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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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British Journal of Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.019
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 73  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0045-3102 - ISSN (Online) 1468-263X
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [423 journals]
  • We Are Never Going Back—Social Workers Should Be Proud ‘Woke
           Champions’

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      Pages: 3777 - 3782
      Abstract: I have been invited to contribute to this Editorial as the winner of the Kay McDougal Prize for the article: Okpokiri, C. (2021) ‘Parenting in fear: Child welfare micro strategies of Nigerian parents in Britain’, British Journal of Social Work (https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcaa205).
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac181
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Beyond the call of duty: A Qualitative study into the experiences of
           family members acting as a Nearest Relative in Mental Health Act
           assessments

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      Pages: 3783 - 3801
      Abstract: AbstractResearch shows that tensions between family carers and professionals become acute where the issue of compulsory admission to hospital is at stake. In England and Wales, a specific family member is appointed to safeguard the interests of a person assessed under the Mental Health Act 1983. This currently occurs through the Nearest Relative (NR) role. The Government is proposing to replace this with a Nominated Person role, chosen by the service user. Drawing on the concept of carer burden, this study reports on the views of nineteen NRs in England to discover their experiences of being involved in a Mental Health Act assessment. Participants identified that they undertook the role due to a sense of duty. Their experiences were mixed with participants highlighting both feelings of distress during the assessment and feelings of relief once their relative had been detained. Participants reported feeling conflicted when their relative was detained and feelings of frustration towards mental health services. The findings have implications for proposals to reform the Mental Health Act 1983. They show that education and support programmes should be created for NRs/Nominated Persons and that research is needed to assess whether such support is effective at reducing carer burden.
      PubDate: Sat, 29 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcab258
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • The Role of the Approved Mental Health Professional: A ‘Fool’s
           Errand’'

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      Pages: 3802 - 3819
      Abstract: AbstractThis article explores the concept of a ‘fool’s errand’ in relation to the specialist role of the Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP). An AMHP has a duty to make an application following a Mental Health Act assessment to detain and admit an individual to a psychiatric hospital. Findings from a qualitative study of ten multiprofessional AMHPs in England suggested AMHPs were subjected to a ‘fool’s errand’, when they were asked by psychiatrists and bed managers to practice in a way, they, themselves, considered unwise or foolish and that did not make sense in the context of their role. The author will illuminate how false starts and delays in securing treatment and care outcomes for mentally unwell individuals compromised AMHP practice.
      PubDate: Mon, 04 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac059
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Staff Perceptions and Capability in using the Mental Capacity Act to
           Assess Decision Making in those with Acquired Brain Injury and Executive
           Dysfunction

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      Pages: 3820 - 3839
      Abstract: AbstractThe purpose of this article is to establish the perceptions and capability of social care professionals (SCPs) in using the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 to assess decision-making capacity in those who have executive dysfunction and issues pertaining to the frontal lobe paradox, in comparison to health care professionals (HCPs). HCPs and SCPs from inpatient and community neurorehabilitation teams, social care teams and a best interest assessor team were contacted via convenience sampling and participated in semi-structured interviews. Data from these consultations were analysed using a form of thematic analysis known as template analysis. Four over-arching template themes were identified: ‘assessment structure’, ‘implications of brain injury’, ‘professionals’ capability/expertise’ and ‘consent, self-report and mental capacity’. The findings suggest that SCPs would benefit from bespoke practice guidance designed to help with the application of the MCA with the acquired brain injury/long-term neurological conditions population—particularly where there is a concern about a person’s ability to understand, apply or use information outside of an assessment or supportive conversation.
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac057
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • The Coronavirus Act’s Easements to the Care Act 2014: A Pragmatic
           Response or a Red Herring'

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      Pages: 3840 - 3857
      Abstract: AbstractEasements to the Care Act 2014 were introduced in England in Spring 2020 to support local authorities (LAs) who were dealing with the impact of COVID-19 on adult social care. They were adopted by a small number of LAs that only kept them in place for a very short period. This article draws on the limited literature covering easements and on a synthesis of the views of twenty key informants with professional experiences of social care policy, advocacy, practice and law. It covers the way they were introduced and the opposition which they attracted, as well as contrasting views on the nature and necessity of easements. It also records the perceptions of interviewees on the rationale for the decisions taken to adopt or not adopt them. The article examines the reasons why government thought they should be in place and the concerns of some of those in the voluntary, human rights and legal sectors who challenged their introduction and operation. Whilst the findings contain messages for how to approach the management of a similar crisis in the future, the study identified a lack of evidence of the impact of easements on those using social care as well as their carers.
      PubDate: Wed, 02 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac009
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Patterns of Demand and Provision in English Adult Social Care Services

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      Pages: 3858 - 3880
      Abstract: AbstractThis article reports on a quantitative study of the national datasets for adult social care in England. Building on recent analysis of trends in demand and expenditure, the aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between local authority (LA) characteristics, levels of demand for state-funded services and rates of short- and long-term provision. Publicly available data on short- and long-term activity and finances were collected for all LAs in England from 2016 to 2019 and combined with other indicators including population demographics and the Index of Multiple Deprivation. Correlation analysis was undertaken to investigate patterns of demand and provision and their link to contextual factors. Findings showed that variation between LAs was to some extent shaped by contextual factors such as deprivation and demographics, but was also subject to the effects of rationing and the impact of the self-funded market on levels of demand. Implications are discussed for efforts to reform the adult social system and address longstanding inequalities that have been both highlighted and exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac011
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Perspectives on Coping with Post-traumatic Stress and Substance Use
           Disorders: A Photovoice Study

