications for Social Work

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      Pages: 81 - 99
      Abstract: AbstractSocial workers play a critical role in responding to the needs of individuals impacted by domestic and family violence (DFV). Social work literature has long been devoted to understanding the functioning, accessibility and effectiveness of specialist DFV services. In contrast, much less is known about how non-specialist services can, and do, support victims of DFV. This study addresses this important gap by empirically examining the links between DFV and a non-specialist service designed to assist people experiencing financial hardship. To accomplish this, we draw on an expansive administrative database of assistance records (n = 305,176) from the St Vincent de Paul Society, one of the largest non-specialist support providers in Australia. Descriptive analyses of DFV-related records (n = 4,374) yield novel insights into the socio-demographic profile of clients seeking assistance due to DFV, the types of assistance they required and how non-specialist providers respond to DFV-related requests for assistance. Our results demonstrate that non-specialist services play a critical yet under-recognised role in responding to people impacted by DFV. This has significant social work practice implications, highlighting the importance of specialist DFV services working in tandem with non-specialist services to deliver the best outcomes for victims.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac125
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Bowlby, Attachment and the Potency of a ‘Received Idea’

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      Pages: 100 - 117
      Abstract: AbstractThis year marks the sixtieth anniversary of a report from the World Health Organisation (WHO) that furnished a mostly coruscating account of John Bowlby’s work on child attachment and maternal deprivation. Despite the WHO critique and a range of other critical interrogations, Bowlby contributions still constitute a ‘received idea’ within the discourse of social work. If criticisms are made of Bowlby, and what has been dubbed the ‘Bowlby School’, the reference point tends to be cogent feminist critiques emerging in the final quarter of the twentieth century. This article aims to excavate critical appraisals from the 1950s and 1960s. It will also be argued that endeavours to ‘retrofit’ Bowlby for our contemporary times present problems.
      PubDate: Tue, 05 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac091
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Cultural Responsiveness in Child Protection: Stakeholders and Parental
           Perceptions of Working Children and Culture-appropriate Assessment in
           Ghana

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      Pages: 118 - 138
      Abstract: AbstractThere is a need to understand cultural responsiveness in the field of child protection and accommodate best interests of the child to local contexts. This research addresses cultural responsiveness in social work interventions as part of child protection services in cases of ‘child labour’ in rural and urban Ghana. The sample size of this study is sixty participants (thirty men and thirty women), and it is made up of social workers and other child welfare practitioners in government agencies; non-governmental organisations; and parents whose children were involved in child labour as well as parents whose children were not. Using semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions and participant observation as methods of data collection, participants included parents (ten), stakeholders (ten), focus groups (thirty people); and parental interviews in participant observation (ten) were conducted to gather the needed data with purposive sampling across rural and urban communities in Ghana. Applying a framework approach as the main qualitative data analysis approach, interviews were recorded and transcribed. Overall, the research finds that professionals need to immerse themselves in different cultural practices and communication whilst considering different working definitions for parenting and creating a mission and vision statement that embraces different cultures.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac123
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Localising social work practice for migrant workers’ children in China:
           An action research learning from other countries

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      Pages: 139 - 156
      Abstract: AbstractWhile literature abounds in studying the phenomenon of migrant workers in China and offering policy suggestions from a macro perspective, this article proposes an inspiration for clinical social workers by developing a comprehensive case management model which aims at improving the well-being of migrant workers’ children. It is argued that lessons could be learned from theories, methods and strategies to address immigration-related issues in the USA, Canada and some European countries, because migration patterns of China’s migrant workers and international immigrants are similar. An action research approach is adopted. Unstructured interviews are conducted with clinical social workers, heads of social work organisations and schoolteachers. Based on the findings, a draft version of the case management model is constructed by borrowing immigrant social work methods selectively. As licensed social workers, the authors offer case management services to migrant workers’ children and families under a social work agency’s supervision in two urban–suburban-integrated schools. In the service process, the model is finished by modifications and localisation. The revised version of the model is elaborated in four steps. In each step, specific methods for migrant workers’ children and families are presented with related case examples attached.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac034
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Recognition of Family Life by Children Living in Kinship Care Arrangements
           in England

