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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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British Journal of Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.019
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 72  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0045-3102 - ISSN (Online) 1468-263X
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Social Work’s Contribution towards an Eco-Social World; the
           People’s Charter

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      Pages: 3073 - 3077
      Abstract: In the beginning of our tenure as journal editors we made a pledge that we would place a particular emphasis on the importance of social and environmental justice. In addition, we explained that a key objective of the journal would be to highlight the centrality and relevance of social work scholarship and practice in promoting social change and engaging with transformative action.
      PubDate: Sat, 17 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac148
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Voices Amidst the Smoke—Social Workers against Police Brutality in
           Hong Kong

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      Pages: 3522 - 3539
      Abstract: AbstractSocial unrest occurred across the latter half of 2019 through to early 2020 in Hong Kong. It changed the lives of many Hongkongers, and also changed the identities of a group of social workers in the city. Initiated by the Hong Kong Social Workers’ General Union, around 140 social workers organised themselves into the ‘Battlefield Social Workers’. Their voices were often heard at the frontier of scenes of social conflict that were full of smoke caused by tear gas shells and other firearms used by the police. Whilst the protesters and police officers were in extremely tense situations, such voices that were trying to calm people down posed a huge contrast. In this study, the authors have interviewed twenty-two Battlefield Social Workers. Their experiences on the ‘battlefront’ were investigated, with special attention paid to their perceptions of what social workers had done against police brutality. The findings and discussions are considered to have brought insights on social workers’ roles in an increasingly turbulent world.
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcab257
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Change from within: Community social workers as local policy actors

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      Pages: 3540 - 3558
      Abstract: AbstractPolicy practice (PP) refers to the on-the-job activities of social workers (SWs) intended to influence the design of public policies. Despite the importance attributed to this type of practice within social work, there is limited empirical knowledge on how SWs actually engage in PP and what explains it. This study contributes to this body of knowledge by examining the engagement of eighteen Israeli local government community SWs who engaged in PP to affect their localities’ policies. The study employed a qualitative method and used semi-structured interviews. The policy issues addressed were diverse, with policies for children and adults with disabilities, for physical infrastructures and for community development prominent. The participants employed foundational strategies, such as cultivating personal and professional relationships with officials in the municipality’s hierarchy, and targeted strategies such as organising meetings between high-level officials and residents. Motivational, facilitating and opportunity factors can explain the engagement in PP. Our main conclusion is that local government community SWs who decided to be policy actors and create change from within adopted a ‘collaborative institutional policy practice’, which is based primarily on internal, collaborative and consensual strategies.
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcab263
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Social work practice for COVID-19 in the acute hospital setting:
           Recommendations for psychosocial assessment

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      Pages: 3559 - 3577
      Abstract: AbstractThe global coronavirus SARS-CoV2 (COVID-19) pandemic outbreak caused immediate, far-reaching social schisms and created unprecedented challenges for hospital social work services worldwide. Existing hospital disaster plans were inadequately equipped for pandemics and organisational plans needed to quickly adapt to respond to the increased clinical demands and unique logistical considerations triggered by the virus. Literature reviews provided little in the way of precise guidance for practitioners. Hospital social workers responded not only to a new cohort of patients, but also to all patients affected by the societal repercussions of the pandemic and by governments’ attempts to mitigate the impacts of the virus. Psychosocial assessments, the bedrock of social work intervention, needed to adapt and evolve to encompass and address the exacerbation of existing social risks in new ways. This article originated from the authors’ interest in identifying practice implications for hospital social work during the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors briefly outline the distinct impact of COVID-19 on psychosocial issues such as domestic and family violence, elder abuse, child protection, financial stress and social isolation. They create a forum of international hospital social work centres to develop a consensus approach for addressing these issues in the context of a social work psychosocial assessment.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcab264
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Bringing Dignity to the Assessment of Safety for Children who Live with
           Violence

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      Pages: 3578 - 3598
      Abstract: Abstract Fear dominates women and children’s experience of domestic violence. Fear of harm, and the consequences of others finding out, can mean mothers are reluctant to seek help. Ironically, these survival behaviours can be understood as non-protective by child protection practitioners. This article describes research undertaken in New South Wales (NSW) Australia to determine the impact on child protection practitioner perceptions of child safety when Response-Based Practice (RBP) questions are combined with the standard NSW Structured Decision Making (SDM) safety assessment. RBP reflects core social work values through questions that explore how victims respond to, resist and manage violence. A vignette experiment with a between-subjects design was used to compare child safety assessments by practitioners who watched an interview guided by SDM alone and practitioners who watched an interview using the combined ‘treatment’ (SDM+RBP) approach. Participants (N = 1,041) were randomly assigned to SDM and treatment groups. Participants who watched the treatment approach were significantly more likely to assess the mother as cooperative and protective and significantly less likely to indicate that the children would be taken from her care. Thus, the results demonstrate that understanding how women manage violence changes practitioner views about maternal protectiveness and child safety.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcab260
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Factors affecting the social gradient in children’s social care

