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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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Research on Social Work Practice
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.883
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 30  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1049-7315 - ISSN (Online) 1552-7581
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Reliability and Validity of a Novel Measure of Nonviolent Communication
           Behaviors

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      Authors: Cherry T.Y. Cheung, Clement Man-Him Cheng, Stanley Kam Ki Lam, Henry Wai-Hang Ling, Kim Ling Lau, Suet Lin Hung, Hong Wang Fung
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Nonviolent communication (NVC) has been increasingly recognized as a potentially beneficial approach that could promote empathy, resolve conflicts, and improve psychosocial well-being. No validated measure is available to assess or quantify NVC-specific characteristics or behaviors. This paper describes the development and pilot psychometric evaluation of a self-report measure for assessing behaviors characteristic of NVC (e.g., awareness of feelings, honest self-expression). Method: We analyzed data in an online convenience sample of young adults (N = 205). Results: The 7-item Nonviolent Communication Behaviors Scale (NVCBS) was found to have satisfactory internal consistency (α = 0.789 to 0.810), good test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.781) and a single-factor structure. The NVCBS was also positively correlated with empathy while negatively correlated with negative beliefs about emotions, demonstrating its construct validity. Discussion: The study provides a reliable and valid measure of NVC behaviors which can facilitate future studies on NVC. Directions for future research are discussed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T07:20:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221128595
       
  • Taiwan's Medical Social Work Development and the Impact of Social Work
           Regulation

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      Authors: Wen-Chung Hsieh, Tung-Hsien Chuang, Hsin-Hsieh Wen
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study explored medical social work development and the impact of social work regulation in Taiwan. Method: From the perspective of historical institutionalism, data were collected through in-depth interviews with 9 senior medical social workers, the review of 49 articles on social work professionalization in Taiwan, and the content analysis of 42 historical files. Results: The findings indicate four critical junctures, namely the postwar–1982 period for charitable relief for the poor and American-style social work, the 1983–1996 period for establishment of the Taiwan Medical Social Work Association and promotion of the Social Worker Act, the 1997–2008 period for implementation of the social work certification and license, and the 2009–present period for approval of specialist social worker institutions. Discussion: The development of medical social work in Taiwan, the characteristics of social work regulation, and the next step in the development of social work professionalization were discussed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T08:08:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221127036
       
  • Addressing Treatment Outcomes and Substance Use Among Formerly
           Incarcerated Individuals Living with HIV

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      Authors: Tawandra Rowell-Cunsolo, Amber Britton, Courtney Blanford, Diandian Yilin
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Incarcerated individuals, who are overrepresented among those infected with HIV, experience multiple barriers to optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence after incarceration. Substance use is highly prevalent among legal system-involved individuals and is commonly associated with suboptimal medication adherence. This manuscript describes the development and pilot test results of two interventions designed to improve ART adherence among formerly incarcerated individuals living with HIV (PLWH). Thirty participants were randomized and completed a multi-session ART adherence and risk reduction intervention or a brief ART adherence intervention. Participants were interviewed at baseline, 1-month, and 3-month follow-up. While past 30-day ART adherence improved in both groups, participants in the brief intervention group took a higher proportion of their ART medication. Multi-session intervention group participants experienced greater reductions in substance use and problematic experiences associated with drug use. ART medication adherence interventions can potentially improve treatment outcomes among PLWH who experience incarceration.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T08:07:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221124135
       
  • Integrating Policy into School Safety Theory and Research

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      Authors: Ron Avi Astor, Rami Benbenishty
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Multiple fields including social work, public health, psychology, and education have been researching school safety issues for the past 40 years. Findings from research and intervention have been a driving force in school safety policy change. Likewise, policy and funding patterns created have dramatically altered how and what school safety researchers study. Yet school safety policy has not been the focus of empirical studies in social work or other research fields as either independent or dependent variables. Based on prior work and current school safety policy issues, the authors created a new theoretical ecological model to generate a conceptual policy-focused model of school safety. They identified thematic, conceptual, methodological, and analytic gaps in the school safety literature using the new model as a guide. Examples from policy and empirical work are given to elucidate the conceptual model. Suggestions are made for researchers and universities to close the gap between school safety research and policy.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T06:31:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221122707
       
  • Leveraging Randomized Controlled Trial Design: HIV and Wellness
           Interventions with Marginalized Populations

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      Authors: Dawn Goddard-Eckrich, Brittany Thomas, Louisa Gilbert, Angela Afiah, Timothy Hunt, Bright Sarfo, Elwin Wu, Amar Mandavia, Mingway Chang, Lisa Matthews, Jessica Johnson, Sandra Rodriguez, Karen Johnson, Nabila El-Bassel
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Treatment as usual has historically been used as control arms for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but utilizing wellness interventions as active comparison conditions can advance the evidence base of such interventions while increasing access to health promotion content. We use the results from the CONNECT 2 RCT's wellness intervention control arm as a case example of active comparison conditions that can control for dosage or attentional effects in future research. We summarized existing studies on wellness control HIV RCT interventions, introduced CONNECT 2, and discussed recruitment, randomization, and the intervention. Overall, Wellness Promotion participants were more likely to engage in physical activity, eat healthier, and do more vigorous exercise when compared with HIV Risk Reduction. CONNECT 2 Wellness intervention results solidify why wellness interventions can play an important role in treatment guidelines. Developing and implementing this model can be a more ethical, equitable, and holistic approach among underserved communities.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T06:31:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221121613
       
  • Feasibility and Acceptability of a Web-Based Peer
           Navigation-Psychoeducational HIV Intervention for Women

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      Authors: Jamila K. Stockman, Katherine M. Anderson, Sara G. Carr, Brittany A. Wood, Marylene Cloitre, Laramie R. Smith
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study examined feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effects of a pilot randomized controlled trial (BRIDGES) designed to improve HIV care outcomes among syndemic-affected women living with HIV (WLHA). Method: We enrolled and randomized adult WLHA who were out-of-care or at risk of falling out-of-care and experienced any syndemic condition(s) into BRIDGES (n = 11) or standard of care (n = 13). BRIDGES employed peer navigation one-on-one sessions and six weekly 2-h video psychoeducation group sessions. Feasibility and acceptability were assessed through participant quantitative and semistructured interviews. Intention-to-treat analyses were conducted to evaluate the preliminary effects of BRIDGES. Results: BRIDGES was highly feasible and acceptable. Intervention participants demonstrated improved self-reported adherence to antiretroviral therapy at 3 months, and better engagement and retention in care and viral suppression at 12 months compared to control participants. Discussion: BRIDGES is a promising program to provide syndemic-affected WLHA with the tools needed to mitigate social and structural barriers to HIV care.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-19T05:08:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221124602
       
  • Rural Challenges in Social Work Regulation

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      Authors: Miriam J. Landsman, Denise Rathman
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Social work practice and its regulation pose special challenges in rural areas. The present study reports findings from a statewide assessment of the social work labor force in a midwestern state, focusing on workforce issues in rural communities. Methods: Researchers used a mixed-methods approach to collect and analyze qualitative and quantitative data through sequenced study phases, conducting focus groups, key informant interviews, and surveys. Results: The statewide assessment identified challenges in rural communities that inform critical issues in recruiting and retaining social workers and in social work monitoring, including access to supervision, continuing education, licensure portability, and equity and justice. Discussion: Study results suggest strategies for improving the recruitment and retention of rural social workers and areas for future research.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-17T05:03:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118360
       