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      Pages: 157 - 176
      Abstract: AbstractKinship care is the long-term caring arrangement within the family constellation for children who cannot remain with their birth parents. Despite being the most prevalent alternative care arrangement for children worldwide, there are significant gaps in the knowledge about kinship care and few children’s perspectives in kinship care research. This article focuses on how children’s views, understood through theories of recognition, can assist understanding their lived experiences in kinship care. The recognition of kinship care has implications on how it is supported, regulated and financed. Insights were drawn from nineteen children in England using dialogical participation and critical realism methodologies, and methods such as child-led tours, photo-elicitation and visual methods. Analysis of the children’s insights unsettles simplistic dichotomous recognition of kinship care, family, participation and childhood seen in most current UK social work policy and practice. The research also demonstrates that children’s views are worthy of further inclusion in social work policy, practice and research, especially for kinship care.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac114
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Exploring Local Authority Variation in Looked After Young People’s
           Subjective Well-being

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      Pages: 177 - 197
      Abstract: AbstractThere has been growing interest in the Local Authority (LA) variation in rates of admission to care and provision of services but less is known about whether young people’s experience of care varies by LA. Using survey data from 4,994 looked after young people (aged eleven to eighteen years) from thirty-six English LAs, the analyses focused on LA variation in their subjective well-being. There was a statistically small LA variation in young people’s responses to individual survey questions except for a question that asked if young people felt they had a trusted adult in their lives. Between 66 per cent and 100 per cent of young people had a trusted adult depending on the LA caring for them. Positively associated with overall well-being were, being looked after by a non-London LA, a longer length of time in care, fewer placement moves, children’s positive perceptions of a reciprocal trusting relationship with their carer, having a good friend and being male. Counter-intuitively, LAs with an outstanding or good Ofsted social care or education judgement were associated with a higher proportion of their young people having low well-being.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac117
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Using the Theory of Family Boundary Ambiguity and Ambiguous Loss to
           Understand the Experiences of Foster Carers’ Own Children

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      Pages: 198 - 215
      Abstract: AbstractIn England, nearly three-quarters of looked after children are cared for in foster families. Despite this, relatively little is known about the experiences of foster carers’ children in families who foster. This study used narrative interviews to explore the experiences of twelve adults now aged eighteen to fifty-four years who had been brought up in such families. Their families had fostered for much or all of their childhood and growing up in a fostering family had had a considerable impact on them. Most participants viewed some of the fostered children as siblings and continued to do so into adulthood. The analysis used the theory of family boundary ambiguity and ambiguous loss to gain a deeper understanding of the participants’ experiences. The findings suggest that there is a need for much greater awareness of the issues that foster carers’ own children face. They also suggest that a change in how foster placements are supported needs to include a greater focus on the children of foster carers.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac139
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Digital Relationality, Rights, Resilience: Conceptualising a Digital
           Social Ecology for Children’s Birth Family Relationships When in Care or
           Adopted

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      Pages: 216 - 235
      Abstract: AbstractThe use of digital communication technology by children residing in out-of-home care or adopted from foster care has mainly been approached hesitantly and from a risk paradigm. The Covid-19 pandemic catalysed many digital and social work intersections, including practices used for birth family contact where in-person visits were supplemented or replaced with ‘virtual’ contact via digital devices. Whilst technology-mediated contact is characterised as ‘virtual’, the relationships it facilitates and emotions it generates are very real within children’s social ecology. Digital ubiquity in social life and the rapid pace of technological change presents significant ethical and practical tensions. To help social workers navigate this complexity of ‘contact-in-reality’ and facilitate safe, ethical use of digital communication technology for birth family contact, we connect an understanding of the dynamics of birth family contact with literature on children’s use of digital technology and ecological concepts of person-in-environment to offer a digital social ecology heuristic for social work practice. Three key aspects cut across all systems and levels, referred to here as the three Digital R’s: digital relationality; digital rights; and digital resilience. Future research is needed to understand how these dynamics play out.
      PubDate: Fri, 29 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac140
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • ‘Villagers in the City’: Resilience in migrant youth amidst
           urbanisation

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      Pages: 236 - 257
      Abstract: AbstractRapid urbanisation necessitates more research attention to the challenges and resources among families moving from rural to urban areas. Using a multisystemic resilience framework, this qualitative study explores how resilience is embodied in the intrapersonal, interpersonal and institutional levels of the daily lives of migrant children in China, an exemplar of contemporary fast-urbanising societies. I conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with ten migrant children who live in Beijing, along with their parents, teachers and social service providers. The findings suggest that rural-to-urban migration is both an empowering and a depriving experience. On the intrapersonal level, migration increases children’s independence, personal growth, future aspirations, as well as academic stress. On the interpersonal level, migrant children receive substantial support from parents, siblings, extended family and peers; however, they are at risk of insufficient parental supervision and loss of meaningful relationships. On the institutional level, migration provides children with a better environment, better school experiences, greater material resources and social organisation services, but migrant children remain vulnerable to educational discrimination, economic deprivation and poor neighbourhood environments in the city.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac122
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Managing Vocational Work, Achieving and Sustaining Work Performance:
           Support and Self-management amongst Young Autistic Adults in the Context
           of Vocational Support Interventions in Sweden

