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Research on Social Work Practice
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.883
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 30  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1049-7315 - ISSN (Online) 1552-7581
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Introduction to Research on Social Work Practice Special Issue: Program
           Theory in Social Interventions Developed in Practice Settings

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      Authors: Tina M. Olsson, Therése Skoog
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Solving individual, group, or societal problems through social intervention in practice settings is a complex task. The extent to which this end is achieved depends heavily on the effectiveness of the change strategies in use. Increased understanding of how these change strategies work to impact outcomes is at the forefront of the science of social intervention. In this special issue, we have gathered a collection of seven articles that present central issues related to program theory in social interventions developed in practice setting. Our goal is to advance the knowledge of how an understanding of theory in practice can advance social intervention research.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T06:42:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231153121
       
  • The Melbourne Statement on Practice Research in Social Work: Practice
           Meets Research

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      Authors: Lynette Joubert, Martin Webber, Lars Uggerhøj, Ilse Julkunen, Laura Yliruka, Ralph Hampson, Grahame Simpson, Timothy Sim, Alys-Marie Manguy, Michael J. Austin
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T06:42:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221139835
       
  • Validation for Multidimensional Measure of Reentry Well-Being Among
           Individuals Who Are Incarcerated

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      Authors: Christopher A. Veeh, Tanya Renn, Carrie Pettus, Yaacov Petscher
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Thousands release from imprisonment every day but no specialized measures of progress during reentry exist beyond criminal risk. This study investigates a new measure of well-being during the transition to the community called the Reentry Well-Being Assessment Tool (RWAT). The RWAT is designed as an alternative to measures of risk while responding to the challenges of individualizing program services and evaluating effectiveness. Method: Confirmatory factor analysis informed by item response theory was undertaken to identify a parsimonious set of RWAT items. Results: Analysis identified 13 unidimensional factors. Multidimensional modeling supported a second-order factor to assess reentry well-being with minor modifications, (x2(3,724) = 12,564.27, p
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T07:05:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231151238
       
  • Co-Word Analysis of First-Authored Publications Written by Top Cited
           Scholars of Social Work

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      Authors: Yajun Song, Xixi Sun, Wenjie Duan
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Bibliometric analysis has been widely adopted to measure individual productivity and discipline development. This study aims to advance the application of this method in the social work discipline. Method: Using the knowledge mapping technique in CiteSpace 5.8.R3, this study performed a co-word analysis of 1,007 first-authored articles published from 2000 to 2022 by 60 scholars who are listed among the top 2% most-cited scholars on social work and are holding doctoral degrees in the same field. Results: The cluster analysis identified seven main research hotspots and burst detection results revealed four groups of research frontiers, including spiritual and cultural needs, children's wellbeing, social work practices and development, and social work research, with bullying and peer victimization, particularly among African-American adolescents and youth in Chicago's southside, continuing to attract much research interest. Discussion: This study examines how individual works contribute to the conceptual structure and scientific evolution of social work.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T07:18:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221148661
       
  • Implementing Legislative Policy Intervention Into Long-Term Care Practice
           Settings

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      Authors: Lisa E. Cox, Jennifer Dunkle, Christina Seel
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:
      Authors discuss program theory and the crafting of long-term care based educational trainings, derived from implementing New Jersey’s mandated legislative policy. Method: This article applies program theory to explain how trainings were designed and implemented, thereby illustrating how sometimes change mechanisms may not be the intervention itself but the response that the activities generated. Results: Program created activities triggered desirable mechanisms to occur which then led to desired educational outcomes. In brief, university social work educators observed the paucity of research on LGBT+ older adults, ran focus groups at senior centers and nutrition sites, and responded to legislation passed in March 2020. Conclusion: Social work researchers, expert in HIV/AIDS, combined efforts via a multi-university collaboration and developed trainings based on local and national research to meet requirements of the S2545 NJ bill. Trainings were created and offered by both a for-profit organization and university collaboration and evaluation measures have been considered.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-09T07:21:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221147888
       
  • Advancing Social Intervention Research Through Program Theory
           Reconstruction

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      Authors: Tina M. Olsson, Sabina Kapetanovic, Katarina Hollertz, Mikaela Starke, Therése Skoog
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Program theory reconstruction is an often-overlooked aspect of social intervention research. In this paper, we argue that intervention research benefits if the research design is informed by the specific intervention's program theory (i.e., the idea of how the intervention is supposed to lead to the intended outcomes). The purpose of this paper is to offer a comprehensive and accessible guide to program theory reconstruction in research on social interventions and to provide arguments as to how program theory reconstruction can be used to benefit intervention studies. First, we summarize what program theory is and its role in intervention research. Second, we provide a direct “how-to” for researchers, practitioners, and students who may be unfamiliar with the methods of program theory reconstruction but are interested in undertaking a program theory reconstruction. Finally, we conclude with how program theory reconstruction can benefit intervention research.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-07T02:21:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221149976
       
  • Obituary—Rosemary Sarri

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      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-06T06:17:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221146191
       
  • Evaluation of a Parenting Program for Disadvantaged Families in the Czech
           Republic

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      Authors: Martina Koutná, Egle Havrdová, Jan Netík, Marek Pour
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This impact evaluation report describes the effects of the “Parenting Program for Disadvantaged Families” in the Czech Republic. We provide a detailed look at the quantitative data on treatment and control families in a program delivered by social workers to reduce the risk of children's misconduct. Method: The study specifies the results of two waves of quantitative research based on Parenting Young Children (PARYC), Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), and items measuring parents’ attitudes toward punishment of their children. Results: The results of parental self-reported competencies and parent-reported children's behavior indicate that there was a statistically significant impact of the intervention. Discussion: There was a large effect on Supporting Positive Behavior (PARYC), and Prosocial Behavior and Peer Relationship dimensions of the SDQ. Parental practices and attitudes toward punishment are further explored, although the conclusions remain ambiguous.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T07:48:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221144000
       
  • Effects of Design-Thinking Intergenerational Service-Learning Model on
           College Students: A Pilot Study in Taiwan

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      Authors: Hsinyi Hsiao, Jeffrey T. Tseng, Yu-Jung Hsu, Tara Chen, Ying-Wei Wang, Tsuann Kuo
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The design-thinking intergenerational service-learning model (DTISLM) has structured ageing-related trainings on strategies to improve empathy among college students for intergenerational program development and promote positive relationships and wellbeing between younger and older generations in community-based settings. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of DTISLM on college students’ ageism, intergenerational relationships, and health. Method: Mixed-methods data were collected via pre–post surveys and after-class reflection notes from 142 students from three universities in Taiwan. Results: DTISLM significantly improved college students’ level of empathy toward older adults, age stereotypes, intergenerational relationships, wellbeing (i.e., life satisfaction), and health behaviors (i.e., exercise). This intervention promoted health awareness among college students. Discussion: Via hands-on trainings for empathy improvement, DTISLM empowered college students to develop intergenerational programs that promoted positive intergenerational relationships and healthy habits. This sheds new light on university–community partnerships involving intergenerational service needs to create age-friendly societies globally.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-12-30T01:08:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221146189
       
  • Evaluation of Youth Empowerment Projects From an Educators’
           Perspective

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      Authors: Mireia Sala-Torrent, Anna Planas-Lladó, Pere Soler-Masó, Cayetano Gómez
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This article focuses on the evaluation of youth empowerment projects from the perspective of the educators themselves. Method: HEBE Rubric (collects quantitative and qualitative data) was applied to 20 youth projects. The selection of projects was based on intentional sampling. Results: The results show that the projects focus on some youth empowerment dimensions to the detriment of others. The most important dimensions are responsibility and self-sufficiency. There is also evidence of more work from the individual perspective of empowerment than from the community perspective, and from a perspective that is more internal to the project than in relation to the context. Discussion: Important educational work is carried out in the projects analyzed, according to the educators themselves. It would be interesting to reinforce the educational work carried out by these projects with activities and strategies that facilitate contact, openness, and educational work with the community.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-12-28T06:11:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221147532
       
  • Health Equity Considerations: HIV Intervention Adaptation for Black Women
           in Community Corrections

