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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Social Science Japan Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.201
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1369-1465 - ISSN (Online) 1468-2680
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [423 journals]
  • Homogenous Japan' An Empirical Examination on Public Perceptions of
           Citizenship

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      Pages: 209 - 228
      Abstract: AbstractDoes the Japanese public consider shared ancestry the most essential condition for inclusion of an individual as a member of their country’s citizenry' This paper empirically assesses how the public in the ethnic nation views citizenship acquisition criteria. The originally conducted survey based on a conjoint format in Japan (2015) displays interesting results. Overall, Japanese people most heavily rely on the nationalities of parents in judging who qualifies as ‘Japanese’, confirming the contentions of previous works that highlight Japanese people’s belief in a mono-ethnic Japan. More detailed statistical analyses further reveal that Japanese people consider ethnic heritage through the father as the most essential criterion while the mother’s nationality and country of upbringing are also relevant. These results seem to reflect Japan’s long-lasting beliefs in cultural homogeneity as well as patriarchal values, which are reinforced by a patrilineal tradition of citizenship. This research advances the discussion on how to classify citizenship features by disaggregating ethnic lineage into paternal and maternal lines. Furthermore, it suggests a reevaluation of Japan’s institutional and social attachment to patrilineal ethnic heritage in order to ease multiple layers of discrimination posed against (particularly female) migrants and to realize a sound multiethnic society.
      PubDate: Sun, 20 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac001
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Vulnerability and Pathways to Precarity: How COVID-19 Has Affected
           Japan’s Nepali Immigrants

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      Pages: 229 - 246
      Abstract: AbstractThis article explores the impact of COVID-19 on Nepali immigrants working as cooks in Nepali-owned Indian curry restaurants, one of the largest ethnic entrepreneurships in Japan. The COVID pandemic disproportionally affected the socio-economic situation of the restaurants’ owners and their cooks based on structural (dis)advantages. Many Nepali cooks have lost their jobs, and those who have stayed employed have seen their salaries reduced by 30–50%. As a result, cooks, who were already a vulnerable group, have been pushed into a more precarious situation, struggling to merely survive. However, surprisingly, more than 90% of Nepali restaurant owners have maintained their business operations and are still better positioned to weather this crisis than the cooks in their restaurants. This raises an important question: why are Nepali restaurant owners able to cope with the economic fall-out of the pandemic when Nepali restaurant cooks fell into destitution due to the coronavirus pandemic' Based on in-depth research in Japan and Nepal conducted from March 2020 to June 2021, and supplemented by my long-term research before the pandemic, this article will examine Nepali cooks’ social, economic, and structural vulnerabilities by emphasizing their responses to the pandemic and its outcome. Through the voices of the cooks, their families, and Nepali restaurants owners, I demonstrate how the vulnerability and the unequal effects of the pandemic, compounded by preexisting social inequality, exploitation, and socio-economic hierarchies are reverberating throughout the Nepali restaurant industry. Furthermore, by analyzing the relationship between the cooks and the owners, I argue that social networks at meso level not only increase migrants’ ‘resilience’, as suggested by vulnerabilities scholars but conversely involve a measure of exploitation and produce vulnerabilities.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac007
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Three is Company, Four is a Crowd' Perceptions of Cultural Diversity
           in the Workplace

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      Pages: 247 - 272
      Abstract: AbstractCultural diversity has gained increased validation as a source of greater performance in the context of globalization. This paper examines whether there is an optimum number of foreign coworkers in order to maximize the perceived benefits and minimize the perceived threats of cultural diversity at work. Using a questionnaire survey of 572 Japanese, we found that for perceived benefits of cultural diversity at work, there is no difference between having zero or a token foreign coworker, while more foreign coworkers are associated with moderately higher perceived benefits. For perceived threats, there is a U-shaped relationship whereby interacting with zero or more than three foreign coworkers is linked to higher perceived threats compared to that of only a few foreign coworkers. Our findings reveal that in the Japanese context, interacting with about three foreign coworkers can maximize the perceived benefits while minimizing the perceived threats of cultural diversity in the workplace. Considering diversity in absolute rather than relative terms is an important contribution and implication for business and policy, as Japan and Japanese firms are increasingly dependent on globalization.
      PubDate: Tue, 05 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac003
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • A Japanese Subjective Well-Being Indicator Based on Twitter Data

