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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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British Journal of Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.019
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 79  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0045-3102 - ISSN (Online) 1468-263X
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [425 journals]
  • Protecting Social Workers as Human Rights Defenders in a Dangerous World

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: In the ever-evolving field of social work, the intersection of human rights and social justice forms a core foundation of the profession. This relationship, deeply rooted in the global definition of social work, is further emphasised in the IFSW Statement of Ethical Principles (2018). These principles resonate across various international conventions and documents, underscoring the profession’s dedication to human rights as integral to social work theory, values, ethics and practice.
      PubDate: Thu, 25 Jan 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcae001
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Supporting Relational, Trauma-Informed Social Care Work with Autistic
           Adults: Evaluation of a Reflective Supervision Group Pilot

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      Pages: 3 - 21
      Abstract: AbstractThere is a growing body of literature highlighting the need for reflective supervision to support the often complex and challenging practice of social care workers. The current study aimed to explore an Irish social care team’s experience of a pilot reflective supervision group. The study participants were six male social care workers supporting autistic adults in the community. The team met for four one-monthly group supervision sessions, facilitated by an external supervisor. A reflective, relational approach was taken to the supervisory work, using role-play, free association and the Seven-Eyed model of supervision. At the end of the four-month pilot, participants completed a brief questionnaire to evaluate the supervision group experience. Thematic analysis of the participants’ open responses revealed the following themes: (i) increased insight/empathy; (ii) experiential learning; (iii) enhanced awareness/skills in relational practice; (iv) personal resilience; (v) team resilience; and (vi) emotional challenges. The study results suggest the potential importance of reflective supervision in boosting resilience, motivation and emotional insight when supporting people with unique relational needs.
      PubDate: Wed, 02 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad177
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • ‘If I Count Everything That Is against Me. It Is My Colour. It Is That I
           Am a Woman’: Exploring the Lived Experiences of Racialised Older Migrant
           Women in Finland

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      Pages: 22 - 39
      Abstract: AbstractCritical race scholars in social work have underlined the importance of race. However, research in social work with older people have often bypassed analysis of the significance of race and racialisation as barriers that marginalised groups encounter due to their complex identities. The lived experiences of older racialised women in Finland are not sufficiently explored to understand how racialisation has an impact in their ageing. This article aims to address the gap in scholarship on how accumulated experiences of racism from the personal to structural levels throughout the life-course contribute to inequalities in ageing of migrant women. It investigates how older women from non-European migrant background narrate their experiences of racialisation in their everyday lives in Finland. It utilises the theoretical concepts of race, racism and racialisation to interpret the research findings. The article presents empirical findings from semi-structured interviews with twenty older women, which were analysed using a thematic analysis. The article concludes that it is key to recognise racism and its ramifications for ageing migrants in structures beyond the personal level. This study sheds light on the need to better understand the structural inequalities, intersecting identities and the lived experiences of older racialised women to promote social justice.
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad178
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Practitioner Vulnerability in Children and Families Social
           Work—Identity, Impact and Implications

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      Pages: 40 - 58
      Abstract: AbstractBased on in-depth qualitative interviews, this article explores the experiences of vulnerability for nineteen children and families Social Workers in England and discusses how this emotional state manifests and impacts upon practice. As this study shows, workers frequently harbour personal vulnerabilities that can motivate them in their work and act as an enabler within relationships with service users; these same feelings can also provoke a sense of threat and discomfort, resulting in self-doubt and reduced confidence. Whether carried from the past or housed in the present, feelings of vulnerability often rise to the surface when provoked by routine encounters with clients and the knotty issues that surround them; what is valued by Social Workers encountering such feelings is a sense of validation and recognition. In taking an explicit focus on practitioner vulnerability, this article adds an original contribution to the literature concerning the emotional world of Social Workers. It reveals vulnerability to be an important component of identity and a driver for practice, which needs to be given greater consideration in social work training and employment, arguing that enhanced attention to worker histories, emotional challenges and self-care are not only necessary but also essential for practitioner and client well-being.
      PubDate: Wed, 02 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad179
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Complexity Theory and Child Protection and Welfare: A Tool of Hindsight
           and/or a Tool to Assist Improved Decision Making in Child Protection and
           Welfare Work