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      Pages: 3881 - 3903
      Abstract: AbstractThis photovoice study explores the experiences of adaptive coping and safety amongst adults with co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD). Participants (n = 6) were purposively sampled from Seeking Safety groups at a community mental health centre in the United States of America. Participants identified primarily as women (83 per cent), white (50 per cent) and had a mean age of 42 years (standard deviation = 11). Data were gathered through individual photo-elicitation interviews. Through reflexive thematic analysis, the authors generated five themes related to coping safely with distress: (1) similar to other views on mental health recovery, the process of learning to cope with distress was framed as a journey; (2) participants cited several behavioural and meaning-making strategies for coping with distress; (3) feelings of agency were promoted through mastery of wellness skills; (4) healthy personal and professional relationships contributed to positive growth and use of adaptive coping strategies; and (5) participants’ social and physical environments greatly impacted perceptions of safety. Findings provide new evidence on the range of adaptive coping strategies persons with SUD and PTSD employ to realise feelings of safety and the assets relationships and communities can provide to support post-traumatic growth and recovery.
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac041
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Gypsy, Roma and Traveller Children in Child Welfare Services in
           England

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      Pages: 3904 - 3922
      Abstract: AbstractOver the last five decades, there has been a growing concern that Gypsy, Roma and Traveller children are overrepresented in child welfare services (CWS) in Europe. However, statistical data used to substantiate this concern often conflates ethnicity and nationality limiting our full understanding of the reported situation. This article provides a more comprehensive illustration of overrepresentation, advancing the quantitative study of this topic in England. Using a per capita division by population method, data obtained from the Department of Education were tested for disparity ratios across four key indicators. The analyses found that the recorded number of ‘Gypsy/Roma’ and ‘Travellers of Irish Heritage’ in CWS in England has been growing at a disproportionate rate since 2011–2012 to now demonstrate overrepresentation. The findings go beyond the concerns that have been raised to highlight a more specific need for remedial and restorative action. Implications are discussed for strategic responses to drive up data quality and further explore the details of the disparities that are found.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcab265
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Use of Linked Administrative Children’s Social Care Data for Research: A
           Scoping Review of Existing UK Studies

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      Pages: 3923 - 3944
      Abstract: AbstractIncreasing access to children’s social care data presents enormous potential for research and policy evaluation, with opportunities increased where data can be anonymously linked to other sources of information, such as health and education data. The purpose of this scoping review was to provide an overview of all UK data linkage studies that have used routinely collected individual-level children’s social care administrative data. Six research databases were searched and twenty-five studies were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria, with the majority (n = 18) based on English data. Complexities and the time-consuming nature of these studies are highlighted, as are issues with missing data and inconsistencies in recording information across local authorities, impacting on the linkage process. Increased access to such data, and improvements to data capture, could improve the utility of these valuable administrative data assets in the social care sector.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac049
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Research-based Risk Factors for Child Maltreatment: Do Child Protection
           Workers Use them in their Case Investigations'

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      Pages: 3945 - 3963
      Abstract: AbstractRisk assessment is an essential aspect of child abuse investigations in order to estimate the risk of future abuse and to develop a risk management and intervention plan. According to the risk–need–responsivity model, intervention and risk monitoring needs to target dynamic risk factors to prevent future child maltreatment. In the current study, we examined whether child protection workers in the Netherlands focus on evidence-based risk factors for child maltreatment. We investigated 192 case files retrospectively for risk factors included in the Child Abuse Risk Evaluation-NL, a structured risk assessment instrument. We expected to find limited information concerning parental risk factors and risk factors related to parent–child interaction, but more information on family and child factors. These hypotheses were confirmed. Because parental and parent–child interaction factors are the most important and proximal risk factors for child abuse, our findings point to a large gap between science and child protection practice. We recommend the use of a structured risk assessment instrument and a risk-focused approach to intervention planning.
      PubDate: Sat, 12 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac042
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • If We Look at Child Protection Reform through the Lens of Systems Science,
           What do we See'

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      Pages: 3964 - 3981
      Abstract: AbstractThe challenge of improving the functioning of child protection systems is a complex one shared by many governments internationally. In Australia alone, there have been dozens of public inquiries and reform efforts in this vitally important domain over the past four decades. The English system has also undergone numerous reforms, including that led by Munro a decade ago. Despite these efforts, systemic pathologies persist. This article views the challenges of child protection reform through the lens of the long-established transdisciplinary systems science of cybernetics. This article argues that reform efforts are often founded on an epistemological and ontological error. Despite pervasive recourse to use of the term ‘child protection system’, and reference to the need for ‘systemic’ change, reform efforts, to varying degrees, fail to operate from a basis in the established tenets of systems science. A critique is offered and some fundamental ‘rules’ that should inform such reform efforts are distilled. It is argued that to achieve positive and enduring change, these systems must be ‘built’ from the front line. It is also argued that the political context in which reform efforts take place is perhaps more of a hindering factor than is the complexity of the systems themselves.
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac048
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Willing but Unable: How Resources Help Low-Income Mothers Care for their
           Children and Minimise Child Protection Interventions