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      Pages: 273 - 296
      Abstract: AbstractThis study presents for the first time the SWB-J index, a subjective well-being indicator for Japan based on Twitter data. The index is composed by eight dimensions of subjective well-being and is estimated relying on Twitter data by using human supervised sentiment analysis. The index is then compared with the analogous SWB-I index for Italy in order to verify possible analogies and cultural differences. Further, through structural equation models, we investigate the relationship between economic and health conditions of the country and the well-being latent variable and illustrate how this latent dimension affects the SWB-J and SWB-I indicators. It turns out that, as expected, economic and health welfare is only one aspect of the multidimensional well-being that is captured by the Twitter-based indicator.
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac002
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Japan’s Foreign Aid Policy: Has It Changed' Thirty Years of ODA
           Charters

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      Pages: 297 - 330
      Abstract: AbstractNearly 30 years have passed since the government of Japan unveiled its first Official Development Assistance Charter. Although it sets forth fundamental guidelines for the government’s foreign aid policy, previous studies have downplayed the influence of the ODA Charter. By contrast, this study argues that the ODA Charter changed Japan’s aid allocation behavior in relation to a number of issues. First, regarding military matters: since the introduction of the 1992 ODA Charter, testing of weapons of mass destruction by developing nations, as well as military expenditures for conventional weaponry by developing nations outside of Asia, have had a negative effect on aid from Japan. Non-military cooperation with military personnel was newly introduced as a principle in the 2015 Development Cooperation Charter, and that type of cooperation increased from 2015 on, a clear indication of the influence of the Charter. Foreign aid designed to serve Japan’s own interests was first discussed in the 2003 Charter, and the proportion of that type of aid has since increased. The aims of avoiding military force and returning economic benefits to Japan, which have long had strong domestic support in postwar Japan, were seamlessly incorporated into the ODA Charter. By contrast, the aims of promoting democratization and protecting the vulnerable—international norms for foreign aid, imported from abroad—are duly set forth in the ODA Charter, which ostensibly guides Japan’s foreign aid policy, but they have had no impact on its actual aid allocation behavior.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac010
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Japan’s Extreme Infrastructure: Fortress-ification, Resilience, and
           Extreme Nature

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      Pages: 331 - 352
      Abstract: AbstractHow have massive concrete walls become thinkable as resilient infrastructure for an extreme nature, and what will collective life become in the shadow of such concrete resilience' These questions hold increasing importance as cities and nations throughout the world contemplate the construction of giant concrete barriers to resist the forces of extreme weather and rising sea levels. This article turns to Japan’s ‘fortress-ification’ of its northeast coast with giant concrete seawalls in wake of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake in order to explore the convergence of resilience thinking, concrete walls, and extreme nature. Treating fortress-ification as an empirical phenomenon and analytic, the argument tracks the emergence of fortress-ification as a manifestation of a kind of resilience thinking that derives from a synthesis of logics of disaster prevention and disaster reduction. Ultimately, the argument posits that the resilience thinking behind fortress-ification engenders adaptation to extreme nature without providing meaningful environmental mitigation. The result is disaster infrastructure with highly questionable efficacy that seals the population within an ecologically empty present while restricting access to better alternative ecological futures.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac011
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Studying Japan: Handbook of Research Designs, Fieldwork and Methods

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      Pages: 353 - 356
      Abstract: Studying Japan: Handbook of Research Designs, Fieldwork and Methods, edited by KottmannNora and ReiherCornelia. Baden-Baden: Nomos, 2020, 501 pp., €58,00 (ISBN 978-3-8487-5085-6)
      PubDate: Sat, 07 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac009
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Amorphous Dissent: Post-Fukushima Social Movements in Japan

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      Pages: 357 - 360
      Abstract: Amorphous Dissent: Post-Fukushima Social Movements in Japan, edited by TakashiHorie, HikaruTanaka, and KiyotoTanno. Melbourne: Trans Pacific Press, 2021, 244 pp., $41.95 paper (ISBN 9781920901851)
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyab049
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Genpatsu Jiko to ‘Shoku’: Shijō, Komyunikēshon, Sabetsu (The Nuclear
           Disaster and ‘Food’. The Market, Communication, Discrimination)

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      Pages: 361 - 364
      Abstract: Genpatsu Jiko to ‘Shoku’: Shijō, Komyunikēshon, Sabetsu(The Nuclear Disaster and ‘Food’. The Market, Communication, Discrimination), edited by IgarashiYasumasa. Tokyo: Chūkō Shinsho, 2018, 240 pp., ¥820 (ISBN 978-4-12-102474-9).
      PubDate: Mon, 16 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac008
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Revolution Goes East: Imperial Japan and Soviet Communism

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      Pages: 365 - 368
      Abstract: Revolution Goes East: Imperial Japan and Soviet Communism, by LinkhoevaTatiana. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2020, 283 pp., $27.95 (ISBN 9781501748080)
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyab047
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The Red Years: Theory, Politics and Aesthetics in the Japanese ‘68