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      Pages: 59 - 76
      Abstract: AbstractChild abuse and neglect is a ‘wicked problem’ (Devaney, J. and Spratt, T. (2009) ‘Child abuse as a complex and wicked problem: Reflecting on policy developments in the United Kingdom in working with children and families with multiple problems’, Children and Youth Services Review, 31(6), pp. 635–41.). Child Protection and Welfare (CPW) systems are open systems in which a wide variety of practitioners and families themselves contribute to outcomes. Small interacting changes in one part of a CPW system can lead to unpredictable and systemic effects so linear, technocratic solutions are not sufficient in addressing this complexity. Whilst CPW systems may aim to make clear roles and responsibilities, steered by legislation and regulatory guidance, complex systems do not behave as system designers expect. Recent literature has demonstrated a turn to complexity theory and systems theory concepts for understanding and working in the world of child protection. This article suggests a practice framework based on complexity theory concepts of self-organisation/emergence/adaptation, path-dependency and bifurcation. The utility of the framework is tested by its application to a fictionalised case study built on a thematic analysis of five National Review Panel published case reviews in the Irish child protection context (2019–2020). We argue that complexity theory may be a useful tool for both post hoc analytics as well as providing a proactive tool for application to practice to assist decision making in CPW systems, services and organisations.
      PubDate: Thu, 03 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad180
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Applying Logotherapy in Teaching Meaning in Life in Professional Training
           and Social Work Education

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      Pages: 77 - 94
      Abstract: Abstract Meaning in life is an important topic for professional training and social work education. This article aims to illustrate how Viktor Frankl’s logotherapy could be applied as the framework in teaching meaning in life to social work students and helping professionals. It critically examines the experience of teaching meaning in life and integrating it with various training and education components, such as human behaviours, end-of-life and bereavement care, and self-care of helping professionals. Reflections on these teaching experiences suggest that the significance of teaching meaning in life is recognised by helping professionals and students, especially its dual influence on both personal and professional aspects. Lack of systematic and continuous training and education of meaning in life may be a hindrance for more in-depth understanding and learning. More case examples and discussion may help advance helping professionals’ practice to facilitate service users’ meaning searching. Reflecting on meaning in life may also facilitate helping professionals’ coping with existential challenges in work, but such self-care training should be offered regularly to provide continuous support. This article suggests that teaching meaning in life may have great implications for the psychological health of helping professionals and the service users who receive their professional services.
      PubDate: Fri, 04 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad181
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • A Sociological Reading of Statutory Social Work and Irish Corporate
           Governmentality: On the Death of Creativity

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      Pages: 95 - 104
      Abstract: AbstractThe corporate and neo-liberal governance of Irish social work, and a strangle-hold of legal-rational reasoning on the profession, has led statutory social work to be increasingly alienated from its traditional commitment to radical change in the pursuit of true social justice. Whilst this case has already been made, we set out to extend debates around an ‘epistemic schism’ in social work through a sociological critique of creativity. The demise of creativity arguably lies in the fettering of social work by corporate state entities, increasingly prescriptive governmental law and policy and a degree of deliberate deformation of social work through the health and social care regulator CORU. We argue that as the artistry of creative practice increasingly now comes under assault through proceduralisation, corporate governance and risk aversion, any remaining residuals of creativity also come to be repackaged and misappropriated in the form of ‘professional discretion’. What is at stake in the death of creativity is the death of anything surplus and exceptional to that which social workers are mandated to do. Moreover, we propose that without creativity, social workers can no longer fulfil the profession’s ideological goal of dismantling social injustice at a wider societal level.
      PubDate: Wed, 02 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad182
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Looking Through the Eyes of General Practitioners: The Role of Social Work
           in Primary Health Care