  • Literature Review on Regulatory Frameworks for Addressing Discrimination
           in Clinical Supervision

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      Authors: Stephenie Howard, Sharon Alston, Michelle Brown, Angela Bost
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore existing frameworks and practices for addressing discrimination in supervision as well as patterns of discriminatory treatment in supervision identified in social work and related fields. Methods: The project employed a rapid review guided by the methods of Search, Appraisal, Synthesize, and Analysis (SALSA) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta Analysis (PRISMA). Results: The authors found evidence that discrimination in supervision is a documented problem that occurs in related fields. It revealed a range of social identities that have been the target of discrimination. It also found opportunities for social work to build on existing regulatory frameworks to address critical gaps. Conclusion: It is critical that social work take steps to fill the gap in social work professional standards and regulations and ensure that social workers from disadvantaged backgrounds have equal opportunity and access to training and licensure.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T07:21:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221121827
       
  • Effectiveness of TSL Program in Improving Child Abuse, Cortisol, and
           Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-s): A Biomedical Perspective

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      Authors: Wonjung Ryu, Jae Yop Kim
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: This study evaluated the Thank You, Sorry, Love (TSL) program's effect on child abuse and the levels of oxidative stress hormone (cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate) among North Korean refugee parents. Method: The participants, North Korean refugees (N  =  45), were assigned to an experimental group with 10 sessions of TSL program intervention (n  =  15), a comparison group with 10 sessions of Program A intervention (n  =  15), or a control group with no intervention (n  =  15). Effectiveness tests included a pre-test, post-test, and 4-week follow-up test. Results: Child abuse scores and cortisol levels differed significantly between the groups in the post-test and follow-up tests. It was confirmed that the group in the TSL program showed statistically significant improvements in child abuse and cortisol compared to the other groups. Conclusion: The TSL program can be used as a practical intervention to prevent child abuse in North Korean refugee families.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-13T03:03:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221123775
       
  • Ending the HIV Epidemic for Persons Left Behind in the Advances of HIV:
           Intervention Studies Addressing the HIV Continuum of Care

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      Authors: Lisa R. Metsch, Daniel J. Feaster, Carrigan L. Parish, Lauren K. Gooden, Tim Matheson, Margaret R. Pereyra, Susan Tross, Louise Haynes, Allan Rodriguez, Hansel Tookes, Moupali Das, Jonathan Colasanti, Michael A. Kolber, Carlos del Rio
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The advent of antiretroviral therapy and biomedical prevention has transformed HIV from a fatal disease to a chronic condition where people with HIV (PWH) can live long, healthy lives. Yet, there remains a subset of PWH left behind from receiving timely HIV diagnosis and care. Striking inequalities in access to resources, socioeconomic disparities, and social forces have prevented certain PWH from achieving significant health and quality of life (QOL) improvements experienced by those who secure life-saving treatment. For decades, our multidisciplinary team developed a collaborative scientific portfolio focused on helping those left behind advance along the HIV continuum of care. In this manuscript, we highlight some of our U.S.-based social interventions that have addressed the disparities and sub-optimal QOL encountered by overlooked populations with the goal of achieving timely HIV diagnosis, care, and sustained viral suppression. We then outline our many lessons learned and vision for the next crucial steps ahead.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-09T02:19:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221124525
       
  • Newly Released Data on Examination Pass Rates Supports Need for Widespread
           Reform

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      Authors: Dawn Apgar, Mary Nienow
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-09T02:18:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221124137
       
  • Intervening on the Intersecting Issues of Intimate Partner Violence,
           Substance Use, and HIV: A Review of Social Intervention Group's (SIG)
           Syndemic-Focused Interventions for Women

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      Authors: Louisa Gilbert, Claudia Stoiscescu, Dawn Goddard-Eckrich, Anindita Dasgupta, Ariel Richer, Shoshana N. Benjamin, Elwin Wu, Nabila El-Bassel
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate partner violence (IPV), HIV, and substance use are serious intersecting public health issues. This paper aims to describe the Social Intervention Group (SIG)'s syndemic-focused interventions for women that address the co-occurrence of IPV, HIV, and substance use, referred to as the SAVA syndemic. We reviewed SIG intervention studies from 2000 to 2020 that evaluated the effectiveness of syndemic-focused interventions which addressed two or more outcomes related to reducing IPV, HIV, and substance use among different populations of women who use drugs. This review identified five interventions that co-targeted SAVA outcomes. Of the five interventions, four showed a significant reduction in risks for two or more outcomes related to IPV, substance use, and HIV. The significant effects of SIG's interventions on IPV, substance use, and HIV outcomes among different populations of women demonstrate the potential of using syndemic theory and methods in guiding effective SAVA-focused interventions.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T06:28:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221121807
       
  • Qualitative System Dynamics Modeling to Support Community Planning in
           Opioid Overdose Prevention*

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      Authors: Nasim S. Sabounchi, David W. Lounsbury, Pulwasha Iftikhar, Priscila Lutete, Biljana Trajkoska, Weanne Myrrh Estrada, Nabila El-Bassel, Bruce Rapkin, Louisa Gilbert, Timothy Hunt, Dawn A. Goddard-Eckrich, Daniel J. Feaster, Terry T.-K. Huang
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: We aimed to help community stakeholders develop a shared understanding of the opioid crisis through qualitative system dynamics (SD) modeling to inform local strategies for prevention and treatment. Methods: As part of the HEALing Communities Study-New York State, we used secondary qualitative data from community stakeholder interviews and coalition meeting notes to develop qualitative SD models that elucidate the interdependencies and feedback structures underlying the opioid epidemic in each community. Results: The synthesized model revealed multiple balancing and reinforcing feedback loops that influenced the adoption and reach of evidence-based practices to reduce opioid overdose and fatality. Conclusion: SD modeling is a novel approach to helping community stakeholders to see the inter-connectedness of actors, factors and sectors and the need for multiple mutually reinforcing strategies to avert opioid overdose and fatality. Social workers could play a key role in linking actions across sectors in such a complex system.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T06:27:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118109
       
  • Defining Clinical Social Work and its Implications for Practice

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      Authors: Katharine Bloeser, Cara Sanner, Jennifer Henkel
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: There is limited research on social work licensing especially the profession's attempts to define clinical social work practice. This article seeks to investigate definitions of clinical social work for clinical licensure in the United States. Methods: Statutes were searched and cross-referenced with data from the Association of Social Work Boards to determine (1) categories of licensure per state, (2) supervised practice hour requirements for clinical licensure, and (3) definitions of supervised practice to obtain clinical licensure. Results: To date, 15 licensing boards limit or require supervised clinical social work practice hours towards licensure to include psychotherapy. In most of these jurisdictions, the definition of clinical social work excludes other forms of direct practice, like case management or medical social work, as not meeting criteria for clinical licensure. Conclusions: These definitions have implications for practitioners and social work's role in addressing social determinants of health and trauma-informed care.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T06:35:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118361
       