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      Pages: 258 - 275
      Abstract: AbstractIn this article, we explore experiences of support and self-management amongst young autistic adults in the context of vocational support interventions in Sweden. We analyse how young autistic men use different strategies to manage their vocational work and the support they need to maintain, achieve and sustain their work performance. Data consist of eleven interviews with 4 autistic young adult men in different work environments where vocational support interventions are implemented to different degrees. One finding concludes that the interviewees are affected by and try to adapt to neurotypical norms and expectations about working life and adulthood. Although individualised coping strategies can be helpful, it is important for employers and formal support persons to understand and acknowledge that individual emotional and problem-solving coping strategies are demanding and need to be combined with adaptations in the working environment. Another finding concludes how work managers act as gatekeeper in the vocational support system the young autistic men aspire to access and in which they need to manage their work performance. Thus, social workers must provide structured and well-coordinated formal work support by both involving the autistic clients’ employers, work managers and informal networks.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac138
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Autistic Parents’ Personal Experiences of Parenting and Support:
           Messages from an Online Focus Group

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      Pages: 276 - 295
      Abstract: AbstractSocial work with autistic adults should be operated within principles of personalisation and strength-based approach. Whilst many parents are diagnosed on the autistic spectrum as adults, their needs, different parenting styles and capabilities have been often misunderstood, or seldom respected by professionals. To address this gap, this study explored autistic parents’ experiences of parenting and support. In order to examine ‘real-life’ through the parent’s own points of view, an online focus group was used to explore seven autistic parents’ own perspectives and experiences. Data were analysed via thematic techniques. This study found that the parents claimed that autism may not impact always on their parenting capacity, and, when it does, they can succeed in raising their children, especially their autistic children, if they are provided with appropriate support services. But their parenting style and capabilities were misunderstood by professionals who used traditional pathologising assumptions on parental capacity. This study concluded that dismantling stereotypical norms of autism and lack of knowledge of autism within professionals is needed to change to properly assess autistic parent’s needs and their capacity using strength-based approach.
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac133
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • ‘It just fundamentally reflects the best of social work’: Social
           Worker’s Practice Understandings and Experience of the Best Interests
           Assessor role

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      Pages: 296 - 314
      Abstract: AbstractThis article explores narratives of professional social workers tasked with undertaking the formal para-legal role of Best Interests Assessor under the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) scheme. Wholesale reform of this practice has been debated in recent years and legislative changes have passed through Parliament—the Liberty Protection Safeguards (LPS). The process and debate preceding this change were, however, marked by a relative marginalisation of accounts and critical opinions of Best Interests Assessors (BIAs) themselves. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample group of BIAs from a variety of social work teams within a single Local Authority. These accounts are explored using a thematic analysis underpinned by Ritzer’s McDonaldization theory and Sayer’s work on Contributive Justice. The work considers the professional identities of the BIAs within and beyond their employing organisation in association with social justice and human rights. Barriers and supports to practice are considered in relation to the organisational, technological and legal contexts of assessment work under the DoLS. The study holds relevance for social workers and organisations in contemplating the transition to LPS and workforce conversions to the Approved Mental Capacity Professional.
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac147
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Peer Support Workers as Equal Team Members. A Case Study of Peer Support
           in Glasgow Housing First

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      Pages: 315 - 333
      Abstract: AbstractThe text investigates peer support in the Glasgow Housing First project. Housing First is considered a social innovation towards ending chronic homelessness. Peer support should be an integral part of this approach, but little is known about its role. The aim of this text is to analyse peer support in the project from the perspective of its team and service users. We carried out an instrumental case study. For data collection we used semi-structured and group interview, direct observation, and studied service users’ files. To analyse the data, we conducted thematic analysis. We found out that peer support workers are seen as equal team members. Peer support needs to be recognised in the organisation, job role defined, and an adequate salary secured. We also present challenges in the areas of personal boundaries, self-care, and fulfilment of formal job requirements, and therefore it is crucial to provide peer mentor’s position within the team. Peer support relates to the provision of healing relationship with hard engagers and service users’ led support. Together with using specific tools and community resources, peer support results in either graduation from Housing First, sustaining their tenancy as Housing First tenants, or less days in homelessness.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac135
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Predictors of Health Literacy among Caregivers of Patients with Multiple
           Sclerosis: A Family-Centred Empowerment Approach

