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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access  
Bakti Budaya     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access  
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Groupwork     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access  
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 320)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 145)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access  
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access  
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 168)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access  
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Social Work / Maatskaplike Werk     Open Access  
Social Work and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Social Work With Groups     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Socialinė teorija, empirija, politika ir praktika     Open Access  
Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
British Journal of Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.019
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 74  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0045-3102 - ISSN (Online) 1468-263X
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [423 journals]
  • Social Work Reflections on a ‘World out of Joint’

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 4475 - 4476
      Abstract: Throughout his celebrated career, the late sociologist Emmanuel Wallerstein worked towards developing a conceptual and political understanding of a world ‘out of joint’.
      PubDate: Fri, 02 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac205
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Exploring the Potential Mechanisms of Action of the Mindfulness-based
           Social Work and Self-care Programme

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      Pages: 4477 - 4496
      Abstract: AbstractThe mindfulness-based social work and self-care (MBSWSC) programme was created in order to support social work students and practitioners to develop enhanced social work and self-care skills. This programme was found to improve feelings of stress, anxiety, mental well-being and burnout of thirty social work students. An explanatory sequential mixed methods design was chosen in order to generate a comprehensive understanding of what the potential mechanisms of action of MBSWSC might be. Data were collected using validated quantitative measures and through an open-ended qualitative questionnaire. The quantitative data were analysed using regression analyses. The qualitative data were thematically analysed. Though this study contains limitations, it’s results suggest that social work student stress, feelings of burnout, anxiety and wellbeing can be improved by supporting students to develop approach-oriented stress coping skills and capacities in acceptance, mindfulness, self-compassion, non-attachment, attention regulation/decentering and non-aversion. This study suggests that these skills and capacities can work individually or collectively to directly improve these outcomes and also indirectly by reducing a student’s tendency to think negatively when they are stressed. The results provide some preliminary evidence on what the mechanisms of MBSWSC might be, enhancing our understanding of how mindfulness-based programmes might achieve positive outcomes.
      PubDate: Sat, 09 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac066
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Social Workers’ Attitudes towards Evidence-based Practice: A
           Multidimensional Perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 4497 - 4517
      Abstract: AbstractThe current study presents a multidimensional model that integrates social workers’ demographics, organisational context variables, evidence-based practice (EBP)-related factors and mental health variables and explores their contribution to social workers’ attitudes to implementing EBP. This model aims to fill a gap in the limited empirical knowledge regarding the relative and joint contribution of these factors to explaining social workers’ attitudes towards EBP, with an emphasis on mental health-related factors not sufficiently explored in this context to date. Structured questionnaires were administered to a sample of 560 Israeli social workers. The research findings revealed that length of professional experience, role ambiguity, work overload and burnout were negatively associated with attitudes to EBP. In contrast, possession of professional skills required for EBP implementation, workplace social support, organisational encouragement to implement EBP, exposure to colleagues’ implementation of EBP and subjective well-being were positively associated with social workers’ attitudes to EBP. No association was found between self-reported familiarity with EBP principles and attitudes to EBP. Improving social workers’ organisational climate, remediating necessary EBP-related skills and encouraging the implementation and modelling of EBP at work, as well as addressing social workers’ mental health issues, may significantly improve their attitudes towards implementing EBP in their professional practice.
      PubDate: Mon, 11 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac067
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Thresholds for Intervention in Child Neglect by Ordinary Citizens:
           Implications for Measuring Informal Social Control of Child Neglect

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      Pages: 4518 - 4536
      Abstract: AbstractThere is growing attention towards neighbourhood and contextual approaches to address and prevent child maltreatment. However, research into neighbour’s protective intervention (protective informal social control) in child neglect has seen little attention. Even amongst the limited research, the findings have not been consistent. The limited research on the subject is partly explained by the contested issue, which centres on the question; how do neighbours witness and intervene in non-aggressive forms of maltreatment, such as neglect' This article aimed to contribute to address this question by exploring thresholds in child neglect amongst ordinary residents. It draws on narrative interviews with seventeen female parents from seven settlements in Ghana. Severity of neglect, consistent exposure and poor parental capacity were key threshold measures reported. It emerged that threshold criteria (high or low) vary based on the subtypes of neglect. Whilst medical and supervisory neglect attracts low threshold criteria, more than one-time exposure is required to meet threshold in food neglect. The findings contrast the uncritical approach of lumping up subtypes of neglect. Instead, it advocates for the development of a context-based measure for protective informal social control of neglect that accounts for subtype effects. Such development should follow an item response theory approach.
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac069
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • The Revolutionary Social Worker in Palestine: Living the Challenge of
           Colonialism through Non-violent Resistance—the Struggles of Munther
           Amira