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      Authors: Karen A. Johnson, Timothy Hunt, Dawn Goddard-Eckrich, Elwin Wu, Stanley Richards, Rick Tibbetts, Jessica C. Rowe, Quentin R. Maynard, Sharun Goodwin, Joana Okine, Milton L. Wainberg, Nabila El-Bassel, Louisa Gilbert
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives: This article describes the process used to adapt the only group-based, computer-assisted, HIV/sexually transmitted infections (STI) prevention intervention designed for drug-using Black women in community corrections using an integrated health equity ADAPT-ITT framework with a peer engagement lens. Methods: Key adaptation partners included cisgender, drug-using Black women in community corrections, and Black, female, community reentry providers slated to deliver the adapted intervention. Focus groups and a study pilot were held. Results: The resulting intervention, Empowering African-American Women on the Road to Health (E-WORTH), features HIV/STI-specific Afrocentric themes of risk and resiliency tailored for and by Black women in the criminal legal system. Evaluation of E-WORTH confirms its cultural resonance. Participants had a 54% lowered odds of testing positive for any STI and reported 38% fewer acts of condomless vaginal or anal intercourse at 12-month follow-up. Conclusions: Findings underscore the need to develop an adaptation model that is explicitly health equity in focus.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-12-28T06:10:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221132523
       
  • Effectiveness of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Among
           Maltreated Children: A Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Weiwei Wang, Keyu Chen, Huiping Zhang
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives: To assess the effects of trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) among maltreated children, and to examine the role of potential moderators. Methods: A search of eight databases was conducted. Eighteen studies involving 11 randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials with 965 maltreated children were included, and the effect sizes were pooled using random-effect models. Results: There were large effect sizes for posttraumatic growth and emotional management. Moderate to large effects were evident for PTSD and depression, while small effects were found for anxiety, internalizing behavior, sexualized behavior, and parenting practice. Effects were maintained at 3–12 months for some outcome domains. The effectiveness of TF-CBT was better when delivered to older children, and versions of TF-CBT, delivery format, sessions, and treatment length will not affect effectiveness. Conclusions: TF-CBT effectively reduces abuse-related symptoms and improves positive psychosocial outcomes among maltreated children.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-12-28T04:20:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221147277
       
  • Black Girl Well-Being: A Scoping Review of Culturally and Gender
           Responsive Interventions

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      Authors: Abigail Williams-Butler, Marquitta Dorsey, Husain Lateef, Tyriesa Howard, Emmanuel Owusu Amoako, Portia Nortey
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Few interventions focus on the unique developmental contexts specific to Black adolescent girls living in the United States. This article conducts a scoping review to identify interventions targeted at the well-being of Black adolescent girls. Method: The authors conducted a comprehensive search using electronic databases to identify peer-reviewed journal articles that center interventions to address the well-being of Black adolescent girls. Results: Of the 3,144 unique records identified, eight peer-reviewed articles met the criteria for inclusion. Most interventions focused on issues related to sexual health (n = 4), followed by interventions focusing on enhancing cultural values (n = 3), and obesity prevention (n = 1). Four interventions were both culturally and gender-responsive, three interventions were primarily culturally responsive, and one intervention was primarily gender-responsive with all articles focusing on Black girls’ well-being. Discussion: More interventions are needed that center on the distinct and intersectional challenges and strengths that Black adolescent girls experience within society.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-12-26T06:51:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221147531
       
  • Computer-Based Simulations in Social Work Education: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Gunilla Egonsdotter, Magnus Israelsson
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Simulation-based learning is important in social work education. Most common is human-based simulations. In recent years, computer-based simulations have emerged as alternative. A question is if computer-based simulations differ from human-based, are similar abilities, that is, competence, trained when the simulation is computer-based' Purpose: Survey the international experiences of using computer-based simulations in social work education. Method: A five step scoping review. Databases focused on educational issues and social work was searched (Eric, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science, Scopus). Sixteen publications were included. Results: Five different didactic categories of computer-based simulations were identified. The most common use of computer-based simulations is to practice student's procedural competence, and in lesser extent to enhance students’ meta-competence. Feedback and reflection are central for computer-based simulation, as for human-based simulations. Conclusion: The study shows a didactic field under development and that computer-based simulations provide opportunities to train self-reflection and critical thinking in social work education.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-12-22T06:55:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221147016
       
  • Systematic Review of Narrative Therapy Publications in Hong Kong

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      Authors: T.M.S. Chan, C.Y.V. Lau, H.W.C. Yu
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This article reviews narrative therapy (NT) publications specific to Hong Kong over a period of 20 years. Methods: Three search strategies are adopted: using the Hong Kong Baptist University OneSearch database and Google Books index, and sending soliciting emails to local scholars and practitioners. Four research questions are asked: (a) how many related publications' (b) who are the targets' (c) who are the authors' (d) what is the type of publication' Results: In total, there are 127 publications identified. The first NT publication is dated 1996. The most common target group is “People with Problem” (48.8%). Most authors are academics (78.7%). The publications are mostly Journal Articles (68.5%). Conclusions: Co-construction between academics and practitioners, co-researching as the landscape for co-constructing an NT community, and finally, the co-deconstruction process of local narratives are recommended as future tasks for Hong Kong related NT publications.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-12-19T05:21:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221125242
       
  • Book Review: Program evaluation—A practical guide for social work and
           the helping professions by David Royse

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      Authors: Johnson Chun-Sing Cheung
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-12-15T06:01:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221146188
       
  • Book Review: The Midlands Psychology Group. Not Nice: An Essay Review of
           Outsight: Psychology, Politics, and Social Justice

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      Authors: William M. Epstein
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-12-09T07:28:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221144004
       
  • Facilitating Personal Recovery Through Mindfulness-Based Intervention
           Among People With Mental Illness

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      Authors: Daphne Y. T. Cheng, Daniel K. W. Young, Per Carlbring, Petrus Y. N. Ng, Shirley S. L. Hung
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This pre-pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) assessed a mindfulness-based intervention (MBI, “REMIND1.0”) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: Twenty mental health service users were allocated to either 8 weekly mixed-mode MBI (n = 10) or treatment-as-usual (TAU) (n = 10). Results: There were significant interactions between group and time (baseline T0, post-intervention T1, and 1-month follow-up T2) across all quantitative outcomes (personal recovery, trait mindfulness, self-compassion, resilience, moods, quality of life, and general health). The main themes that emerged from qualitative interviews at T1 are previous experience with MBIs, features of current MBI, and benefits of personal recovery and at T2 are recollection of MBI content, maintaining regular practice after MBI, and retained benefits of personal recovery. Conclusions: The current MBI is acceptable, feasible, and potentially effective in facilitating personal recovery.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T07:37:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221137137
       
  • Systematic Review of Research on Special Education Needs in Greater China

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      Authors: Tak Mau Simon Chan, Chi Yuen Victor Lau, Hoi Wa Christina Yu, Yuen Han Kitty Mo
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This article reviews research work on special education needs in Greater China during the past 5 decades. Methods: All searches are done on online search engines to determine the (a) volume of the related research work, (b) targets of the research studies, (c) types of SENs addressed, and (d) type of research work. Results: 828 publications are identified, among which the majority are published in the Mainland China and Taiwanese contexts. The most common target groups are “children” (51.3%). The studies mostly focus on ASD with 467 articles (56.4%), and 600 articles (72.5%) are descriptive, empirical, or correlational. Conclusion: There is a shift of research target group from person of interest to caregivers; importance of collective shame in the Chinese culture; and increase in research in the Greater China context. More support for research related to SEN in Greater China and acknowledging cultural relevance are recommended.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T07:35:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221137112
       