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      Pages: 334 - 348
      Abstract: AbstractWith regards to the importance of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the sufferers’ caregivers, and also by focusing on the importance of identifying factors influencing health literacy based on theoretical principles, it is necessary to detect the most effective factors involved in forming these direct or indirect effects. This study aimed to determine the relationship between health literacy and self-efficacy, and knowledge among caregivers of individuals with MS in Iran. One hundred and twenty caregivers of individuals with MS participated in this cross-sectional study. Data were collected through TOFHLA health literacy. Data were analysed using SPSS with independent t-tests, Pearson correlation and linear regression. More than 80 per cent of the participants had border and insufficient health literacy. Statistically, there was a significant relationship between health literacy level and self-efficacy, income source, economic situation and education. The results showed that for every 1 score increase in knowledge, self-efficacy, self-esteem and health literacy increased by 2.17, 0.62 and 2.71, respectively. Considering that there is a significant relationship between health literacy, self-efficacy and the knowledge of caregivers of people with MS, which plays a role in caring for patients, effective strategies should be developed in order to promote health literacy and consequently, the individuals' self-efficacy.
      PubDate: Mon, 04 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac121
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Resilience and Resistance in the Community Sector: Organisational
           Challenges and Responses by the Australian DFV Sector in the Time of
           COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Pages: 349 - 367
      Abstract: AbstractThe COVID-19 pandemic led to increases in family violence in Australia and elsewhere. In response, organisations in the domestic and family violence (DFV) sector, had to adapt to the emerging public health measures and worked collaboratively to protect the most vulnerable in the community. These services, including courts, rapidly transformed their methods of service delivery that are likely to continue for some time. But what have been the implications/impacts of these rapid changes on the DFV service sector in Australia' How have these impacts informed the future needs of the DFV sector' And what is needed to strengthen this community sector of the future' This article reports on the findings of a national research project examining the impacts of COVID-19 on the DFV service sector and the adaptations and innovations that emerged in response. The study highlights that the surge in demand for services put pressure on an already overwhelmed workforce/service sector and provided an opportunity for front line workers to contribute to building a robust sector to respond to future crisis events. These findings have significant implications for future DFV sector service delivery, and for the social work profession as a whole.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac128
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Prosocial Personality as a Predictor of Burnout in Spanish Social Workers

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      Pages: 368 - 385
      Abstract: AbstractThe aim of this study is to establish the link between burnout and prosocial personality and discover how prosocial personality influences burnout. A single-group ex post facto prospective descriptive design questionnaire was created incorporating socio-demographic data, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and Penner’s Prosocial Personality Battery. The study involved 442 members of professional social workers’ associations in Spain, comprising 91.1 per cent women and 8.9 per cent men, with ages ranging from twenty-four to sixty-three years. The results showed that social responsibility is significantly lower and personal distress is higher in emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, whilst the personal accomplishment variable correlates positively with the positive variables of prosociality and negatively with personal distress. Social responsibility, perspective-taking, self-reported altruism, prosociality factor 1 (other-oriented empathy) and prosociality factor 2 (helpfulness) were found to be significantly higher amongst professionals without burnout, while personal distress predominates in professionals with burnout. The study also found that personal distress and mutual concerns moral reasoning are risk factors for burnout, whilst perspective-taking is a protective factor. It was concluded that prosociality acts as a protective factor against burnout—a novel idea of great importance when developing prevention programmes to alleviate this problem amongst professionals.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac134
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Social Workers Response to Domestic Violence and Abuse during the COVID-19
           Pandemic

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      Pages: 386 - 404
      Abstract: AbstractThe rapid global spread of COVID-19 has put increased pressure on health and social service providers, including social workers who continued front line practice throughout the pandemic, engaging with some of the most vulnerable in society often experiencing multiple adversities alongside domestic violence and abuse (DVA). Movement restrictions and stay-at-home orders introduced to slow the spread of the virus, paradoxically leave these families at even greater risk from those within the home. Utilising a survey methodology combining both open- and closed-ended questions, this study captured a picture of social work practice in Ireland with families experiencing DVA during the early waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings highlight both the changes and challenges in work practices and procedures that limit social work assessment and quality contact with families, changes to the help-seeking behaviours from victims/survivors, as well as emerging innovative practice responses with enhanced use of technology. Implications for practice include an increased awareness of the risk and prevalence of DVA accelerated by the pandemic. Conclusions assert that social work assessment and intervention with families experiencing DVA must remain adaptive to the changing COVID-19 context and continue to develop innovative practice approaches.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac119
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • How Did Levels of Psychological Distress and Perceptions of Workplace
           Support amongst Children’s Social Work Staff Change during the Covid-19
           Pandemic'

