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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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British Journal of Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.019
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 78  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0045-3102 - ISSN (Online) 1468-263X
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [425 journals]
  • Editorial

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      Pages: 527 - 530
      Abstract: This is my second editorial for the BJSW and, sadly, will be my last, as my term as Associate Editor comes to an end in June. It has been an absolute honour to work on the journal for the last five years, with the leadership and support initially from editors Professors Margaret Holloway and Malcolm Golightley and for the last few years, Dr Reima Ana Maglajlic and Professor Vasilios Ioakimidis. The superb support from our editorial administrator, Penny Brown, means the behind-the-scenes running of the journal is seamlessly smooth, and thanks are also owed to the wider team at OUP, the other associate editors and members of our editorial board and international advisory boards. It has been a pleasure working with everyone and I will continue to read, support and champion the journal in the years to come.
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcae031
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Changing Gears and Buying Time: A Study Exploring AMHP Practice Following
           Referral for a Mental Health Act Assessment in England and Wales

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      Pages: 797 - 816
      Abstract: AbstractThe role of the Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) under the Mental Health Act (MHA) 1983 in England and Wales is to respond to referrals for psychiatric detention and make an application for detention where they consider this necessary. This article reports the findings of my doctoral study into AMHP decision-making at the point of referral for an MHA assessment. The strengths-based methodology of Appreciative Inquiry was adopted, positioned in a social constructionist paradigm. Nine AMHPs working for one Local Authority participated in the study, including myself as an insider researcher. During four one-day workshops over five months participants defined their best practice, analysing emerging data together within the workshops using nominal group technique. Service developments included the creation of a triage role and a bespoke report to prioritise this decision within the service, opening avenues to change gears and buy time for a more thorough assessment at this point, and promoting greater collaboration with those referred. A multi-agency approach to searching for less restrictive options was advocated within an assessment pathway. The results of this study offer a research insight into this important area of practice, offering an evidence base to inform practice and policy developments.
      PubDate: Tue, 09 Jan 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad271
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Mapping Social Work’s Response to the ‘Grand Challenge’ of
           Loneliness: A Systematic Scoping Review of the Literature

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      Pages: 817 - 837
      Abstract: AbstractLoneliness is recognised as a ‘grand challenge’ for social work, given its negative impact on health and well-being. But there has been limited progress on how social workers should respond. We aimed to characterise social work research on loneliness from 2016 to 2021, to inform policy, practice and training. We utilised the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology for scoping reviews with a narrative synthesis of results. Data were extracted on study characteristics, assessment and intervention strategies, the role of social workers in this literature and limitations in the research. The final review consisted of 366 studies. Results showed a steady growth in research outputs on loneliness over time, predominantly (40 per cent) aimed at improving social work practice. Qualitative research methods (45 per cent) and cross-sectional study designs (61 per cent) were most common. Fewer than one-third of studies (32 per cent) used a formal assessment tool to identify loneliness. The most common intervention strategies examined were enhancing social relationships (30 per cent) and person-centred solutions (21 per cent). A slight majority (57 per cent) of peer-reviewed journal articles had a social work lead author. The review indicates social workers are engaged in research and action on loneliness, but ensuring this expertise is visible, led by social workers and accessible, remains a challenge.
      PubDate: Wed, 10 Jan 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad272
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Finding Home: The Experience of Home on Journeys Away from Intimate
           Partner Violence

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      Pages: 531 - 547
      Abstract: AbstractViolence in the intimate sphere can send women and children out of their homes and onto journeys over vast geographical distances and into various forms of temporary accommodation. When women and children are displaced like this, they have to settle and re-settle on their complex journeys away from intimate partner violence. This article shows that not all these places will be or become home and that the absence of home can entail different forms of distress, such as fear, alienation and despondency. The concept of home is (re)emerging in social work. By employing a threefold understanding of home as a physical place, a feeling and a practice, this article offers new insights into the role of home in the recovery process of women and children subjected to violence. Home is an essential place for adults and children. Therefore, this article argues that home is an important concept for social workers working with families subjected to violence, as finding home can be a central part of the recovery process. This article is based on data from two studies on families experiencing intimate partner violence, drawing on fieldwork at a women’s shelter and on semi-structured interviews with women and children.
      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad157
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • ‘There’s No Hope for Any Kind of Decent Life’: A Qualitative Study
           to Explore the Perspectives of People Experiencing Homelessness with a
           Recent Non-Fatal Overdose in Scotland