  • A Systematic Review of Measures of Child Neglect

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      Authors: Simon Haworth, Jason Schaub, Elaine Kidney, Paul Montgomery
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Child neglect is prevalent in children's social work and assessing neglect is complex because it is multifaceted and opaque. This systematic review identifies and evaluates evidence of tools or measures to better assess child neglect. Methods: Informed by Cochrane methodology and adapted to the needs of social work practice, a systematic search and review of measures of child neglect was undertaken. Ten databases were searched, augmented by grey literature, and are in contact with relevant experts. Results: Only two measures, the Child Neglect Index (CNI) and modifications of the Maltreatment Classification System (MCS), met the inclusion criteria. Neither tool was completely comprehensive for child neglect. Discussion: Our findings indicate (a) a dearth of suitable tools to measure neglect and (b) the need for robust testing of neglect measures in the social work setting. The current evidence based on measuring child neglect is too limited to effectively inform policy and practice.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T07:54:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221138066
       
  • Exploring Treatment Response Predictors of a Parent-Led Therapist-Assisted
           Treatment for Childhood Trauma

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      Authors: Alison Salloum, Yuanyuan Lu, Omar Ali, Henian Chen, Kristen Salomon, Judith A. Cohen, Michael S. Scheeringa, Troy Quast, Eric A. Storch
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: While stepped care trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (SC-TF-CBT) is an effective service delivery model, understanding predictors of Step One, a parent-led therapist-assisted treatment, will help inform how to best match children at baseline to treatments. Method: Potential predictor variables were explored from 63 parent–child Step One participants with 43 responders and 20 non-responders. Baseline tailoring variables explored were anticipated critical life events, demographics, trauma-related variables, and child and parent outcomes. Results: Predictors of Step One non-response were parental depression, child anger outbursts and Hispanic/Latino parents even after controlling for child demographics, child post-traumatic stress, severity, and impairment. Conclusions: Parents with depression and children with high anger outbursts should consider starting with Step Two, therapist-led TF-CBT. Step One may benefit from including TF-CBT culturally modified strategies for Hispanic/Latino parents. If preference is to start with Step One, these parents and children should be closely monitored for treatment progress.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-24T06:21:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221137880
       
  • Family-Based Intervention for Substance Using Parents: Experiences and
           Resource Use

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      Authors: Anna Fäldt, Camilla Nystrand, Karin Fängström
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The study aimed to assess families’ resource use and to explore parents’ experiences of the Sofia model, a family-based intervention for parents with substance use disorder (SUD). Methods: Interviews were conducted with 14 parents. Data were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. The resource use assessment was estimated based on data for 40 families referred to the Sofia model and 30 reference families. Results: Parents described difficulties accessing family support and differences in received services in the Sofia model. The intervention lacked focus on the children. Families’ communication regarding substance use did not increase. Resource use estimations indicated larger use of services by families in the Sofie model, but little co-parent and child-specific support. Conclusions: The intervention failed its aim to focus on the children, and enhance communication about SUD. Parents voiced a need for more long-term comprehensive support for their children and themselves.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-24T06:20:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221138070
       
  • Blueprint for Social Work Blended Learning Curriculum in the Chinese
           Context

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      Authors: T.M.S. Chan, H.W.C. Yu, N. Bruce, C.M. Lam
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study explored the conceptual framework and procedures of course design and then optimal evaluation tools for blended learning in social work education in the Chinese context. Method: Fifteen courses of five social work programs in Hong Kong are used to create a blueprint for blended learning in the social work curriculum in the Hong Kong Chinese context. Videos, virtual tours, online games, and an e-forum are components of the course design while pre-test and post-test multiple measurements are used for course evaluation. Parameters are provided for the blended learning blueprint and framework that integrate face-to-face instruction and virtual learning elements. Results: A prominent conceptual framework and important protocols in social work higher education in China is introduced. Discussion: The results of this study contribute to current understanding of the applicability and pedagogical aspects of blended learning in social work in the Chinese context, especially in the post-pandemic era.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-24T06:19:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221137111
       
  • Who are the Top 100 Contributors to Social Work Journal Scholarship' A
           Global Study on Career Impact in the Profession

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      Authors: David R. Hodge, Patricia R. Turner
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study identified the top 100 most impactful global contributors to social work journal scholarship. Methods: To conduct this descriptive study, we used a publicly available database of the world's leading scientists. After extracting all scholars in the social work category, we rank ordered them according to a composite measure of scholarly impact that controls for self-citations and author order. Results: All identified contributors to the profession's journals ranked highly relative to the larger global population of published scientists. Furthermore, 23 individuals were in the top 100,000 scientists globally. Scholars were based in seven different nations and most had solid social work credentials according to three measures: current affiliation in a social work program and Master of Social Work/doctoral degree status. Conclusions: The results reveal that social work is home to some of the world's leading scientists. Leveraging their skills and knowledge can help advance the profession's collective knowledge development and dissemination.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T05:45:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221136623
       
  • Client Outcomes in Graduate Trainee-Provided Psychotherapies: A Mixed
           Model and Exploratory Analysis

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      Authors: David J. Roseborough, Kingsley U. Chigbu, Kate B. Jergensen
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study used a linear mixed model and descriptive analysis of quantitative, archival data to evaluate improvement among clients receiving graduate trainee-delivered individual psychotherapy (N = 421), and for those in dialectical behavior therapy (n = 52). Method: The OQ 45.2 was administered to clients on a session-by-session basis. This analysis gave attention to an overall course of recovery and to meaningful interaction effects: to those variables serving as potential moderators. We gave attention to both attrition and deterioration, based on Lambert’s earlier observation of this elevated risk among trainees. Results: Analysis showed evidence of client improvement (change over time), broadly. Distinct trajectories emerged early in treatment for participants who went on to improve versus those who deteriorated. Discussion: Clinical and training implications are discussed, including the importance of giving attention to these unique and potentially distinct trajectories early in a clinical relationship.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T08:17:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221115868
       
  • Nurses and Outreach Workers’ Stigmatizing Attitudes in Needle
           Syringe Programs in Kazakhstan

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      Authors: Sholpan Primbetova, Meruyert Darisheva, Ohshue Gatanaga, Louisa Gilbert, Alissa Davis, Elwin Wu, Timothy Hunt, Assel Terlikbayeva, Tara McCrimmon, Anindita Dasgupta, Olivia M Cordingley, Nabila El-Bassel
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This paper examines differences in attitudes, stigma, and discrimination towards people living with HIV (PLWH) in needle and syringe programs (NSPs) in Kazakhstan to help inform HIV care interventions in these settings. Method: We collected data on HIV/AIDS attitudes using a modified Health Policy Project Standardized Brief Questionnaire with two subscales: attitudes within the health facility environment in a facility caring for PLWH, and opinions about PLWH. Results: Outreach workers were significantly more likely than nurses to report health professionals disparaging PLWH, and having stigmatizing attitudes towards PLWH. Outreach workers LWH were significantly more likely to report HIV discrimination in the NSP, and male staff was significantly more likely to have negative opinions of PLWH. Conclusions: Assessing different staff attitudes of nurses versus outreach workers, male versus female staff, and HIV positive versus negative staff and conducting follow-up training may decrease stigma and improve attendance at harm reduction programs.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-15T02:29:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221137109
       
  • Self-Recognition, Self-Efficacy, and Confidence Intervention of Kunjing
           Children Without Sufficient Parental Care

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      Authors: Miao Wang, Kexin Liu
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: Kunjing children are children in need. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a pilot trial to promote the self-recognition, self-efficacy, and confidence of kunjing children without sufficient parental care (KCw/oSPC) in Mainland China. Method This intervention was a randomized controlled trial (RCT), 57 KCw/oSPC were recruited and allocated to treatment (n = 24) and waiting group (n = 33) randomly. Participants in treatment group received group-based services, while waiting group didn’t receive any services in this trial period. We assessed participants’ self-recognition, self-efficacy, and confidence in both groups during the pre- and post-treatment periods. Results: Group comparison results suggested that the group-based intervention was effective to promote the self-recognition, self-efficacy, and confidence of KCw/oSPC, with a large effect size as Cohen's d values suggested. Conclusion: This intervention was essential for KCw/oSPC in practice. Suggestions were provided to inform social work practice, involving integrating services, usage of group-based intervention module, and services settings.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-09T07:22:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221138071
       
  • Adaptation and Validation of the Nigerian (Igbo) Version of the WHOQOL-OLD
           Module

