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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 243 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 395)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 212)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)

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Similar Journals
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Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.225
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 51  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0002-7162 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3349
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • The Long Recovery from the Great Recession: An Introduction

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Timothy M. Smeeding, Jennifer Romich, Michael R. Strain
      Pages: 8 - 26
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 8-26, May 2021.
      The first two decades of the twenty-first century have been marked by the Great Recession (GR), which was followed by the longest recovery in U.S. history, here termed the Long Recovery (LR). The LR lasted more than 10 years and ended with a pandemic bang in March 2020. This article introduces the eighteen articles that make up our review of the effects of the LR on the working class. What did more than a decade of economic expansion following the GR do for the working class and various groups of disadvantaged workers' We study this question through the lenses of economics, demography, sociology, and policy. The working class—lower-middle-income units, especially those whose adults have low education levels or other credentials—was hit hard by the GR. Did groups who are usually at a labor market disadvantage in fact make absolute and relative gains in incomes and living standards during the LR' Lessons from the LR will help to inform policy efforts to sustain the postpandemic economic expansion, which is still under way as of this writing.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211036030
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • The Recovery from the Great Recession: A Long, Evolving Expansion

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      Authors: Jay C. Shambaugh, Michael R. Strain
      Pages: 28 - 48
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 28-48, May 2021.
      Prior to 2020, the Great Recession was the most important macroeconomic shock to the United States’ economy in generations. Millions lost jobs and homes. At its peak, one in ten workers who wanted a job could not find one. On an annual basis, the economy contracted by more than it had since the Great Depression. A slow and steady recovery followed the Great Recession’s official end in summer 2009, but because it was slow and the depth of the recession so deep, it took years to reduce slack in labor markets. But because the recovery lasted so long, many pre-recession peaks were exceeded, and eventually real wage growth accumulated for workers across the distribution. In fact, the business cycle (including recession and recovery) beginning in December 2007 was one of the better periods of real wage growth in many decades, with the bulk of that coming in the last years of the recovery.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211022305
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Labor Market Trends and Outcomes: What Has Changed since the Great
           Recession'

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      Authors: Erica L. Groshen, Harry J. Holzer
      Pages: 49 - 69
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 49-69, May 2021.
      This article describes 40 years of trends in wages and labor force participation for the “working class”—workers with a high school education or less—compared to workers with a college degree or more. We compare cyclical peaks over the entire period 1979 to 2019, with particular focus on the Great Recession (2007–2010) and recovery (2010–2019). We also present results by gender and race. We find real wage growth for all workers in the recovery from the Great Recession, but not enough to change the long-term trends of growing inequality and stagnant wages for the less educated. We also find that labor force participation continued to decline for the less educated, even during the recovery. Gaps between whites and Blacks grew, while Hispanics and Asians made more progress than Blacks. We consider various explanations for these findings and show that the early effects of the 2020 to 2021 pandemic recession hurt less-educated workers and those of color more than anyone else.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211022326
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Recent Trends in the Material Well-Being of the Working Class in America

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      Authors: James P. Ziliak
      Pages: 70 - 91
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 70-91, May 2021.
      I examine trends in the material well-being of working-class households using data from the Current Population Survey in the two decades surrounding the Great Recession. In the years leading up to the Great Recession, average earnings, homeownership, and insurance coverage all fell, and absolute poverty and food insecurity accelerated. After-tax incomes were, for the most part, stagnant. The economic hemorrhaging either abated or reversed, however, in the decade after the Great Recession, especially for the least skilled and for households headed by a Hispanic person. This includes robust earnings growth, which led to declines in earnings inequality, absolute poverty, and food insecurity, coupled with increased insurance coverage and a modest rebound in after-tax incomes. As many of these recent advances likely stalled with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, I discuss various policy options.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211021365
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • A Growing Divide: The Promise and Pitfalls of Higher Education for the
           Working Class

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      Authors: Douglas A. Webber
      Pages: 94 - 106
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 94-106, May 2021.
      This article is an analysis of recent dynamics in U.S. higher education, paying particular attention to how the market for higher education has changed since the Great Recession and how those changes have affected the working class. I examine the evolution of higher education over the past decade from the perspectives of both students and institutions, and document ways in which the Great Recession exacerbated inequality in access to college and outcomes among those who attend. While the expected return to attending college remains high, the downside risk (driven largely by student debt and a high degree of noncompletion) is also nontrivial. As in many other contexts, the burden of this risk is not shared equally across the population but is shouldered most acutely by students from low-income backgrounds, particularly among underrepresented minority groups.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211026199
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Justice-Involved Individuals in the Labor Market since the Great Recession