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      Pages: 4537 - 4553
      Abstract: AbstractThis article explores Munther Amira’s ‘Pedagogy of Revolution’, a unique approach of non-violent resistance that adopts the pedagogy of Paulo Freire and global social work values and principles, for educating, empowering and mobilising Palestinian refugees living in the Westbank, as a means for liberation from the oppression imposed by Israel’s military occupation. The article begins by charting the history of Palestine, locating it as a place of violent upheaval and colonial occupation. It also pays particular attention to Britain’s role in abandoning the Palestinian people describing how this decision contributed to the continuing unrest and violence in the region. Using narrative inquiry methods, and by deploying a lens of contemporary social theory, the article provides a deeper understanding of the lived experiences of Palestinian refugees through the lived experiences of Munther Amira, a Palestinian refugee, social worker and human rights defender. It concludes by showing that regardless of the exceptionalism (or otherwise) of the environment, globally social work should align itself with the defence of human rights through non-violence resistance and, as a matter of urgency, should adopt what we describe as a ‘Pedagogy of Revolution’.
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac071
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Professional Orientation of Social Pedagogy Students at Work Placement in
           Prisons

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      Pages: 4554 - 4570
      Abstract: AbstractThe research is based on work placements done by social pedagogy students in Slovenian prisons. It focuses on their professional orientation as reflected by their journal entries. A qualitative substantive analysis of a collection of their journal entries was performed, recognising six key topics that also represented the key aspects in which the journals differentiated drastically. Based on these, a continuum of student orientations was developed, featuring three models: the adoptive, non-professional and engaged orientation. Findings reveal a heterogeneity in the students’ orientations and are in this aspect in line with several other studies that have similarly shown various orientations and operating models in social pedagogy. This research adds to studying this field whilst being a reminder that perhaps the largest potential of social pedagogy today is to be able to state clear position about this variety and to be more assertive in promoting certain models and practices, whilst being critical to others. The research has shown that this can already be done during the students’ studying process, i.e. in the process of forming new future professional identities.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac070
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • The Politics of Matching: Ethnicity, Religion and Muslim-heritage Children
           in Care in the UK

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      Pages: 4571 - 4587
      Abstract: AbstractIn 2014, in order to improve outcomes for children from ethnic minority backgrounds and to speed up the adoption process, the UK government changed the Children and Families Act. The legal requirement on adoption agencies to consider ethnicity in the decision around ‘matching’ was removed, thus clearing the way for transracial placements. This article interrogates the impact of the change in law on social work practice around adoption, using the experiences of diverse Muslim-heritage children as a case study. Grounded in the sociology of religion, the findings presented here are based on semi-structured qualitative interviews (n = 28) with those involved in the care of Muslim-heritage children. In discussing qualitative findings, all adopters and prospective adopters interviewed in this research insisted on adopting children who ‘look like them’, and social workers continued to look for the ‘best’ possible matches. Children from minoritised backgrounds continue to wait for long periods before finding permanent homes. Our evidence raises questions about the efficacy of policy guidance. Based on this evidence we conclude that greater strategizing is needed around the recruitment of adopters from diverse backgrounds.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac068
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Disclosure of Child Sexual Abuse: Experiences of Men Survivors in India

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      Pages: 4588 - 4605
      Abstract: AbstractLittle is known about men and boys’ experiences of child sexual abuse (CSA) in India, particularly about their experiences of disclosing abuse. Disclosure experiences are often important as they can potentially make the path to recovery and healing more tractable or challenging for survivors. Using the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis approach, in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with eleven adult men survivors of CSA in India varying in age, location and sexual orientation, to learn about their experiences of disclosing abuse. Barriers to disclosure included guilt, shame, protecting the perpetrator, protecting others from emotional stress and pain, stigma about same-sex sexual activity, and fear of minimisation of abuse experiences. Disclosure was further inhibited by pervasive silence in society about sexuality and sexual abuse. Responses to disclosure were varied and included supportive responses, silence and victim blaming. Findings demonstrate that disclosure experiences of men survivors were strongly influenced by patriarchal and heteronormative norms and practices. Social work has a role to play in building awareness of sexual abuse of boys, helping create a social environment where survivors can feel safe about disclosing abuse, and challenging the oppressive structures of patriarchy and heteronormativity.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac073
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Contributions and Challenges of Public Health Social Work Practice during
           the Initial 2020 COVID-19 Outbreak in China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 4606 - 4621
      Abstract: AbstractSocial workers contributed significantly to the promotion of public and community health during the initial outbreak of COVID-19 in China. Based on a quasi-scoping review of articles on social work practice during that outbreak, this reflective article elucidates how social workers contributed in three chronological stages. In the early stage (late January and February 2020), social workers provided community services offered as part of the governmental structure (moderate information and resource provision); in the middle stage (March 2020), social workers provided services to vulnerable groups alongside supporting the quarantine strategy; and in the late stage (April 2020 onwards), their services were focused on recuperation and recovery after the national lockdown was lifted. In the meanwhile, several issues for public and community health social work as a profession in terms of how it was able to support anti-COVID-19 practices became clear, including a lack of independence and stability, the need for better flexibility and greater ability to act pragmatically and lack of professional agreement. This article aims to enlighten the development of a (re)emerging field—public health and community health social work in China in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.
      PubDate: Sat, 23 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac077
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Freedom in Chains' Religious Freedom Rights in an International Frame:
           Addressing the Increasing Intolerance and Violence Directed Toward People
           of Faith