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      Authors: Tadesse Gebrye, Emmanuel C. Okoye, Christopher O. Akosile, Ifeoma Uchenna Onwuakagba, Richard Uwakwe, Chibueze C. Igweze, Victoria C. Chukwuma, Francis Fatoye
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: To adapt and validate the original English version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-version for older adults (WHOQOL-OLD) in Igbo language, culture, and environment. Participants: Community-dwelling older adults (≥65 years) from Nnewi community in Nigeria. Methods: This was a cross-cultural adaptation and validation study. The original English version of the WHOQOL-OLD was translated into Igbo language, synthesized, backward translated into the English language, subjected to expert panel review, and pretested. The Igbo and English versions of the WHOQOL-OLD were then used to assess the quality of life among consecutively recruited 109 older adults through interviewer-administration. Findings: The structure of the Igbo version of the WHOQOL-OLD differed from that of the original WHOQOL-OLD. The Igbo version of the WHOQOL-OLD displayed acceptable internal consistency (0.63–0.95), known-group validity (0.60–0.99), convergent validity, and ceiling and floor effects. Conclusion: The I-WHOQOL-OLD is a reliable and valid tool and thus can be used as an outcome measure among Igbo-speaking older adults.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-08T06:26:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221130527
       
  • Individual, Relationship, and Family Structure Predictors of African
           American Noncustodial Father Involvement Satisfaction

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      Authors: Gerry L. White, Harold E. Briggs, Robert Miller, Leon Banks, Junior Lloyd Allen
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The current study seeks to investigate the extent to which factors such as income and child support along with relationship factors such as family structure and communication with the custodial mother potentially mitigate overall parent satisfaction for African American noncustodial fathers (NCFs) with multi-partnered fertility (MPF). Methods: 163 noncustodial fathers without and with children other than the custodial parents were selected. An independent sample t-test was conducted to determine differences in satisfaction levels. Multiple linear regression was conducted to predict participants' overall level of parental involvement satisfaction by income, child support, and relationship factors. Results: The data illustrates the combined influence of income, child support, relationship factors, and family structure account for a significant amount of the variance in satisfaction. Fathers without MPF reported greater satisfaction levels. Conclusions: Future study is recommended to advance our understanding of the predictors of NCFs parent satisfaction among NCFs with and without MPF.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T07:35:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221128774
       
  • Book Review

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      Authors: Beren Crim Sabuncu
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T07:12:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221131927
       
  • Innovation of Social Workers Under Different Leadership Styles: An
           Experimental Vignette Study

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      Authors: Yajun Song, Jing Lan, Guanghuai Zheng, Yean Wang
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Using situational leadership theory, this study examined the innovation of social workers in community-level social work institutions under different leadership styles. Methods: We conducted an online survey experiment on the professional strengths of social workers in eight cities of mainland China from December 8–20, 2020. Results: Both ethical leadership and servant leadership are conducive to social workers’ innovative behaviors. Our full model also suggests that organizational climate moderates the effects of leadership styles on innovative behaviors, with servant leadership having a greater impact than ethical leadership on social workers’ innovative behavior in low-innovation climate environments, but ethical leadership has a greater impact than servant leadership on social workers’ innovative behavior in high-innovation climate environments. Conclusion: Our study provides important strategies to fully stimulate the innovation effects of leadership based on the stage characteristics of social work innovation practices.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-10-11T07:51:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221131319
       
  • Preferences for an HIV Self-Testing Program Among Women who Engage in sex
           Work and use Drugs in Kazakhstan, Central Asia

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      Authors: Olivia Cordingley, Tara McCrimmon, Brooke S. West, Meruyert Darisheva, Sholpan Primbetova, Assel Terlikbaeva, Louisa Gilbert, Nabila El-Bassel, Victoria Frye
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Women engaged in sex work (WESW) who use drugs face barriers to HIV testing. HIV self-testing (HST) may empower sex workers to learn their HIV status; however, it is not scaled up among WESW in Kazakhstan. This study aimed to explore barriers and facilitators to traditional HIV testing and HST among this population. Method: We conducted 30 in-depth interviews (IDIs) and four focus groups (FGs) with Kazakhstani WESW who use drugs. Pragmatic analysis was used to explore key themes from qualitative data. Results: Participants welcomed HST due to its potential to overcome logistical challenges by accessing HIV testing, as well as the stigma that WESW faces in traditional HIV testing. Participants desired emotional and social support for HST, and for linkage to HIV care and other services. Discussion: HST among women who exchange sex and use drugs can be successfully implemented to mitigate stigma and barriers to HIV testing.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-10-10T05:59:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221128594
       
  • Smaller System Predictors of Satisfaction with Low-Income Paternal
           Involvement of Noncustodial African American Fathers

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      Authors: Gerry L. White, Harold E. Briggs, Leon Banks
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Shifts in the rates of divorce, marriage, and childbirth are accompanied by shifts in rates of diverse family structures. The science to date is mixed on the predictors of father involvement among unwed fathers: The current study investigated the impact of smaller system predictors on the paternal satisfaction of African American noncustodial fathers’ (NCFs) paternal involvement. Methods: 163 noncustodial with and without multipartnered fertility were selected for study. Results: The study authors investigated the extent to which offspring status (whether they only have children with the custodial parent without multipartnered fertility; or have other children with other mothers, which is multipartnered fertility, has on the duration of their relationship with the custodial parent before their child was conceived, and after their child was conceived. Additionally, the current study seeks to determine whether offspring status impacts NCFs overall parental involvement satisfaction levels. Discussion: Future research on practice with unwed fathers with children with different partners is highlighted.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T06:01:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221128590
       
  • Medicaid, Race, Utilization of Crisis Services at Community Mental Health
           Agencies

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      Authors: Christopher R. Larrison, Jordan P. Davis, Oladoyin Okunoren, Gaurav R. Sinha, Samantha M. Hack
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      We compare African-American and White clients receiving services at 13 rural and semi-rural community mental health agencies (CMHAs) and the impact of Medicaid on the use of crisis and outpatient services. SEM was utilized to model the indirect effect of crisis services between the association of Medicaid and total hours of outpatient services. We modeled the moderating effects of race using mixture modeling and latent class. The base model showed a non-significant indirect effect between having Medicaid and total hours of services through the use of crisis services (Indirect effect = 0.01, p = .98). African-American clients who received Medicaid were more likely to use crisis services ([math], which was associated with increased hours of outpatient services ([math]. In general, Medicaid was not related to increase service or crisis service usage. However, African-American clients access crisis services significantly more than White clients.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-29T06:12:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221128770
       
  • Reliability and Validity of a Novel Measure of Nonviolent Communication
           Behaviors

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      Authors: Cherry T.Y. Cheung, Clement Man-Him Cheng, Stanley Kam Ki Lam, Henry Wai-Hang Ling, Kim Ling Lau, Suet Lin Hung, Hong Wang Fung
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Nonviolent communication (NVC) has been increasingly recognized as a potentially beneficial approach that could promote empathy, resolve conflicts, and improve psychosocial well-being. No validated measure is available to assess or quantify NVC-specific characteristics or behaviors. This paper describes the development and pilot psychometric evaluation of a self-report measure for assessing behaviors characteristic of NVC (e.g., awareness of feelings, honest self-expression). Method: We analyzed data in an online convenience sample of young adults (N = 205). Results: The 7-item Nonviolent Communication Behaviors Scale (NVCBS) was found to have satisfactory internal consistency (α = 0.789 to 0.810), good test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.781) and a single-factor structure. The NVCBS was also positively correlated with empathy while negatively correlated with negative beliefs about emotions, demonstrating its construct validity. Discussion: The study provides a reliable and valid measure of NVC behaviors which can facilitate future studies on NVC. Directions for future research are discussed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T07:20:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221128595
       
  • Addressing Treatment Outcomes and Substance Use Among Formerly
           Incarcerated Individuals Living with HIV

