A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Social Policy and Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.653
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 140  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1474-7464 - ISSN (Online) 1475-3073
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [352 journals]
  • SPS volume 22 issue 1 Cover and Front matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-12-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746422000689
       
  • SPS volume 22 issue 1 Cover and Back matter

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-12-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746422000677
       
  • Social Policy Responses to Covid-19 in the Global South: Evidence from 36
           Countries

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dorlach; Tim
      Pages: 94 - 105
      Abstract: The Covid-19 pandemic has prompted manifold social policy responses all around the world. This article presents the findings of a meta-analysis of thirty-six in-depth country reports on early Covid-19 social policy responses in the Global South. The analysis shows that social policy responses during the early phase of the pandemic have been predominantly focused on expanding temporary and targeted benefits. In terms of policy areas, next to labour market and social assistance measures, the focus has also been on unconventional social policy instruments. The social policy responses of developing economies were often rudimentary, focusing on cash transfers and food relief, and heavily relied on external funding. In contrast, many emerging economies introduced a much broader array of social policies and were less reliant on external support.
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746422000264
       
  • Checking Activation at the Door: Rethinking the Welfare-Work Nexus in
           Light of Australia’s Covid-19 Response

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stambe; Rose, Marston, Greg
      Pages: 106 - 121
      Abstract: Public health measures to address the COVID-19 pandemic have disrupted welfare regimes around the world. The Australian government suspended activation requirements for millions of social security clients and substantially increased payment levels. Both measures go against the dominant policy logic over the past several decades in Australian social policy. When these changes were made, many advocates and academics called for a permanent increase in the rate of payment and a relaxation of activations requirements. The Australian Government insisted the stimulus package was temporary and that there would be a gradual return to the pre-pandemic policy settings. In this article, we examine what was learned during this natural experiment of unconditional higher payments, which temporarily lifted millions of households out of poverty. We argue that a return to pre-pandemic policy settings should not go unchecked as there remains an opportunity to consider alternative approaches to the welfare-work nexus in Australia.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746421000944
       
  • Introduction: Personalisation and Collaboration: Dual Tensions in
           Individualised Funding Policy for Older and Disabled Persons

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Foster; Michele, Needham, Catherine, Hummell, Eloise, Borg, Samantha J., Fisher, Karen R.
      Pages: 122 - 126
      PubDate: 2022-09-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S147474642200046X
       
  • Tailored and Seamless: Individualised Budgets and the Dual Forces of
           Personalisation and Collaboration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Needham; Catherine, Foster, Michele, Fisher, Karen R., Hummell, Eloise
      Pages: 127 - 138
      Abstract: This article reviews the design and delivery features of individualised budgets for disabled and older adults to understand the mechanisms for disaggregation and collaboration in the way support is organised and delivered. Individualised funding is often assumed to be a fragmenting force, breaking down mass provision into personalised and tailored support and stimulating diverse provider markets. However, disability campaigners and policy makers are keen that it also be an integrative force, to stimulate collaboration such that a person receives a ‘seamless’ service. The article brings out these tensions within the individualisation of funding and support for older and disabled people in the United Kingdom and Australia, and considers whether there is scope for reconciling these dual forces.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746422000434
       
  • Responding to Complexity in the Context of the National Disability
           Insurance Scheme

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: McKenzie; Kirsty, Smith-Merry, Jennifer
      Pages: 139 - 154
      Abstract: Background:Personalisation in disability support funding is premised on the notion that services come together through the individual. Where people have very complex needs, many individuals and their supporters find it difficult to facilitate services themselves. This article examines the Integrated Service Response (ISR), an Australian response to complexity implemented during the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) roll-out. We explore its facilitation of collaboration in the context of the NDIS.Results:Results from interviews and observation of collaboration suggest there are multiple challenges with effective inter-organisational collaboration under the NDIS, including communication between services, and the loss of previous ways of addressing complexity and crisis. Participants valued ISR as a response to complexity, including its ability to facilitate collaboration by ‘getting the right people at the table’.Conclusions:While programmes such as ISR may improve inter-organisational collaboration around specific clients, broader ongoing systemic approaches are required to address system-wide issues.
      PubDate: 2022-11-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746422000562
       
