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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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British Journal of Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.019
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 79  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0045-3102 - ISSN (Online) 1468-263X
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [425 journals]
  • Revitalising Communities of Shared Knowledge in the Wake of a Global
           Crisis

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      Pages: 2475 - 2477
      Abstract: The current academic year has borne witness to a remarkable resurgence, a rekindling of in-person interactions within the world of social work. For the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic transformed the landscape of human connection, social workers across the globe are reclaiming the vitality of shared physical spaces. In Europe alone, all three major international social work organisations (IFSW, EASSW, ESWRA) organised major conferences within the span of three months. Social work educators and practitioners in Asia and Africa will also be organising their key events later this year, whilst the global social work conference (IFSW and IASSW) returns to face-to-face modalities, for the first time, post-pandemic, in 2024. In a period marked by isolation and distance, the chance to meet again at multiple events and conferences spanning all continents feels like a long-awaited homecoming.
      PubDate: Sat, 29 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad176
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • How Effective are Current Joint Working Practices between Children and
           Family Social Workers and Mental Health Care Coordinators, in Supporting
           Families in which there is a Primary Care-giver, with a Diagnosis of
           Emotionally Unstable Personality Disorder'

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      Pages: 2665 - 2684
      Abstract: AbstractEmotionally Unstable Personality Disorder (EUPD) is a complex and often stigmatising diagnosis. Although falling under the remit of mental health services, it is not always seen as a mental health need, and research suggests that if parents or carers are not provided with more holistic support, parental mental health will deteriorate with children likely to have poorer outcomes, placing them at an increased risk of harm. This likelihood of harm increases with compounding factors such as substance misuse and domestic abuse. One organisation alone cannot effectively address the complex difficulties that people with this diagnosis may experience, thus inter-agency working is necessary. This article explores the barriers and facilitators to inter-agency working to support parental care-givers with a diagnosis of EUPD between Children’s Social Care and a Community Mental Health Team within the same English area. Five mental health care coordinators and two children and families’ social workers who had experience working with this client group were interviewed. Participants identified the challenges and benefits of working with their partner agency around communication, knowledge, stigmatisation and resources. The research provides suggestions to develop current inter-agency working relationships and to enhance care and support available to people experiencing the diagnosis.
      PubDate: Mon, 09 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac238
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • Socio-emotional adjustment in children attending family centres: The role
           of the parent–child relationship

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      Pages: 2725 - 2741
      Abstract: AbstractFamily services offer the possibility of producing data sets, capable of primary analyses to measure service efficacy, and secondary analyses to develop nuanced understandings of family needs. In this article, we report secondary analysis of data drawn from 1,151 families elicited upon intake to family centres in Ireland. The aim was to examine correlates of children’s socio-emotional functioning, with focus on the quality of relationships between children and parents. Participating families completed surveys containing socio-demographic questions and standardised instruments tapping into children’s social, emotional and behavioural strengths and difficulties, parents’ mental health, and closeness and conflict in parent–child relationship. Findings indicated that parents’ perceptions of their children’s socio-emotional functioning significantly influenced the quality of the child–parent relationship. Higher levels of conflict were significantly associated with psychological difficulties, whilst greater closeness was significantly related to prosocial behaviours. These relationships held after controlling for a range of child, parent and family socio-demographic variables, such as the child’s experience of chronic illness or stressful life events, both of which independently predicted poorer outcomes. Results are discussed in terms of the dynamic, reciprocal nature of family relationships whereby parent–child conflict and children’s problematic socio-emotional functioning likely influence, and are influenced by, each other.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac241
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • Evaluation of Social Work Student Placements in General Practice

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      Pages: 2762 - 2783
      Abstract: AbstractSocial work and social work student placements in general practice [GP] can contribute to wholistic healthcare. The overall aims of this research were to develop, implement and evaluate a field education placement curriculum for social work student placements in GP clinics. Between December 2021 and June 2022, six students completed their social work placements in four GP practices in North Queensland. Data collection included student records and an online survey that invited students, field educators, task supervisors, mentors, allied health professionals and GPs to provide feedback about the usefulness of the developed materials, the benefits and challenges of the placements, the services provided by the students, patient outcomes and feedback, social work learning, service delivery overall and the value of, and satisfaction with, the social work GP placements. Social work student placements in GP practices offer a valuable broadening of field education learning opportunities for social work and can benefit GP settings. Such placements need to be particularly carefully scaffolded and supported through a comprehensive curriculum, supervision, and a welcoming GP setting. Students interested in embarking in such a learning journey need to be highly confident and competent in social work practice.
      PubDate: Tue, 03 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac244
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • Evaluating Child Interviews Conducted by Child Protective Services Workers
           and Police Investigators