  • Couple-Based Behavioral HIV Interventions by the Social Intervention
           Group: Progress, Gaps, and Future Directions

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      Authors: Nabila El-Bassel, Tim Hunt, Dawn A. Goddard-Eckrich, Mingway Chang, Tara R. McCrimmon, Trena Mukherjee, Robert H. Remien, Assel Terlikbayeva, Sholpan Primbetova, Alissa Davis, Tina Jiwatram-Negrón, Shoshana N. Benjamin, Susan S. Witte, Elwin Wu, Louisa Gilbert
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This paper reports a review of couple-based behavioral HIV interventions conducted by the Social Intervention Group (SIG); and addresses gaps, future directions, and implications for couple-based HIV interventions. Method: We performed a literature review for SIG research on intervention and prevention studies involving couples/partners. Results: We identified nine couple-based interventions. Outcomes included reduced sexual and substance use-related risk behaviors and improved use of anti-retroviral treatment. We conducted these studies in diverse venues, including needle/syringe exchange programs, primary care clinics, and criminal justice settings. Conclusions: The findings of this review provide strong evidence for the efficacy of couple-based HIV interventions in reducing sexual HIV risks and linkage to HIV and substance-use treatment. SIG has advanced couple-based HIV intervention research science by improving study design, intervention core components, conceptual models, and implementation strategies; which have informed scientific directions and transformed couple-based HIV prevention research.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T01:17:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118850
       
  • Evaluating Professional Misconduct: The Effects of Licensure State and
           Board Membership

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      Authors: Michelle Gricus
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      By further analysis of a subset of data collected from licensed social workers from six selected states, this article explores the effect of respondents’ licensure state and board membership on their perceptions of professional misconduct vignettes. Using a simplified factorial survey design, 5,388 licensed social workers evaluated versions of vignettes involving social worker misconduct. Respondents rated the vignettes as serious and important to discipline and assigned sanctions to the vignette they viewed as most troubling. The licensure state was a factor in the seriousness and importance of discipline ratings, board membership less so. Results indicated that some factors involved in misconduct are more relevant than others. Respondents generally agreed on the most troubling vignettes and sanctions appropriate to the action. These results may serve as preliminary support for the formation of national licensure standards and processes.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T07:04:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221120946
       
  • Using Twins to Assess What Might Have Been: The Co-twin Control Design

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      Authors: Wilhelmina van Dijk, Cynthia U. Norris, Sara A. Hart
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Randomized control trials are considered the pinnacle for causal inference. In many cases, however, randomization of participants in social work research studies is not feasible or ethical. This paper introduces the co-twin control design study as an alternative quasi-experimental design to provide evidence of causal mechanisms when randomization is not possible. This method maximizes the genetic and environmental sameness between twins who are discordant on an “exposure” to provide strong counterfactuals as approximations of causal effects. We describe how the co-twin control design can be used to infer causality and in what type of situations the design might be useful for social work researchers. Finally, we give advantages and limitations to the design, list a set of Twin Registries with data available after application, and provide an example code for data analysis.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T07:03:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221120604
       
  • Social Work Regulation in the United Arab Emirates

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      Authors: Prospera Tedam, Beverly Wagner, Vivienne Mitchell
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is currently developing a social work licensure process to serve as a quality assurance mechanism and enhance the quality of care for service beneficiaries. This article outlines the opportunities, challenges, and contextual issues associated with the UAE regulation such as differing licensing processes and structures in three of seven emirates that are progressing licensure. With a paucity of information about this process in the UAE, this article reviews a range of international literature to situate the status and development of UAE social work licensure regionally and internationally. The UAE is currently utilizing a social work regulatory process similar to the United States in which regulation is implemented at the Emirate level and licensure is the primary regulatory process. Benefits and risks of the current UAE regulation process are provided that include recommendations for culturally relevant supervisory frameworks and regulation processes.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T07:03:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221120601
       
  • One Last Fandango Professor Por Favor' The Potential Contribution of
           Clinical Data-Mining to Randomized Clinical Trials

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      Authors: Irwin Epstein
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T04:47:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221121769
       
  • Randomised Controlled Trial Evaluating the Strengths Model Case Management
           in Hong Kong

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      Authors: Samson Tse, Chong Ho Yu, Winnie Wing-Yan Yuen, Catalina Sau-Man Ng, Iris Wann-Ka Lo, Sadaaki Fukui, Richard J. Goscha, Sunny H.W. Chan, Eppie Wan, Stephen Wong, Sau-Kam Chan
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives: Strengths-based approaches to case management for people with mental illness have been widely used in Western countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Strengths Model Case Management (SMCM) among mental health clients in Hong Kong. Method: Two hundred and nine service clients were recruited from three Integrated Community Centres. Multiple measures related to recovery progress (e.g., Recovery Assessment Scale) were reported by both the clients and caseworkers before intervention and at 6 and12 months post-recruitment. Results and conclusion: Although there were no significant differences in improvement of most outcomes between the SMCM and control groups, the recovery scores of the SMCM group remained stable over time regardless of age, and also middle-aged participants (i.e., 40–59 years old) in the SMCM group achieved higher recovery scores over time than those in the control group. Trial registration number: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN) 12617001435370.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T04:47:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118550
       
  • Start Where the Social Worker Is: Social Workers’ Perceptions of
           Clinical Licensure in Nebraska

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      Authors: Susan R. Reay, Henry J. D’Souza, Kris D. Tevis, Avery H. Fleck
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to evaluate the perceptions of clinical social workers compared to other mental health professionals (OMHPs). This exploratory survey research evaluates the perceptions of clinical licensure from social workers (N = 519) and OMHPs (N = 624) in a midwestern state. The results indicate that most respondents believe that universities should be evaluated based on whether students pass licensing exams, and that faculty should be licensed. Many social workers feel ill-prepared to take a licensing exam. There are significant differences between social workers and OMHP in several areas. Additionally, differences are distinct between social workers who are people of color and White in their perception of universities’ ability to prepare them for licensing exams. This research serves as a prototype for a more extensive study exploring social workers’ perceptions of licensure's three main components: examination, supervision, and education.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T04:47:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118110
       
  • Effects of Social Work Licensure Exemptions: Theoretical Propositions,
           Evidence, and Research Agendas

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      Authors: Joy Jeounghee Kim
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This article intends to review the literature to address the concern that prevalent licensure exemptions in social work undermine public safety. Methods: It reviews (1) the rationales for licensure exemptions, (2) the effects of exemptions on the public and the social work workforce, and (3) critical gaps in the extant evidence to recommend future research agendas to fill the gaps. Results: A review of the literature revealed that concerns about duplicated regulations and potential labor shortages justified licensure exemptions but with little empirical evidence. Limited evidence was found to support the claim that exemptions minimize the effects of licensure. Extant evidence, albeit scant, implies that licensure may not eliminate lower-quality services but benefit incumbent social workers with higher earnings. Conclusions: Recognizing the gaps in the literature, it recommends empirical research and discusses available data to assess the effects of exemptions on public safety and socioeconomic (in)equity within the workforce.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T04:47:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118106
       