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      Authors: Tawandra Rowell-Cunsolo, Amber Britton, Courtney Blanford, Diandian Yilin
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Incarcerated individuals, who are overrepresented among those infected with HIV, experience multiple barriers to optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence after incarceration. Substance use is highly prevalent among legal system-involved individuals and is commonly associated with suboptimal medication adherence. This manuscript describes the development and pilot test results of two interventions designed to improve ART adherence among formerly incarcerated individuals living with HIV (PLWH). Thirty participants were randomized and completed a multi-session ART adherence and risk reduction intervention or a brief ART adherence intervention. Participants were interviewed at baseline, 1-month, and 3-month follow-up. While past 30-day ART adherence improved in both groups, participants in the brief intervention group took a higher proportion of their ART medication. Multi-session intervention group participants experienced greater reductions in substance use and problematic experiences associated with drug use. ART medication adherence interventions can potentially improve treatment outcomes among PLWH who experience incarceration.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T08:07:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221124135
       
  • Integrating Policy into School Safety Theory and Research

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      Authors: Ron Avi Astor, Rami Benbenishty
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Multiple fields including social work, public health, psychology, and education have been researching school safety issues for the past 40 years. Findings from research and intervention have been a driving force in school safety policy change. Likewise, policy and funding patterns created have dramatically altered how and what school safety researchers study. Yet school safety policy has not been the focus of empirical studies in social work or other research fields as either independent or dependent variables. Based on prior work and current school safety policy issues, the authors created a new theoretical ecological model to generate a conceptual policy-focused model of school safety. They identified thematic, conceptual, methodological, and analytic gaps in the school safety literature using the new model as a guide. Examples from policy and empirical work are given to elucidate the conceptual model. Suggestions are made for researchers and universities to close the gap between school safety research and policy.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T06:31:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221122707
       
  • Effectiveness of TSL Program in Improving Child Abuse, Cortisol, and
           Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-s): A Biomedical Perspective

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      Authors: Wonjung Ryu, Jae Yop Kim
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: This study evaluated the Thank You, Sorry, Love (TSL) program's effect on child abuse and the levels of oxidative stress hormone (cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate) among North Korean refugee parents. Method: The participants, North Korean refugees (N  =  45), were assigned to an experimental group with 10 sessions of TSL program intervention (n  =  15), a comparison group with 10 sessions of Program A intervention (n  =  15), or a control group with no intervention (n  =  15). Effectiveness tests included a pre-test, post-test, and 4-week follow-up test. Results: Child abuse scores and cortisol levels differed significantly between the groups in the post-test and follow-up tests. It was confirmed that the group in the TSL program showed statistically significant improvements in child abuse and cortisol compared to the other groups. Conclusion: The TSL program can be used as a practical intervention to prevent child abuse in North Korean refugee families.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-13T03:03:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221123775
       
  • Qualitative System Dynamics Modeling to Support Community Planning in
           Opioid Overdose Prevention*

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      Authors: Nasim S. Sabounchi, David W. Lounsbury, Pulwasha Iftikhar, Priscila Lutete, Biljana Trajkoska, Weanne Myrrh Estrada, Nabila El-Bassel, Bruce Rapkin, Louisa Gilbert, Timothy Hunt, Dawn A. Goddard-Eckrich, Daniel J. Feaster, Terry T.-K. Huang
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: We aimed to help community stakeholders develop a shared understanding of the opioid crisis through qualitative system dynamics (SD) modeling to inform local strategies for prevention and treatment. Methods: As part of the HEALing Communities Study-New York State, we used secondary qualitative data from community stakeholder interviews and coalition meeting notes to develop qualitative SD models that elucidate the interdependencies and feedback structures underlying the opioid epidemic in each community. Results: The synthesized model revealed multiple balancing and reinforcing feedback loops that influenced the adoption and reach of evidence-based practices to reduce opioid overdose and fatality. Conclusion: SD modeling is a novel approach to helping community stakeholders to see the inter-connectedness of actors, factors and sectors and the need for multiple mutually reinforcing strategies to avert opioid overdose and fatality. Social workers could play a key role in linking actions across sectors in such a complex system.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T06:27:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118109
       
  • Using Twins to Assess What Might Have Been: The Co-twin Control Design

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      Authors: Wilhelmina van Dijk, Cynthia U. Norris, Sara A. Hart
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Randomized control trials are considered the pinnacle for causal inference. In many cases, however, randomization of participants in social work research studies is not feasible or ethical. This paper introduces the co-twin control design study as an alternative quasi-experimental design to provide evidence of causal mechanisms when randomization is not possible. This method maximizes the genetic and environmental sameness between twins who are discordant on an “exposure” to provide strong counterfactuals as approximations of causal effects. We describe how the co-twin control design can be used to infer causality and in what type of situations the design might be useful for social work researchers. Finally, we give advantages and limitations to the design, list a set of Twin Registries with data available after application, and provide an example code for data analysis.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T07:03:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221120604
       
  • Randomised Controlled Trial Evaluating the Strengths Model Case Management
           in Hong Kong

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      Authors: Samson Tse, Chong Ho Yu, Winnie Wing-Yan Yuen, Catalina Sau-Man Ng, Iris Wann-Ka Lo, Sadaaki Fukui, Richard J. Goscha, Sunny H.W. Chan, Eppie Wan, Stephen Wong, Sau-Kam Chan
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives: Strengths-based approaches to case management for people with mental illness have been widely used in Western countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Strengths Model Case Management (SMCM) among mental health clients in Hong Kong. Method: Two hundred and nine service clients were recruited from three Integrated Community Centres. Multiple measures related to recovery progress (e.g., Recovery Assessment Scale) were reported by both the clients and caseworkers before intervention and at 6 and12 months post-recruitment. Results and conclusion: Although there were no significant differences in improvement of most outcomes between the SMCM and control groups, the recovery scores of the SMCM group remained stable over time regardless of age, and also middle-aged participants (i.e., 40–59 years old) in the SMCM group achieved higher recovery scores over time than those in the control group. Trial registration number: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN) 12617001435370.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T04:47:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118550
       
  • The Aftermath of Covid and Cyclones Idai and Kenneth: A Naturalistic
           Experiment Examining Empowerment and Resiliency in Rural Mozambique

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      Authors: Patrick Panos, Angelea Panos
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: To determine, by using a naturalistic experiment resulting from Covid and Cyclones Idai and Kenneth, if a previously completed comprehensive intervention within a Mozambiqian village by the Non-Governmental Organization Care-for-Life (CFL), resulted in community empowerment in the community's response to these disasters, as defined by World Bank. Method: Over a nine-month period, beginning three weeks post-cyclones (November 2019), data were collected using mixed research methods, including in-depth interviews (22), focus group discussions (four), pre–post household surveys, and nonparticipatory observations. Results: Quantitative results demonstrated that the village responded effectively by decreasing disease, increasing sanitation, and providing food security to community members. Using thematic analysis of focus group discussions and interviews, several themes were identified documenting the community's and village leaders’ responses. Discussion: This mixed-methods study demonstrated that the comprehensive CFL interventions were effective in empowering community leaders and members, and in building resiliency in responding to disasters.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T04:46:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221117547
       
  • Preregistration of Randomized Controlled Trials

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      Authors: Bryan G. Cook, Vivian C. Wong, Jesse I. Fleming, Emily J. Solari
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are designed to answer causal questions with internal validity. However, threats to internal validity exist for even well-designed RCTs. In this article, we focus on how preregistration can help address some specific threats to internal validity related to the reporting of results. Preregistration involves researchers publicly posting critical decision points in a study prior to conducting it for the purpose of making researcher plans transparent, making deviations from those plans discoverable, and improving the validity of tests of significance. We provide a brief overview of null-hypothesis significance testing; consider how questionable research practices (e.g., p-hacking) and conducting data-dependent analysis threaten the validity of significance tests; discuss how preregistration can help address these threats and how preregistration works for RCTs; note limitations and challenges to preregistration; and provide recommendations for increasing the use of preregistration by researchers conducting RCTs in social work, education, and related fields.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:34:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221121117
       
  • Spirituality in Social Work Practice With Young College Students: A
           Validation Study