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      Pages: 2784 - 2803
      Abstract: AbstractHigh-quality interviews that follow best-practice guidelines are the best means available to frontline child protective service (CPS) workers and specially trained police officers to investigate and detect abuse and maltreatment. In Norway, the CPS and police are trained in the same interview method. In the current quantitative study, we investigate sixty-five interviews conducted by the CPS of children ages 4–8 years and seventy-two interviews conducted by the police of children ages 3–6 years. Our analysis shows that the CPS workers presented more open-ended invitations and fewer suggestive questions than the police officers. However, the CPS also asked more option-posing questions. Still, this finding may indicate that CPS workers come closer than police officers to follow best practice guidelines when they conduct child interviews. It should be noted that the police are also trained in an extended interview method, unlike the CPS workers. The number of open-ended invitations was sparse in both samples. Differences in the span of children’s ages in the two samples and different legal frameworks may have affected the findings. Implications for interview training are discussed.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac245
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • Co-producing Research with Disabled Lay Researchers: Lessons from a
           Project Exploring Social Workers’ Use of Digital Communication
           Technologies with Disabled Users of Social Work Services

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      Pages: 2820 - 2840
      Abstract: AbstractThe value of co-produced research is increasingly recognised. This is a case study of a lay conducted, co-produced qualitative research study on the experiences of social workers and Disabled users of their services of using (or not) digital technologies when communicating with each other. We describe the co-production process from inception to dissemination and draw out lessons for future studies. Disabled lay researchers developed interview topic guides, conducted semi-structured interviews with social workers and Disabled users of social work services, analysed the data and led or contributed to study outputs. Several factors contributed to the success of this study. It was co-produced using service user, practitioner and academic knowledge. It is built on existing trusted relationships. Training and support were targeted and relevant, and delivered using a variety of learning methods, including peer support. Disabled lay researchers drew on their lived experiences to develop topic guides and interpret data. The study team was committed to inclusion, capacity building and an assets-based approach, and to carefully managing power relationships. Challenges were the time required to setup the study and to train and support lay researchers, and the bureaucratic and governance systems that were not ideally suited to root and branch co-production.
      PubDate: Wed, 18 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac248
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • Measuring the Quality of Statutory Social Workers’ Communication Skills
           with Young People: Reliability of the My Social Work Partner Scales

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      Pages: 2841 - 2859
      Abstract: AbstractStatutory meetings are at the core of social work practice, yet there is no quantitatively tested common set of criteria for assessing statutory social workers’ communication skills with young people. Reliably measuring such skills is important for the training and supervision of social workers as well for drawing conclusions about whether such skills impact service users’ outcomes. To fill this gap, we developed a new measure, the My Social Work Partner (MRP in Danish abbreviation) scales, which measure eleven dimensions of statutory communication. We tested the inter-coder reliability and intra-coder reliability of codings on the MRP scales using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) in a random sample of thirty videotapes of statutory meetings. Five professional social workers participated in the inter-coder reliability test; three of them coded the same films again after a three- to five-month interval for the intra-coder reliability test. ICC estimates of inter-coder reliability ranged from good to excellent. Intra-coder reliability estimates ranged from fair to excellent. Overall, the results are promising and support the use of the MRP scales in social work practice with young persons, education and research. Future research will focus on how to improve the intra-coder reliability of the scales, in particular the Dialogue structure scale.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad002
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • Empowerment or Holding the Child Responsible' An Australian
           Recovery-Oriented Mental Health Policy Analysis