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      Pages: 3982 - 3998
      Abstract: AbstractLow-income mothers face disproportionately high risks of engaging with statutory child protection systems. Whilst this is often perceived as a result of poor or irresponsible parenting practices, an increasing body of scholarship foregrounds the role of structural issues—such as poverty and homelessness—that constrain mothers’ agency and impact their ability to care for their children. In this article, we examine Australia’s first permanent Supportive Housing for Families (SHF) programme, which offers low-income mothers practical resources to minimise the risk of statutory child protection intervention. Our research aims to understand low-income mothers’ willingness and ability to care for their children, and how mothers engaged with and made meaning of their experiences residing in SHF. Using a qualitative research design, we analyse interview data with programme mothers (n = 17), programme support workers (n = 10) and statutory child protection officers (n = 7). We find that the resources provided through the programme enabled mothers to care for their children in ways that aligned with their parenting beliefs and aspirations. We conclude that SHF programmes may be an effective means through which low-income mothers can overcome the structural barriers that keep them engaged with statutory child protection systems.
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac027
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Devolved Budgets in Children’s Social Care: A Logic Model Based on
           Three Pilot Evaluations

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      Pages: 3999 - 4020
      Abstract: AbstractA lack of basic resources and financial difficulties affect many families and increase risks to children. Social workers’ ability to help is limited by scarce resources, and managers usually control the financial and material help that is available, making it difficult to access directly. This article reports on a mixed methods evaluation of ‘devolved budgets’ (DBs), an intervention where social workers could use up to £10,000 to help families directly and reduce the need for children to enter care. The devolution of decision making to workers was a key feature of the intervention, and many needed encouragement and support to use DBs, exercised caution and spent less than expected. Resources were used to access additional help quickly, though often in circumstances where there was no immediate likelihood of a child entering care. We present a logic model which delineates two pathways through which we theorise DBs to operate: by (1) resources being dedicated to a family’s needs and (2) improved worker–family relationships. By illustrating the erosion of practical support within the social work role, our findings substantiate critiques of managerialism. As a way forward, we argue for greater trust in social workers’ judgement.
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac019
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Exploring the Anti-professional Turn in English Foster Care: Implications
           for Policy, Practice and Research

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      Pages: 4021 - 4039
      Abstract: AbstractFollowing decades in which professionalisation was widely assumed to be a permanent (and growing) feature of foster care in England, the government signalled a clear anti-professional turn in its 2018 publication Fostering Better Outcomes (FBOs). This rejected the notion that foster carers should be regarded as professionals and indicated that there should be a return to the term foster parent. This article analyses FBO, its feeder reports and evidence submitted by stakeholders to map the shifting debate surrounding professionalisation. This includes both direct commentary on its (de)merits, but also discussion of components such as pay, conditions, motivation, training, expertise, a national college or register and related questions of supporting and valuing foster carers. A number of important flaws are identified within the review process. These include an ahistorical and insular treatment of professionalisation, its conflation with employment, a homogenisation of foster care and deployment of a familial discourse that fails to engage with its complexities and ‘hybrid’ nature between work and family. The consequence is a confused policy stance where professionalisation is rhetorically rejected while many of its core elements are endorsed. Implications of the anti-professional turn for policy, practice and research in England but also internationally, are discussed.
      PubDate: Sat, 26 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac039
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • FII and Perplexing Presentations: What is the Evidence Base for and
           against Current Guidelines, and What are the Implications for Social
           Services'

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      Pages: 4040 - 4056
      Abstract: AbstractFabricated or induced illness (FII) and perplexing presentations (PPs) are the terms used by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) in the UK. FII is presented as if synonymous with Munchausen syndrome by proxy, a rare presentation which is now known in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition as factitious disorder imposed on another (FDIoA). However, FII is not a diagnosis, and the definition is far broader than FDIoA. RCPCH admit that there is a limited evidence base for the prevalence, specificity or sensitivity of FII and the associated ‘alerting signs’, and yet local authorities across the UK have Child Protection Policies developed directly from the RCPCH guidelines. An increasing number of families of children with neurodevelopmental presentations (such as autism), or presentations of complex or less well-known conditions such as Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, are finding themselves being investigated for FII by Social Services, and consequently labelled as potential ‘perpetrators’ of child abuse, on the basis of FII guidelines. The present article discusses the issues relating to FII and PP, how current guidelines are creating implicit and explicit bias against certain kinds of families and the implications for Social Services.
      PubDate: Mon, 07 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac037
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Emerging Adults’ Intentions to Participate in Radical Protest Actions:
           The Role of the Parents in the Midst of Extra-Familial Influences and the
           Offspring’s Political Characteristics

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      Pages: 4057 - 4076
      Abstract: AbstractThis study explored the influence of parental socialisation, relative to that from crucial dispositions of the offspring and other socialisation agents, on the offspring’s intentions to engage in radical protest actions in Hong Kong, a city that has been experiencing periodical socio-political upheavals and generational rifts over politics. A sample of 666 university students, aged eighteen to twenty-five years, from eight universities in Hong Kong completed the survey. Employing hierarchical regression analysis, the results revealed that participation in ritual protests among fathers positively associated with radicalism intentions. With the introduction of a broader group of socialisation agents, however, its effect on the dependent variable became statistically non-significant. Rather, peer influence and media consumption positively associated with radicalism intentions, whilst family discussions about politics negatively associated with such intentions. After including the respondents’ political characteristics in the final model, which accounted for the greatest variance in the dependent variable, no variables reflecting influences from the household remained statistically significant. Apart from peer influence and media consumption, the respondents’ past histories of activism and radicalism and his/her political sympathies over the self-determination stance positively associated with radicalism intentions. In the light of the findings, implications for future studies and social work practice are discussed.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac035
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties of the Multidimensional Scale of
           Perceived Social Support Among Resettled Burmese in the United States