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      Pages: 3599 - 3617
      Abstract: AbstractThe social gradient in children’s social care refers to the relationship between socio-economic status and the likelihood of a child welfare intervention. This article reports on a quantitative study of national administrative data, aiming to identify social gradients across all local authorities in England and to examine the factors affecting their relative strength. An anonymised extract of case-level information on all school-aged children involved with statutory social care services in 2018–2019 was combined with income deprivation data for 32,837 small neighbourhoods. Poisson regression models were used to calculate how much intervention rates could be expected to rise for each 10 percent increase in neighbourhood deprivation. This produced a single number indicator of the social gradient that could be compared for different groups of children. The strongest social gradients were found for younger children, White children, children assessed with neglect and children on protection plans under the category of neglect. For children receiving statutory services the social gradient increased at every threshold of intervention. Findings suggest the shift from prevention to intervention in children’s social care is exacerbating inequalities and encouraging a disproportionate focus on poorer families. Implications are discussed for reforming child welfare services in the context of widening social inequalities.
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcab255
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Expanding Well-Being by Participating in Grassroots Innovations: Using the
           Capability Approach to Explore the Interest of Alternative Food Networks
           for Community Social Services

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      Pages: 3618 - 3638
      Abstract: AbstractGrassroots social innovations are citizen-led initiatives that develop bottom-up solutions to societal challenges. Alternative food networks (AFNs) are innovations which propose alternative schemes for distribution and consumption of food—such as community-based agriculture or food cooperatives—which can improve the well-being of participants. Its potential for social work and social services has been recognised, but remains underexplored. This paper proposes a theoretical framework based on the capability approach in order to explore the impacts, drivers and factors at play in the expansion of well-being in participants in AFNs. This framework is applied to address seven cases of different kind of AFNs in Valencia (Spain) and to explore implications and strands of action so community social services can make use of AFNs. The study draws on information from thirteen interviews with participants of AFNs, local experts and policymakers; from secondary sources and from participant observation. It deductively uses the categories in the framework and inductively identifies specific capabilities, drivers and factors. The results show that AFNs expand well-being in several aspects of human experience. They are highly diverse, from more reformist to more radical, so they can mobilise different publics. Social services can benefit from this impact and diversity.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcab267
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Participatory Research with Care Leavers to Explore their Support
           Experiences During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Pages: 3639 - 3657
      Abstract: Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic has perpetuated the challenges faced by care leavers and increased the need for support. Online participatory research was conducted to explore care leavers’ support experiences during the pandemic. A research team of twenty-five care leavers aged sixteen to twenty-five years and support workers from six local authorities across England identified priorities and developed an online questionnaire that was completed by ninety-four care leavers aged seventeen to twenty-six years. The research team also participated in focus groups, reflected on findings and agreed recommendations. The findings focused on four overarching themes: finances and practical issues, mental health, social connection, and support from services. The recommendations suggest that corporate parent services should provide information, offer equal opportunity to access support, facilitate connection for care leavers, and proactively reach out and ensure someone is always there for them. So that support is responsive to their needs, the continued participation of care leavers in decisions that affect them is paramount, along with commitment by the government and corporate parent services to listen and take action. By using a participatory approach that involved care leavers in the research process, this research promotes their voices and strengthens the evidence for enhancing care leaver support during the pandemic and beyond.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac001
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • How to promote the child welfare approach' A qualitative content
           analysis study in Iran

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      Pages: 3658 - 3676
      Abstract: AbstractProtecting children and developing their well-being have become a great concern in Iran. But policies and services for in-need or at-risk children often follow unintegrated and even incongruous approaches. To address this gap, this study aimed to develop a promoted approach to child welfare to integrate the practices and policies. The conventional qualitative content analysis was applied to in-depth interviews conducted with child welfare experts in Iran. Purposeful and theoretical sampling was used until data saturation was gained by fifty-six qualitative interviews. The interviews were analysed simultaneously using MAXQDA 2018 software. Findings of the study present an approach to reform and promote child welfare in Iran, including four main categories: (i) custodianship of government to child welfare issues; (ii) the holistic, universal and systemic approach to the child welfare system, (iii) child-centred approach; and (iv) family-centred approach. According to the experts’ opinion, in the first place, it is necessary to accept the government’s custodial and responsible role for children that allow authorities to intervene in families regarding children’s best interests. Also, the child-centred approach should be addressed more profoundly and both family-centred and child-centred approaches should be developed concurrently and intently.
      PubDate: Fri, 21 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcab268
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Adult Safeguarding Legislation—The Key to Addressing Dualism of Agency
           and Structure' An Exploration of how Irish Social Workers Protect
           Adults at Risk in the Absence of Adult Safeguarding Legislation