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      Authors: Emine Özmete, Fulya Akgül Gök, Melike Pak
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The aim of this study was to make an adaptation of the Spirituality Measurement Scale into Turkish to evaluate the spirituality of clients for social workers. Methods: A total of 385 students from the Department of Social Work at Ankara University, were included in the research. The online survey method was used as a data collection method. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a 5-factor model with 38 items similar to the original study. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was found as 0.919 and test-retest reliability was 0.868 in this study. Also, concurrent validity analysis results confirmed that higher spirituality is associated with more positive life orientation and higher life satisfaction. Discussion: This study suggests that the Turkish Spirituality Measurement Scale is a valid and reliable measurement tool to be used in the social work field. Spirituality can be evaluated in the field of mental health in youth welfare.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:34:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118851
       
  • Intervention Adaptation and Implementation Method for Real-World
           Constraints and Using New Technologies

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      Authors: Elwin Wu, Yong Gun Lee, Vitaliy Vinogradov, Sultana Kali, Aidar Yelkeyev, Dawn A. Goddard-Eckrich, Anindita Dasgupta, Leona Hess
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Rigorous adaptation methods are needed to revise existing evidence-based behavioral interventions for implementation for new target populations, revised/updated outcomes, new delivery modalities, recent advances, and new technologies. We describe an adaptation method designed to overcome the real-world challenges of having very limited existing expertise, resources, and time. Method: This adaptation method and accompanying visualization tool (“Deconstruction/Reconstruction Matrix”) preserves theoretical mechanisms of behavior change, accounts for challenges in utilizing new technologies, and strengthens clinical processes, with an emphasis on safety. Results: The adaptation of an in-person HIV behavioral intervention for sexual and gender diverse men in Kazakhstan to one delivered remotely via telecommunication and social media technologies exemplifies the process and strengths of the method, concomitantly resulting in recommendations for adaptation and implementation of mobile health (mHealth) and digital health interventions. Discussion: This method allows researchers and clinicians to adapt interventions rapidly and rigorously and to benefit from new technologies.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:34:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221120605
       
  • Effectiveness of Solution-Focused Group Counseling on Depression and
           Cognition Among Chinese Older Adults: A Cluster Randomized Controlled
           Trial

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      Authors: Chenxi Wang, Chunyan Wang, Jinfeng Wang, Nancy Xiaonan Yu, Yi Tang, Zhengkui Liu, Tianyong Chen
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of solution-focused group counseling (SFGC) to reduce depressive symptoms and improve cognitive functions among Chinese rural older adults. Method: In a cluster randomized controlled trial, 290 participants were randomly assigned to a 12-session SFGC intervention or a control group. the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale and Mini-Mental State Examination was adopted to measure depressive symptoms and cognitive functions, respectively, at pretest and posttest. Results: Repeated measure ANOVAs showed a significant group by time effect for both measures. Paired sample t-tests showed that depressive symptoms significantly decreased in the intervention group, but not in the control group. Cognitive functions did not change in the intervention group, but significantly declined in the control group. Conclusions: Our findings support the feasibility and effectiveness of a culturally adapted SFGC for reducing depressive symptoms and protecting cognitive functions among the disadvantaged older adults in a developing country.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:33:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221119991
       
  • Feasibility of Supported Education for Youth with Mental Illness in Hong
           Kong

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      Authors: Daniel K.W. Young, Yi Ting Daphne Cheng, Y.N. N.G. Petrus, Chun Hong Leung, Xiaolin Gan
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Youth with mental illness face many challenges in educational attainment, including a high school dropout rate. Objectives: This study aims to explore the feasibility of a supported education program for youth with mental illness in Hong Kong. Research Method: Mixed research method was conducted. The quantitative study adopted one group pre- and posttest design involving 34 participants, while the qualitative study involved conducting in-depth semistructured individual interviews for seven participants who completed all training courses. Results: A dropout rate of 23.5% was reported, and more than one-third of participants achieved open employment or educational attainment during the 24-month follow-up period. Qualitative content analysis revealed that all participants benefited from the supported education by enjoying a positive learning environment and achieving personal growth. Conclusion. The results of both quantitative and qualitative studies support the feasibility and efficacy of the supported education for youth with mental illness in Hong Kong.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:33:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118108
       
  • Impact of Community Service on Latent Deprivation of Social Assistance
           Recipients

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      Authors: Dinka Caha, Darja Maslić Seršić
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study examined the impact of community service on latent deprivation and mental health of long-term unemployed receiving social assistance by using a two-wave quasi-experimental design with an untreated control group. According to the latent deprivation model, we hypothesized that unpaid participation in community service for the period of three months would alleviate the participants’ experience of latent deprivation and improve their mental health. Method: A total of 209 participants (105 in intervention and 104 in the control group; Mage = 44.7, SD = 10.47, 58.9% males) completed pretest and posttest measures. Results: Multivariate analysis of variance, followed by the analysis of variances and post-hoc group comparisons, revealed significant effects of the intervention on several dimensions of perceived latent deprivation, but not on the mental health of social assistance recipients. Conclusion: Community service might mitigate the lack of latent benefits of work associated with unemployment by enhancing time structure, regular social contacts, status, and collective purpose.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-17T08:02:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118107
       
  • Implementation of a Dyad-Based Intervention to Improve Antiretroviral
           Therapy Adherence Among HIV-Positive People Who Inject Drugs in
           Kazakhstan: A Randomized Trial

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      Authors: Alissa Davis, Gaukhar Mergenova, Sara E. Landers, Yihang Sun, Elena Rozental, Valera Gulyaev, Pavel Gulyaev, Mira Nurkatova, Assel Terlikbayeva, Sholpan Primbetova, Frederick L. Altice, Robert H. Remien
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: HIV-positive people who inject drugs (PWID) in Kazakhstan face many challenges to antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Interventions that leverage social support from an intimate partner, family member, or friend may be effective in improving ART adherence among this population. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation process of a dyad-based intervention among HIV-positive PWID and their treatment support partners. Method: Sixty-six HIV-positive PWID and 66 of their treatment support partners will be enrolled in this pilot randomized controlled trial in Almaty, Kazakhstan, and randomized as dyads to receive an adapted version of the SMART Couples intervention or standard of care. Results: Several implementation strategies were used to facilitate intervention delivery, including remote delivery, training of staff, supervision, technical assistance, quality assurance, and collection of assessments through diverse sources. Discussion: This trial responds to a need for dyad-based ART adherence interventions adapted specifically for HIV-positive PWID.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T06:27:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221117543
       
  • Digital Interventions for the Mental Health and Well-Being of
           International Migrants: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Zahra Abtahi, Miriam Potocky, Zarin Eizadyar, Shanna L. Burke, Nicole M. Fava
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This systematic review examines the literature related to digital interventions and applies the findings to the mental health and well-being of international migrants. Method: A total of 1,854 articles were found during the initial search. Removing duplicates (n = 95) produced a sample of 1,759 articles for review. Next, 1,750 articles were excluded based on inclusion criteria. The final sample was comprised of nine articles for review. Results: The final articles reviewed in this study were categorized according to the examined outcomes: 1) depression; 2) mental health literacy and stigma; 3) social connections; and 4) post-traumatic stress disorder. All but one of the studies reported positive effects ranging from small to large effect sizes. The majority of studies (n = 6) can be rated as moderate in quality using established measures. Conclusion: A few digital interventions have been designed to address mental health and well-being of international migrants.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T06:45:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118854
       
  • Interventions that Address Institutional Child Maltreatment: An Evidence
           and Gap Map