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      Pages: 4077 - 4088
      Abstract: AbstractSocial support plays an essential role in refugees’ mental health and well-being. To assess how people appraise their sources of support, one needs to have an appropriate valid and reliable measure. This study examines the psychometric properties of the Chin-Burmese version of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS-CB) among 242 resettled Burmese refugees. Participants completed the MSPSS-CB and the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). Exploratory factor analysis found a three-factor solution that supported the theoretical dimensions of the original MSPSS: friends (FR), family (FAM) and significant others (SO) subscales, accounting for 82.15 per cent of the total variance. The Cronbach’s α was 0.96, 0.94 and 0.96 for the FR, FAM and SO, respectively. Confirmatory factor analysis found moderate goodness of fit of the data. Investigation of the fit indices revealed that the three-factor solution was adequate (χ2 = 73.65, df 51, p < 0.05); Goodness-of-Fit Index = 0.952; Normed Fit Index = 0.977; Comparative Fit Index  = 0.993 and root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.043. There were negative correlations between the FR, FAM and SO subscales and the K10. The current study's findings indicate that the MSPSS-CB is a reliable and valid instrument for use with the Chin-Burmese population and can provide helping professionals with a useful tool to measure and identify the source of social support.
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac036
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • The Challenges Faced by Korean Social Workers at the Community Welfare
           Centres for People with Disabilities during COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Pages: 4089 - 4107
      Abstract: AbstractThis study was intended to explore the experiences of social workers in Community Welfare Centres for People with Disabilities (CWCPDs) to understand their practices and challenges during COVID-19. It considered the essential role that CWCPD social workers play in responding to ‘new normal’ settings. Zoom interviews were conducted with twenty supervisory and manager-level social workers of CWCPDs nationwide. This study showed the unexpected cross-regional nature of risks and burdens. The high level of uncertainty and complexity allowed for the centres to operate safely under the COVID-19 legislation and for them to change and deliver alternative service provisions. Social workers had to develop new ways to deal with unprecedented risks, challenges, and dilemmas within ‘the new normal’. COVID-19 means that centres must recalibrate their relationships with service users, communities and the government. CWCPDs need to change their service provision model from a large group-centred to a person-centred model to meet individual demands. Changes are needed in terms of clarity of communication, the application of step-by-step guidelines to service provisions and a shift away from an exclusive focus on quantitative performance needs in how centres are evaluated. In all these processes, both close cooperation and support from local authorities are needed.
      PubDate: Thu, 03 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac012
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Need for Knowledge—What, Where and How' How Social Workers Handle
           Service and Support for Individuals with Disability

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      Pages: 4108 - 4126
      Abstract: AbstractThis article investigates the need and sources of knowledge among LSS administrators in Sweden (i.e. social workers handling service and support for individuals with disability according to the Swedish Disability Act [LSS]). Changing and challenging working conditions and issues concerning professional status warrant the aim. A questionnaire distributed via gatekeepers in a number of municipalities demonstrated that knowledge about ‘disability’, ‘law’, ‘ethics’ and ‘augmentative and alternative communication’ was rated highly. This result is particularly interesting given that many social work education programmes do not have compulsory courses in disability. Colleagues appear to be relied upon as essential sources of support and knowledge, but the knowledge sharing seems unorganised. Findings are discussed in relation to communities of practice (CoP) and shows that, due to the lack of essential knowledge from formal education and the strong dependence on colleagues, a locally developed praxis might be established. Inadequate theoretical and research-based knowledge, together with this local praxis knowledge, may result in the LSS administrators’ work becoming inadequate. A specialist education in disability studies is proposed as a prerequisite for being employed as an LSS administrator, and the inclusion of a theoretical and scientific framework in the regular CoP interaction is also recommended.
      PubDate: Fri, 11 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac020
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • The Empowerment of Informal Female Workers: A Case Study for Social Work
           Intervention in Tehran Province

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      Pages: 4127 - 4148
      Abstract: AbstractInformal employment constituting a major part of Iranian economy correlates strongly with social deprivation. The aim of the present study is to understand the mechanisms that lead to deprivation and how formalisation can empower informal workers. The study is of qualitative type using grounded theory and thematic analysis. The participants were thirty-two female workers and twelve elites selected through stratified sampling. In-depth interviews were used to collect data. Data were analysed through theoretical coding. The findings indicate that informal occupation is considered as a survival mechanism for women with deficient capital (deficient psychological, social, economic and legal capitals). In other words, women enjoying less power in legal, economic, social and psychological areas enter this domain, stay therein or exit. Based on the findings, informal occupation is a five-stage process where the female workers can be placed according to their status. The phases include pre-awareness, awareness, action, regression and emancipation. Moreover, using the model of formalising social work through empowerment and its tetrad (psychological, social, economic and legal empowerments), the formalising social worker can facilitate the formalisation of workers and their progress towards the emancipation stage, so that the workers could gain more access to the minimum and lowest social protection.
      PubDate: Wed, 18 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac029
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Agile Emotion Practices: Findings from an Ethnographic Study of Children
           and Families Social Work