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      Pages: 548 - 567
      Abstract: AbstractThe past ten years has seen a marked increase in the numbers of people experiencing homelessness globally and an associated public health epidemic of drug-related deaths. Drawing from qualitative interviews as part of a wider pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) conducted in Glasgow, Scotland with National Health Service pharmacists and third sector homeless outreach caseworkers, insights from those with living experience of both homelessness and a recent non-fatal drug overdose will be presented. Twenty people experiencing homelessness with at least one drug overdose in the past six months were interviewed in person, in a homelessness drop in centre or in emergency accommodation between November 2021 and January 2022. Findings from our study indicate that participants’ drug use and overdose risk were exacerbated during the Covid-19 pandemic due to the pervasive availability of illicit drugs for those placed in emergency accommodation, alongside reduced support and access to health and social care services. Additionally, multi-agency stressors such as a lack of autonomy and dehumanising experiences were reported, leading to a significant sense of powerlessness. Furthermore, the necessity of advocacy-based services as critical aspects of support was identified, with importance placed upon dedicated, homelessness staff and access to safe environments.
      PubDate: Mon, 03 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad160
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Structural and Socio-Political Barriers to Providing Services to
           Arab-Palestinian Young Women: Social Workers’ Perspectives

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      Pages: 568 - 586
      Abstract: AbstractThe aim of the study was to understand structural and socio-political barriers faced by social workers to providing services to Arab-Palestinian young women abused in childhood, considering their multiple marginalisation. The literature has addressed the structural barriers in terms of the written policy and the social services provided to the Arab-Palestinian minority. However, little is known about how these barriers affect the provision of services to Arab-Palestinian young women abused in childhood from the perspective of service providers. To address this gap, twenty-one social workers were interviewed in depth. The findings revealed two main themes: (i) structural discrimination and the socio-political context of Arab Palestinians in Israel; (ii) challenges and structural barriers at the level of social policy. Our findings shed light on the oppressive othering of Arab-Palestinian young women, who feel invisible vis- à-vis governmental organisations. Thus, social workers working in the field should examine the needs of the young women and work in collaboration with senior government officials to promote culture- and gender-adapted programmes.
      PubDate: Fri, 06 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad216
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Voicing or Silence: Palestinian Israeli and Jewish Israeli Social
           Workers’ Relationships during Political Turmoil

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      Pages: 587 - 606
      Abstract: AbstractIn this study, we examined Palestinian Israeli and Jewish Israeli social workers’ relationships in relation to events in May 2021 that involved serious political violent incidents between Palestinian and Jewish Israelis. The qualitative phenomenology approach was used. We interviewed twenty-five social workers from both groups who work in public social services in six ethnonational mixed Palestinian–Jewish cities in Israel. Participants, who were predominantly female and between the ages of 25 and 55, were recruited using a purposive sampling technique. In-depth interviews, conducted in Hebrew and Arabic, focused on the perceptions, experiencing and challenges in relationships between colleagues during crises. Findings revealed the complexity of relationships amid political violence. Most participants coped by remaining silent on political matters. Three themes emerged: subjects of silence, reasons for silence and instances of breaking silence within WhatsApp groups, staff meetings and private conversations amongst individuals of the same ethnic group. The authors make recommendations for research, practice and training for social workers concerning relationships in the context of ongoing political conflict. It is also important to raise ‘social-work-informed conflict awareness’ amongst social workers that relates to how political conflicts may influence their behaviours and relationships.
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad219
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Social Work with No Recourse to Public Fund Migrants: Obstacles and
           Strategies