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      Pages: 105 - 123
      Abstract: AbstractIn Flanders, Belgium, a primary healthcare reform is ongoing to strengthen the health system and work towards improving integrated care. At the core of this transformation stands a person-centred perspective that considers social factors, which increases the tendency for collaboration between health and welfare systems. Primary care physicians and social workers are urged to collaborate; however, the way general practitioners (GPs) define and utilise the role of social work remains unclear. This study explores the perceptions of GPs regarding the role of social work. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-three GPs, working under both fee-for-service and capitation financing systems, with varying years of experience and in different geographical areas. The findings reveal that physicians recognise the influence of social factors on their patients care needs, yet, struggle with addressing them. Due to limited experience and understanding of the role of social work, GPs primarily focus on its value in individual cases, whilst having less awareness of their role and potential at the neighbourhood, organisational or population level. This study identified different factors that either facilitate or hinder collaboration with social work. The implications for the social work profession and future joint efforts are discussed.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad183
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Burdened but Meaningful': How Gender Role Attitudes Influence the Complex
           Links between Care-giver Self-Efficacy, Formal Support Utilisation and
           Benefit-Finding among Spousal Care-givers

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      Pages: 124 - 146
      Abstract: AbstractTo foster family caregiving resilience, helping care-givers find benefits to further promoting care-giver and care-recipient well-being has emerged as an efficacious intervention in geriatric social work practice. This cross-sectional mixed-methods study investigates how gender role attitudes influence the complex associations between care-giver self-efficacy, formal support utilisation and benefit-finding among spousal care-givers. A total of 210 spousal care-giver/care-recipient dyads from four Chinese cities participated in a survey from July to August 2021. The survey used the Positive Aspects of Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Task Inventory Scale and Gender Role Attitude Scale. Mediation and moderated mediation analysis found that care-giver self-efficacy partially mediated the path of the primary stressor and benefit-finding; formal support utilisation directly moderated the mediated pathways linking primary stressor, care-giver self-efficacy and benefit-finding; and gender role attitudes moderated these intersections. Qualitative analysis revealed that spousal care-givers with high self-efficacy, who used formal support services, and who had modern gender role attitudes found the most benefits in caregiving. The findings also suggested that professionals should recognise the influence of gender role attitudes in spousal caregiving and incorporate this understanding into the development of tailored psychoeducational interventions aimed at promoting care-giver well-being.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad184
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Exploring the Lived Experiences of Compassion Fatigue in Parents who Adopt
           Children with Trauma Histories

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      Pages: 147 - 167
      Abstract: AbstractThe challenges of caring for children with early life adversity have been identified as contributing to feelings of compassion fatigue (CF)—an emotional disconnection resulting from repeated exposure to another’s trauma. Although extensive studies have focused on contributors to trauma-inducing workplace stress and well-being, research on trauma-related stress in the home, especially in adoptive parent populations, is relatively underexplored. This study aimed to understand how adoptive parents make sense of their experiences of parenting adopted children, identify core components of CF, understand parents’ perceptions of contributing factors and explore wider relational impacts. Parents were recruited from Adoption UK via email invite. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve parents to form a holistic picture of adoptive parents’ experiences. Data were analysed using Reflexive Thematic Analysis. Findings yielded three overarching and interrelated themes: (i) a parent not a therapist; (ii) strained connections; and (iii) support is a mirage. Findings support recent literature highlighting the reality of CF in adoptive parents and the need to develop more preventative structures and responsive systems of support adapted to the needs of adopted children but also the unique needs of their families to help prevent mental health crises across the family and adoption breakdowns.
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad185
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Strengths-based Approaches—Perspectives from Practitioners

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      Pages: 168 - 188
      Abstract: AbstractDespite its popularity, relatively little is known about strengths-based approaches in adult social work. In order to explore how strengths-based models and approaches are developed and implemented in social work and social care in England, and how these models are impacting practice, a two-stage project was conducted between December 2020 and October 2021. An online survey was completed by thirty-two respondents and a sub-sample of ten semi-structured interviews were conducted with social work and social care professionals involved in organising, managing, delivering or commissioning strengths-based approaches. The majority of participants were social workers. A range of positive outcomes were reported including improved reported well-being and satisfaction for people accessing services and enriched interactions (greater empathy, trust, better rapport), particularly for social workers. Challenges included incompatibility of systems and organisational structures; workload pressures and a depleted workforce; limited resources and applying the model at crisis point. The principles and values associated with adopting a strengths-based approach appear consistent with providing high-quality social work. The challenge for researchers—and to some extent practitioners—is how to meaningfully capture the nuanced impact of such a multi-dimensional approach. The challenge for policy is how to operationalise and replicate the benefits.
      PubDate: Mon, 07 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad186
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Using Preventive, Protection, Prosecution and Partnership Framework to
           Explore the Successes and Constraints of Social Work to Address Sex
           Trafficking in Edo, Nigeria