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      Pages: 3677 - 3696
      Abstract: AbstractAdult safeguarding is characterised by competing debates related to core concepts including policy and legislative frameworks. In some countries, to reconcile the dualism of agency and structure, conflict and ambiguity are legislated for through the introduction of adult safeguarding legislation (ASL). This study set out to explore how the absence of ASL in the Irish context impacts safeguarding processes. A qualitative approach involving semi-structured interviews (N = 14) and focus groups (N = 2) with social workers, explored variables from adult safeguarding cases that contribute to positive outcomes in the absence of ASL, and where legislation could have helped, using a critical incident technique. Four themes emerged: practices and processes; coercive control and undue influence; information sharing and multiagency cooperation; and inability to access services. Whilst in the majority of cases existing policy and legislation achieved successful outcomes, legislative powers such as a duty to cooperate, to share information and powers of entry were deemed necessary. This study suggests limits to safeguards and protections within current policy. It illustrates the dualism that often exists between the agency of social workers to act to safeguard adults at risk and the structural rules, relationships and resources that can restrict the context of action in absence of legislation.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac003
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Client Perspectives Regarding the Effects of a Community-centred Programme
           Aimed at Reducing Poverty and Social Exclusion

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      Pages: 3697 - 3720
      Abstract: AbstractPeople struggling with poverty and social exclusion constitute the principal population targeted by social services around the world. To deal with this social problem, many intervention plans have been developed. In Israel, the ‘Otzma’ Centre programme was adopted in 2007 by the Ministry of Welfare and Social Affairs. The programme’s goals are reducing clients’ economic distress and social exclusion through various social work methods, with the core principle being the population’s participation. The current qualitative study focused on a community programme for reducing poverty and exclusion. It was based on semi-structured in-depth interviews with thirteen women and two men aged thirty-five to fifty-eight years who participated in the programme. The study had two central goals: (i) understanding clients’ experience of living in poverty and (ii) understanding clients’ perceptions of the contribution of a community programme to their lives. Research findings included participants’ most salient perceptions: namely, the multidimensional experience of dealing with poverty, becoming knowledgeable about their rights and the change process in terms of economic, personal and family issues. A finding that stood out in its absence concerned partnership and participation. The study enriches the literature regarding community intervention programmes, which aim to reduce poverty and exclusion. Practical and theoretical considerations are discussed.
      PubDate: Sat, 29 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac006
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • ‘Block, Unfollow, Delete’: The Impacts of the #BlackLivesMatter
           Movement on Interracial Relationships in Australia

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      Pages: 3721 - 3739
      Abstract: AbstractInterracial relationships are situated historically within a complex racial discourse. At the height of the #BlackLivesMatter Movement in 2020, interracial relationships were tested, broken and repaired, whilst others were unable to withstand the racial destabilisation summoned by the Movement. In this article, we theorise how Blac/k bodies are organised and structured within systems of racial hierachialisation and the impact of this within relational contexts. Probing concepts of silence, fragility and allyship, which underpin the white racial frame, we provide critical argumentations of how processes of racialisation impact personal relationships where variables of blackness and whiteness are produced as sites of racial contestation. We argue that the political significance of race enters interracial relationships and theoretically transforms them into racial battlegrounds.
      PubDate: Sat, 29 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac008
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Construction and Validation of Social Work Intervention Complexity Scale
           in Hospital Care Settings

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      Pages: 3740 - 3760
      Abstract: AbstractThe aim of this article was to develop and validate a scale to measure the complexity of social intervention with adults in hospital care settings. Two separate studies were conducted (N1 = 224 and N2 = 224). Study 1 was focused on the development of the Social Work Intervention Complexity (SWIC) scale and on its dimensionality. The exploratory factorial analysis was conducted to identify its factor structure, and reliability was assessed. Study 2 examined the construct validity of the scale and tested its robustness in the two samples with an invariance test. Single-group and multi-group confirmatory factor analyses were used. The results confirmed a three-factor structure and convergent validity, and discriminant validity was guaranteed. The invariance of the measuring instrument across the two groups was also proved. The practical implications arising from the validation of the SWIC scale are also a distinctive feature of this work. The application can be implemented to monitor the complexity of social intervention with adults in hospital care settings. In the future, different hospitals could integrate the application of the SWIC scale into their protocol since the social worker's professional practice must be combined with scientific rigor and the quality of social intervention.
      PubDate: Tue, 31 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac103
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 6 (2022)
       
 
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