  • Breaking Up Is Risky Business: Personalisation and Collaboration in a
           Marketised Disability Sector

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hummell; Eloise, Borg, Samantha J., Foster, Michele, Fisher, Karen R., Needham, Catherine
      Pages: 155 - 171
      Abstract: The marketisation of disability support driven by individualised funding brings new dilemmas for multi-agency collaboration, in particular how to provide personalised supports while remaining commercially viable. This article explores the challenges, risks and adaptations of organisations to navigate the tensions of personalisation and collaboration. Framed by street-level research and using the context of Australia’s National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), this article draws on interviews with twenty-eight organisational managers. Multi-agency challenges are highlighted when several providers are delivering parts of a NDIS participant’s plan, blurring organisational responsibilities and accountabilities. Interviews also revealed the paradox of organisational disconnection and organisational dependence concerning quality support provision and described the collaborative responses organisations implement to ensure their sustainability. There is commitment among organisations to build a trusted ecosystem of providers, but this is largely discretionary and there is a need for further policy mechanisms to enable organisations to negotiate a way through multi-agency dilemmas.
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746422000410
       
  • ‘They Made an Excellent Start…but After a While, It Started to Die
           Out’, Tensions in Combining Personalisation and Integration in English
           Adult Social Care

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Allen; Kerry, Burn, Emily, Hall, Kelly, Mangan, Catherine, Needham, Catherine
      Pages: 172 - 186
      Abstract: This article seeks to understand the challenges of combining the distinct aims of personalisation and integration in adult social care. Addressing the local context of service delivery in England through interviews with key stakeholders, we identify how personalisation and integration activities require different, and potentially conflicting, approaches. We observe direct tensions when structural integration with health systems distracts focus from achieving personalised delivery of care or where a focus on clinical outcomes takes precedence over broader wellbeing aspirations. Integration can entail the prioritisation of health over social care and a population rather than personal orientation. We suggest that personalisation and integration are in ‘policy conflict’ (Weible and Heikkila, 2017) and that policy-makers need to acknowledge and address this rather than promise the ‘best of both worlds’.
      PubDate: 2022-12-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746422000392
       
  • Partnership and Personalisation in Personal Care: Conflicts and
           Compromises

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rummery; Kirstein, Lawrence, Julia, Russell, Siabhainn
      Pages: 187 - 204
      Abstract: Background:Personalisation in social care services has become a feature of the delivery of long-term care for disabled people in many developed welfare states.Aim:Scotland has used the devolution of health and social care powers to develop a personalisation scheme (known as ‘Self-directed Support’). The authors apply a theoretical and empirical framework to understand the experience of contemporary disabled users of personalised services.Methods:The authors use a Scottish data set of six focus groups and a survey of 126 disabled people and family carers.Results:The data showed that flexible funding and the ability to provide services that cross agency boundaries were instrumental in moving towards equitable outcomes.Conclusions:Although there are clear policy and practice barriers to inter-agency working in personalised care services, the evidence suggests that it is worth investing in overcoming these barriers for disabled people and family carers.
      PubDate: 2022-08-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746422000525
       
  • Some Useful Sources

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hummell; Eloise, Foster, Michele
      Pages: 205 - 207
      PubDate: 2022-09-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746422000471
       
  • Determinants of Public Support for Eco-Social Policies: A Comparative
           Theoretical Framework

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gugushvili; Dimitri, Otto, Adeline
      Pages: 1 - 15
      Abstract: Global warming and some climate change policies pose additional social risks that necessitate novel responses from the welfare state. Eco-social policies have significant potential to address these challenges, but their wide-scale adoption will depend, among other factors, on public support. In the current article, we theorise how public opinion about eco-social policies is likely to be influenced by a set of contextual and individual-level factors, as well as the perceived welfare deservingness of the target groups. Alongside contributing to the emerging body of literature on eco-social policies, this theoretical framework could help policymakers to anticipate the social groups that will support or oppose eco-social policy agendas and how some of the contradictions could be reduced through policy design.
      PubDate: 2021-09-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746421000348
       