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      Pages: 2860 - 2877
      Abstract: AbstractRecovery, as a concept is internationally recognised as a means to empower children to manage their own mental health. Recovery-oriented mental health policy production and service delivery in many Western countries, however, occurs in a discursive field influenced by biomedical and neo-liberal discourses. This article uses Critical Discourse Analysis to investigate an Australian policy—'A National Framework for Recovery-Oriented Mental Health Services: Guide for Practitioners and Providers', to critically analyse the competing versions of recovery. The findings reveal ideological slippages at work and show the operation of biomedical, developmental, collaborative, empowerment and responsibilisation discourses that compete in this mental health policy. This article shows how social workers require critical analysis to discern the consequences of different understandings of recovery in the child and youth mental health field. Despite the collaborative and strengths-based language of recovery, the analysis demonstrates the need to recognise the fine line between empowerment and the neo-liberal imperative for children to self-manage their mental health concerns.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad009
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • How did the COVID-19 Pandemic Affect Palliative Care Social Work
           Services' A Scoping Review

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      Pages: 2878 - 2901
      Abstract: AbstractThe SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) generated life-defining challenges on a global level, affecting healthcare professionals, who faced the same imminent public health threat as patients and families. Reduced face-to-face contact, wearing personal protective equipment and enforcing visitor restrictions generated moral distress in healthcare professionals, unable to provide holistic care. This scoping review explored the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on palliative care social workers (PCSWs). PubMED, CINAHL and PsycINFO were systematically searched. Empirical studies and reflective articles about palliative care social work during the pandemic were screened. Data extraction used Arksey and O’Malley’s framework. Thematic analysis was underpinned by Braun and Clarke for identifying, analysing and reporting patterns. From 706 citations retrieved, 125 were selected for full-text review and 32 were included in the scoping review. Thematic analysis revealed three themes: (i) moral distress, (ii) transitioning and (iii) inequality. Implementing visitor restrictions caused moral distress and raised questions about their justification. Not being present at the time of death generated feelings of anger among bereaved family members. Virtual communication replaced face-to-face contact, yet improved access to Telehealth. Inequalities were illuminated and PCSWs advocated for disadvantaged populations, worked creatively to minimise suffering or stigma and supported peers.
      PubDate: Sat, 11 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad042
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • The Role of Social Work Education in Relation to Empathy and Self-Reported
           Resilience: Results from Entry to Exit of Social Work Education on the
           Island of Ireland during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Pages: 2902 - 2921
      Abstract: AbstractThe COVID-19 pandemic has affected all aspects of people’s lives worldwide, including the work of social workers and the education of social work students. Field placements are a significant part of social work education, but during the pandemic they were cut short and most teachings moved online. The current mixed methods study examined the effects of social work education on social work students’ empathy and resilience during the COVID-19 pandemic on the island of Ireland. A matched sample of forty-nine students completed an online survey at the start (T1) of their degree and at the end (T2). A further 229 students who only completed the T1 survey were compared to 70 others who only completed the T2 survey. The results showed improved resilience in the cohort comparison. There were no differences in empathy in the matched sample nor between the cohorts. Thematic analysis of students’ narratives showed that they found the switch to online learning difficult, with some reporting negative impacts on their mental health and the abrupt ending of placements impacting their feelings of preparedness for practice. Implications of this study and future research areas are discussed.
      PubDate: Fri, 10 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad046
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • The Role of Uncertainty in Professionals’ Thinking about Children
           Who Harm Other People

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      Pages: 2922 - 2939
      Abstract: AbstractUncertainty in thinking and reasoning is crucial in allowing professionals to engage with the complexities of practice, yet the way it is expressed in childcare social work remains under-researched. This study examines the uncertainty expressed by professionals when discussing children who present a serious threat of harm to others. Discourse analysis is used to examine data from twenty meetings involving seventy-five professionals. The findings suggest that there is considerable variance in the way professionals express uncertainty and in many of the meetings it appears to be relatively infrequent. The low levels of expression of uncertainty in such complex cases are problematic because it reflects limitations in professionals’ thinking and actions. The majority of instances of uncertainty occur in response to a question from another professional. This is a positive aspect of professional interaction and suggests that robust questioning from peers that encourage analysis of our practice might be particularly useful in prompting uncertainty. Rather than ignore or supress uncertainty by viewing it in negative terms, it should be valued and embraced by professionals who want to reduce unnecessary errors and enhance children’s safety.
      PubDate: Mon, 13 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad056
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • Decisions in Child Protection—Heuristics, Law and Organisation