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      Pages: 4622 - 4639
      Abstract: AbstractViolations of religious freedom rights are accelerating across the globe, with levels of religious harassment reaching record levels. Yet, despite social work’s commitment to challenging religious discrimination and promoting human rights, little, if any, attention has focused on this issue in the profession’s literature. In keeping with calls from the United Nations, this article highlights a human rights concern of critical importance to many vulnerable people, namely those who experience acts of intolerance, hate and violence for peacefully practicing the tenets of their faith. Accordingly, the parameters of religious freedom are delineated along with the status of religious freedom rights in the world, in conjunction with the populations that experience particularly extensive discrimination. After discussing the systemic factors that legitimise discrimination against people of faith, strategies are offered that social workers might implement to promote more equitable and socially just societies.
      PubDate: Mon, 25 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac072
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Implementation of the Making Safeguarding Personal Approach to
           Strengths-based Adult Social Care: Systematic Review of Qualitative
           Research Evidence

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      Pages: 4640 - 4663
      Abstract: AbstractSince the Care Act (2014), there is fresh impetus for social workers to apply strengths-based approaches (SBAs) when working with adults. However, implementation challenges remain. This article presents our synthesis of seven studies that examined Making Safeguarding Personal (MSP). It was conducted as part of a systematic review that aimed to summarise research evidence on the implementation of different SBAs within adult social work in the UK. Qualitative studies were analysed using a framework synthesis approach. Four themes were identified: (1) MSP as an intervention: seen as initially demanding but with long-term advantages; (2) Culture and settings: required broad cultural changes; ‘outward facing’ and smaller/specialist councils tended to find this easier; (3) Individual characteristics: related to enhancing the knowledge, skills and confidence of practitioner and stakeholders in MSP; and service user willingness to engage; and (4) Embedding and sustaining MSP: depended on strong leadership and active engagement at all levels. We found a wide range of factors affecting the implementation of MSP. These may have broader relevance for other strengths-based models of social work practice.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac076
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Do Social Media Impact Young Adult Mental Health and Well-Being' A
           Qualitative Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 4664 - 4683
      Abstract: AbstractThe Social Work profession recognises the ethical and educational implications of social media usage but remains cautious in embracing the technology in the context of clinical practice. Social media platforms allow their users to share thoughts, opinions, experiences, information, develop online communities and access social and emotional support. Social media-focused research in the mental health context has described the risk of vulnerable populations using social media. However, there is a dearth of research examining the lived experiences of young adult social media users or addressing both the perceived risks and benefits. Social Work clinicians need to understand the experience of clients and be able to respond to questions or challenges that service users using social media experience. Deploying inductive thematic content analysis, this study presents the qualitative findings of an online survey eliciting the experience of young adult social media users. Young adults reported varying perspectives, including preferences for anonymity, how social media is employed and consideration that specific platforms are either helpful or harmful. Results are discussed with consideration given to existing literature. This article contributes to the evidence-base for social work and other disciplines, allowing for a greater phenomenological understanding of young adults’ use of social media.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac078
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • International Social Work: Cross-Cultural Supervision of Interns from the
           West in India

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      Pages: 4684 - 4702
      Abstract: AbstractSocial work practice in a global context requires an understanding of the cross-cultural nature of practice settings in local communities and globally. One step to developing this understanding of the internationalisation of social work education, including the student internship, is to incorporate supervision by local practitioners and educators. A qualitative interview study of fourteen social work students from Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA completing internships in the Southwest Indian state of Kerala revealed themes of increased practice knowledge, practice skills, understanding of cross-cultural values and ethics, critical reflection and research skills development as a result of reflexive supervision provided to them by practitioners in their internship agencies and faculty from their host and home institutions. This challenging of views within one’s own culture, promoted by supervision, leads to increased capacity to engage in critical anti-oppressive practice amongst social workers.
      PubDate: Fri, 29 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac081
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Psychometric Examination of the Freshman Stress Questionnaire Using a
           Sample of Social Work Students in Spain during the Covid-19 Pandemic