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      Pages: 189 - 207
      Abstract: AbstractSocial work features in human trafficking discourses as a remedial approach, but the profession’s potentials in Nigeria have not been fully realised. Thus, our research seeks to understand how social work has fared across the Prevention, Protection, Prosecution and Partnership (4Ps) of anti-human trafficking in Edo (a prime source destination for sex trafficking in Nigeria), and what can be done to scale up the presence and efficacy of social work. Qualitative research was conducted with twenty-three participants comprising qualified social workers, allied social work professionals and operational staff of ten anti-human trafficking agencies. Data were sourced using in-depth interviews, deductively coded and analysed based on the 4Ps framework. An important finding was the recognition of the social work profession by most anti-human trafficking agencies, as they employed qualified social work staff or outsourced social work roles to allied professions. Across the 4Ps, Prevention and Protection fared better, unlike Prosecution and Partnership. We provide insights on how to scale up all 4Ps using a social work lens. This research has the potential to strengthen the social work component of anti-human trafficking and presents an in-road to conduct more social work analysis in anti-human trafficking and other fields.
      PubDate: Mon, 07 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad189
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Barriers to High-quality Therapy Services for Children with Autism
           Spectrum Disorder: An Analysis of Street-level Policy Practice of Therapy
           Service Organisations in China

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      Pages: 208 - 227
      Abstract: AbstractSocial workers with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) should assist them to have timely access to high-quality therapy services. This research addresses the gap between policy intention to improve the quality of therapy services and families’ unmet needs by examining the policy implementation practices of therapy service organisations. A longitudinal study was conducted in Beijing from 2013 to 2022. Qualitative data were obtained from policy documents and interviews with the managers of therapy service organisations (n = 17), therapists (n = 19) and families of children with ASD (n = 35). It found that the government policies created service challenges for the organisations. Managers adopted a short-term focus on organisational survival due to inadequate resources to implement the policy, intensified competition for therapists and service users and pressure from performance measurement. They focused on improving the sites, facilities, publicity and documentation of the organisations rather than the effectiveness of therapy services. Consequently, families still felt they were unable to access good quality therapy. The implications reinforce the significance for social workers to work with the government to actively supporting the training of therapists, establishing meaningful service quality measurement and promoting practical guidance about service quality standards to families of children with ASD.
      PubDate: Sat, 12 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad191
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • ‘Seen’ through Records: Parents’ Access to Children’s Social Care
           Records in an Age of Increasing Datafication

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      Pages: 228 - 245
      Abstract: AbstractGeneral Data Protection Regulations state that parents may submit a Subject Access Request (SAR) to see personal records held about them. In this article, we draw on interviews with parents who have made an SAR in order to view their children’s social care records. Their experiences reveal the significant barriers of time, energy and bureaucracy that they faced in accessing their children’s records. The parents felt that they were ‘seen’ through their records, reported inaccuracies in information about them and relayed the devastating impact that false allegations of maltreatment continued to have in their lives. Datafication becomes an integral part of the unequal power dynamic between parents and professionals, further shifting the balance towards professionals, damaging fragile trust and engagement. Crucially, there are ethical questions raised for the social work profession about the accessibility and accountability of local authority processes when parents seek justice and reparation for harm. Given the importance of records in decision making about intervention in families lives and increasing datafication of public services working with families through electronic systems including predictive analytics, our indicative findings point to the need for further investigation.
      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad192
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Listening in Mental Health Clinical Practice

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      Pages: 246 - 266
      Abstract: AbstractIn mental health clinical practice, listening is viewed as a fundamental skill that clinicians should possess to support service users and enable recovery. Given its importance, this review sought to explore how listening is understood in mental health clinical practice. A scoping review was conducted to search for peer-reviewed articles reporting on literary and empirical studies. The search covered five databases (JSTOR, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Google Scholar) and the International Journal of Listening. A total of nineteen articles published from 2000 to 2022 were included for analysis. Thematic analysis was used to identify relevant themes. Findings showed that although listening was seen as critical to mental health treatment and care, little had been done to deconstruct the concept, examine the way it was practised and empirically verify its use. Further, listening was described and used differently, not only across different mental health professions but even within the same profession, between practitioners. This article will discuss these variations and how certain listening types can improve the therapeutic encounter. It will further look at whether listening can be regarded as a virtuous professional characteristic trait in achieving professional role responsibilities in social work.
      PubDate: Sat, 12 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad193
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • ‘Social Justice Practice’ in Social Work Under Political
           Challenge—Case in Hong Kong