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      Pages: 607 - 628
      Abstract: AbstractMigrants with no recourse to public funds (NRPFs) are vulnerable to destitution due to the NRPF condition attached to their immigration status. In this quantitative study, fifty-five social workers in England completed an anonymous online survey identifying the obstacles faced in their practice with NRPF migrants and any strategies they developed to overcome these impediments. Informed by the Theoretical Domains Framework, the study identified four main obstacles when working with NRPF migrants: lack of resources to support NRPF migrants; lack of knowledge/skills; negative attitudes from colleagues and insufficient institutional support. Compared to their local authority counterparts, NHS social workers expressed lower levels of confidence in their knowledge and skill level, and received less specific training, organisational guidance and support in their work with NRPF migrants. A 4-fold typology of strategies used by social workers to overcome obstacles was devised from responses to an open-ended question. In addition to the need for more resourcing, the findings suggest a need for social work education and training on how to effectively support NRPF migrants using extant legislation and agencies, and suggest knowledge exchange to promote inter-agency collaboration.
      PubDate: Fri, 27 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad224
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Addressing the Ongoing Effects of the Nakba: Experiences and Challenges
           that Israel’s Arab Social Workers Face

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      Pages: 629 - 648
      Abstract: AbstractThe Nakba (‘catastrophe’ in Arabic) began in 1948 with the displacement and dispossession of many Palestinians, leaving a lasting impact on Palestinian society and individual identity. To this day Palestinian social workers must address the difficulties of Palestinians deriving from the Nakba whilst they themselves contend with its ramifications. This descriptive qualitative study, conducted in 2021 using in-depth semi-structured interviews, explored the personal experiences of eighteen Palestinian Arab social workers in Israel who are members of the third generation of the Nakba. Four main themes emerged from the data analysis: ongoing pain, the struggle for justice, the comparison of the Nakba to the Holocaust and perseverance following trauma. However, participants from financially and socially established families in villages whose inhabitants were not displaced reported experiencing growth and resilience. The recommendations include creating safe spaces for Israel’s Arab social workers, where their perspectives can be heard and valued; action by national and international social work organisations to help repeal Israel’s Nakba Law, which seeks to suppress discussion of the Nakba; and inclusion of the Nakba and its consequences in social work curricula. The findings are relevant to social workers in silenced minorities worldwide.
      PubDate: Sat, 14 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad225
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Social Workers’ Perceptions of the Effect of Interpersonal Factors on
           Older Adults’ Decision to Remain in Abusive Relationships

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      Pages: 649 - 667
      Abstract: AbstractOlder adults who are abused by their offspring often find it difficult to cooperate with professionals to end the abuse. In these situations, social workers face an ethical dilemma between respecting the older adult’s right to autonomy and intervening in a paternalistic way to prevent harm. This qualitative study aimed to examine the effect of interpersonal factors on the decision-making ability of older adults who do not experience significant cognitive and mental decline and choose to remain in abusive relationships. Twenty-one social workers specialising in the field of aging participated in a semi-structured interview based on a vignette. The analysis was encoded inductively, informed by the principles of content analysis. Two themes emerged: (i) Older adults’ feelings towards their abusive adult children, including love and concern, shame and guilt and relationships with symbiotic characteristics; (ii) Older adults’ motivation to stay in the abusive relationships, based either on utilitarian motivation or on their fear of the abuser. The study’s findings can serve as a foundation for the development of a tool for evaluating the influence of abusive relationships on older adults’ decision-making ability, which considers not only their personal characteristics but also their interactions and relationships with their surroundings.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad226
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • The Relationships between Stress, Burnout, Mental Health and Well-Being in
           Social Workers

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      Pages: 668 - 686
      Abstract: AbstractStress and burnout can have several negative effects on the individual social worker’s work performance, along with their mental health and well-being. We are still unclear on how these negative effects play out, as no studies have examined what the relationships are between stress, burnout, anxiety, depression and well-being in social workers. This cross-sectional study attempted to identify the rates and correlates of stress, burnout, anxiety, depression and mental well-being of 121 social workers, using bivariate and multiple regression analyses. This study highlighted a significant proportion of social workers who reported mild to severe issues in anxiety, depression and mental well-being. This study highlighted that perceived stress is likely to be a universal risk factor for anxiety, depression, and mental well-being in social workers. Emotional exhaustion was also identified as a potential risk factor for anxiety, with personal accomplishment being a potential protective factor against depression and for positive mental well-being. This study provides promising preliminary evidence that if social workers who are experiencing issues with anxiety, depression and mental well-being are supported to reduce feelings of stress, emotional exhaustion, and increase feelings of personal accomplishment, they are likely to experience improvements in their mental health and job performance.
      PubDate: Tue, 07 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad232
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Role of Peer Support in Building Motivation to Change Addictive Behaviour