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      Authors: Keith Finlay, Michael Mueller-Smith
      Pages: 107 - 122
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 107-122, May 2021.
      We examine how individuals convicted of a felony or released from prison have fared in the labor market since the Great Recession. Using data from thirteen states in the Criminal Justice Administrative Records System (CJARS) linked with IRS W-2 information, we measure the employment and earnings of cohorts with focal criminal justice events before, during, and after the recession. These justice-involved cohorts experienced significant declines in employment and earnings during and immediately after the recession. Outcomes improved moderately during the long recovery but are still far below those of a reference group of people without high school degrees who were not involved in the justice system. We also correlate the employment outcomes of the justice involved to industry-specific local economic performance, finding that expansions in the construction and other services sectors are positively correlated with growing employment and especially earnings.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211024532
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • The Economic Status of People with Disabilities and Their Families since
           the Great Recession

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      Authors: Leila Bengali, Mary C. Daly, Olivia Lofton, Robert G. Valletta
      Pages: 123 - 142
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 123-142, May 2021.
      People with disabilities face substantial barriers to sustained employment and stable, adequate income. We assess how they and their families fared during the long economic expansion that followed the Great Recession of 2007 to 2009, using data from the monthly Current Population Survey (CPS) and the March CPS annual income supplement. We find that the expansion bolstered the well-being of people with disabilities and, in particular, their labor market engagement. We also find that federal disability benefits fell during the expansion. On balance, our results suggest that sustained economic growth can bolster the labor market engagement of people with disabilities and potentially reduce their reliance on disability benefits.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211022693
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • The Great Recession and Economic Outcomes for Indigenous Peoples in the
           United States

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      Authors: Randall Akee
      Pages: 143 - 157
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 143-157, May 2021.
      This article examines the earnings and employment experience of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN) and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) residing in the United States during and after the Great Recession. I compare these populations to non-Hispanic whites over the same time period with respect to median earnings and inequality, labor force participation rates, earnings by location, educational attainment, and occupational status. I find that the AIAN population has the lowest median earnings and highest level of earnings inequality. NHPI and AIAN experience a sharp increase in earnings inequality over the Great Recession and AIAN have a pronounced drop in labor force participation; these inequality measures remained elevated and stable over the recovery period especially for the AIAN population. Indigenous peoples employed in food services occupations experienced the least amount of earnings decline over the Great Recession, while those employed in construction and sales experienced larger declines. Labor force participation rates dropped most dramatically for the AIAN population over the Great Recession and remained at a new lower level in the recovery period. The analysis shows that there are stark differences across time, space, and occupation for these groups.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211025476
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Examining the Differential Impact of Recessions and Recovery across Race
           and Gender for Working- versus Professional-Class Workers

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      Authors: Ofronama Biu, Christopher Famighetti, Darrick Hamilton
      Pages: 158 - 172
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 158-172, May 2021.
      We investigate how wages and occupation sorting vary by race, gender, and class during recessions. We performed repeated Kitagawa-Blinder-Oaxaca decompositions of the Black-White wage gap from 1988 to 2020. Black professional-class workers’ wages are more unstable and take a more substantial hit during recessions. Black workers see a lower return to their labor market characteristics during recessions, and this is pronounced for the professional class. Using an occupational crowding methodology, we find that Black women are overrepresented in essential work and roles with high physical proximity to others and receive the lowest wages. White men are crowded out of riskier work but, within these categories, dominate higher-paying roles. Black workers earn less in professional riskier work than in working-class roles, while the reverse is true for White workers. We find that class status does not protect Black workers to the same extent as White workers, especially during recessions.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211027926
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Disparate Recoveries: Wealth, Race, and the Working Class after the Great
           Recession

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      Authors: Fenaba R. Addo, William A. Darity
      Pages: 173 - 192
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 173-192, May 2021.
      What does it mean to be working class in a society of extreme racial wealth inequality' Using data from the Survey of Consumer Finances, we investigate the wealth holdings of Black, Latinx, and white working-class households during the post–Great Recession (pre–COVID-19) period that spanned 2010 to 2019. We then explore the relationship between working-class and middle-class attainment using a wealth-based metric. We find that, in terms of their net worth, fewer Black working-class households benefitted from the economic recovery than white working-class households. Among white households, the working class saw the greatest increase in wealth in both absolute and relative terms. Working-class households were less likely to be middle class as defined by their wealth holdings, and Black and Latinx households were also less likely to be middle class. For Black households, racial identity is a stronger predictor of wealth attainment than occupational sector.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211028822
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • How Foreign- and U.S.-Born Latinos Fare during Recessions and Recoveries