  • The Aftermath of Covid and Cyclones Idai and Kenneth: A Naturalistic
           Experiment Examining Empowerment and Resiliency in Rural Mozambique

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      Authors: Patrick Panos, Angelea Panos
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: To determine, by using a naturalistic experiment resulting from Covid and Cyclones Idai and Kenneth, if a previously completed comprehensive intervention within a Mozambiqian village by the Non-Governmental Organization Care-for-Life (CFL), resulted in community empowerment in the community's response to these disasters, as defined by World Bank. Method: Over a nine-month period, beginning three weeks post-cyclones (November 2019), data were collected using mixed research methods, including in-depth interviews (22), focus group discussions (four), pre–post household surveys, and nonparticipatory observations. Results: Quantitative results demonstrated that the village responded effectively by decreasing disease, increasing sanitation, and providing food security to community members. Using thematic analysis of focus group discussions and interviews, several themes were identified documenting the community's and village leaders’ responses. Discussion: This mixed-methods study demonstrated that the comprehensive CFL interventions were effective in empowering community leaders and members, and in building resiliency in responding to disasters.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T04:46:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221117547
       
  • Preregistration of Randomized Controlled Trials

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      Authors: Bryan G. Cook, Vivian C. Wong, Jesse I. Fleming, Emily J. Solari
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are designed to answer causal questions with internal validity. However, threats to internal validity exist for even well-designed RCTs. In this article, we focus on how preregistration can help address some specific threats to internal validity related to the reporting of results. Preregistration involves researchers publicly posting critical decision points in a study prior to conducting it for the purpose of making researcher plans transparent, making deviations from those plans discoverable, and improving the validity of tests of significance. We provide a brief overview of null-hypothesis significance testing; consider how questionable research practices (e.g., p-hacking) and conducting data-dependent analysis threaten the validity of significance tests; discuss how preregistration can help address these threats and how preregistration works for RCTs; note limitations and challenges to preregistration; and provide recommendations for increasing the use of preregistration by researchers conducting RCTs in social work, education, and related fields.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:34:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221121117
       
  • Spirituality in Social Work Practice With Young College Students: A
           Validation Study

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      Authors: Emine Özmete, Fulya Akgül Gök, Melike Pak
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The aim of this study was to make an adaptation of the Spirituality Measurement Scale into Turkish to evaluate the spirituality of clients for social workers. Methods: A total of 385 students from the Department of Social Work at Ankara University, were included in the research. The online survey method was used as a data collection method. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a 5-factor model with 38 items similar to the original study. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was found as 0.919 and test-retest reliability was 0.868 in this study. Also, concurrent validity analysis results confirmed that higher spirituality is associated with more positive life orientation and higher life satisfaction. Discussion: This study suggests that the Turkish Spirituality Measurement Scale is a valid and reliable measurement tool to be used in the social work field. Spirituality can be evaluated in the field of mental health in youth welfare.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:34:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118851
       
  • Intervention Adaptation and Implementation Method for Real-World
           Constraints and Using New Technologies

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      Authors: Elwin Wu, Yong Gun Lee, Vitaliy Vinogradov, Sultana Kali, Aidar Yelkeyev, Dawn A. Goddard-Eckrich, Anindita Dasgupta, Leona Hess
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Rigorous adaptation methods are needed to revise existing evidence-based behavioral interventions for implementation for new target populations, revised/updated outcomes, new delivery modalities, recent advances, and new technologies. We describe an adaptation method designed to overcome the real-world challenges of having very limited existing expertise, resources, and time. Method: This adaptation method and accompanying visualization tool (“Deconstruction/Reconstruction Matrix”) preserves theoretical mechanisms of behavior change, accounts for challenges in utilizing new technologies, and strengthens clinical processes, with an emphasis on safety. Results: The adaptation of an in-person HIV behavioral intervention for sexual and gender diverse men in Kazakhstan to one delivered remotely via telecommunication and social media technologies exemplifies the process and strengths of the method, concomitantly resulting in recommendations for adaptation and implementation of mobile health (mHealth) and digital health interventions. Discussion: This method allows researchers and clinicians to adapt interventions rapidly and rigorously and to benefit from new technologies.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:34:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221120605
       
  • Effectiveness of Solution-Focused Group Counseling on Depression and
           Cognition Among Chinese Older Adults: A Cluster Randomized Controlled
           Trial

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      Authors: Chenxi Wang, Chunyan Wang, Jinfeng Wang, Nancy Xiaonan Yu, Yi Tang, Zhengkui Liu, Tianyong Chen
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of solution-focused group counseling (SFGC) to reduce depressive symptoms and improve cognitive functions among Chinese rural older adults. Method: In a cluster randomized controlled trial, 290 participants were randomly assigned to a 12-session SFGC intervention or a control group. the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale and Mini-Mental State Examination was adopted to measure depressive symptoms and cognitive functions, respectively, at pretest and posttest. Results: Repeated measure ANOVAs showed a significant group by time effect for both measures. Paired sample t-tests showed that depressive symptoms significantly decreased in the intervention group, but not in the control group. Cognitive functions did not change in the intervention group, but significantly declined in the control group. Conclusions: Our findings support the feasibility and effectiveness of a culturally adapted SFGC for reducing depressive symptoms and protecting cognitive functions among the disadvantaged older adults in a developing country.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:33:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221119991
       
  • Feasibility of Supported Education for Youth with Mental Illness in Hong
           Kong

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      Authors: Daniel K.W. Young, Yi Ting Daphne Cheng, Y.N. N.G. Petrus, Chun Hong Leung, Xiaolin Gan
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Youth with mental illness face many challenges in educational attainment, including a high school dropout rate. Objectives: This study aims to explore the feasibility of a supported education program for youth with mental illness in Hong Kong. Research Method: Mixed research method was conducted. The quantitative study adopted one group pre- and posttest design involving 34 participants, while the qualitative study involved conducting in-depth semistructured individual interviews for seven participants who completed all training courses. Results: A dropout rate of 23.5% was reported, and more than one-third of participants achieved open employment or educational attainment during the 24-month follow-up period. Qualitative content analysis revealed that all participants benefited from the supported education by enjoying a positive learning environment and achieving personal growth. Conclusion. The results of both quantitative and qualitative studies support the feasibility and efficacy of the supported education for youth with mental illness in Hong Kong.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:33:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118108
       
  • Impact of Community Service on Latent Deprivation of Social Assistance
           Recipients

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      Authors: Dinka Caha, Darja Maslić Seršić
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study examined the impact of community service on latent deprivation and mental health of long-term unemployed receiving social assistance by using a two-wave quasi-experimental design with an untreated control group. According to the latent deprivation model, we hypothesized that unpaid participation in community service for the period of three months would alleviate the participants’ experience of latent deprivation and improve their mental health. Method: A total of 209 participants (105 in intervention and 104 in the control group; Mage = 44.7, SD = 10.47, 58.9% males) completed pretest and posttest measures. Results: Multivariate analysis of variance, followed by the analysis of variances and post-hoc group comparisons, revealed significant effects of the intervention on several dimensions of perceived latent deprivation, but not on the mental health of social assistance recipients. Conclusion: Community service might mitigate the lack of latent benefits of work associated with unemployment by enhancing time structure, regular social contacts, status, and collective purpose.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-17T08:02:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118107
       