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      Authors: Meghan Finch, Rebecca Featherston, Sangita Chakraborty, Ludvig Bjørndal, Robyn Mildon, Bianca Albers, Caroline Fiennes, David J. A. Taylor, Rebecca Schachtman, Taoran Yang, Aron Shlonsky
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis evidence and gap map collates evidence reporting on the effectiveness of interventions aimed to prevent, disclose, respond to, or treat child maltreatment occurring in institutional settings.MethodsA comprehensive and systematic literature search identified primary studies and systematic reviews meeting the review’s eligibility criteria. Literature screening, data extraction and critical appraisals were undertaken independently by multiple reviewers. Data extracted and reported from the included studies included information about the institutional setting, target population, type of maltreatment, intervention type and outcomes.ResultsSeventy-three studies were identified, including 11 systematic reviews and 62 primary studies. Overall, the methodological quality of the studies was low to moderate. Most evaluated curriculum-based interventions delivered in educational settings, primarily aimed at preventing sexual abuse. Fewer studies examined other institutional settings or intervention types.ConclusionsThis review highlights a need for high-quality studies evaluating a more diverse range of interventions across more varied institutional contexts.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T08:34:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221115867
       
  • Interventions for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Arousal and Reactivity
           Symptoms in Adults with a History of Childhood Adversity: Scoping Review

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      Authors: Jose E. Velasquez, Laura H. Dosanjh, Cynthia Franklin
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) predispose individuals to adult-onset posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with amplified arousal and reactivity symptoms (A&R). This review aimed to identify interventions for reducing A&R symptoms in adults diagnosed with PTSD and a history of ACEs. Method: Systematic scoping review of RCT and quasi-experimental studies in peer-reviewed journals using Arksey and O’Malley’s 5-Stage Framework. Extracted data were analyzed descriptively and thematically. Results: Five articles met inclusion criteria. Skills training in affect and interpersonal regulation (STAIR) with exposure, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT-PE), Interpersonal Processing Group Therapy (IPG), and Trauma-informed yoga interventions were identified. STAIR (d = −1.45, 95% CI [−2.10, −0.80), CBT-PE (d = −1.21, 95% CI [−1.92, −0.51]), and IPG (d = −1.33, 95% CI [−2.07, −0.58]) had large effects on A&R symptoms. Discussion: CBT exposure-based treatments were supported interventions for reducing A&R symptoms in adults diagnosed with PTSD and a history of ACEs.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-12T08:37:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221112962
       
  • A Parent Education Program for Single Fathers’ Parent-Child Relationship
           in Rural China: A Pretest–Posttest-Follow-Up Study

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      Authors: Yan Luo, Anao Zhang, Qi An
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study evaluates a parent education program (PEP), a 13-session group intervention, for single fathers’ parental self-efficacy and father-child relationship in rural areas in China. Methods: Through convenience sampling, 16 single fathers received a parental education program for their parental self-efficacy and the father-child relationship between May 30 and August 30, 2020. Results: Most single fathers (14 out of 16) completed all intervention sessions and assessments. Statistically significant improvements were observed for pre-, post-, and follow-up scores for parental self-efficacy, father-child relationship, and certain subdomains of family participation. Conclusions: A group-based parental education program for parental self-efficacy and parent-child relationship shows promise for supporting single fathers from rural areas in China and in improving the wellness of their children.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-09T11:07:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221112961
       
  • School-based Child Sexual Abuse Interventions: A Systematic Review and
           Meta-analysis

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      Authors: Mengyao Lu, Jane Barlow, Franziska Meinck, Kerryann Walsh, Yumeng Wu
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe purposes of this systematic review were to systematically summarize components in existing school-based child sexual abuse (CSA) prevention programs and identify predictors for program effectiveness.MethodBuilding upon the most comprehensive systematic review on this topic, we conducted systematic searches in both English-language from September 2014 to October 2020 and Chinese-language from inception to October, 2020. Meta-regressions were performed to identify predictors for program effectiveness.ResultsThirty-one studies were included with a total sample size of 9049 participants. Results from meta-analyses suggested that interventions are effective in increasing participants’ CSA knowledge as assessed via questionnaires (g = 0.72, 95% CI [0.52–0.93]) and vignette-based measures (g = 0.55, 95% CI [0.35–0.74]). Results from meta-regression suggested that interventions with more than three sessions are more effective than interventions with fewer sessions. Interventions appear to be more effective with children who are 8 years and older than younger children.DiscussionCSA is a global issue that has significant negative effects on victims’ physical, psychological, and sexual well-being. Our findings also provide recommendations for future research, particularly in terms of optimizing the effectiveness of school-based CSA prevention programs, and the better reporting of intervention components as well as participant characteristics.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T04:55:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221111393
       
  • Assessing the Fidelity of an Affirmative Cognitive Behavioral Group
           Intervention

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      Authors: Shelley L. Craig, Rachael V. Pascoe, Gio Iacono, Nelson Pang, Ali Pearson
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeSupport implementation fidelity in intervention research with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and sexual and gender diverse (LGBTQ+) populations, this study explores the systematic development of a fidelity process for AFFIRM, an evidence-based, affirmative cognitive behavioral therapy group intervention for LGBTQ+ youth and adults.MethodAs part of a clinical trial, the AFFIRM fidelity checklist was designed to assess clinician adherence. A total of 151 audio-recorded group sessions were coded by four trained raters.ResultsAdherence was high with a mean fidelity score of 84.13 (SD = 12.50). Inter-rater reliability was 81%, suggesting substantial agreement. Qualitative thematic analysis of low-rated sessions identified deviations from the manual and difficulties in group facilitation, while high-rated sessions specified affirmative and effective clinical responses.DiscussionFindings were integrated into clinical training and coaching. The fidelity process provides insights into the challenges of implementing social work interventions effectively with LGBTQ+ populations in community settings.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T04:36:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221110865
       
  • Pre- and Post-Conception Relationship Duration and Parental Involvement
           Satisfaction among Noncustodial African American Fathers

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      Authors: Leon Banks, Gerry L. White, Junior Lloyd Allen, Kimberly Y. Huggins-Hoyt, Harold E. Briggs, Tony B. Lowe
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines how parental involvement satisfaction (PIS) in terms of accessibility, engagement, and responsibility (A-E-R) among of noncustodial African American fathers (NCAAFs) may be explained by the pre- and post-conception relationship durations they have with their children’s mothers, controlling for quality of communication satisfaction (QCS) with the mothers. Method: A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was performed with a sample size of N=163 NCAAFS who were surveyed participants in the Parenting Time Visitation Program (PTVP) in Atlanta and Savannah, Georgia communities. Results: There no significant relationships found between pre/post-conception relationship durations and PIS in terms of A-E-R, even when controlling for QCS. Correlational and crosstabulation analyses did reveal some interesting patterns of note. Discussion: This study extends the literature on noncustodial father involvement with their children and provides valuable insight to co-parenting studies.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:31:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221093542
       
  • Custodial and Noncustodial Parent Predictors of Noncustodial Father
           Involvement

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      Authors: Gerry L. White, Harold E. Briggs, Leon Banks, Junior Lloyd Allen, Tony B. Lowe
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study theorizes the interrelationship between African American noncustodial father’s (NCF) (a) income, (b) child support payment (CSP), (c) satisfaction with custodial parent (CP) communication, and (d) satisfaction with the way the CP is raising his child as predictors of father’s involvement. Method: Regression models were tested along a hypothesized framework to determine direct and indirect influences to NCF’s involvement. Results: Based on regression results, new direct and indirect relationships were identified. Discussion: These findings suggest healthier communication, and timely child support payments are critical to NCF’s satisfaction with involvement as well as his views toward the CP.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:19:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221089686
       
  • An Instrumental Variable Approach for Head Start Attendance on Low Income
           Children

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      Authors: Kyunghee Lee, Ryota Nakamura, Kristin Rispoli, Mackenzie Norman
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study examined (1) the causal impact of Head Start on children’s comprehensive outcomes and (2) why families did not comply to the original assignment. Method: Based on the Head Start Impact Study data, children between the ages of 3 and 4 years (N = 3780) were examined for assignment, attendance, and causal impacts on outcomes. Results: Effect of instrumental variable analysis was greater than that of assignment and attendance for measured outcomes. Assignment to the Head Start, older child age (age 4 over age 3), urban residence, and higher family income were associated with non-compliance. Inclusion of care quality into the model illustrated important nuances in predicting families’ compliance with Head Start versus control condition. Discussion: Head Start participation among low income children should be maintained for its positive causal effects on children. Quality of childcare as well as several child and family barriers to access to Head Start needs to be addressed to enhance Head Start enrollment.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T05:40:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221087231
       