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      Pages: 405 - 424
      Abstract: AbstractCovid-19 brought about drastic changes in day-to-day life and working practices, and had a profound impact on the mental health and well-being of the general population. Certain professional groups have also been particularly affected. This study sought to explore how levels of psychological distress and perceptions of workplace support amongst social work staff changed during the pandemic. We present the results from a series of surveys conducted in four local authorities (LAs) in England, before and during the Covid-19 pandemic. Social workers and other social care staff (n = 62) were asked about their experiences of psychological distress, using the twelve-item General Health Questionnaire. Overall, we found the proportion of staff reporting elevated levels of psychological distress increased and, in line with previous studies involving social workers, was high relative to the general population. Yet, most staff also said they had high levels of support from managers and colleagues, whilst a small proportion reported an increased perception of workplace support during the pandemic, compared to before. We consider these findings in relation to Organisational Support Theory and reflect on the ability of LAs to provide effective support for social care staff.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac126
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • ‘Have They Talked About Us At All'’ The Moral Distress of
           Healthcare Social Workers during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Qualitative
           Investigation in the State of Texas

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      Pages: 425 - 447
      Abstract: AbstractAmid the ongoing pandemic, as overburdened and underfunded health systems are requiring health care social workers (HSWs) to assume responsibilities beyond their scope of practice, institutional constraints have undoubtedly heightened encounters of moral distress (MD). MD is the psychological disequilibrium that arises when institutional factors obligate an individual to carry out a task that violates their professional and/or personal ethics. Our qualitative study investigated HSWs’ (n = 43) MD in Texas during the 2019 COVID-19 pandemic. Findings from our study indicate that MD occurs across five levels: (i) patient care decisions; (ii) personal care decisions; (iii) team/unit decisions; (iv) organisational decisions; and (v) social justice decisions. MD is rooted in systems that disproportionately impact historically excluded populations, including social inequities such as financial instability, homelessness and substance use. Organisations need to explicitly consider social justice initiatives that seek to identify growing disparities in care that have been at the forefront of the pandemic; macro-level perspectives that expand MD must address social and health inequities that impede daily tasks of all health care workers. MD encounters that are rooted in social determinants of health can inform supervision, education and practice to ameliorate HSWs’ value conflict.
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac206
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Reimagining Social Work Placements in the Covid-19 Pandemic

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      Pages: 448 - 470
      Abstract: AbstractThe Covid-19 pandemic has fundamentally changed how social work education is provided, and these changes are particularly pronounced in field education. Globally, the introduction of restrictions on mobility and social interaction have contributed to the cancellation, postponement and early termination of social work field placements. Accrediting bodies, social work field education departments and industry partner agencies have needed to rapidly adapt how placements are conceptualised and provided. This article examines the experiences of agencies who have continued to provide student placements throughout the pandemic. Interviews were conducted with placement supervisors employed at twelve human services agencies partnering with a university social work department in Melbourne, Australia. Whilst experiencing challenges, agencies outlined how they adapted to the environment to enable meaningful student placement experiences. This article contributes to an ongoing discussion around the trajectory of social work field education and the significance of agency-based placements in this evolution.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac124
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Roles and Tasks of Social Workers in Chinese Disaster Management

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      Pages: 471 - 489
      Abstract: AbstractAlthough social workers are often deeply involved in disaster management, their distinct roles and tasks in its various phases have not been adequately recognised. This may impede social work training and practice in disaster contexts and particularly in China, which regularly experiences disasters. In this study, we investigated the unique roles and tasks of Chinese social workers in disaster management. We conducted thirty-two in-depth interviews with stakeholders including front line social workers, academics, government officials, other professionals and survivors, and a content analysis. We identified the three main roles of social workers as conduits, mediators and providers of psychosocial support. We then assessed the complexity of social workers’ roles and tasks in the Chinese context, and the potential for the strategic integration of social workers into a top-down disaster management system.
      PubDate: Fri, 17 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac110
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Supervision of Information Communication Technologies in Social Work
           Practice: A Mixed Methods Study

