A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Social Compass
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.477
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0037-7686 - ISSN (Online) 1461-7404
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Exorcisms, extraction of unwanted entities, and other spiritual struggles
           around the body: A comparative perspective Exorcismes, extractions
           d’entités indésirées et autres combats spirituels autour du corps:
           une perspective comparative

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Serena Bindi, Verónica Giménez Béliveau
      Pages: 443 - 480
      Abstract: Social Compass, Volume 69, Issue 4, Page 443-480, December 2022.
      Exorcism is a long-standing practice in the history of religions and has increased in contemporary societies. The introduction to the dossier ‘Exorcisms, extractions of unwanted identities, and other spiritual struggles around the body’ proposes a revision of the production of contemporary social sciences – in particular, anthropology and sociology – on exorcism. First, we propose a reflection on the category of exorcism, and then we discuss some of the issues that underlie research on the contemporary practice: ritual performance, the status of exorcism in modernity, the relationship with therapeutic and healing practices, the discussion of exorcism as a gendered ritual, and the political dimension of the practice.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T05:37:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221147797
      Issue No: Vol. 69, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Religious representation and performative citizenship: The civic
           dimensions of Shia lamentation rituals in Barcelona

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Avi Astor, Rosa MartÍNez-Cuadros, Víctor Albert-Blanco
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      In diasporic contexts, religious representatives play a key role as cultural ambassadors for their respective communities and religions. This article examines religious representation as a form of civic engagement among Shia Muslims who have assumed representational responsibilities in Barcelona. Our study focuses on their interactions with municipal authorities and the wider public amid the planning, organization, and enactment of public lamentation processions. We show how public rituals provide representatives of Barcelona’s main Shia community with a platform for ‘performative citizenship’ practices like claiming rights and demonstrating their deservingness of inclusion in the neighborhood, city, and nation. Yet, different representatives have engaged in distinct styles of representation and performative citizenship. In explaining these differences, we draw attention to how their respective migration trajectories, historical experiences, and sociostructural location have contributed to certain pressures, forms of positional awareness, and practical dispositions that account for their inclinations toward different approaches to civic engagement.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T12:33:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221148408
       
  • Creator, saviour, garburator: (Re)imagining the human role in the world
           through a case of food waste

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anna Sofia Salonen
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      The contemporary food system relies on a paradigm of human exceptionalism. But living well together with all forms of life would require that we imagine humans’ place in the world as embedded, not as separate. This study explores food waste as a case for how to reimagine humans’ place in the world. Drawing from individual and group interviews conducted in Canada and Finland, I trace the roles that ordinary people assign for themselves when talking about food waste. Humans see themselves as both creators of food waste and as saviours of food that is in danger of going to waste. These images uphold the division between humans and the nonhuman world. As a way of troubling these anthropocentric notions and re-embedding the human in the analysis in a way that transcends hierarchical subject positions, I identify a third role: that of the garburator. This role takes humans seriously as material, embodied, and eventually decomposing beings.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-12-29T05:08:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221144400
       
  • La vérité sur soi-même : les pédagogies de conversion et les nouveaux
           mouvements religieux catholiques en Amérique latine

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Diego Meza
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I analyze the conversion retreats of the John XXIII Movement in Ipiales, Colombia in order to understand the swift spread of new Catholic groups in Latin America. Based on a qualitative research, I examined through twenty semi-structured interviews the definitions, narratives and meanings that some members and leaders of this movement attribute to their confessions and public testimonies of conversion. Instead of distinguishing John XXIII spiritual retreats and conversion testimonies as forms of domination, I propose the concept of pedagogies of conversion, in other words, a set of practices that seek to morally educate believers and that create a double economy of freedom and constraint. Finally, I drawn on various stories to show how moral agency relates to the intensity of these practices and to the past religious experiences of believers.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T09:13:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221108276
       
  • Space and secularism: Laïcité, spatial governmentality, and exclusion in
           French hijab stories

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dimitri Almeida
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      The article frames current practices of French laïcité in terms of spatial governmentality. It builds upon this notion to explore spatialised representations of religion and secularism in ‘hijab stories’ (narratives of the self that focus on the daily experiences of women who wear a hijab). The analysis of Fatimata Diallo’s Sous mon voile and Nargesse Bibimoune’s Confidence à mon voile reveals an ever-expansive reach of an exclusionary reading of laïcité. This phenomenon has severely restricted the spatial practice of hijabi women in French society favouring adaptive strategies that include the creation of counter-spaces of subjectivation and self-expression.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T12:03:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221103130
       