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      Authors: Pia Orrenius, Madeline Zavodny
      Pages: 193 - 206
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 193-206, May 2021.
      Latinos make up the nation’s largest ethnic minority group. The majority of Latinos are U.S. born, making the progress and well-being of Latinos no longer just a question of immigrant assimilation but also of the effectiveness of U.S. educational institutions and labor markets in equipping young Latinos to move out of the working class and into the middle class. One significant headwind to progress among Latinos is recessions. Economic outcomes of Latinos are far more sensitive to the business cycle than are outcomes for non-Hispanic whites. Latinos also have higher poverty rates than whites, although the gap had been falling prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Deep holes in the pandemic safety net further imperiled Latino progress in 2020 and almost surely will in 2021 as well. Policies that would help working-class and poor Latinos include immigration and education reform and broader access to affordable health care.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211028827
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • The New Realities of Working-Class Jobs: Employer Practices, Worker
           Protections, and Employee Voice to Improve Job Quality

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      Authors: Julia R. Henly, Susan J. Lambert, Laura Dresser
      Pages: 208 - 224
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 208-224, May 2021.
      Over the last 40 years, changing employer practices have introduced instability and insecurity into working-class jobs, limiting the voice that employees have in their own employment and deteriorating overall job quality. In the decade after the Great Recession, slow but sustained economic growth benefitted workers in terms of generally higher employment and wages and reductions in involuntary part-time work. But we show that in that same period, other aspects of working-class jobs changed in ways that were less advantageous to workers. We examine recent, troubling trends in nonstandard employment, precarious scheduling practices, and employer labor violations, arguing that without the introduction of policies that rebalance terms of employment toward worker interests, an economic recovery alone is unlikely to reverse the overall trend toward reductions in job quality. We argue for federal-level policies that expand public insurance programs, establish minimum standards of job quality, and include avenues for collective employee voice in employment and public policy debates. Such strategies have potential to improve job quality.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211028130
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • How Labor Market Institutions Matter for Worker Compensation

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      Authors: Ryan Nunn, Jennifer Hunt
      Pages: 225 - 241
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 225-241, May 2021.
      Labor markets deviate substantially from the competitive ideal, and policies and institutions affect workers’ outcomes. Over the last 45 years, the dramatic increase in compensation of high earners and weak or stagnant growth for low and middle earners have shone a spotlight on the ways in which labor market institutions sometimes work to the detriment of lower-paid workers. In this article, we survey several institutions—minimum wages, private sector unions, noncompete agreements, and occupational licensing—considering how they have evolved in ways that affect workers’ outcomes, given that the labor market is characterized by uneven distribution of market gains. We describe the modern labor market as one that substantially features alternative work arrangements and labor market concentration, and we consider the implications of this for public policy. Those policies, along with the surveyed institutions, are the focus of our final section that discusses key options for improving worker outcomes.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211035965
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Major Means-Tested and Income Support Programs for the Working Class,
           2009–2019

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      Authors: Yu-Ling Chang, Jennifer Romich, Marci Ybarra
      Pages: 242 - 259
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 242-259, May 2021.
      This article examines policy changes to and trends in five cash or near-cash income support programs for low-income workers and their families from 2009 to 2019. Our analyses show that the safety net expanded during the recession and then contracted via the tightening of eligibility rules and expiration of most temporary expansions for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), unemployment insurance (UI), and Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF). Expansions for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax Credit (CTC) over the period 2009 to 2019 align with a decades-long trend of social welfare policy reinforcing or enforcing labor force participation. Caseloads fell mostly rapidly for UI, which is explicitly designed as countercyclical support; and for TANF, which maintained high levels of administrative burden. We conclude with a cross-program discussion of the state of the social safety net in the pandemic era and postpandemic recovery.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211033524
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Workforce Entry Including Career and Technical Education and Training