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      Pages: 4703 - 4720
      Abstract: AbstractThe teaching–learning model implemented in Spanish universities as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic has generated a scenario of academic uncertainty amongst Spanish students. In the case of the Social Work degree, this apprehension appears to be linked to the heavy emotional load related to the theoretical–practical curricular contents of the degree. In this sense, the Freshman Stress Questionnaire (FSQ) has presented adequate levels of reliability and validity for its use on a population of Spanish university students; however, there is as yet no psychometric studies for its use on social work students. This study sought to analyse the psychometric properties of the FSQ using a sample of social work students. The sample comprised 732 students at three Spanish universities doing a social work degree (88.3 per cent women, 11.7 per cent men) with an average age of 21.51 years (standard deviation (SD) = 3.58). The results obtained from the exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the FSQ maintained the structure of four correlated factors and suitable reliability values for each dimension. The results of the factor invariance analysis indicate that the FSQ remains stable up to the level of metric invariance for the variable age. Results are discussed with available theory.
      PubDate: Fri, 29 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac074
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Practitioner Wisdom: A Conceptual Approach

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      Pages: 4721 - 4737
      Abstract: AbstractThis conceptual paper explores the role that wisdom plays in social work. In the literature, this topic is primarily discussed in terms of ‘Practice Wisdom’, a kind of implicit and intuitive-based body of knowledge that is acquired through practice experience. After reviewing some formulations of it, we argue that practice wisdom faces a number of difficulties and is a misguided approach. To replace it, we propose a novel framework called ‘Practitioner Wisdom’, which emphasises that the proper subject of wisdom is not some sub-personal construct like a body of knowledge or a set of skills but the social work practitioner. Drawing from virtue theory in philosophy, we theorise that being a wise practitioner is a matter of acquiring and cultivating a character that is constituted by the relevant social work virtues and values. We conclude by discussing some benefits of practitioner wisdom, including how it can be taught to social work students and entrants, and suggest some future areas of research.
      PubDate: Fri, 06 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac086
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Service user involvement in social work education: Enhancing student
           learning about intimate partner violence

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      Pages: 4738 - 4755
      Abstract: AbstractMen who use intimate partner violence (IPV) are often excluded from service user involvement approaches, including those provided in social work education. This article outlines Australian research in which men who use IPV developed a learning resource, the resource was shown to social work students and student feedback sought through pre- and post-test questionnaires and group discussion. Students reported increased knowledge regarding interpersonal violence, greater awareness of the skills required to engage service users who use IPV and willingness to work alongside service users who are involuntary and/or have multiple issues in future social work placements and practice. The findings suggest, when risks are well managed, it may be possible to incorporate the lived experiences of men who use IPV in social work education with positive benefit for student learning. The ramifications of these findings for social work education and practice internationally are discussed.
      PubDate: Fri, 06 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac087
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Reunification and Re-entry to Care: An Analysis of the National Datasets
           for Children Looked after in England

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      Pages: 4756 - 4777
      Abstract: AbstractThis article reports on a quantitative study of the national datasets for children in state care in England. The aim of the study was to investigate the likelihood of re-entry to care for children who returned home to their parents or main carers after an episode of care. An anonymised extract of case-level information on all children who received an episode of care between 2014 and 2020 (n = 51,238) was assembled from local authority (LA) administrative data held by the UK government. Cox regression models were used to calculate the cumulative probability of re-entry to care over time and identify the factors associated with a higher or lower probability. The findings showed that one in five children re-entered care after one year and over a third of children re-entered care after six years. A number of factors affected the probability of re-entering care, including age, ethnicity, care history, placement type and whether provision was LA, voluntary or private sector. Implications are discussed for planning and design of services to support reunification from care, and for the broader goal of reducing the number of children looked after by the state.
      PubDate: Fri, 06 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac079
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • (Re-)Imagining Social Work in the Anthropocene

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      Pages: 4778 - 4794
      Abstract: AbstractThe ecological crisis, marked by the Anthropocene epoch, is having a major impact on the global ecosystem, and the consequences are predicted to become increasingly severe in coming decades. The turbulence and uncertainty of the crisis means social work must begin planning, reflecting and reorientating. The first half of the article contextualises the climate crisis within neoliberal capitalism, whereas the second half proposes alternatives for social work practice that attempt to exist outside these structures. We have argued that social work should have a greater focus on developing an eco-social transition which means engaging with alternative economic systems, intentional communities, community gardens and localism. These approaches can practically espouse the profession’s values whilst beginning to conceptualise a response to the climate crisis that operates outside neoliberal capitalism.
      PubDate: Mon, 09 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac075
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Social Workers Dealing with Ethical Dilemmas in the Course of Their
           Professional Work: The Greek Experience