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      Pages: 687 - 703
      Abstract: AbstractThis article deals with the results of a qualitative, multiple-case study that examined the impact of peer support on motivation for change amongst service users in a drug addiction recovery program. A total of nine semi-structured interviews were carried out with patients who also worked with a peer worker as part of their involvement with the service. Participant observation and keeping a research diary were additional methods of data collection. The data collected was further processed using reflective thematic analysis. This article draws on DiClemente’s (2018. Addiction and Change: How Addictions Develop and Addicted People Recover, Guilford Publications) transtheoretical model model of intentional behaviour change and McClelland’s (1951. ‘Personality, Sloane, New York’, in The Achievement Motive, p. 28, New York, Appleton-Century-Crofts) theory of motivation and current research findings on motivation in the context of peer support. Main research question is ‘What mechanisms of formal peer support influence motivation to change harmful behaviour in people who take drugs'’ A key finding is that a successfully established peer-service user relationship is a key instrument and premise for building motivation for change. It also presents an overview of the basic mechanisms that build the peer-service user relationship as well as the basic mechanisms that build motivation for change. It is concluded by a discussion on these mechanisms and the current literature as well as drawing implications for practice.
      PubDate: Wed, 08 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad236
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Social Workers’ Experiences of Working with Partner Violence

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      Pages: 704 - 722
      Abstract: AbstractIn this study, we investigated social workers’ use of risk assessments and risk management in cases concerning intimate partner violence. The study examined social workers’ experiences of work performance, organizational conditions, internal and external collaboration and challenges and opportunities at work. We interviewed twelve respondents in Swedish social work offices about what structures, supports and foundations they found essential for work sustainability and resilience. Support from colleagues and managers, experience, openness and trust were critical factors for work satisfaction. The study showed that work experience created trust and security, partly because the social worker became better at translating laws and regulations into practical work. Concerning the severity of the cases, collaboration was essential for building workplace confidence and well-being. A well-functioning internal and external collaboration was described as trust, reducing stress and access to open and straightforward communication with others. Sustainable routines and access to guidelines facilitated the work. An unsupportive work climate included a culture of silence, a lack of trust and generated feelings of stress. Feelings of vulnerability in the professional role arose when the workgroup and/or the management did not take a supportive approach to operational work.
      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad240
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Seeing, Sharing and Supporting: Assertive Outreach as a Partial Solution
           to Rough Sleeping

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      Pages: 723 - 740
      Abstract: AbstractAssertive outreach is becoming an increasingly salient feature of policy responses to homelessness—and particularly rough sleeping—with the aim of supporting people to access secure housing. Despite its demonstrated successes, existing research points to structural challenges practitioners face in navigating complex and fragmented service systems to provide people sleeping rough with a continuum of care. This study examines an Australian organisation’s efforts to collaboratively and systematically overcome these challenges by bringing together government, community and service practitioners from multiple sectors in their delivery of an assertive outreach programme. Using an ethnographic research design, this article draws on observations of outreach practices and service provider administrative quantitative data, as well as qualitative interviews and focus groups conducted with assertive outreach service providers. Our findings demonstrate that through flexible and collaborative social work practices, practitioners were able to see people sleeping rough, share information across services and support people into a range of housing, health and other forms of services. Critically, however, structural barriers such as a lack of affordable and social housing prevented assertive outreach from ending people’s homelessness. We foreground the critical implications of these findings for social work.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad251
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • ‘We Reach out but we Also Expect Something in Return’: Social Work
           Engaging with Roma People in Temporary Container Homes at the Edge of the
           City