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      Authors: Burt S. Barnow, Lois M. Miller, Jeffrey A. Smith
      Pages: 260 - 274
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 260-274, May 2021.
      This article reviews the basic patterns of employment and school enrollment for new labor market entrants in the period leading up to the Great Recession and in the decade thereafter. We find a persistent shift into four-year colleges that began during the Great Recession. At the same time, fewer youth are neither working nor enrolled in school. We see little change in occupational training programs during our study period, in program or in participation rates; in particular, rates of training provided via federal workforce development programs remain low among workforce entrants. The research literature on these programs has advanced but without large effects on policy or practice.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211031811
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • The Opioid Epidemic Was Not Caused by Economic Distress but by Factors
           That Could Be More Rapidly Addressed

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      Authors: Janet Currie, Hannes Schwandt
      Pages: 276 - 291
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 276-291, May 2021.
      Without the opioid epidemic, American life expectancy would not have declined prior to 2020. The epidemic was sparked by the development and marketing of a new generation of prescription opioids, and the behavior of opioid providers is still helping to drive it. Little relationship exists between the opioid crisis and contemporaneous measures of labor market opportunity: cohorts and areas that experienced poor labor market conditions do show lagged increases in opioid mortality, but the effect is modest relative to the scale of the epidemic. We argue that specific policies and features of the U.S. health care market, especially liberal prescribing of opioids, led to the current crisis. It will not be possible to quickly reverse depressed economic conditions, but it is possible to implement policies that would reduce the number of new opioid addicts and save the lives of many who are already addicted.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211033833
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Communities Moving Ahead, Falling Behind: Evidence from the Index of Deep
           Disadvantage

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      Authors: Vincent A. Fusaro, H. Luke Shaefer, Jasmine Simington
      Pages: 292 - 312
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 292-312, May 2021.
      Using a multidimensional index weighting factors related to income, health, and social mobility—the Index of Deep Disadvantage (IDD)—we rank the well-being of disadvantaged U.S. counties (initial scores below the median IDD) when they were on the cusp of the Great Recession and then again well into the recovery. We compare the characteristics of counties that saw improvements to those that saw declines. We find that a clear majority of counties were stable in relative rank. Counties showing improvement tended to have been worse off prerecession than counties where well-being declined. Improving counties were less likely to be urban, tended to have smaller fractions of the population identifying as Black and larger fractions as white, and had a lower proportion of jobs in manufacturing. Stable counties were, on average, the worst off pre-recession and thus remained the worst off near the end of the recovery. All county groups improved in income and employment through the recovery, but these advances were not consistently associated with gains in other areas such as incidence of low-weight births.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211035966
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Policies to Help the Working Class in the Aftermath of COVID-19: Lessons
           from the Great Recession

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      Authors: Richard V. Burkhauser, Kevin Corinth, Douglas Holtz-Eakin
      Pages: 314 - 330
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 314-330, May 2021.
      The COVID-19 pandemic and the associated government-mandated shutdowns caused a historic shock to the U.S. economy and a disproportionate job loss concentrated among the working class. While an unprecedented social safety net policy response successfully offset earnings losses among lower-wage workers, the risk of continued and persistent unemployment remains higher among the working class. The key lesson from the Great Recession is that strong economic growth and a hot labor market do more to improve the economic well-being of the working class and historically disadvantaged groups than a slow recovery that relies on safety net policies to help replace lost earnings. Thus, the best way to prevent a “k-shaped” recovery is to ensure that safety net policies do not interfere with a return to the strong pre-pandemic economy once the health risk subsides and that progrowth policies that incentivize business investment and hiring are maintained.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211031772
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Improving the Fortunes of America’s Working Class

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      Authors: Gary Burtless, Isabel V. Sawhill
      Pages: 331 - 344
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 695, Issue 1, Page 331-344, May 2021.
      The prosperity of America’s working class depends on trends in their employment and earnings, but also on the social protection and income supplements they receive as a result of government policy. Since 2000, working-class wages climbed slowly once we account for the increase in consumer prices. Nonetheless, the total personal income of lower- and middle-income families increased considerably faster than their wages. As documented in the article, the income gains were in part the result of rising fringe benefits from employers and even more the result of rising government subsidies for health insurance and social protection. The article recommends a range of policies to increase the pace of working-class income gains, including macroeconomic policies that increase the duration of economic expansions, reforms in labor law to improve workers’ bargaining power, boosting the minimum wage, and revising occupational training of non-college-educated workers to boost their earning power.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:05:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00027162211036009
      Issue No: Vol. 695, No. 1 (2021)
       
 
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