  • Exorcism: A device of differentiation in Burmese Buddhism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bénédicte Brac de la Perriére
      First page: 481
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      In Burma, exorcism is readily observable as a healing practice, and appears as a relatively well-bound domain ensconced into the larger and manifold Burmese Buddhist esoterism known as the weikza path. In this article, exorcism will be examined to unveil what he does to the Burmese religion. Particularly, manifestation of nefarious beings provoked by specialists in their patients during séances, through supposedly erratic movement is opposed to spirit possession’s dances as exorcism to adorcism (de Heusch). It is argued that bodily behaviour is used by exorcist as a way to demonstrate whose spiritual beings’ worship should be abandoned by patients undertaking the exorcist cure and by weikza followers.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T10:57:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221115529
       
  • Music for healing: Black Gnawas and the ‘professional’ practice of
           dealing with spirits in southeastern Morocco

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Silvia Montenegro
      First page: 498
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      In Morocco, people usually call Gnawa those communities of black Moroccans made up of descendants of slaves from sub-Saharan Africa (Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, Nigeria, and Guinea) who follow rituals merging Islamic traditions with pre-Islamic African traditions. Gnawa brotherhoods are organised into ‘houses’ called Dar Gnawa. Each house is led by a Mʿallem (a ritual master) who inherits his ancestor’s knowledge and is responsible for a group of apprentice musicians and dancers from the same town or from other places. Music and dancing are key elements in their religious ceremonies. Based on fieldwork carried out in 2012–2016 in a black community living in southeastern Morocco, a village in the desert, 50 km away from the border with Algeria, this article analyses the healing rituals performed by the brotherhood in the two Dar Gnawas in the town, in nearby villages, and in the annual festival. The aim of this article is to explain how Gnawas created their legitimacy and prestige as ‘professional’ healers.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T10:55:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221111967
       
  • Exorcisme catholique en France contemporaine, entre thérapeutique et
           régulation institutionnelle

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Verónica Giménez Béliveau
      First page: 515
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      This article proposes to study the contemporary implementation of Catholic exorcism rituals in France. It is a growing demand that challenges the Catholic Church and expresses discomforts in contemporary society. Based on a study conducted in France between 2016 and 2020, the research is spread over various dioceses and works with diverse actors (priests, exorcists, ritual requesters, lay collaborators) belonging to plural groups. Using qualitative strategies – mainly ethnography, active interviews and document analysis – this article analyses the population requesting exorcism, and attempts to understand the environments in which the practices are anchored and the work of the exorcists. This article shows the dialogue established between the practice of exorcism and medical interpretations, and the deployment of a new listening and regulation of the Church towards an increased demand which is related to indeterminate misfortunes linked to the field of health and healing.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-10-25T12:28:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221122981
       
  • Possession and exorcism on the margins of Islam: Mali

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jean-Paul Colleyn
      First page: 536
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on three different patterns of spirit possession in Mali, a country where spirits interact with human beings. Some Malian cases – but not all of them – comfort the well-received theory asserting that possession is a form of protest and is related to a historical crisis. African possession cults are generally considered as characteristics of marginal groups in response to the domination of a monotheist religion, especially Islam and Christianity, but several cults from the Minianka area contradict this ideal type. At a national level, some cults look for a compromise with the spirits, while others are aimed to get rid of them.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T10:34:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221133943
       
  • Exorcising angry deities and spirits of the dead: Spiritual and earthly
           battles of married women in Uttarakhand (India)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Serena Bindi
      First page: 550
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      Ethnographic analysis of the two main exorcistic practices in which married women are involved in Garhwal (India) shows that the theme of domestic conflict is central to both rituals. Addressing classical debates in anthropology about possession, this text raises two main questions: are these practices forms of feminine resistance to patriarchal social rules' And what is the notion of the person and her or his action in the world underlying these practices' Although these rituals may sometimes bring benefits to the women participating in them, women do not seem to perceive themselves nor to act as individuals who are resisting social structures, but more as part of collective networks of human and spiritual persons. As for the effects of these rituals, they are geared towards the preservation of family unity. This is achieved by the fact that, while evoking human conflict, these ritual devices subordinate it to the problem of divine conflict. Yet these practices do not only have an integrative function vis-à-vis conflicts that potentially endanger the family unit, but they also firmly establish the position of married women and their irreplaceability in the fabric of social life. Being close to the deities of their natal villages and easily affected by spirits of the dead, married women have an essential role in mediating with them and therefore in building and preserving the network of human and non-human beings on which the well-being of the family depends.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T07:10:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221139214
       