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      Pages: 4795 - 4814
      Abstract: AbstractGlobally, ethical dilemmas are a relatively neglected topic in social work research, despite their obvious importance to ethical professional practice. This study aims to contribute to the existing literature by exploring ethical dilemmas and related issues faced by social workers in Greece. For our purposes, we created an online survey questionnaire via Survey Monkey software and distributed it nationwide to all social workers, asking those who had more than two years of work experience at any kind of service providing agency to complete it. A total of 835 questionnaires were returned and used for data analysis (response rate 11.13 per cent). The study highlights the diversity of ethical dilemmas encountered by social workers in their professional practice, as well as revealing the different strategies, tools and mechanisms used in dealing with them. Further, it shows the urgent need for developing appropriate ethics support activities and training programmes for social workers, as a crucial part of their ongoing professional education and development. Such ethics initiatives are required to remain ethically competent throughout their working life.
      PubDate: Tue, 10 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac084
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Creating ‘Communities of Practice’ to Enhance Ecosocial Work: A
           Comparison between Finland and Australia

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      Pages: 4815 - 4835
      Abstract: AbstractThis article reports on findings from a small qualitative study in two industrialised countries—Finland and Australia, which aimed to engage social work practitioners in ‘communities of practice’ to collaboratively explore ecosocial work practice. Using a Participatory Action Research approach, a series of workshops were established to plan, implement and evaluate ecosocial work interventions. Data were gathered using qualitative pre- and post-surveys to examine changes to practice, including similarities and differences between Finnish and Australian practitioners. Overall, results indicated that practitioner engagement in the workshops increased their capacity to implement ecosocial work interventions in both countries. Despite differences identified between Finnish and Australian practitioners at the pre-survey phase, many changes identified at the post-survey phase were aligned. These post-changes involved growth in practitioners’ personal and professional awareness about ecosocial work, as well as observed positive changes within the organisations they worked. Interestingly, organisations were identified as both a barrier and enabler to implementing ecosocial work interventions. The authors conclude that whilst further research is needed, ‘communities of practice’ established through the workshops enhanced the practical application of ecosocial work and may provide a way forward for progressing ecosocial work and the profession’s response to the global environmental crisis.
      PubDate: Thu, 12 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac092
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Thrown into the Water: Early-career Social Workers’ Job Challenges and
           Time Management Coping Strategies

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      Pages: 4836 - 4852
      Abstract: AbstractThe present study examined the early-career experiences of Israeli social workers in their first years in the profession. The study also sought to examine the participants’ coping with the challenges posed by entering social work. Using a qualitative methodology, two focus groups of eleven social workers with eighteen months of work experience were conducted. The participants were asked about their professional role and workplace experiences. The findings pointed to two main challenges: stress and emotional overload, and dissatisfaction with organisational and employment conditions. The participants felt that social work education had not prepared them adequately for the complex reality of their practice. At the same time, they also described coping strategies related to time management. The implications discussed include requisite preparations of social work education and employing organisations to support early-career social workers.
      PubDate: Thu, 12 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac090
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Adopting a position—analysing, theorising and decolonising transnational
           and transracial adoptions in Sweden

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      Pages: 4853 - 4870
      Abstract: AbstractDecolonisation was first known as the return of land when the colonial states let go of their illegal settlements in the countries or territories they conquered by violence. However, today decolonisation is also known as the practice of how structures may be decolonised, through knowledge production. The aim of this article is to decolonise Swedish transnational and transracial adoptions through the lens of feminist post-colonial theory and theorisation. The methods involve analysing the field through theoretical concepts within feminist postcolonial theory, followed by autoethnographic writing and theorising of new concepts which can lead to new theoretical positions and thus a decolonisation. New theoretical concepts added to the field are ‘the first world mother’, ‘the second world citizen’ and ‘adopting a position’. By using these theorised concepts, the article contributes to the decolonisation of transnational and transracial adoptions. This new knowledge can be of use for various stakeholders. More specifically, it can be useful for therapists and counsellors if they want to follow and explore adoptees’ lived experience and contribute to decolonisation. Although the article is based on the Swedish context, it is relevant to a wider European and global setting, in that it deepens the theoretical understanding.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac083
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Systematic Review of Service User and Carer Involvement in Qualifying
           Social Work Education: A Decade in Retrospect

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      Pages: 4871 - 4893
      Abstract: AbstractService user and carer involvement in social work education is well established in the UK and other countries. There has however been limited research on the outcomes of this for social work practice and its subsequent impact on service users and carers. This has been noted in a previous systematic review involving one of the current authors. The current review aimed to synthesise literature from the previous decade (2011–2020) and follows on from the earlier review. PRISMA scoping review guidelines were followed and twenty-eight papers met the inclusion criteria that were framed. Data were extracted and tabulated according to the framework for the evaluation of educational programmes used in the previous review and analysed using narrative synthesis. A ten-item critical appraisal checklist was used to assess the rigour of all papers. The findings were similar to the earlier review. Most studies were from the UK and few evaluated change in students’ skills or subsequent practice; none evaluated subsequent outcomes for service users and carers. All stakeholders were positive about the perceived benefits of service user and care involvement. Future research needs to use more robust evaluation methodologies and evaluate skills development for students and outcomes for service users and carers.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac080
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Implementing the Learning from the Mindfulness-based Social Work and
           Self-care Programme to Social Work Student Practice during COVID-19: A
           Qualitative Study