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      Pages: 369 - 372
      Abstract: The Red Years: Theory, Politics and Aesthetics in the Japanese ‘68, edited by WalkerGavin. London: Verso, 2020, 272 pp., £56.00 cloth. (ISBN 9781788731638)
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac012
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Cold War Democracy: The United States and Japan

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      Pages: 373 - 376
      Abstract: Cold War Democracy: The United States and Japan, by MillerJennifer M.. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2019, 368 pp., $46.50 cloth (ISBN 9780674976344)
      PubDate: Sat, 11 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac013
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Rekishi-ninshiki wa dō katararete kita ka (The Development of Historical
           Disputes: How Japan and South Korea Have Talked about Their History)

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      Pages: 377 - 380
      Abstract: Rekishi-ninshiki wa dō katararete kita ka (The Development of Historical Disputes: How Japan and South Korea Have Talked about Their History), by KimuraKan. shobōChikura, 2020, 336 pp., ¥3,850 (ISBN 978-4-8051-1207-6).
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyab048
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Reluctant Warriors: Germany, Japan, and Their U.S. Alliance Dilemma

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      Pages: 381 - 384
      Abstract: Reluctant Warriors: Germany, Japan, and Their U.S. Alliance Dilemma, by SakakiAlexandra, MaullHanns W., LuknerKerstin, KraussEllis S., and BergerThomas U.. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, 2019, 314 pp., $41.99 (ISBN 9780815737360)
      PubDate: Sun, 20 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac005
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Gendai Nihon no daihyōsei minshuseiji: Yūkensha to seijika

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      Pages: 385 - 386
      Abstract: Gendai Nihon no daihyōsei minshuseiji: Yūkensha to seijika(Representative Democracy in Japan: Voters and Politicians), by TaniguchiMasaki. Tokyo: University of Tokyo Press, 2020, 336 pp., ¥6,380 (ISBN 978-4-13-030171-8)
      PubDate: Sun, 20 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac006
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Seiji kenryoku to gyōsei soshiki: Chuo shōchō no Nihongata
           seido sekkei

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      Pages: 387 - 390
      Abstract: Seiji kenryoku to gyōsei soshiki: Chuo shōchō no Nihongata seido sekkei (Political Power and Government Organizations: Japanese-style Institutional Design in Central Ministries and Agencies), by KawaiKōichi. Tokyo: Keisō shobō, 2019, 176 pp., ¥3,800 (ISBN 978-4-326-30276-5)
      PubDate: Sun, 20 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac004
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Gakuryoku, shinri, katei kankyō no keizai bunseki: Zenkoku
           shōchūgakusei no tsuiseki chōsa kara miete kita mono (An Economic
           Analysis of Academic Ability, Non-cognitive Ability, and Family
           Background: Primary Findings from a Panel Survey of Japanese School-Age
           Children)

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      Pages: 391 - 394
      Abstract: Gakuryoku, shinri, katei kankyō no keizai bunseki: Zenkoku shōchūgakusei no tsuiseki chōsa kara miete kita mono(An Economic Analysis of Academic Ability, Non-cognitive Ability, and Family Background: Primary Findings from a Panel Survey of Japanese School-Age Children), edited by AkabayashiHideo, NaoiMichio, and ShikishimaChizuru. Tokyo: Yūhikaku, 2016, 274 pp., ¥3,100 (ISBN 978-4-641-16473-4)
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyab050
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Nihon no safety net no kakusa—rōdō shijo no henyō to shakai hoshō
           (Inequality of the Safety Net in Japan—The Transformation of the Labour
           Market and Social Security)

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      Pages: 395 - 398
      Abstract: Nihon no safety net no kakusa—rōdō shijo no henyō to shakai hoshō (Inequality of the Safety Net in Japan—The Transformation of the Labour Market and Social Security), by SakaiTadashi. Tokyo: Keio Daigaku Shuppankai, 2020, 352 pp., ¥2,970 (ISBN 978-4-7664-2649-6)
      PubDate: Mon, 11 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac015
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Gender and the Koseki in Contemporary Japan: Surname, Power, and Privilege

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      Pages: 399 - 402
      Abstract: Gender and the Koseki in Contemporary Japan: Surname, Power, and Privilege, by WhiteLinda. Abingdon: Routledge Press, 2018, 119 pp., $48.95 paper (ISBN 9780367424206)
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac014
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Global Coffee and Cultural Change in Modern Japan

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      Pages: 403 - 405
      Abstract: Global Coffee and Cultural Change in Modern Japan, by GrinshpunHelena. London: Routledge, 2021, 157 pp., £96.00 paper (ISBN 9780367533922)
      PubDate: Sat, 09 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ssjj/jyac016
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 2 (2022)
       
 
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