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      Pages: 741 - 761
      Abstract: AbstractIn this article, we critically explore the research findings of a qualitative study of local social policy and work interventions, called ‘the post-mobile project’ in Ghent, Belgium. The project provided temporary housing for families in container units, accompanied by mandatory integration assistance, and was implemented as a potential solution for Romanian Roma families after the dismantlement of two informal settlements in 2020. Our qualitative study explores the underlying ontological assumptions of the social work interventions in this project, and aims to gain insights into the role of contemporary social work practice in Belgium and its impact on advancing or hindering the pursuit of social justice within this Roma community. The study is based on an ethnography as a multi-method approach. Participant observations are complemented by document analysis, semi-structured interviews and focus groups to gain an in-depth understanding of the divergent experiences and opinions of different stakeholders involved in the interventions. The findings reveal different ontological frameworks regarding the way the social problem is defined, the project’s goals and the principles guiding practice, thus exposing tensions between the local policy-makers and the social justice orientation of social work practitioners.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad253
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Approved Mental Health Professionals’ Experiences of Moral Distress:
           ‘Who Are we For’'

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      Pages: 762 - 779
      Abstract: AbstractIn England and Wales, approved mental health professionals (AMHPs) undertake interviews with service users as part of wider Mental Health Act assessments. AMHPs act as the ultimate decision-maker in relation to statutory detentions. They have legal duties to consider the least restrictive outcomes for service users, including alternatives to hospital. Yet they are increasingly unable to act on this, resulting in conflicting pressures. This article draws on a qualitative research study incorporating ethnographic research and interviews with AMHPs. Evidence suggests that service restructures are creating different approaches to practice with contradictory priorities, for example, whether the work is values-driven and relational or whether approbation is attached to a ‘need for speed’. AMHPs are increasingly deliberating about what makes ‘proper’ or ‘good’ AMHP practice, asking ‘who are we for'’ and referring to their work as ‘political activity’. AMHPs’ sense-making and language are indicative of moral distress. Organisational politics may lead to the work being seen as a technical-rational endeavour, not a moral one, leading to dissonance. More broadly, AMHPs and service users are, together, bearing the brunt of austerity measures and there are increasing unmet needs. Overall, there is a need to establish an ideological, theoretical and political base for practice.
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad258
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • ‘Permanent Temporariness’ as a Critical Lens: A Framework for Social
           Work with Forced Migrants

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      Pages: 780 - 796
      Abstract: AbstractThe realities of increasing numbers of forced migrants in Global North countries, including families and children, are shaped by a regime of permanent temporariness—the granting of temporary status for prolonged periods. This uncertainty-producing state means that people are temporarily banned from deportation, but their futures remain unclear and they have almost no access to rights, including social services. Whilst the role of temporality in understanding migrants’ everyday realities is gaining attention in migration scholarship, such a perspective has seldom been integrated into social work literature. As such, this article offers to adopt permanent temporariness as a critical lens for social work with forced migrants in ongoing precarious situations. It offers a conceptualisation of the meanings and implications of permanent temporariness for the lives of forced migrant families and children, manifesting on the individual, familial and extra-familial levels. Thus, the present article highlights the critical role that legal liminality plays in organising people’s lives and intensifying other coinciding post-migration challenges. Finally, implications for a temporal-aware approach in social work with displaced families and individuals are discussed, calling into question the linearity of social work frameworks and the necessity and feasibility of a future-oriented intervention in situations of prolonged uncertainty.
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad260
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking: The Victim Journey, Carole Murphy
           and Runa Lazzarino

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      Pages: 838 - 840
      Abstract: Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking: The Victim Journey, MurphyCarole and LazzarinoRuna, Bristol, Policy Press, 2022, pp. 290, ISBN 9781447363637, £85.00 (h/b)
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad166
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Understanding Mental Distress: Knowledge, Practice and Neoliberal Reform
           in Community Mental Health Services, Rich Moth

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      Pages: 840 - 842
      Abstract: Understanding Mental Distress: Knowledge, Practice and Neoliberal Reform in Community Mental Health Services, MothRich, Bristol, Policy Press, 2023, pp. 276, ISBN 978-1447349891, £26.99 (pbk)
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad265
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2023)
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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