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      Pages: 490 - 512
      Abstract: AbstractThe integration of informal information and communication technologies (ICTs) has transformed social work practice, yet the use of ICTs in practice is not commonly discussed in supervision. The aim of this sequential mixed methods study was to understand the factors associated with social workers’ discussion of informal ICT use in supervision, and the considerations that influence these discussions. A logistic regression was conducted using data from Canadian #socialwork survey participants in organisational settings (n = 958). Quantitative findings were integrated with the qualitative findings from a reflexive thematic analysis of participant interviews (n = 22), some of which occurred during and were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on our integrated findings, supervisory ICT discussion was highly dependent on organisational policy and supervisors’ interpretation of these policies. The setting in which the survey participants worked was also associated with ICT discussion in supervision. In making their decisions to discuss ICT use, interview participants further highlighted the importance of the supervisory relationship based on supervisor qualities and availability.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac113
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Social Workers’ Experiences of Bureaucracy: A Systematic Synthesis
           of Qualitative Studies

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      Pages: 513 - 533
      Abstract: AbstractSince the 1990s managerialism has spread across the public sector, implementing private sector practices targeting greater efficiency in public services. Consequently, reforms focusing on risk management, standardisation, fragmentation and accountability have increased demands for paperwork and procedure compliance from street-level bureaucrats (SLBs). Focusing specifically on the impact on social work, this paper presents the findings of a systematic literature review synthesising social workers experience of bureaucracy across thirty-nine published qualitative studies. Despite warnings being voiced about the risks associated with enforcing highly bureaucratic and managerial cultures in social work, evidence reinforces the consequences predicted over two decades prior. Major themes from the systematic synthesis include negative effects on social workers and service users, social workers’ resistance to bureaucratic structures and the coping strategies they employed. Although the review found some positive perspectives, this was sporadic and only reported in a minority of studies. As SLBs, social workers face an important question: What should be prioritised in the delivery of social services' Managing procedures, administration and documentation or pursuing sustainable change through meaningful engagement with service users'
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac106
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Enhancing the relevance of social work education in Nigeria

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      Pages: 534 - 551
      Abstract: AbstractQuality locally relevant social work education is essential in social workers’ professional development and, in Nigeria, in the profession’s struggle for legitimacy and connection with local families and communities. It is also pivotal to efficient and effective service delivery in the contemporary digitally connected world, where myriad social issues warrant the professional intervention of skilled practitioners in diverse fields. Social workers’ responsiveness and effectiveness depend crucially on the quality and relevance of the education and training they receive at the start of and throughout their professional careers. This article examines social work education, its relatively recent origins and issues in contemporary Nigerian society highlighting the ongoing need for socio-cultural relevance in the interests of professional recognition. It proposes that social work educators and administrators have a crucial role to play in enhancing the profession’s relevance and suggests a way forward.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac144
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • How Does Race Work in Social Work Education' Everyday Racial Logics,
           Distinctions and Practices on Social Work Qualifying Programmes in England
           

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      Pages: 552 - 569
      Abstract: AbstractThis article presents findings from a study which explored the everyday ways race works on social work programmes in England. The study focused on how race was spoken about and conceptualised, how people were categorised and ordered according to race and the social interactions where race was understood by participants to be significant. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight social work lecturers and nineteen black social work students at two universities in England, to explore the following topics: classroom-based and practice learning, assessment and feedback, interactions between students and between students and educators, and university and practice agency cultures. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and the following themes identified: the routine interpellation of black students and communities in terms of absolute cultural differences, black students’ everyday experiences of marginalisation, hostility and othering, and the racialisation of black students in judgements made about their academic and practice performance. The article concludes that social work education must engage more deeply with contemporary theorisations of race and culture, and that social work educators need a reflexive understanding of how notions such as diversity, equality and universal academic standards are put into practice in ways that marginalise and devalue black students.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac120
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • bell hooks’s Legacy and Social Work: A Distillation of Her Key Ideas
           about Love and Some Implications for Social Work Practice

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      Pages: 570 - 586
      Abstract: Abstractbell hooks is regarded as one of the most influential cultural critics, writers and speakers of the last fifty years. She has published more than forty books which collectively articulate a feminist critique of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy. At the same time, she offers a loving, non-violent and just vision for attaining collective and personal well-being. Hooks makes feminist theory meaningful as a guide not only for Black American women but also for anyone seeking to resist inequality and discrimination due to race, class and gender. Her main thesis is that where there is love there can be no oppression. hooks’s contribution is traced through some of the key themes of her books which explicitly refer to love to develop a rich understanding of love and its transformative power. These contributions are then considered for the relevance they have for social work. Social workers can practice love by fostering their own and others’: self-love; willingness to learn; and cultural responsiveness. Two loving practices with other people are dadirri (deep listening) and narrative resistance. Love provides the power to do the justice and healing work.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac127
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Social Work and the ‘Social Doctor’: Bowlby, Social Reproduction and
           ‘Common Sense’