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      Pages: 4149 - 4170
      Abstract: AbstractSocial work is intrinsically relational, centred on interpersonal encounters between practitioners, service users and other professionals. Emotions are a core element in these encounters. Yet, despite a substantial focus on relationship-based practice there is limited research into the everyday experience and functions of practitioners’ emotions in socio-legal organisational environments. This article reports on findings from an ethnographic study of a Local Authority Children and Families Referral and Assessment Service in England. It explores how practitioners constructed and used their emotions in everyday practice. The construct of ‘agile emotion practices’ was generated from analysing observations of teams, home visits, systemic group supervision, interviews and diaries. Informed by social constructionist and psychosocial theories, the characteristics of agile emotion practices are outlined. This article suggests there is merit in recognising practitioners’ emotions as functional practices, which inform relational practice, analysis and assessment. Data are specific to the organisation, context and timeframe. However, valuable insights are provided into the ‘doing’ of emotions in social work, including some of the factors that facilitate and hinder agile emotion practices. The analysis offers new empirically based knowledge, applicable to diverse social work settings, education and research.
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac051
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Being ‘good enough’: Perfectionism and well-being in social
           workers

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      Pages: 4171 - 4188
      Abstract: AbstractPerfectionism refers to a tendency to set unrealistically high standards for oneself and others. Although often seen positively, perfectionism can threaten health, relationships and performance. This study examined the effects of three types of maladaptive perfectionism on burnout in 294 UK social workers: self-oriented (having excessively high standards for oneself), other-oriented (having excessively high expectations of others) and socially prescribed (perceiving external pressure to excel). In line with previous research, we predicted that socially prescribed perfectionism would have particularly powerful effects on well-being, but significant relationships with self and other-oriented perfectionism were also expected. We also examined whether maladaptive perfectionism intensified the negative impact of work-related emotional demands on burnout. Significant positive relationships were found between socially prescribed and other-oriented perfectionism and burnout. A higher level of socially prescribed perfectionism was found than self and other-oriented and its relationship with burnout was particularly strong. We found no evidence, however, that perfectionism was an additional risk factor for burnout when emotional demands were high. Early career social workers were found to be at greater risk of dysfunctional perfectionism and burnout. The implications of the findings for the well-being of social workers are considered and potential interventions outlined to reduce maladaptive perfectionism.
      PubDate: Thu, 03 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac010
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Shame and Pride among Social Workers in Israel: A Concept Map

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      Pages: 4189 - 4203
      Abstract: AbstractThe research on shame and pride among social workers is in its infancy. Given the potential consequences of these emotions on social workers and social work practice, this study had two main aims: (i) to identify practice situations in which social workers in Israel felt shame and pride and (ii) to classify and map these situations into conceptual domains. A concept mapping approach was used to achieve these aims. Eighty social workers recruited via social networks and snowballing participated in the statement generation of experiences of shame and pride in their daily practice. The sample was diverse in terms of seniority, role (managerial/frontline), populations served and agencies. The process yielded ten clusters, six of them representing sources of shame and four sources of pride. Based on the statements comprising the clusters, it can be argued that the ability of social workers to advance change can serve as an organising concept for comparing shame and pride. Not being able to promote desired change induces shame, while promoting such change fosters pride. These outcomes can be explained by self-discrepancy theory. The article discusses the implications of the study's results for theory, practice and research.
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac026
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Job Demands and Resources and Employee Well-being among Social Workers in
           China: The Mediating Effects of Affect

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      Pages: 4204 - 4222
      Abstract: AbstractSocial workers’ jobs require a great deal of emotional labour and can lead to compassion fatigue and psychological distress. Whilst China has seen rapid development in the professionalisation of social work, the future of this field is threatened by high burnout and turnover, prompting a need to understand how best to support the well-being of social workers, who provide essential services to vulnerable community members. This study examines job demands (JD) and resources as antecedents of employee well-being (EWB) and whether these relations are mediated by positive and negative affect (NA). In a sample of 897 social workers based in Chengdu, China, JD had a total effect of −0.15 on EWB (p < 0.001), whilst job resources (JR) had a total effect of 0.52 on EWB (p < 0.001). About two-thirds of JD’s effects and half of JR’s effects on EWB were mediated by positive and NA. The mediation effects of positive and NA suggest that interventions that seek to increase positive affect and reduce NA may promote EWB in Chinese social workers.
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac043
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Arab Social Workers’ Burnout in Welfare Bureaus: Expressions, Reasons,
           Implications and Coping-Mechanisms

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      Pages: 4223 - 4241
      Abstract: AbstractThe research investigated expressions of, reasons, implications and coping strategies for burnout according to twenty-three Arab ethnic-national minority social workers in Arab welfare bureaus in Israel. Interview data indicated that burnout is expressed in somatisation and interpersonal behaviours with clients and colleagues. As in Arab culture, personal emotional suffering is not mentioned. Micro- and meso-level factors were ignored. Macro-level dependence on the establishment includes professional training and government policies inappropriate for the Arab population’s unique needs. Interviewees mentioned only minor consequences, ensuring their continued employment. They rationalised and universalised burnout as normative, sufficing with indirect coping strategies, for example social events.
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac016
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Narratives of individual capacities: Positive organisational scholarship
           amongst child welfare workers in Norway