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      Pages: 267 - 285
      Abstract: AbstractSocial justice is a core element of the social work profession. As Hong Kong has undergone a significant socio-political transformation, how social workers in Hong Kong cope with the challenges in practising social justice is a worthy case to explore. To explore how social workers approach social justice in this changing environment, this study conducted in-depth interviews with six social workers with different understandings of social justice and governance. Thematic analysis guided our analysis of the interviews, revealing the challenges and difficulties in social justice practice, social justice practice under the challenges and the unsolved vexation of the social workers.
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad194
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Becoming a ‘Social Work Coach’: How Practising Coaching Creates
           Beneficial Agility in Social Work Identity

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      Pages: 286 - 304
      Abstract: AbstractThis article explores how social workers experienced the intersection of social work and coaching roles, and the impact that incorporating dual roles within a child protection context has on social work identity. It discusses the themes from a ‘real-world’ qualitative study conducted in a local authority family support and child protection service in the North of England. Thematic analysis was used to interpret data from focus groups and semi-structured interviews with seven social workers, and semi-structured interviews with six service users. The findings reveal that social work identities initially become disrupted through using coaching, before a more flexible, enriched professional identity is fashioned which is congruent with both the social work persona and coaching attitudes and behaviours. Service users appeared to intuit this shift in professional identity when comparing their received experiences of social work and coaching. They responded by compartmentalising their hostile associations towards their social worker identity and recast them positively as ‘coaches’. The study findings infer significant applied implications for social work practice, education and continuing professional development that includes coaching knowledge and skills training.
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad195
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Using Therapeutic Photography in Social Work—An Interpretive
           Phenomenological Analysis of the Dynamics within a Group Programme

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      Pages: 305 - 325
      Abstract: AbstractTherapeutic photography is the practice of using photography in order to explore issues and reach defined outcomes with people who use services. It has been deemed to be an accessible tool which can have a positive impact on self-esteem, self-efficacy and empowerment. Using interpretive phenomenological analysis, this research analyses observations and focus group feedback from a group of participants receiving support from a third-sector organisation for mental health issues. Specifically, the data were analysed to look at how a therapeutic photography programme contributed to group dynamics, exploration and outcomes. Three inter-related super-ordinate themes were identified, these being (1) exposing the self; (2) searching; and (3) developing the self. These themes centred around the identity of the participants as they explored their photographs and associated narratives. The results suggest that the medium of photography contributes to enhanced self-disclosure and social bonding through the familiarity of engaging with photographs. The photographs also enable participants to feel in control of the information shared, facilitating the level of exploration and personal learning around identity and roles and could be beneficial in social work with groups where these outcomes are sought.
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad196
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Professional Burnout as a Mediator in the Relationship Between
           Pandemic-Related Stress and Social Care Workers’ Mental Health

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      Pages: 326 - 340
      Abstract: AbstractUnderstanding pathways between social care workers’ Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19)-related stress and poorer mental health outcomes can inform employers’ efforts to support the well-being of staff. The present study engaged 103 workers at an Irish Non-Government Organisation providing child and family support services. In the initial months following the cessation of pandemic restrictions in 2022, they completed an anonymous online survey that included questions about their experiences of COVID-19, their professional quality of life and their mental health. The aim was to explore the direct effect of COVID-related stress on workers’ mental health, and the indirect effect through the mediators of compassion satisfaction and the compassion fatigue components of burnout and secondary traumatic stress. The results indicated that greater levels of pandemic stress are significantly and directly related to both increased burnout and poorer mental health, and that burnout also partially mediates the relationship between pandemic stress and poorer mental health. This study adds to a growing body of work concerned to better understand the social care workers’ pandemic experiences, and results are discussed in terms of apprising employers of the need for timely and effective staff supports.
      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad198
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Mechanisms for Support: A Realist Evaluation of Peer Parental Advocacy in
           England