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      Pages: 587 - 603
      Abstract: AbstractThis article furnishes a critical commentary on the work of John Bowlby. It is argued that social work’s critical engagement with his contributions demands that his ideas are historised. An exploration of his rarely examined early articles reveals a figure preoccupied with the wider social world and not simply the dyadic relationship involving the mother and her child. Viewing himself as a ‘social doctor’, Bowlby was also relentlessly intent on shaping public and professional perceptions within the framework of the ‘Fordist’ economic and social settlement after the Second World War. It is maintained that Bowlby and ‘Bowlbyism’ might be more fully understood if examined through the lens of Marxist feminist social reproduction theory and alongside Gramscian ideas about ‘common sense’.
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac132
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Professional capital and social work futures: Contemporary challenges for
           Australian social work

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      Pages: 604 - 620
      Abstract: AbstractThe future of social work preoccupies scholars and educators in the field, with consideration periodically extending beyond ‘trends’ to the fundamental question of whether social work per se even has a future. A recurring theme in these debates concerns social work’s professional project, and whether professionalisation enhances or undermines social work’s values and aims. Whilst contributing to the conceptual articulation of a social work habitus, few of these contributions are informed by the views of practitioners in the field. This article analyses 122 practitioners’ perspectives on current issues for social work, through data taken from a survey conducted in Victoria, Australia in 2018. Practitioners’ perspectives are analysed in relation to the theoretical construct of professional capital. In contrast to modernist interpretations of professionalisation-as-status typical of polemical works, a professional capital perspective construes social work’s professional project as a legitimation strategy, the primary aim of which is to secure recognition of the unique view of the social world which informs social work practice. From that perspective, arguments against professionalisation misrecognise the role professionalisation plays in securing social work’s future, unwittingly placing its future in jeopardy.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac143
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • A Social Work Model of Historical Trauma

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      Pages: 621 - 636
      Abstract: AbstractThis article introduces a Social Work Model of Historical Trauma. The model draws from social work perspectives (ecosystems theory and the life model, human rights philosophy, race-based traumatic stress injury theory and attachment theory), disparities research, social work issues and policy statements, social work ethics and epigenetics. Assessment and intervention in micro, mezzo and macro domains are discussed. The article concludes with a case vignette and model application.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac112
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Approaching the Colonial

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      Pages: 637 - 655
      Abstract: AbstractNotwithstanding the frequency with which the word ‘colonial’ and its variants occur in social work writing, it is treated with a curious lack of inspection and reflection. I will critically assess how social work writing has dealt with the colonial in the light of recent work in the field, before drawing several inferences. I will put forward a series of arguments as to useful ways of considering the nature and significance of late colonialism for social welfare, primarily but not only in countries formerly part of the British Empire in Singapore and Southeast Asia. I will suggest the need for a scholarship for imperial social work. In an endeavour to suggest an agenda for work in this area, and for its consequences for further arguments regarding ‘late colonialism’, I will signal the relevance of mutual influences between colonies and the metropole; the inter-relation of war and welfare; the role of central and colonial government officials; the significance of work by imperial anthropologists; women in late colonial social welfare; and the meaning of nation-building as part of late and post-colonial welfare programmes.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac141
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Social Work in Brazil in the Vortex of Three crises: Pandemic, Social and
           Political

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      Pages: 656 - 672
      Abstract: AbstractSocial work in Brazil advocates a radical and critical model of social work theorisation and practice. This article explores the Brazilian theoretical and practice model, identifying the profession as being in the vortex of Covid-19, increasing state economic austerity, attacks on previously hard-won progressive social policy and increasing inequality and precarity. This provides a challenging practice environment. The professional re-conceptualisation model proposes that social work needs to fully theorise social difficulties to ensure that the profession intervenes to address the causes of the problems, rather than manifestations underlying them. This is undertaken through aligning itself with working-class conflicts, promoting rights and refusing to accept the rolling back of support already won. The Brazilian framework, located within its social realities, offers an opportunity for social work globally to consider what lessons can be learnt, to recognise the uniqueness of its perspectives and provide solidarity through its recognition.
      PubDate: Thu, 18 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac129
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Critical Reflections on Women, Family, Crime and Justice, Isla Masson,
           Lucy Baldwin and Natalie Booth (eds.)