  • Combination Microfinance and HIV Risk Reduction Among Women Engaged in Sex
           Work

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      Authors: Susan S. Witte, Lyla Sunyoung Yang, Tara McCrimmon, Toivgoo Aira, Altantsetseg Batsukh, Assel Terlikbayeva, Sholpan Primbetova, Gaukhar Mergenova, Laura Cordisco Tsai, Cady Carlson, Carolina Vélez-Grau, Fred Ssewamala, Nabila El-Bassel
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this paper is to summarize 15 years of intervention science in combination HIV prevention and microfinance among women engaged in sex work (WESW) in Central Asia, identifying gaps in our understanding and recommendations for future studies. We begin by describing the emergence of HIV/STI risk among WESW in the Central Asia region, specifically Mongolia and Kazakhstan, and bridge to the formative stages of our methodology as well as completed prevention intervention studies. We describe the development of combining HIV prevention with asset-based microfinance interventions, lessons learned, and contributions these studies make to HIV prevention, intervention science, and practice. We end by recommending next steps to move prevention science forward in this area and among this key population, which continues to be underserved in HIV prevention science worldwide.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T05:33:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221119992
       
  • Implementation of a Dyad-Based Intervention to Improve Antiretroviral
           Therapy Adherence Among HIV-Positive People Who Inject Drugs in
           Kazakhstan: A Randomized Trial

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      Authors: Alissa Davis, Gaukhar Mergenova, Sara E. Landers, Yihang Sun, Elena Rozental, Valera Gulyaev, Pavel Gulyaev, Mira Nurkatova, Assel Terlikbayeva, Sholpan Primbetova, Frederick L. Altice, Robert H. Remien
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: HIV-positive people who inject drugs (PWID) in Kazakhstan face many challenges to antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Interventions that leverage social support from an intimate partner, family member, or friend may be effective in improving ART adherence among this population. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation process of a dyad-based intervention among HIV-positive PWID and their treatment support partners. Method: Sixty-six HIV-positive PWID and 66 of their treatment support partners will be enrolled in this pilot randomized controlled trial in Almaty, Kazakhstan, and randomized as dyads to receive an adapted version of the SMART Couples intervention or standard of care. Results: Several implementation strategies were used to facilitate intervention delivery, including remote delivery, training of staff, supervision, technical assistance, quality assurance, and collection of assessments through diverse sources. Discussion: This trial responds to a need for dyad-based ART adherence interventions adapted specifically for HIV-positive PWID.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T06:27:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221117543
       
  • Digital Interventions for the Mental Health and Well-Being of
           International Migrants: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Zahra Abtahi, Miriam Potocky, Zarin Eizadyar, Shanna L. Burke, Nicole M. Fava
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This systematic review examines the literature related to digital interventions and applies the findings to the mental health and well-being of international migrants. Method: A total of 1,854 articles were found during the initial search. Removing duplicates (n = 95) produced a sample of 1,759 articles for review. Next, 1,750 articles were excluded based on inclusion criteria. The final sample was comprised of nine articles for review. Results: The final articles reviewed in this study were categorized according to the examined outcomes: 1) depression; 2) mental health literacy and stigma; 3) social connections; and 4) post-traumatic stress disorder. All but one of the studies reported positive effects ranging from small to large effect sizes. The majority of studies (n = 6) can be rated as moderate in quality using established measures. Conclusion: A few digital interventions have been designed to address mental health and well-being of international migrants.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T06:45:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221118854
       
  • Linking Social Work Licensing Exam Content to Educational Competencies:
           Poor Reliability Challenges the Path to Licensure

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      Authors: Dawn Apgar, Wade Luquet
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: There has been increasing interest in the academy to assist social work graduates to become licensed which is likely to grow as the Council of Social Work Education (CSWE) cites licensure pass rates as a post-graduation outcome required for accreditation by newly adopted standards. This study determines the ability of academics to reliably link Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities statements that are the bases of licensure tests with the CSWE competencies in the Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS). Method: Four full-time faculty members at two institutions conducted an interrater reliability analysis on practice tests to determine the extent to which licensure questions could be consistently linked to EPAS competencies. Results: Study findings indicate weak reliability between social work licensure examination questions and CSWE EPAS competencies. Discussion: Lack of consistency threatens the path to licensure and may explain why graduates of accredited programs lack the requisite knowledge to become licensed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T02:47:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221116123
       
  • Interventions that Address Institutional Child Maltreatment: An Evidence
           and Gap Map

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      Authors: Meghan Finch, Rebecca Featherston, Sangita Chakraborty, Ludvig Bjørndal, Robyn Mildon, Bianca Albers, Caroline Fiennes, David J. A. Taylor, Rebecca Schachtman, Taoran Yang, Aron Shlonsky
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis evidence and gap map collates evidence reporting on the effectiveness of interventions aimed to prevent, disclose, respond to, or treat child maltreatment occurring in institutional settings.MethodsA comprehensive and systematic literature search identified primary studies and systematic reviews meeting the review’s eligibility criteria. Literature screening, data extraction and critical appraisals were undertaken independently by multiple reviewers. Data extracted and reported from the included studies included information about the institutional setting, target population, type of maltreatment, intervention type and outcomes.ResultsSeventy-three studies were identified, including 11 systematic reviews and 62 primary studies. Overall, the methodological quality of the studies was low to moderate. Most evaluated curriculum-based interventions delivered in educational settings, primarily aimed at preventing sexual abuse. Fewer studies examined other institutional settings or intervention types.ConclusionsThis review highlights a need for high-quality studies evaluating a more diverse range of interventions across more varied institutional contexts.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T08:34:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221115867
       
  • Corrigendum to Pedagogical Methods of Teaching Social Justice in Social
           Work: A Scoping Review

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      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T10:24:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221114238
       
  • Interventions for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Arousal and Reactivity
           Symptoms in Adults with a History of Childhood Adversity: Scoping Review

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      Authors: Jose E. Velasquez, Laura H. Dosanjh, Cynthia Franklin
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) predispose individuals to adult-onset posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with amplified arousal and reactivity symptoms (A&R). This review aimed to identify interventions for reducing A&R symptoms in adults diagnosed with PTSD and a history of ACEs. Method: Systematic scoping review of RCT and quasi-experimental studies in peer-reviewed journals using Arksey and O’Malley’s 5-Stage Framework. Extracted data were analyzed descriptively and thematically. Results: Five articles met inclusion criteria. Skills training in affect and interpersonal regulation (STAIR) with exposure, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT-PE), Interpersonal Processing Group Therapy (IPG), and Trauma-informed yoga interventions were identified. STAIR (d = −1.45, 95% CI [−2.10, −0.80), CBT-PE (d = −1.21, 95% CI [−1.92, −0.51]), and IPG (d = −1.33, 95% CI [−2.07, −0.58]) had large effects on A&R symptoms. Discussion: CBT exposure-based treatments were supported interventions for reducing A&R symptoms in adults diagnosed with PTSD and a history of ACEs.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-12T08:37:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221112962
       