  • Income Support in an Eco-Social State: The Case for Participation Income

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: McGann; Michael, Murphy, Mary P.
      Pages: 16 - 30
      Abstract: Contemporary models of welfare capitalism have frequently been critiqued about their fit-for-purpose in provisioning for people’s basic needs including care, and longer-term ecological sustainability. The Covid-19 pandemic has also exposed the need for better institutions and a new welfare architecture. We argue a post-productivist eco-social state can deliver sustainable well-being and meet basic needs. Arguing Universal Basic Services are an essential building block and prerequisite for a de-commodified welfare state, we focus on examining the form of income support that might best complement UBS. The article develops, from the perspective of feminist arguments and the capabilities approach, a case for Participation Income. This, we argue, can be aligned with targeted policy goals, particularly reward for and redistribution of human and ecological care or reproduction and other forms of socially valued participation. It may also, in the short term, be more administratively practical and politically feasible than universal basic income.
      PubDate: 2021-09-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746421000397
       
  • Working Hard or Hardly Working' Examining the Politics of In-Work
           Conditionality in the UK

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Abbas; Joan, Chrisp, Joe
      Pages: 31 - 52
      Abstract: The intensification of behavioural requirements and punitive measures in unemployment benefits by UK governments has been popular and instrumental to the politics of welfare reform. Yet there is scant research into the politics of extending this approach to working households, known as ‘in-work conditionality’ (IWC), which was introduced in the UK under Universal Credit in 2012. Addressing this gap, we examine the preferences of political parties and voters towards IWC, using data from an online survey of 1,111 adults in 2017, party manifestos and parliamentary debates. While we find evidence of a partisan split between voters and politicians on the left (oppose IWC) and right (support IWC), intra-party divides and the relative infancy of IWC suggests the politics of IWC is not set in stone. This helps to explain the blame avoidance strategies of current and previous Conservative governments responsible for IWC.
      PubDate: 2021-10-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746421000294
       
  • Analysing Co-creation and Co-production Initiatives for the Development of
           Age-friendly Strategies: Learning from the Three Capital Cities in the
           Basque Autonomous Region

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zuniga; Martin, Buffel, Tine, Arrieta, Felix
      Pages: 53 - 68
      Abstract: Driven by the ageing process taking place in the Basque Autonomous Region (BAR), the ‘Age-Friendly Cities and Communities’ (AFCC) initiative has become a major political reference for the development of ageing policies in the territory. This article addresses this subject by means of a qualitative study that analyses how the three main capital cities in the region are implementing age-friendly strategies, with a focus on co-creation and co-production processes. The article examines the challenges they are currently facing in the development of the aforementioned participatory processes. Our research suggests that political involvement, even if necessary, is meaningless if the strategy is not embedded in the work of influential stakeholders. Moreover, the success of communities in becoming more age friendly will, to a large extent, depend on whether older people, including those facing social exclusion, become involved as key actors in future research and policies around age-friendly developments.
      PubDate: 2021-08-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746421000282
       
  • Progressing Towards a Freer Market in Australian Residential Aged Care

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cochrane; Susan F, Holmes, Alice L, Ibrahim, Joseph E
      Pages: 69 - 93
      Abstract: The Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety has again focussed attention on the failings of the Australian aged care system. Residential aged care in Australia has become increasingly market-driven since the major reforms of 1997. The aims of increased marketisation include providing residents with greater choice, higher quality services, and increasing providers’ efficiency and innovation. However, marketisation is not meeting these aims, predominantly due to asymmetries of knowledge and power between residents and aged care providers. These asymmetries arise from inadequate provision of information, geographic disparities, urgency for care as needs arise acutely, and issues surrounding safety, including cultural safety. We propose a human rights framework, supported by responsive regulation, to overcome the failings of the current system and deliver an improved aged care system which is fit for purpose.
      PubDate: 2021-12-03
      DOI: 10.1017/S1474746421000786
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.236.70.233
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-