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      Pages: 4242 - 4259
      Abstract: AbstractChild welfare services across the world are often criticised for the quality of service and care that they provide. Whilst the validity of some of these criticisms is debatable, critics often neglect to take into account the intense nature and working conditions of this work, staff mental health and well-being, and the range of work-related psychosocial risks in child welfare workers’ (CWW) daily work. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to explore CWW work experiences and personal capacities to conduct their work. We achieve this through the lens of positive organisational scholarship and in-depth interviews with sixteen CWW in Norway. Thematic narrative analysis yielded five distinct personal capacities: showing commitment and going the extra mile, viewing challenges as opportunities for learning and growth, demonstrating confidence and efficacy beliefs, controlling work behaviours and prioritising work tasks. These personal capacities enabled CWW to perform their work despite excessive pressure and demands at work, since they serve as protective factors for their well-being and performance. Our in-depth findings highlight the utility of making more resources available for building and maintaining individual capacities to support this work group, especially when changing the nature of the work and working conditions is not feasible.
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac063
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Predictors of Social Workers Attitudes Towards Evidence-based Practice:
           Self-determination and the Moderating Role of Organisational Learning

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      Pages: 4260 - 4279
      Abstract: AbstractSocial workers’ attitudes towards evidence-based practice (EBPA) are critical to evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation. However, current studies on EBPA have not yet established a theoretical framework based on the intrinsic motivations that underlie social workers’ attitudes. By applying self-determination theory, this study constructed an explanatory framework that focussed on intrinsic motivation and used organisational learning capability (OLC) as a moderating role. Furthermore, this study verified the constructed framework using data from the Chinese Social Workers Survey including 5,620 social workers from all provinces in China. The results showed that social workers’ professional autonomy, job satisfaction and professional competence had significantly positive impacts on their EBPA and that OLC played a moderating role in the relationship between social workers’ intrinsic motivations and their EBPA. These findings provide further insight into social workers’ EBPA. The practical implications include emphasising practitioners’ innate psychological needs, including the voice of service users and building learning organisations when improving social workers’ EBPA and implementing EBP.
      PubDate: Wed, 02 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac014
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Investigating Secondary Trauma in Student Placements: An Exploratory Study

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      Pages: 4280 - 4298
      Abstract: AbstractIt is well established that secondary trauma is a phenomenon that affects professionals in a range of health and social care settings, including social work. Whilst students going into placement are often exposed to similar experiences as qualified colleagues, limited research has been undertaken to investigate whether students suffer secondary trauma from their placement experience. This quantitative exploratory study of forty-five students on a Social Work and a Health and Social Care undergraduate degree course examined the potential impact of secondary trauma in placements using a Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale. This article will explore secondary trauma, how students are prepared for placement and student well-being in general. The findings of the study indicated that no students appear to have suffered from secondary trauma in placements, suggesting that there may be other potential support mechanisms that could have reduced, impacted or negated the issue. A discussion of some of these mechanisms is explored. Finally, this article calls for educators and professionals in higher education and placement agencies/organisations to be aware of the potential impact on student well-being.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac052
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Making the ‘Local’ Visible in Social Work Education: Insights from
           Nigeria and Scotland on (Re)balancing and Contextualising Indigenous and
           International Knowledge

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      Pages: 4299 - 4317
      Abstract: AbstractSocial work in the twenty-first century is maturing as a global profession. This comparative study offers an original contribution to the evolving discussion in the field of international social work. The paper makes visible the socio-spatial dimensions and contested interpretations of international and indigenous knowledge through the experiences of social work students in the Global South and Global North. Drawing on findings from an online survey completed by undergraduate and postgraduate Nigerian and Scottish social work students (n = 142), the paper provides insights into the students’ experiences, expectations and perceived challenges. The Nigerian students critiqued the international (Western) knowledge informing their learning and practice, questioned the absence of indigenous knowledge and were aware of the importance, and challenges, of working with cultural diversity. The Scottish students showed little criticality of the Western (local) knowledge underpinning their learning and practice, did not prioritise learning about international social work and highlighted tensions between working with a culture of neoliberalism and social work values and social justice. We call for raising awareness of the epistemological foundations of what is included/excluded in curriculum and why, making the ‘local’ visible through re-balancing and contextualising the use of international and indigenous knowledge within social work.
      PubDate: Sat, 19 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac028
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • An interactive process model of knowledge transfer for social work through
           university–agency collaboration: Subjective experiences of the agency
           social workers in Hong Kong

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      Pages: 4318 - 4339
      Abstract: AbstractThis article reports on the outcome of an exploratory study on a university–agency collaboration in a Chinese context for transferring social work knowledge from academia to the field and beyond. A six-stage process characterised by interactive contributions from the university and the agency in question was identified from the trainees’ narratives of the content, process and their subjective experiences with the three-year collaboration. The two parties co-constructed and adapted knowledge oriented for a specific clientele and agency context, and they implemented the intervention together with underlying theories and ways of thinking. Through interactive practising and coaching, knowledge was indigenised and disseminated into and beyond the agency. The study highlighted the trainees’ active participation, the deep collaboration between the two parties and the trusting relationship within the changing power dynamics, and the comprehensive planning at the organisational level for a fully sustainable transfer of social work knowledge with tacit characteristics. Multiple implications for continuing professional education in social work are drawn.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac023
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Towards Democratising Social Knowledge: A Political–Economic Analysis of
           the Departments of Social Work in Swiss Universities of Applied Sciences