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      Pages: 341 - 362
      Abstract: AbstractInternational research shows that although parents perceive the child protection system to be stigmatising and authoritarian, peer parental advocacy (PPA) programmes have a positive impact on improving complex relationships between parents and professionals. PPA programmes enable parents with lived experience of child protection processes to support other parents to navigate the system. As an emerging area of policy interest, research investigating the role of PPA in empowering parents to participate meaningfully in decision-making is crucial to developing collaborative approaches within child protection social work. This realist-informed study considered how a newly implemented PPA programme supported parents in two English Local Authorities. Our findings highlight the unique role peer advocates can play as a resource to influence decision-making, power relations and working relationships between professionals and parents. This article presents our final programme theory, which identifies four key mechanisms that support perceived effectiveness in PPA implementation: active engagement, effective communication, facilitating trust and adequate support for advocates. These findings highlight how PPA programmes in these Local Authorities were valued and begin to build a picture of how further advocacy programmes can be explored throughout the UK.
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad200
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Educating Young People about Vulnerability to Sexual Exploitation:
           Safeguarding Practitioners’ Standpoints at the Intersections of Gender,
           Sexuality and Risk

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      Pages: 363 - 380
      Abstract: AbstractThis article discusses findings from a qualitative study designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) awareness-raising programme targeted at young people. Drawing on data from in-depth interviews with practitioners involved in a multi-agency team established to reduce vulnerability to CSE, we elucidate that, in addition to being directed by professional codes, practitioners’ perceptions and judgements were also influenced by gendered assumptions and underlying anxieties about childhood sexuality. The empirical data presented suggest that attitudes towards young people and intervention decisions are partially steered by cultural values that connect not only to personal morals but also influence decisions made in conjunction with professional risk analytic frameworks. Our analysis indicates that broader investigation of the commingling of personal and professional values in safeguarding contexts is required, alongside the creation of protected spaces for professional reflection and dialogue amongst practitioners to support decision-making.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad201
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Social Workers in Socio-Legal Collaborations: Re-Asserting a Pivotal Role
           of Influence and Leadership

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      Pages: 381 - 398
      Abstract: AbstractCurrent legal discourse puts forward socio-legal collaborations, integrated social work and legal practice and medical/legal partnerships as innovations from the legal sector aimed at resolving clients’ intertwined legal and social issues. In doing so it has generalised and diminished the specific contribution in these programmes of highly skilled social work staff. This article sets out a study of Australian socio-legal collaborations to re-establish the significant contribution made by social workers in this sector. It argues that social workers are the dominant social service profession and provide integral practice and leadership contributions. It argues that further research in Australia and internationally is required to support social work to stand in leadership alongside lawyers, not only in these programmes but also in the discourse and sector that surrounds them.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad204
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Age Differences in Perceived Preparedness for the Continuation of COVID-19
           Pandemic: Important Role of Social Support

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      Pages: 399 - 418
      Abstract: AbstractThis study examined the age differences in perceived preparedness for the continuation of COVID-19 pandemic; and tested the moderating effects of three types of social support, i.e., emotional, financial and instrumental support. Using a sample of 450 adults in Texas, USA from the research project ‘Vulnerability and Resilience to Disasters’ (October 2020 to January 2021), results of multiple linear regressions showed that compared with people aged over sixty-five, those aged eighteen–forty-four perceived a lower level of preparedness for the ongoing COVID-19 and there was no significant difference in perceived preparedness between individuals aged sixty-five+ and those aged forty-five–sixty-four. Receiving emotional and instrumental support was, respectively, more important for people aged sixty-five+ to perceive a better level of preparedness than for those aged eighteen–forty-four and forty-five–sixty-four. The findings highlighted the unique strengths of older adults in COVID-19 preparedness from the life course perspective and the importance of social support in their disaster preparedness. Based on these findings, social workers could incorporate the wisdom and experience of older adults into disaster management and develop age-specific interventions to promote preventive behaviours during future public health disasters.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad205
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Technology-Facilitated Domestic Abuse: An under-Recognised Safeguarding
           Issue'