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      Pages: 4894 - 4913
      Abstract: AbstractThis is the first study which has explored how social work students have applied the learning from a bespoke Mindfulness-Based Social Work and Self-Care (MBSWSC) programme to their social work practice. A qualitative research design was chosen, and a realist ontological position taken. The qualitative data were collected from reflective journals from seven social work students on placement who had completed the MBSWSC programme. An inductive thematic and comparative analysis methodology was used to identify key themes. This study found that the MBSWSC programme supported students to cope with the stress and anxiety that manifested before and during their placement. Students highlighted how switching from an avoidant to an approach oriented coping strategy allowed them to alleviate any negative thoughts or feelings they were experiencing. Students identified that this allowed them to employ more positive responses when dealing with stress. Students outlined that the learning from the programme allowed them to develop increased self-awareness, empathy, reflection and reflexivity skills, all of which will likely enhance their capacity for anti-oppressive social work practice. It is clear that improved access to the MBSWSC programme will allow social work students to develop the skills necessary to practice sustainably over the longer term.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac094
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Child Protection in Irish Primary Schools: Supports and Challenges in the
           Role of Designated Liaison Person for Child Protection

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      Pages: 4914 - 4932
      Abstract: AbstractThis article reviews child protection in the Irish primary school context from the perspective of the Designated Liaison Person (DLP). Research undertaken with DLPs is presented which illuminates the supports and challenges that are part of this responsible role. A review of the role of the DLP is presented in the article alongside an overview of the changes in legislation in the Irish child protection system. Particular attention is paid to the challenges of the role of DLP and the potential impact on children’s lives and their safety.
      PubDate: Fri, 20 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac097
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Formalist, Specialist, Pragmatist or Idealist—Approaches to Boundary
           Spanning in Personal Social Services

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      Pages: 4933 - 4951
      Abstract: AbstractThe social services generally operate in the very centre of welfare systems marked by organisational specialisation. However, a downside to high levels of specialisation is the risk of service fragmentation, which may particularly affect clients with complex needs. In this context, work over organisational boundaries—boundary spanning—is a crucial challenge for staff when performing their duties for the benefit of both organisation and clients. The aim of this article is to describe and analyse approaches to boundary spanning in the daily work of Swedish personal social services staff, paying particular attention to the often overlooked informal dimensions of work. Findings from a non-participation observation study and a group interview study are presented. Four approaches to boundary spanning are identified and conceptualised: the ‘formalist’, ‘specialist’, ‘pragmatist’ and ‘idealist’ approaches. The article concludes with a discussion of influence of these approaches—and particularly dimensions of informal organisation—on future challenges for a specialised welfare sector.
      PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac101
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Art Training and Artistic Efficacy as Predictors of Volunteerism in Elders

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      Pages: 4952 - 4969
      Abstract: AbstractFacilitating elders’ volunteerism, which comprises motivation and practice to help people formally, is beneficial to the elders and their volunteering beneficiaries. According to social–cognitive theory, such facilitation supposedly benefits from art training to raise elders’ artistic efficacy. This study examines such a supposition with a two-wave panel survey of 118 elders in Hong Kong, China. Among them, forty-seven were art trainees in a senior centre and seventy-one were non-trainees. Results show that art training significantly contributed to Waves 1 and 2 artistic efficacy and volunteerism in the elder. Moreover, Wave 1 artistic efficacy significantly contributed to Wave 2 volunteerism. The results imply that art training aiming to raise artistic efficacy in a senior centre is valuable for facilitating elders’ volunteerism. Incorporating such training in social services is thus worthwhile.
      PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac093
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Between Us and Them: Deaf Bedouin Women’s Perception of the Role of
           Social Workers

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      Pages: 4970 - 4989
      Abstract: AbstractIsrael’s Bedouin minority, with unique socio-demographic and cultural characteristics, has a higher incidence of deafness than that reported worldwide. Because they lack suitable social services, local access to information and public transportation, deaf Bedouins live in a challenging social context. Most social workers are hearing people untrained regarding this population and lacking proficiency in sign language. This complicates the therapeutic encounter. Most of the Bedouin service users are women, who contend with triple discrimination deriving from their gender, disability and socio-ethnic affiliation. Therefore, this qualitative study using semi-structured interviews of twenty-three deaf Bedouin women focuses on how they perceive the social workers in the local social services bureaus. We found that they view the social worker as a person to whom one can complain, who is supposed to look out for one’s rights, whom it is unpleasant to meet and who abandons them in a struggle. They also expressed ambivalent feelings towards their social workers: anger and frustration but also compassion and pity. The discussion focuses on the role of the social worker, the influence of acculturation and the three-way therapeutic encounter. Recommendations include equipping social workers with communication skills, knowledge about the population and skills for changing oppressive policy.
      PubDate: Tue, 31 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac102
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Practices and knowledge of socio-environmental organisations and movements
           in Maule, Chile and Antioquia, Colombia