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      Pages: 4340 - 4357
      Abstract: AbstractIn Switzerland, the relatively new social work departments are located in so-called universities of applied sciences (UASs), which provide a university-based and practice-oriented education. At the beginning, UASs were required to carry out ‘applied’ research and their teaching had to be ‘non-academic’, unlike in traditional universities. Although this definition is no longer present in the legal framework of tertiary education, it shapes policymakers’ representations. In reality, research and teaching agendas in UAS departments of social work have become similar to those of the social sciences departments in traditional universities. However, two aspects differentiate them from their counterparts in traditional universities and from other UAS departments today: Less research funding is available and social work students are more likely to accumulate socio-economic disadvantages compared to elsewhere. In this article, I discuss the role of social work departments in Switzerland, with a focus on the social knowledge they produce and transfer into teaching programmes and society. In addition, I use Arendt’s thoughts about knowledge, education and democracy to reflect on the existing gap between political representations of—and what takes place in—UAS departments of social work in Switzerland. The article ends with recommendations for policymakers in Switzerland and abroad.
      PubDate: Sat, 19 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac022
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Unfolding Social Work Research to Address the COVID-19 Impact: A Text
           Mining literature Analysis

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      Pages: 4358 - 4377
      Abstract: AbstractThis article aims to contribute to understanding the main social impacts of the pandemic caused by COVID-19 by highlighting the present and future challenges of social intervention and proposing a research agenda for social workers. Based on main indicators collected from international reports, we categorise the terms associated and analyse 284 Scopus articles that address social work issues in face of the COVID-19 through a text mining literature analysis. By applying topic modelling, we are able to identify relations within the body of knowledge between the main indicators. The results enable to highlight the current trends of research, contributing to leverage knowledge in social work in face of a complex and uncertain society. We find that most articles are focused on professional practice, as well as areas such as health, education and employment. In contrast, we argue that issues related to women or migrants have been less explored. These aspects could bring new perspectives in future research within the pandemic context.
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac025
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Assessment as a Site of Anti/Oppressive Social Work Practice: Negotiating
           with Power and the De/Professionalisation of Social Work

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      Pages: 4378 - 4400
      Abstract: AbstractSocial work practice starts with an effort to understand clients-in-context, a task which involves a process of assessment. Whilst social workers often assess clients-in-systems, rarely do they consider the social worker-in-systems as part of the client’s context. Guided by Foucault’s concepts of disciplinary and biopolitical power and related constructs of ‘Panopticism’ and ‘homo oeconomicus’, this article interrogates how the social worker’s observational gaze in assessment has become veiled in practice. Using a critical review method, the author examines how Foucault’s notion of a ‘faceless gaze’ has been increasingly intensified by the use of information technology in ‘common assessment’, thereby transforming the fundamentals of assessment from understanding the client for ‘care’ to ‘managing risk’ in neoliberal governance. This article historicises and politicises temporal discourses of social work assessment and illustrates how the worker’s embodied knowledge of assessment as a governing apparatus may solidify and/or endanger the social work profession. Locating assessment as a site of social in/justice, this critical review on the inevitable workings of power in assessment invites social workers to re-think the boundaries of de/professionalisation and to critically reflect on and re-imagine everyday institutional practices in social work assessment.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac038
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • ‘If I’m not real, I’m Not Having an Impact’: Relationality and
           Vicarious Resistance in Complex Trauma Care

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      Pages: 4401 - 4417
      Abstract: AbstractThere is growing commitment to trauma-informed practice and increased recognition of risks associated with this work. However, the benefits of working with trauma-affected clients are under-studied. Drawing on interviews with sixty-three welfare, health and legal professionals in Australia, we consider the salutogenic dynamics of work with women with experiences of complex trauma. Participants articulated an ethics of care in which professionals ally with clients against abuse and violence as well as transactional neoliberal service models. We identify this approach to trauma work as a form of vicarious resistance that challenges dichotomies of vicarious trauma and resilience.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac054
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Social Workers as Leaders Rather than as Agents of Change

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      Pages: 4418 - 4435
      Abstract: AbstractArab citizens of Israel constitute 21 per cent of the country’s population. In April and May 2021 violent conflict erupted between Arab and Jewish Israeli citizens, more severe than ever before. It was manifested on both sides in physical brutality, destruction of property and torching of homes and places of worship. The political leadership on both sides was divided over how to respond. Some tried to restore calm; others tried to use the conflict for political gain and to divide the population. Against this background, a qualitative study, using semi-structured interviews, was conducted among forty Jewish and Arab social workers with the aim of understanding how they viewed their role in the conflict and how they were dealing with it. A thematic analysis revealed three main themes: ‘What’s needed is a social worker who is a leader’; ‘The writing was on the wall’ and ‘The situation could be changed, but…’. The social workers saw importance in their profession’s values of social justice and acceptance of the other but expressed difficulty in acting in a sphere that is defined as political. Recommendations are made for equipping social workers with the necessary tools for acting effectively in times of conflict.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac044
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Who killed social welfare'