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      Pages: 419 - 436
      Abstract: AbstractResponding to domestic abuse is a key element of social work practice, in both child protection and adult safeguarding. This article sets out the ways in which rapid technological advances are being co-opted by perpetrators of domestic abuse to create new ways of exerting control. After starting with a brief reminder of recent UK legislative changes around domestic abuse, the article outlines the main ways in which technologies, including mobile phones and other Internet-enabled devices, are used by abusers for surveillance, monitoring, tracking and otherwise controlling all aspects of the lives of those they target. The article then moves on to consider how some groups may be at greater risk than others of technology-facilitated domestic abuse (TFDA), including women with insecure immigration status, women with learning disabilities and younger women and girls. Finally, the key social work tool for assessing risk in relation to domestic abuse is critiqued as lacking sufficient focus on TFDA. The article concludes by suggesting what individual social workers and local authorities need to do in order to better respond as TFDA continues to evolve.
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad206
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Political Institutions and Social Work: How Switzerland’s Direct
           Democracy, Federalist Structure and Consensus System Affect Social
           Workers’ Policy Engagement

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      Pages: 437 - 455
      Abstract: AbstractThe social work profession has a long tradition of engaging with policy to promote social justice, to improve the well-being of service users and the working conditions of social workers. Previous studies have mainly focused on the levels and forms of social workers’ policy engagement. However, little is known about the factors that influence social workers’ decisions to engage in policy. Addressing this research gap, this study focuses on one very specific influencing factor that has so far only received limited scholarly attention, namely, political institutions. More specifically, the article draws upon Switzerland as a case study and examines how Switzerland’s direct democracy, federalist structure and consensus system promote social workers’ policy engagement. The findings illustrate how these three key political institutions provide important opportunities for social workers—as individuals or as members of groups and coalitions—to access formal and informal areas of the policy process, both as private citizens and as part of their jobs. Based on these findings, the final section of the article outlines suggestions for further research.
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad208
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial to Improve Social Problem-Solving
           Skills of Kunjing Children without Sufficient Parental Care

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      Pages: 456 - 474
      Abstract: AbstractSocial problem-solving skills (SPS) are essential to child development, especially for kunjing children without sufficient parental care (KCw/oSPC). This study aimed to design and implement a group-based pilot intervention programme to improve KCw/oSPC’s SPS and assessed its effectiveness. This pilot intervention was a randomised controlled trial, fifty-seven KCw/oSPC at seventh grade (aged twelve to thirteen years) were recruited and randomly assigned into experimental (n = 24) and waiting (n = 33) groups. All participants in the experimental group received SPS training, whilst the waiting group did not receive any services at the research stage. Both pre- and post-test data about participants’ SPS from both groups were analysed with Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, respectively. Results indicated that KCw/oSPC’s SPS in the experimental group improved significantly, with large effect size (Cohen’s d = 1.15). This pilot study, although with limitations, contributed to informing future social work intervention studies and practice to promote KCw/oSPC’s SPS in Mainland China and worldwide.
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad209
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Shifting Labour Process in Professional Care: Recreating Dominance and
           the Managerialised Mental Health Social Worker

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      Pages: 475 - 493
      Abstract: AbstractThough the rationalisation of health care has been well documented, less is known about its impacts on mental health social workers. Drawing on qualitative data collected from 120 interviews and the qualitative comments on a Canadian four-province survey, the article explores the shifting labour process through profession-linked and organisational care strategies. The article argues that power is shifted from mental health social workers to management through stratagems including managerialism, biomedical hegemony and team-based care. These processes are complex and dynamic, travelling along professional divisions and logics, appearing neutral and scientific rather than as conduits reinforcing neoliberalised approaches to health care provision. Social workers’ resistance to these models of care is similarly complex and professionally based, though with strong elements of gendered altruism and social justice themes. Though this article draws on Canadian data, the analysis is likely highly applicable to other managerialised contexts including the UK. The article contributes to the intersection of Labour Process Theory and moral economy theory by highlighting the operation of a unique form of engagement referred to here as resistance-as-engagement. Overall, mental health social workers revealed strong oppositional narratives and identities pivoting on their marginalised position within team-based care, medical professional hierarchies and narrow, neoliberal approaches.
      PubDate: Wed, 27 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad210
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • HURTing: An Analysis of Service User and Carer Referrals to a UK Social
           Work Regulator