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      Pages: 673 - 675
      Abstract: Critical Reflections on Women, Family, Crime and Justice,MassonIsla, BaldwinLucy and BoothNatalie (eds.), Bristol, Policy Press, 2021, pp. xii + 235, ISBN 978-1-4473-5869-5 (pbk), £21.59
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac032
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Working with Domestic Violence and Abuse across the Lifecourse:
           Understanding Good Practice, Ravi Thiara and Lorraine Radford (eds)

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      Pages: 675 - 676
      Abstract: Working with Domestic Violence and Abuse across the Lifecourse: Understanding Good Practice, ThiaraRavi and RadfordLorraine (eds), London, Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2021, pp. 272, ISBN 978-1-7859-2404-0 (p/b), £19.99
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac033
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Safeguarding Children Living with Foster Carers, Adopters and Special
           Guardians: Learning from Case Reviews 2007–2019, Hedy Cleaver and Wendy
           Rose

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      Pages: 677 - 678
      Abstract: Safeguarding Children Living with Foster Carers, Adopters and Special Guardians: Learning from Case Reviews 2007–2019, CleaverHedy and RoseWendy, London, CoramBAAF, 2020, pp. 131, ISBN 9781910039984 (p/b), £18.95
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac040
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Dissenting Social Work: Critical Theory, Resistance and Pandemic, Paul
           Michael Garrett

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      Pages: 678 - 680
      Abstract: Dissenting Social Work: Critical Theory, Resistance and Pandemic, GarrettPaul Michael, Oxfordshire, Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, 2021, pp. 288, ISBN 9780367903701, £34.99 (p/b)
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac045
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Children’s Experiences of Welfare in Modern Britain, Siân
           Pooley and Johnathon Taylor

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 681 - 682
      Abstract: Children’s Experiences of Welfare in Modern Britain, PooleySiân and TaylorJohnathon (eds), London, University of London Press, 2021, pp. xv + 285, ISBN 978-1-9127-02862, £40 (hbk), available to download for free
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac047
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Sex and Diversity in Later Life: Critical Perspectives, Trish
           Hafford-Letchfield, Paul Simpson and Paul Reynolds

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 683 - 684
      Abstract: Sex and Diversity in Later Life: Critical Perspectives, Hafford-LetchfieldTrish, SimpsonPaul and ReynoldsPaul, Bristol, Policy Press, 2021, pp. xxvi + 238, ISBN 9781447355403 (h/b), £26.99
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac050
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Support and Protection across the Lifecourse—A Practical Approach for
           Social Workers, Caroline McGregor and Pat Dolan

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 684 - 686
      Abstract: Support and Protection across the Lifecourse—A Practical Approach for Social Workers, McGregorCaroline and DolanPat, Bristol, Policy Press, 2021, pp. x + 256, ISBN 978-1-4473-6054-4 (pbk), £24.99
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac053
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • How to Use Social Work Theory in Practice: An Essential Guide, Malcolm
           Payne

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      Pages: 687 - 689
      Abstract: How to Use Social Work Theory in Practice: An Essential Guide, PayneMalcolm, Bristol, Policy Press, 2020, pp. xiii + 272, ISBN: 978-4473-4377-6 (pbk), £21.99
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac060
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Remote and Rural Dementia Care: Policy, Research and Practice, Anthea
           Innes, Debra Morgan, and Jane Farmer (eds)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 689 - 691
      Abstract: Remote and Rural Dementia Care: Policy, Research and Practice, InnesAnthea, MorganDebra, and FarmerJane (eds), Bristol, Policy Press, 2020, pp. 305, ISBN 978-1447344957, £79.99, £27.99 Kindle
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac061
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Correction to: Rethinking Anti-Discriminatory and Anti-Oppressive Theories
           for Social Work Practice, Christine Cocker, Trish Hafford-Letchfield (eds)
           

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      Pages: 692 - 692
      Abstract: This is a correction to: Richard Ingram, Rethinking Anti-Discriminatory and Anti-Oppressive Theories for Social Work Practice, Christine Cocker, Trish Hafford-Letchfield (eds), The British Journal of Social Work, Volume 52, Issue 4, June 2022, Pages 2427–2428, https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcaa243
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac192
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 1 (2022)
       
 
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