  • Social Work Licensure and Regulation in the United States: Current Trends
           and Recommendations for the Future

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      Authors: Deana F. Morrow
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article provides a review of current trends in social work licensure and regulation in the United States. Topics include practice regulation, the purpose of licensure, the gap between social work education and regulation, and practice mobility. Recommendations for advancing licensure and regulation practices for the future are also provided. Discussion includes narrowing the gap between Council on Social Work Education standards and Association of Social Work Boards exam content, improving licensure preparation in educational settings, resolving macro practice concerns about social work licensure, developing consistency across license titles, providing transparency in exam pass rate demographics, achieving practice mobility, and advancing empirical research on testing and practice competence.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-09T12:24:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221114175
       
  • A Parent Education Program for Single Fathers’ Parent-Child Relationship
           in Rural China: A Pretest–Posttest-Follow-Up Study

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      Authors: Yan Luo, Anao Zhang, Qi An
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study evaluates a parent education program (PEP), a 13-session group intervention, for single fathers’ parental self-efficacy and father-child relationship in rural areas in China. Methods: Through convenience sampling, 16 single fathers received a parental education program for their parental self-efficacy and the father-child relationship between May 30 and August 30, 2020. Results: Most single fathers (14 out of 16) completed all intervention sessions and assessments. Statistically significant improvements were observed for pre-, post-, and follow-up scores for parental self-efficacy, father-child relationship, and certain subdomains of family participation. Conclusions: A group-based parental education program for parental self-efficacy and parent-child relationship shows promise for supporting single fathers from rural areas in China and in improving the wellness of their children.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-09T11:07:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221112961
       
  • School-based Child Sexual Abuse Interventions: A Systematic Review and
           Meta-analysis

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      Authors: Mengyao Lu, Jane Barlow, Franziska Meinck, Kerryann Walsh, Yumeng Wu
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe purposes of this systematic review were to systematically summarize components in existing school-based child sexual abuse (CSA) prevention programs and identify predictors for program effectiveness.MethodBuilding upon the most comprehensive systematic review on this topic, we conducted systematic searches in both English-language from September 2014 to October 2020 and Chinese-language from inception to October, 2020. Meta-regressions were performed to identify predictors for program effectiveness.ResultsThirty-one studies were included with a total sample size of 9049 participants. Results from meta-analyses suggested that interventions are effective in increasing participants’ CSA knowledge as assessed via questionnaires (g = 0.72, 95% CI [0.52–0.93]) and vignette-based measures (g = 0.55, 95% CI [0.35–0.74]). Results from meta-regression suggested that interventions with more than three sessions are more effective than interventions with fewer sessions. Interventions appear to be more effective with children who are 8 years and older than younger children.DiscussionCSA is a global issue that has significant negative effects on victims’ physical, psychological, and sexual well-being. Our findings also provide recommendations for future research, particularly in terms of optimizing the effectiveness of school-based CSA prevention programs, and the better reporting of intervention components as well as participant characteristics.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T04:55:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221111393
       
  • Assessing the Fidelity of an Affirmative Cognitive Behavioral Group
           Intervention

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      Authors: Shelley L. Craig, Rachael V. Pascoe, Gio Iacono, Nelson Pang, Ali Pearson
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeSupport implementation fidelity in intervention research with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and sexual and gender diverse (LGBTQ+) populations, this study explores the systematic development of a fidelity process for AFFIRM, an evidence-based, affirmative cognitive behavioral therapy group intervention for LGBTQ+ youth and adults.MethodAs part of a clinical trial, the AFFIRM fidelity checklist was designed to assess clinician adherence. A total of 151 audio-recorded group sessions were coded by four trained raters.ResultsAdherence was high with a mean fidelity score of 84.13 (SD = 12.50). Inter-rater reliability was 81%, suggesting substantial agreement. Qualitative thematic analysis of low-rated sessions identified deviations from the manual and difficulties in group facilitation, while high-rated sessions specified affirmative and effective clinical responses.DiscussionFindings were integrated into clinical training and coaching. The fidelity process provides insights into the challenges of implementing social work interventions effectively with LGBTQ+ populations in community settings.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T04:36:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221110865
       
  • Development and Validation of a Chinese Standardized Client Satisfaction
           Scale

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      Authors: Jiang Liu, Lin Chen
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a standardized client satisfaction scale for social work programs in China. Method: We generated items through a thorough literature review, confirmed by experts, and indigenized and revised by scholars, practitioners, and clients. The sample was from 15 government-sponsored social work programs’ clients in Jiangsu Province, China. We conducted exploratory factor analyses to test reliability (N = 299) and confirmatory factor analyses to examine validity (N = 699). Predictive validity was also tested. Results: The client satisfaction scale, consisting of 4 dimensions with 15 items, demonstrates good internal consistency, satisfactory factorial validity, and positive correlation with clients’ service participation frequency. Discussion: The 4-dimension client satisfaction scale is a reliable and valid instrument. It taps into client perceptions and feedback based on their service experiences. This study offers a feasible way to promote the standardization of social work programs in China.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T07:12:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221109213
       
  • Clinical Social Work Practice in Canada: A Critical Examination of
           Regulation

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      Authors: Toula Kourgiantakis, Rachelle Ashcroft, Faisa Mohamud, Alison Benedict, Eunjung Lee, Shelley Craig, Karen Sewell, Marjorie Johnston, Alan McLuckie, Deepy Sur
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The most common form of social work (SW) practice in Canada is clinical which requires specialized knowledge and advanced clinical skills. The SW profession is more than 100 years old, but regulation is new to Canada and presently most jurisdictions have regulatory bodies to advance safe, competent, and ethical practices. Regulatory bodies establish admission requirements, standards of practice, ethical guidelines, supervision, continuing education requirements, and measures for complaints and discipline. This article examines regulation of SW practice in Canada with a focus on registration requirements, clinical SW designation, use of controlled acts such as psychotherapy and diagnosis, supervision, continuing education, technology, private practice, and how regulatory bodies address diversity, equity, reconciliation, racism, and discrimination. This critical examination of clinical SW practice found inconsistent standards across the country. It is important to harmonize the three pillars including education, association, and regulation to strengthen clinical SW practice in Canada.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T05:46:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221109486
       
  • Critical Time in Regulation of Social Work Practice: Forging a Path
           Forward

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      Authors: Dawn Apgar, Mary Nienow
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-06-11T04:26:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221106938
       
  • Synchronous Online Cognitive-Behavioral Group Intervention: 12-month
           Evaluation for Substance Use Mandated Clients