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      Pages: 2940 - 2957
      Abstract: AbstractWith theories of heuristics and decision-making ecology as our analytical lens, we examined social work practitioners’ use of heuristics (rules-of-thumb) as a response to real-world situations, emphasising the legal framework and how the work was organised. The data comprised eleven exploratory and follow-up group interviews with thirty-nine social workers and team leaders, observations of 108 decisions in child cases during eighteen meetings, and an analysis of fourteen case files in two Danish municipalities. Open, interpretative coding was used within a systemic approach, using Fish et al. (2008). Three heuristic rules guided decisions in all cases: (i) Form and maintain the first impression. (ii) When in doubt or disagreement, wait. (iii) Avoid parents’ resistance. Key takeaways are that these heuristics help social workers and managers and are connected to satisficing strategies as a natural response to legal and organisational factors. However, the heuristics can also lead to a lack of transparency, delayed interventions and other kinds of bias. We point out the need for understanding such patterns through an extended research to facilitate better and timely feedback to practitioners on their decisions.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad065
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • ‘Relocating’ Adolescents from Risk beyond the Home: What Do We Learn
           When We Ask about Safety'

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      Pages: 2958 - 2978
      Abstract: AbstractThere is an absence of evidence supporting the use of ‘out-of-area placements’ to address risks adolescents face beyond the home. Approximately one in ten adolescents in England and Wales are ‘relocated’ from their hometowns by children’s social care teams due to these risks. Initial findings from the Independent Review of Children’s Social Care in England situate these relocations as a ‘failure’ to safeguard teenagers. Using participatory approaches to research design and data collection, this article asks what do we learn about the impact of relocations when we ask about safety' Activity-based, qualitative interviews were conducted with young people (n = 5), parents (n = 3) and professionals (n = 15) based in England and Scotland between 2020 and 2021, asking what worked and what didn’t when a relocation was chosen, and what was the perceived impact on safety. Interview data were thematically analysed in collaboration with young people and a Research Advisory Group of professionals, all with expertise in the area. Data indicated a tension between what professionals, and then parents and young people, thought was significant when planning relocations and an ambivalence about the impact of relocations. Considerations for safety planning are suggested to support young people’s holistic safety needs.
      PubDate: Sat, 25 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad077
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • Managing DNACPR Recommendations in Residential Care: Towards Improved
           Training for Social Care and Capacity Professionals

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      Pages: 2979 - 2999
      Abstract: AbstractThe use of ‘Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation’ (DNACPR) recommendations has come under scrutiny during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the Care Quality Commission (CQC) has issued a call for new standards, guidance and training. One group for whom new training is required is ‘capacity professionals’ working in and with residential care facilities. These professionals (including Independent Mental Capacity Advocates and Best Interests Assessors) typically have a social work background and have specialist training regarding the 2005 Mental Capacity Act, the provisions of which have a direct relevance to DNACPR recommendations. We report on a survey and focus groups that probed the experiences of this professional group during the pandemic. We recruited 262 participants by approaching civil society organisations in which capacity professionals are well represented; twenty-two participated in follow-on focus groups. We used manifest content analysis and descriptive statistics to analyse the results. Our findings contribute to an emerging picture of what transpired in residential care homes during the first year of the pandemic and help to provide an empirical and normative basis for the development of the new guidance and training for which the CQC has called.
      PubDate: Tue, 16 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad078
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • Seeking Asylum and Mental Health—A Practical Guide for Professionals,
           Chris Maloney, Julia Nelki and Alison Summers (eds)

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      Pages: 3009 - 3010
      Abstract: Seeking Asylum and Mental Health—A Practical Guide for Professionals,MaloneyChris, NelkiJulia and SummersAlison(eds), Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2022, pp. 348, ISBN 9781009292184, £39.99, (p/b)
      PubDate: Tue, 31 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad003
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
  • International Perspectives on Social Work and Political Conflict, Joe
           Duffy, Jim Campbell and Carol Tosone (eds)

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      Pages: 3010 - 3012
      Abstract: International Perspectives on Social Work and Political Conflict,DuffyJoe, CampbellJim and TosoneCarol (eds), Abingdon, Oxon, Routledge, 2020, pp. xviii + 190, ISBN 9781138557307, £96 (h/b), £29.59 (p/b)
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad004
      Issue No: Vol. 53, No. 5 (2023)
       
 
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