  • Couple-Based Behavioral HIV Interventions by the Social Intervention
           Group: Progress, Gaps, and Future Directions

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      Authors: Nabila El-Bassel, Tim Hunt, Dawn A. Goddard-Eckrich, Mingway Chang, Tara R. McCrimmon, Trena Mukherjee, Robert H. Remien, Assel Terlikbayeva, Sholpan Primbetova, Alissa Davis, Tina Jiwatram-Negrón, Shoshana N. Benjamin, Susan S. Witte, Elwin Wu, Louisa Gilbert
      First page: 147
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This paper reports a review of couple-based behavioral HIV interventions conducted by the Social Intervention Group (SIG); and addresses gaps, future directions, and implications for couple-based HIV interventions. Method: We performed a literature review for SIG research on intervention and prevention studies involving couples/partners. Results: We identified nine couple-based interventions. Outcomes included reduced sexual and substance use-related risk behaviors and improved use of anti-retroviral treatment. We conducted these studies in diverse venues, including needle/syringe exchange programs, primary care clinics, and criminal justice settings. Conclusions: The findings of this review provide strong evidence for the efficacy of couple-based HIV interventions in reducing sexual HIV risks and linkage to HIV and substance-use treatment. SIG has advanced couple-based HIV intervention research science by improving study design, intervention core components, conceptual models, and implementation strategies; which have informed scientific directions and transformed couple-based HIV prevention research.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T01:17:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118850
       
  • Intervening on the Intersecting Issues of Intimate Partner Violence,
           Substance Use, and HIV: A Review of Social Intervention Group's (SIG)
           Syndemic-Focused Interventions for Women

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      Authors: Louisa Gilbert, Claudia Stoiscescu, Dawn Goddard-Eckrich, Anindita Dasgupta, Ariel Richer, Shoshana N. Benjamin, Elwin Wu, Nabila El-Bassel
      First page: 178
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate partner violence (IPV), HIV, and substance use are serious intersecting public health issues. This paper aims to describe the Social Intervention Group (SIG)'s syndemic-focused interventions for women that address the co-occurrence of IPV, HIV, and substance use, referred to as the SAVA syndemic. We reviewed SIG intervention studies from 2000 to 2020 that evaluated the effectiveness of syndemic-focused interventions which addressed two or more outcomes related to reducing IPV, HIV, and substance use among different populations of women who use drugs. This review identified five interventions that co-targeted SAVA outcomes. Of the five interventions, four showed a significant reduction in risks for two or more outcomes related to IPV, substance use, and HIV. The significant effects of SIG's interventions on IPV, substance use, and HIV outcomes among different populations of women demonstrate the potential of using syndemic theory and methods in guiding effective SAVA-focused interventions.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T06:28:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221121807
       
  • Leveraging Randomized Controlled Trial Design: HIV and Wellness
           Interventions with Marginalized Populations

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      Authors: Dawn Goddard-Eckrich, Brittany Thomas, Louisa Gilbert, Angela Afiah, Timothy Hunt, Bright Sarfo, Elwin Wu, Amar Mandavia, Mingway Chang, Lisa Matthews, Jessica Johnson, Sandra Rodriguez, Karen Johnson, Nabila El-Bassel
      First page: 193
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Treatment as usual has historically been used as control arms for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but utilizing wellness interventions as active comparison conditions can advance the evidence base of such interventions while increasing access to health promotion content. We use the results from the CONNECT 2 RCT's wellness intervention control arm as a case example of active comparison conditions that can control for dosage or attentional effects in future research. We summarized existing studies on wellness control HIV RCT interventions, introduced CONNECT 2, and discussed recruitment, randomization, and the intervention. Overall, Wellness Promotion participants were more likely to engage in physical activity, eat healthier, and do more vigorous exercise when compared with HIV Risk Reduction. CONNECT 2 Wellness intervention results solidify why wellness interventions can play an important role in treatment guidelines. Developing and implementing this model can be a more ethical, equitable, and holistic approach among underserved communities.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T06:31:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221121613
       
  • Combination Microfinance and HIV Risk Reduction Among Women Engaged in Sex
           Work

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      Authors: Susan S. Witte, Lyla Sunyoung Yang, Tara McCrimmon, Toivgoo Aira, Altantsetseg Batsukh, Assel Terlikbayeva, Sholpan Primbetova, Gaukhar Mergenova, Laura Cordisco Tsai, Cady Carlson, Carolina Vélez-Grau, Fred Ssewamala, Nabila El-Bassel
      First page: 213
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this paper is to summarize 15 years of intervention science in combination HIV prevention and microfinance among women engaged in sex work (WESW) in Central Asia, identifying gaps in our understanding and recommendations for future studies. We begin by describing the emergence of HIV/STI risk among WESW in the Central Asia region, specifically Mongolia and Kazakhstan, and bridge to the formative stages of our methodology as well as completed prevention intervention studies. We describe the development of combining HIV prevention with asset-based microfinance interventions, lessons learned, and contributions these studies make to HIV prevention, intervention science, and practice. We end by recommending next steps to move prevention science forward in this area and among this key population, which continues to be underserved in HIV prevention science worldwide.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T05:33:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221119992
       
  • Ending the HIV Epidemic for Persons Left Behind in the Advances of HIV:
           Intervention Studies Addressing the HIV Continuum of Care

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      Authors: Lisa R. Metsch, Daniel J. Feaster, Carrigan L. Parish, Lauren K. Gooden, Tim Matheson, Margaret R. Pereyra, Susan Tross, Louise Haynes, Allan Rodriguez, Hansel Tookes, Moupali Das, Jonathan Colasanti, Michael A. Kolber, Carlos del Rio
      First page: 230
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The advent of antiretroviral therapy and biomedical prevention has transformed HIV from a fatal disease to a chronic condition where people with HIV (PWH) can live long, healthy lives. Yet, there remains a subset of PWH left behind from receiving timely HIV diagnosis and care. Striking inequalities in access to resources, socioeconomic disparities, and social forces have prevented certain PWH from achieving significant health and quality of life (QOL) improvements experienced by those who secure life-saving treatment. For decades, our multidisciplinary team developed a collaborative scientific portfolio focused on helping those left behind advance along the HIV continuum of care. In this manuscript, we highlight some of our U.S.-based social interventions that have addressed the disparities and sub-optimal QOL encountered by overlooked populations with the goal of achieving timely HIV diagnosis, care, and sustained viral suppression. We then outline our many lessons learned and vision for the next crucial steps ahead.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-09T02:19:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221124525
       
  • Feasibility and Acceptability of a Web-Based Peer
           Navigation-Psychoeducational HIV Intervention for Women

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      Authors: Jamila K. Stockman, Katherine M. Anderson, Sara G. Carr, Brittany A. Wood, Marylene Cloitre, Laramie R. Smith
      First page: 242
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study examined feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effects of a pilot randomized controlled trial (BRIDGES) designed to improve HIV care outcomes among syndemic-affected women living with HIV (WLHA). Method: We enrolled and randomized adult WLHA who were out-of-care or at risk of falling out-of-care and experienced any syndemic condition(s) into BRIDGES (n = 11) or standard of care (n = 13). BRIDGES employed peer navigation one-on-one sessions and six weekly 2-h video psychoeducation group sessions. Feasibility and acceptability were assessed through participant quantitative and semistructured interviews. Intention-to-treat analyses were conducted to evaluate the preliminary effects of BRIDGES. Results: BRIDGES was highly feasible and acceptable. Intervention participants demonstrated improved self-reported adherence to antiretroviral therapy at 3 months, and better engagement and retention in care and viral suppression at 12 months compared to control participants. Discussion: BRIDGES is a promising program to provide syndemic-affected WLHA with the tools needed to mitigate social and structural barriers to HIV care.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-19T05:08:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221124602
       
  • Corrigendum to Pedagogical Methods of Teaching Social Justice in Social
           Work: A Scoping Review

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      First page: 263
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T10:24:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221114238
       
 
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