  • Negotiating Germany’s first Muslim–Christian kindergarten:
           Temporalities, multiplicities, and processes in interreligious dialogue

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Arndt-Walter Emmerich
      First page: 578
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on fieldwork in the Northern German town of Gifhorn, the article analyses the negotiation process of Germany’s first Muslim–Christian kindergarten during its inception and consolidation phase between 2007 and 2020. Through the reconstruction of the kindergarten case, the study informs the literature on interreligious dialogue and governance of religious diversity from a local perspective. A temporal analysis is used for the study of dialogue to capture changing views and positions of different stakeholders during shifting opportunity structures, including the rise of far-right populism and deteriorating political relations between Germany and Turkey. Hence, the kindergarten, which mirrors Germanys’ national policy framework of institutionalizing Islam through treaties and dialogue cooperation, can be seen as a stage on which local negotiations and interreligious dynamics play out, uncovering complex intersections within the local, national, and international arena of politics.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T12:03:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221084694
       
  • Athéisme et sécularisme au Kenya : les tribulations des Atheists
           In Kenya (AIK)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hervé Maupeu, Yonatan N. GEZ, Yvan DROZ
      First page: 596
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      As affirmed by the 2010 constitution, the Republic of Kenya is a secular country that promises both freedom of faith and freedom from religion. In practice, however, the realm of religion in Kenya is highly normative. The 2010s have seen the rise of a group seeking to challenge this status quo: Atheists in Kenya (AIK). The group met with fierce resistance, and its attempt to register as a legal society ended before the country’s High Court. AIK’s activism turned it into a social movement that demands a reexamination of the close ties between religion and the State. It is thus an important participant in a wide debate on secularism in Kenya. In addition, AIK may be read as a testimony to the country’s present stage of democratization, which allows – if sometimes reluctantly – for new modes of social action and for the expression of claims that were formerly kept in check.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-07-02T09:18:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221105780
       
  • We have always been transreligious: An introduction to transreligiosity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anastasios Panagiotopoulos, Eugenia Roussou
      First page: 614
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      This article is a proposition and exploration of the term ‘transreligiosity’. We argue that transreligiosity is more apt to describe the transgressive character of religiosity, focusing more particularly on the transversality of spaces, symbolic or otherwise, which are created in religious phenomena. We examine the porosity of religious boundaries and, ultimately, propose the term transreligiosity to embrace them, placing emphasis on their transreligious character, while perceiving them as significant instantiations of transreligiosity. We take some of Latour’s key concepts on ‘purification’, to argue for the ultimate impossibility of it in the sphere of religiosity. While processes of purification have been powerful through efforts to institutionalize and centralize religiosity, at a vernacular level, this has had a contrary effect. Religious subjects have been distanced from a more direct participation (‘mediation’). Hence, they are constantly creating transreligious instances to abolish and transgress those rigid borders.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-07-02T06:15:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221103713
       
  • In plain view: Gender in the work of women healthcare chaplains

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sonya Sharma, Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham
      First page: 631
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      In sociological studies of religion and chaplaincy, there is little research on how gender plays a role in structural inequalities and experiences of women chaplains. Through research on the work of women chaplains in public healthcare in Vancouver (Canada) and London (England) this qualitative study revealed that while they have opportunities for leadership and ministry in chaplaincy, they are often on the margins of the religious institutions they are affiliated with and the secular medical organisations that employ them. Simultaneously, they confront the social structuring of gender and race that can affect them being overlooked. By applying a lived religion and feminist intersectional analysis, this research focuses on an area of study that has received scant attention.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T11:44:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686221105770
       
  • From dialogue to activism: How to get Generation Z and Millennials to
           participate in the multifaith movement in Australia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Geraldine Smith
      First page: 648
      Abstract: Social Compass, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines why young people rarely participate in the activities, initiatives, and organisations of the multifaith movement in Australia. It will discuss five issues which impede Generation Z and Millennials from engaging in the multifaith movement by drawing on previous studies on these generations and interview data with multifaith activists in Australia. There is a significant portion of Generation Z and Millennials who have hybrid religious identities, identify as nonreligious, and/or stand at the margins of religious institutions. Yet, this is incompatible with the dialogue model which assumes that its participants are unambiguous full members of their religious tradition who are imbued with the legitimacy of their institution and endowed with the role of a representative. If multifaith activists shifted the focus from dialogue to activist, relational, and humanitarian aspects of the multifaith movement, it may empower young people to participate in a way that reflects their experiences, concerns, and goals.
      Citation: Social Compass
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T11:25:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00377686211065980
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.236.70.233
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-