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      Pages: 4436 - 4449
      Abstract: AbstractSocial welfare policy is a modernist enterprise that grew out of the Enlightenment project. By attacking the theoretical foundation of Enlightenment thought, postmodernism directly challenges the theoretical foundation of social welfare policy. As postmodern theory is increasingly used to ‘deconstruct’ social policy, the means to justify the welfare state are at risk of collapsing. It will be argued that, despite all its acclaim, postmodern theory has not only functioned as an ally of neoliberalism, postmodern theory has obscured the problems of mushrooming inequality, increasing privatisation of public and social services and, the erosion of the welfare state by framing these issues as questions of difference, diversity and choice. Through a re-examination of the Enlightenment project as it relates to the theoretical foundation of the welfare state, it will be argued that the welfare state requires a notion of collective responsibility, a position that is theoretically supported by psychoanalytic theory. Applied to social welfare, psychoanalytic theory could provide the intellectual tools to develop and justify policies; it offers a theoretical method to re-establish the welfare state as an ideal of the democratic project.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac056
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • The Adopter’s Handbook on Education (Scotland). Getting the Best for
           Your Child. Alison Rennie Parkinson and Eileen Fursland

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      Pages: 4458 - 4459
      Abstract: The Adopter’s Handbook on Education (Scotland). Getting the Best for Your Child, ParkinsonAlison Rennie and FurslandEileen, London, CoramBAAF Adoption and Fostering Academy, 2021, pp. IV + 164, ISBN 9781910 039960, £14.95 (pbk)
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcab261
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Fostering for Adoption; Our Story and the Story of Others, Alice Hill

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      Pages: 4459 - 4461
      Abstract: Fostering for Adoption; Our Story and the Story of Others, HillAliceSt Albans, Critical Publishing Ltd, 2021, pp. xviii+221, ISBN 978 1 914171 23 9, £14.99 (pbk)
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcab266
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Children Forsaken: Child Abuse from Ancient to Modern Times Steven Walker
           (ed.)

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      Pages: 4461 - 4462
      Abstract: Children Forsaken: Child Abuse from Ancient to Modern TimesWalkerSteven (ed.), St Albans, Critical Publishing, 2021, pp. 184, ISBN 9781913453817, £19.99 (p/b)
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac002
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • The Anti-Racist Social Worker; stories of activism in social care and
           allied health professionals, Tanya Moore and Glory Simango

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      Pages: 4462 - 4464
      Abstract: The Anti-Racist Social Worker; stories of activism in social care and allied health professionals,MooreTanyaSimangoGlory, St Albans, Critical Publishing, 2021,pp.172, ISBN 9781914171413, £14.99 (p/b)
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac004
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Mental Health in Later Life: Taking a Life Course Approach, Alisoun Milne

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      Pages: 4464 - 4465
      Abstract: Mental Health in Later Life: Taking a Life Course Approach, MilneAlisoun, Bristol: Policy Press, 2020, pp. vii + 351, ISBN 978 1 4473 0571 2, £28.99 (p/b)
      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac005
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Adoption from Care: International Perspectives on Children’s Rights,
           Family Preservation and State Intervention, Tarja Pösö, Marit Skivenes
           and June Thoburn (eds)

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      Pages: 4466 - 4467
      Abstract: Adoption from Care: International Perspectives on Children’s Rights, Family Preservation and State Intervention, PösöTarjaSkivenesMaritThoburnJune (eds), Bristol, Policy Press, 2021, pp. xiii + 271 ISBN 978-1447351030, £26.99, p/b
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac013
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Social Policy: A Critical and Intersectional Analysis, Fiona Williams

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      Pages: 4467 - 4468
      Abstract: Social Policy: A Critical and Intersectional Analysis, WilliamsFiona, Cambridge, Polity Press, 2021, pp. ix + 299, ISBN 978 1 5095 4039 6, £18.99, p/b
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac015
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Clients, Consumers, Citizens' The Privatisation of Adult Social Care
           in England, Bob Hudson (ed.),

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 4469 - 4471
      Abstract: Clients, Consumers, Citizens' The Privatisation of Adult Social Care in England,HudsonBob (ed.), Bristol, Policy Press, 2021, pp. v + 188, ISBN 978-1-4473-5569-4 (hbk), £24.99
      PubDate: Thu, 03 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac021
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Errors and Mistakes in Child Protection. International Discourses,
           Approaches and Strategies, Kay Biesel, Judith Masson, Nigel Parton and
           Tarja Pösö

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 4471 - 4472
      Abstract: Errors and Mistakes in Child Protection. International Discourses, Approaches and Strategies, Biesel,KayMasson,JudithPartonNigelPösöTarja, Bristol, Policy Press, 2021, pp. XIV +273, ISBN 978-1-4473-5093-4 (pbk), £26.99
      PubDate: Fri, 11 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac024
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Ageing and the Crisis in Health and Social Care: Global and National
           Perspectives, Bethany Simmonds

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 4472 - 4474
      Abstract: Ageing and the Crisis in Health and Social Care: Global and National Perspectives, SimmondsBethany,Bristol, Policy Press, 2022, pp. v + 156, ISBN 978-1-4859-7 (hbk), 978-1-4873-3 (ePub), 978-1-4872-6 (ePdf), £79.99
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac030
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 7 (2022)
       
 
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