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      Authors: Virgil L. Gregory, Lisa Werth
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Far less prevalent in intervention research for justice involved or other mandated clients is the advent of synchronous online cognitive-behavioral group intervention (SOC-BGI). Purpose: The purpose of the study was to provide an effectiveness-oriented evaluation regarding the feasibility of SOC-BGI facilitated by licensed clinical social workers. Method: The study used a pre-experimental design (N = 41) with four observations including a 12-month follow-up. A linear mixed model was used to evaluate longitudinal comparisons. Results: On the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment Contemplation subscale, from Baseline to posttest, the participants had a significant improvement (p = .004) and a moderate Hedge’s g effect size of -.54. From baseline to 12-month follow-up, there was a significant reduction in self-reported Diagnostic Statistical Manual 5 substance use symptoms (t = 4.68, df = 29, p < .001) and a large effect (Hedges’ g = .84). Discussion: Study applications, limitations, and strengths are discussed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T04:31:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221106785
       
  • Benchmarks for Group Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Tools for Social
           Work Professionals

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      Authors: Micki Washburn, Miao Yu, Allen Rubin
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis article provides within-group effect size benchmarks for RCTs of group-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for adults with anxiety and/or depression.MethodsA systematic literature search of RCTs of the group-based ACT intervention was conducted following PRISMA guidelines. Articles were selected based on predetermined eligibility criteria. Pre/post within-group effect sizes were calculated using the Glass approach, adjusted using Hedges g, and aggregated to produce separate benchmarks for symptoms of depression and anxiety for ACT and the comparison/control group(s).ResultsResults indicate that the average within-group pre/post effect sizes for the group-based ACT intervention is .59 (95% CI 0.37–0.81) for anxiety and .73 (95% CI 0.56–0.89) for depression.DiscussionThese benchmarks may be used by social workers to evaluate the effectiveness of their group-based ACT intervention and to guide clinical decision making.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-28T02:35:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221105470
       
  • Impact of Moderating Demographic Variables on a Health Intervention for
           People with Serious Mental Illness

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      Authors: Leopoldo J. Cabassa, Ana Stefancic, Jun-Hong Chen, Michael Park, Daniela Tuda, Mark R. Hawes, Shenyang Guo
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Healthy lifestyle interventions can improve the health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). Little is known whether demographic variables moderate the effectiveness of these interventions on health outcomes. Method: Data from an effectiveness trial of a peer-led healthy lifestyle intervention (PGLB) for people with SMI examine whether age, racial/ethnic minoritized status, and gender moderated the effectiveness of PGLB compared to usual care (UC) in achieving clinically significant improvements in weight, cardiorespiratory fitness, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduction. Results: Compared to UC, PGLB was most beneficial for participants age 49 and younger for achieving clinically significant weight loss and for racial/ethnic minoritized communities for achieving clinically significant weight loss and reductions in CVD risk. Conclusions: These findings suggest the impact of healthy lifestyle interventions for people with SMI may not be uniform and adaptations may be needed to make these interventions responsive to the needs of diverse populations.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T03:27:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221102403
       
  • Psychometric Properties of a European French Version of the PTGI

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      Authors: Charlotte Henson, Didier Truchot, Amy Canevello, Marie Andela
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo validate a European French translation of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI).MethodsThis study examined the factorial and the convergent validity of the French version of the PTGI (PTGI-F). A first sample of 406 firefighters was used to test the psychometric structure of the PTGI. A second sample of 210 first responders was then used to test its convergent validity. Participants completed measures of growth, traumatic events, PTSD, anxiety and depression, and personality.ResultsThe PTGI-F was unrelated to Anxiety, supporting the convergent validity of the PTGI-F. Additionally, there was a positive correlation between the PTGI-F and the PCL-C. Finally, the PTGI-F had the same five-factor structure as the PTGI.DiscussionThe PTGI-F appears to be a valid tool. However, the contradictions that were put froward by other translated versions suggest that the PTGI should be reconsidered and improved to better assess the growth process.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T09:17:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221101906
       
  • Evaluating the Psychometric Properties of a Proposed Farsi Version of the
           Interpersonal Reactivity Index Using Item Response Theory

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      Authors: Parvaneh Yaghoubi Jami, Stefanie A. Wind
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Although researchers have examined empathy among many populations worldwide, investigations of empathy among Farsi-speakers are limited. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) for Farsi-speakers (IRI-Farsi). Methods: After translating, we explored psychometric properties of the IRI-Farsi with exploratory factor analysis and item response theory using a sample of Iranians (N = 517). Results: The IRI-Farsi appeared to exhibit a four-factor structure and acceptable item properties within each subscale. Moreover, the IRI-Farsi rating scale categories were generally ordered and distinct with emotion-triggering items as easier to endorse compared to more complex cognitively aroused statements. Conclusions: Results support using the IRI to measure dispositional empathy in mainland Iran. Social work researchers can use these results to inform research and practice related to empathy in this population and design more effective interventions to increase awareness of empathic feelings and understanding for practitioners and clients.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T11:58:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221089322
       
  • Parallel Parent–Child Mindfulness Intervention Among Chinese Migrant
           Families: A Mixed-Methods Feasibility Study

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      Authors: Shuang Lu, Renhui Lyu, Hui Hu, Kristy K. M. Ho, Tom J. Barry, David Black, Daniel F. K. Wong
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study examines the feasibility and effects of a parallel parent–child mindfulness intervention on parenting stress, child behavior, and parent–child relationship among low-income migrant families.MethodsUsing a quasi-experimental design, 21 Chinese migrant parents and one child of each parent were assigned to an 8-week intervention (n = 11 pairs) or waitlist control (n = 10 pairs). Semi-structured qualitative interviews and pre–post quantitative measures were used to assess intervention feasibility and effects.ResultsQualitative interviews suggest mindfulness training promotes family well-being through enhanced parental and child emotional regulation. Quantitative results suggest within-group parenting stress significantly decreased in the intervention group (partial η2 = .423) but not in controls (partial η2 = .000); between-group analyses showed a nonsignificant, medium effect size on parenting stress (partial η2 = .069).ConclusionsThe intervention shows good feasibility and initial support for reducing parenting stress. Future research requires a larger randomized controlled trial among high-stress populations such as migrant families.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T12:59:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221089684
       
  • Pre- and Post-Conception Relationship Duration and Parental Involvement
           Satisfaction among Noncustodial African American Fathers

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      Authors: Leon Banks, Gerry L. White, Junior Lloyd Allen, Kimberly Y. Huggins-Hoyt, Harold E. Briggs, Tony B. Lowe
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines how parental involvement satisfaction (PIS) in terms of accessibility, engagement, and responsibility (A-E-R) among of noncustodial African American fathers (NCAAFs) may be explained by the pre- and post-conception relationship durations they have with their children’s mothers, controlling for quality of communication satisfaction (QCS) with the mothers. Method: A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was performed with a sample size of N=163 NCAAFS who were surveyed participants in the Parenting Time Visitation Program (PTVP) in Atlanta and Savannah, Georgia communities. Results: There no significant relationships found between pre/post-conception relationship durations and PIS in terms of A-E-R, even when controlling for QCS. Correlational and crosstabulation analyses did reveal some interesting patterns of note. Discussion: This study extends the literature on noncustodial father involvement with their children and provides valuable insight to co-parenting studies.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:31:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221093542
       
  • Custodial and Noncustodial Parent Predictors of Noncustodial Father
           Involvement