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      Pages: 4990 - 5008
      Abstract: AbstractIt is generally accepted that the effects of climate change are a significant threat to human ecosystems, culture and health, and to global economic development as a whole. In response to these environmental changes and the attendant human vulnerability, it is imperative that social workers can more consciously lead the planning and social advocacy efforts needed to meet this challenge. The poorest and most vulnerable communities generally suffer the worst effects of climate change, and it is, therefore, essential to understand the different experiences of socio-environmental organisations and movements in response to environmental justice issues. This article presents the results of a comparative exploratory research study on Chile and Colombia, focusing on the practices and knowledge of socio-environmental organisations and movements in the Maule Region, Chile and the Department of Antioquia, Colombia. The research uses qualitative methodology and considers the views of nine social actors and leaders, four in Chile and five in Colombia. The conclusions indicate that these socio-environmental organisations see their purpose as defending water and territory, they fulfil a local advocacy role and they raise awareness and provide education on issues through participation and collective action.
      PubDate: Thu, 02 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac107
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Theatre and professional training: The Trame method

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      Pages: 5009 - 5026
      Abstract: AbstractThe article presents the method called Trame, a method designed for the professional training of doctors, nurses and social workers. The method makes the theoretical reflection of the pedagogical directors of the twentieth century dialogue with a more specifically pedagogical and sociological literature that distances itself from cognitive learning models and conceives learning as a situated and collective activity; it interfaces with Dewey (1961) and, at the same time, with pedagogical approaches that thematise theatre as an educational device (Massa, R. (eds.) (1992) La Clinica Della Formazione, Milano, Italy, Franco Angeli). It also focuses on the role that the body plays in learning processes. Theatre is done with the body and it is precisely starting from the centrality of the body that theatrical practices can ‘push’ training practices towards an overcoming of the mind/body dichotomy and a clearer focus on the intertwining between performance and training. In this perspective, Trame is configured as a method that aims to train the ‘knowledge of’ the body to develop self-awareness and reflexivity on one’s professional action.
      PubDate: Fri, 03 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac099
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Beyond the Carceral/Anti-carceral Binary: Considerations for Addressing
           Gender-based and Sexual Violence

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      Pages: 5027 - 5044
      Abstract: AbstractThis article aims to contribute to the burgeoning scholarship on carceral and anti-carceral feminist approaches to addressing gender-based and sexual violence (GBSV). Specifically, this article attempts to draw out the contributions and tensions of carceral and anti-carceral approaches towards the elimination of GBSV within the context of feminist social work practices and policies. Engaging in a reflexive process that draws on our collective experience of social work education, practice, activism, and research, we argue that, rather than reinforcing the carceral/anti-carceral binary, a critical consideration of current tensions and debates in this area may provide a more productive way forward in addressing gender-based and sexual violence more broadly.
      PubDate: Fri, 03 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac104
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • The Construction of Character in Social Work Narratives of Practice with
           Undocumented Migrants

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      Pages: 5045 - 5065
      Abstract: AbstractUndocumented migration is a global phenomenon. Social work practice with undocumented migrants, worldwide, is ethically complex as social workers are positioned between the mandates of the state, designed to deter ‘illegal’ migration and the needs of their undocumented clients. Yet, despite this complexity, the relationship between social workers and their undocumented clients remains largely unexamined. In this article, we draw on interviews with thirteen social workers to analyse how character is constructed in narratives of practice with undocumented migrants. We have used narrative analysis to explore: the relationship between social workers and their undocumented clients; the influence of other key actors and social workers’ constructions of their own practice. We identified three key findings from our analysis: (i) the emergency circumstances in which social workers encounter undocumented migrants made it difficult to establish relationships and consequently, undocumented migrants were weakly drawn in social workers’ narratives; (ii) off-stage actors who existed outside of social workers’ gaze (migrants’ relatives, employers and migrant brokers) exerted power over undocumented migrants and inhibited trusting relationships with professionals and (iii) tension between social workers’ moral claims about undocumented migrants and their personal empathy led to the construction of social workers as characters enmeshed in emotional conflict.
      PubDate: Fri, 03 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac105
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Transparency in Social Work: Mapping Polarities Faced by Social Workers

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      Pages: 5066 - 5083
      Abstract: AbstractDuring recent decades, the notion of transparency has become a guiding framework in social work policy and practice. Transparency is often approached in this context as a managerial notion. In this article, we approach transparency as a relational notion, a key attitude in social work. Relation transparency is a prerequisite for achieving democratic partnership with service users and their family and social network. Transparency as a key attitude of the social worker is often taken for granted, both by practitioners and policymakers. In the first face of our action research, we found that the way in which transparency is realised in the everyday practice of social work is a major challenge. After discussing the shift from a managerial to a relational notion of transparency, we analyse the various polarities social workers have to deal with in order to develop a transparent practice vis-à-vis service users. The question is whether we repeatedly fall into the trap of thinking that these dilemmas can be resolved instead of looking for ways to deal with them in daily practice without losing the fundamental values and ethical standards that social work represents.
      PubDate: Sat, 11 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac095
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Patients’ Supportive Care Needs—A
           Social Work Perspective