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      Pages: 494 - 513
      Abstract: AbstractIn the context of increasing regulation of social workers internationally, this study examines allegations made to a UK social work regulator, the Northern Ireland Social Care Council (NISCC), by service users and carers. A retrospective review of 134 records relating to such allegations during the ten-year period 2006–2015 was undertaken, representing just over one-third (36.4 per cent) of all allegations received. Allegations were made primarily about family and child-care social workers (91.0 per cent) and reflected the four inter-linking categories of concerns about the honesty of social workers, reports that service users/carers were treated unequally, allegations that social workers failed to demonstrate respect in their interactions with service users/carers, and concerns about technical aspects of social workers’ practice. The nature of these allegations forms the acronym HURT that describes both the experiences of service users/carers and the stressful context in which social workers practice. This article concludes that addressing the stress and HURT of both parties is important and makes suggestions regarding how the findings can strengthen the role of the regulator, influence social work practice and empower service users and carers.
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad211
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Donors: Curious Connections in Donor Conception, Petra Nordquist and Leah
           Gilman

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      Pages: 514 - 515
      Abstract: Donors: Curious Connections in Donor Conception, NordquistPetra and GilmanLeah, Bingley, UK, Emerald Publishing Ltd, 2022, ISBN 978-1-80043-567-4; £24 (pbk), 274 p.
      PubDate: Wed, 10 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad131
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Migration and Social Work: Approaches, Visions and Challenges, Emilio
           José Gómez-Ciriano, Elena Cabiati and Sofia Dedotsi

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      Pages: 515 - 517
      Abstract: Migration and Social Work: Approaches, Visions and ChallengesGómez-CirianoEmilio José, CabiatiElena and DedotsiSofiaBristol, Policy Press, 2023, 248pp., ISBN 978-1-44736-180-0, £80.00 (h/b)
      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad136
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Mindful Social Worker: Living Your Best Social Work Life, Barbara
           Starns

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      Pages: 517 - 519
      Abstract: The Mindful Social Worker: Living your best Social Work Life, StarnsBarbara, St Albans, Critical publishing, 2022, pp 160, ISBN: 9781915080356 (p/b), £16.99
      PubDate: Sat, 10 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad142
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Dilemmas and Decision Making in Residential Childcare, Abbi Jackson

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      Pages: 519 - 521
      Abstract: Dilemmas and Decision Making in Residential Childcare, JacksonAbbi, St. Albans, Critical Publishing, 2023, pp v + 113, ISBN: 978 1 915080 80 6 (p/b), £14.99
      PubDate: Fri, 09 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad143
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Advancement of Social Work: Studies in Social Work to Mark the
           Fiftieth Anniversary of the Social Workers’ Educational Trust
           1972–2022, David Pitcher and Beverley Burke (eds)

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      Pages: 521 - 523
      Abstract: The Advancement of Social Work: Studies in Social Work to Mark the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Social Workers’ Educational Trust 1972–2022Pitcher, David and BurkeBeverley (eds) Birmingham, British Association of Social Workers, 2022, pp. viii + 94, ISBN: 9781861780911 (p/b), £12.50—download at https://www.basw.co.uk/resources/advancement-social-work
      PubDate: Fri, 23 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad153
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • When Words Are Not Enough: Creative Responses to Grief, Jane Harris and
           Jimmy Edmonds

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      Pages: 523 - 524
      Abstract: When Words Are Not Enough: Creative Responses to Grief, HarrisJane, and EdmondsJimmy, Hawthorn Books, UK, 2022, pp. xx +112, ISBN 978-1-91248-057-9, £19.99 (p/b)
      PubDate: Fri, 23 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad156
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Transforming Social Work Field Education, New Insights from Practice,
           Research and Scholarship, Edited by Julie L. Drolet, Grant Charles, Sheri
           M. McConnell, and Marion Bogo

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      Pages: 524 - 526
      Abstract: Transforming Social Work Field Education, New Insights from Practice, Research and Scholarship, DroletJulie L., CharlesGrant, McConnellSheri M., and BogoMarion (eds), Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 2022, pp. 400, ISBN 9781773854397, $44.00 (p/b)
      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcad162
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 1 (2023)
       
 
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