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      Pages: 5084 - 5104
      Abstract: AbstractThe purpose of this study was to identify (unmet) needs from a social work perspective of Adolescents and Young Adults (AYAs; aged eighteen to thirty-nine years) treated for cancer. The biopsychosocial model was used as framework to investigate the (unmet) needs of the AYAs. AYAs within two years after their cancer diagnosis were invited to participate in an interview. In addition, case studies were presented. Nine AYAs agreed to participate in the interviews. All respondents struggled with the rehabilitation and ‘post cancer’ phase and the impact of the treatment on their physical, sexual and psychological well-being. AYAs with an active desire to have children mentioned lack of information about the options of fertility preservation. The respondents would recommend psychosocial support for their peer AYAs, despite the absence of a need themselves. Themes such as lack of control, social economic (financial) status and existential issues were less prominent. Social workers should standardly be involved in the hospitals’ care path throughout the disease continuum: starting at diagnosis, continuing throughout treatment, and importantly, also in the rehabilitation phase and end-of-life care. The biopsychosocial model can serve as a tool to support the social worker in the counselling of these AYAs.
      PubDate: Sat, 11 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac096
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Pandemic and Social Work in Chile: Precarity, Precariousness and the Quest
           for Resistance in an Uncertain World

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      Pages: 5105 - 5123
      Abstract: AbstractIn Chile, the Covid-19 pandemic overlapped with a socio-political crisis that arose in response to the neoliberal model imposed during Pinochet’s dictatorship. Social workers have been key to addressing the multiple vulnerabilities the population has faced during the political uprising and pandemic. From a critical perspective that analyses precarity, precariousness and resistance as a continuum, this article examines SWs’ employment and intervention conditions during the pandemic and the resistances that have emerged in this context. Drawing upon a mixed sequential study that included an online survey (N = 872) and forty-two semi-structured (online) interviews, we identified that precarity and precariousness affecting professional interventions have persisted. However, findings indicate that (i) younger and less educated frontline SWs were most affected by worsening employment conditions; (ii) the shift towards tele-intervention has not only led to transformations in professional roles but also in the emergence of new surveillance mechanisms and (iii) new types of professional resistances emerged that have been identified as individual and spontaneous but nevertheless explicit in nature. We conclude that the pandemic and the on-going political crisis present social work with an opportunity to advocate for dignified working conditions as well as changing the historical subordinate position of the profession.
      PubDate: Sun, 12 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac109
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • A Political History of Child Protection: Lesson for Reform from Aotearoa
           New Zealand, Ian Kelvin Hyslop

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      Pages: 5124 - 5126
      Abstract: A Political History of Child Protection: Lesson for Reform from Aotearoa New Zealand,HyslopIan Kelvin, Bristol, Policy Press, 2022, pp. 214, ISBN: 978-1447-3531-88 (p/b), £24.99
      PubDate: Mon, 02 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac085
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After
           Children, Mariela Neagu

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      Pages: 5126 - 5127
      Abstract: Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children,NeaguMariela, Bristol, Policy Press, 2021, pp. 242, ISBN: 978-1447-3579-88 (h/b), £80.00
      PubDate: Fri, 20 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac098
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Care at Home for People Living with Dementia—Delaying
           Institutionalization, Sustaining Families Christine Ceci and Mary Ellen
           Purkis

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      Pages: 5128 - 5129
      Abstract: Care at Home for People Living with Dementia—Delaying Institutionalization, Sustaining FamiliesCeciChristine and PurkisMary Ellen, Bristol, Bristol University Press, 2021, pp. xii, 196, ISBN: 978-1447-3592-89 (hbk), £75.00
      PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac088
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Politics for Social Workers: A Practical Guide to Effecting Change,
           Stephen Pimpare

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      Pages: 5129 - 5131
      Abstract: Politics for Social Workers: A Practical Guide to Effecting Change,PimpareStephen, New York, Columbia University Press, 2022, pp. xii + 241, £25, ISBN 9780231196932 (pbk)
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac115
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Editors’ Note—Thank You to Reviewers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 5132 - 5136
      Abstract: The Editors would like to thank those listed below who have given their valuable help over the last year, between 1 October 2021 and 30 September 2022, in the review of manuscripts submitted to The British Journal of Social Work.
      PubDate: Fri, 02 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcac216
      Issue No: Vol. 52, No. 8 (2022)
       
 
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