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      Authors: Gerry L. White, Harold E. Briggs, Leon Banks, Junior Lloyd Allen, Tony B. Lowe
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study theorizes the interrelationship between African American noncustodial father’s (NCF) (a) income, (b) child support payment (CSP), (c) satisfaction with custodial parent (CP) communication, and (d) satisfaction with the way the CP is raising his child as predictors of father’s involvement. Method: Regression models were tested along a hypothesized framework to determine direct and indirect influences to NCF’s involvement. Results: Based on regression results, new direct and indirect relationships were identified. Discussion: These findings suggest healthier communication, and timely child support payments are critical to NCF’s satisfaction with involvement as well as his views toward the CP.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:19:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221089686
       
  • Independent Living Coordinators’ Effects on Intangible Domains in an
           Independent Living Program

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      Authors: Laura L. Nathans, Lori J. Chaffers
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study involved an evaluation of the role of the Independent Living Coordinator (ILC) in a. Email multi-domain Independent Living program (ILP). It focused on the intangible domains of health/mental health, support, and prevention.MethodOne hundred and nineteen ILP plans from 97 foster youth were coded to determine which goals were achieved for foster youth between the ages of 14 and 21. Quotations from case notes and IL plans were selected to illustrate the role of the ILC.ResultsResults demonstrated that ILCs were effective in achieving goals regarding mental health counseling and medication management and practical support for finances and transportation. ILCs struggled to promote peer support, romantic relationships, and use of birth control.DiscussionILCs play roles in supporting foster youths’ transition into adulthood. ILCs were successful based on the types of goals, their understanding of developmental needs, and access to resources. Future research should involve randomized control trial evaluations.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T02:09:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221091520
       
  • Extended Case Management Services Among Resettled Refugees in the United
           States

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      Authors: Stacey A. Shaw, Graeme Rodgers, Patrick Poulin, Jessica Robinson
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeEconomic self-sufficiency is the priority of U.S. refugee resettlement policy, and opportunities for economic integration are shaped by social service contexts. While reception and placement services are typically provided for 3–8 months, extended case management (ECM) involves 2 years of services. This study examines associations between economic integration outcomes—employment, income source, income, and employment satisfaction—and exposure to ECM.MethodWe compare 243 resettled refugees, including those resettled in Salt Lake City, Utah who received ECM and those resettled in Tucson, Arizona without ECM.ResultsParticipants at both sites experienced increased employment and income over time. Participants in Salt Lake City initially experienced higher rates of employment, income, and employment satisfaction than those in Tucson. Employment satisfaction increased more rapidly in Salt Lake City. Being female and older age were also associated with poorer outcomes.DiscussionFindings point to the benefits of ECM services in promoting economic integration.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T05:08:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221085014
       
  • Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing to Reduce Post-Traumatic
           Stress Disorder and Related Symptoms among Forcibly Displaced People: A
           Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Mark J. Macgowan, Mitra Naseh, Maryam Rafieifar
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study is a meta-analysis on the efficacy of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) in reducing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and co-occurring depression, and anxiety symptoms among forcibly displaced people. Methods: A search was followed by data extraction and assessment of risk of bias. Within- and between-conditions effect sizes of posttest and follow-up outcomes using a random effects model were examined, with heterogeneity and subgroup analyses. Results: Twenty-two studies (N = 1964) were included and seventeen (N = 1652) had complete data for the meta-analysis. There were medium to large effect size reductions on PTSD, depression, and anxiety within-conditions. EMDR was more effective than other conditions at posttest for PTSD symptoms but outcomes for the posttests and follow-ups for depression and anxiety were inconclusive. Discussion: EMDR effectively reduced PTSD symptoms, depression, and anxiety among forcibly displaced people. More studies with larger samples and better designs are needed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T01:30:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221082223
       
  • Virtual Support and Intimate Partner Violence Services: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Stephanie L. Baird, Sarah Tarshis, Catherine Messenger, Michaeline Falla
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This article reports on a scoping review that maps the empirical research on virtual intimate partner violence (IPV) interventions. Method: Following the Joanna Briggs Institute’s nine-step scoping review methodology, 25 studies were selected. Results: The majority of the studies (72%) were published in the United States, and included quantitative (56%), mixed methods (24%), and qualitative study designs (20%). The most frequent focus of the virtual interventions to support survivors of IPV included safety (52%), with other interventions focusing mainly on treatment (36%), and education and prevention (12%). Forms of interventions included interactive, internet-based (72%), smartphone apps (16%), live videoconferencing (8%), and an asynchronous chatroom (4%). Barriers and strengths of virtual IPV interventions are identified. Discussion: From this analysis, emerging models in virtual IPV intervention are identified, as well as next steps necessary in virtual IPV practice and research. The article concludes with implications for social work practice and research.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T12:19:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221087232
       
  • An Instrumental Variable Approach for Head Start Attendance on Low Income
           Children

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      Authors: Kyunghee Lee, Ryota Nakamura, Kristin Rispoli, Mackenzie Norman
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study examined (1) the causal impact of Head Start on children’s comprehensive outcomes and (2) why families did not comply to the original assignment. Method: Based on the Head Start Impact Study data, children between the ages of 3 and 4 years (N = 3780) were examined for assignment, attendance, and causal impacts on outcomes. Results: Effect of instrumental variable analysis was greater than that of assignment and attendance for measured outcomes. Assignment to the Head Start, older child age (age 4 over age 3), urban residence, and higher family income were associated with non-compliance. Inclusion of care quality into the model illustrated important nuances in predicting families’ compliance with Head Start versus control condition. Discussion: Head Start participation among low income children should be maintained for its positive causal effects on children. Quality of childcare as well as several child and family barriers to access to Head Start needs to be addressed to enhance Head Start enrollment.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T05:40:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221087231
       
  • Feasibility of Self-Guided Online Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for
           University Students During COVID-19

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      Authors: Daniel K. W. Young, Per Carlbring, Petrus Y. N. Ng, Qi-rong J. Chen
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: This study aimed to test the feasibility and efficacy of a self-guided online cognitive behaviour therapy (iCBT) for university students in Hong Kong during COVID-19. Method: One group pre-post-test design with convenient sampling was adopted in this study, involving 84 university students who received a newly developed iCBT within an 8 week intervention period. The iCBT offered eight online modules for students to learn the skills of CBT at home through an online platform which was accessible any time anywhere anonymously with technical support only. Standardized assessment tools were used for outcomes assessment at the pre- and post-intervention periods. Results: Three quarters of participants completed all iCBT modules. The results of paired t-tests showed that, after completing the iCBT, participants showed reduction in anxiety, depression, and perceived stress. Conclusion: This study provides preliminary evidences to support the feasibility and efficacy of the self-guided iCBT for university students during COVID-19.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T04:01:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221087904
       
  • Connecting Practice Research With the Process of Theorizing

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      Authors: Michael J. Austin, Bowen McBeath
      First page: 731
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In this analysis, we contend that theorizing strengthens the connections between practice and research by requiring researchers to check their working assumptions, premises, conclusions, and implications for research, theory, and practice. Our exploration of the process of theorizing in practice research is rooted in the concept of “sensemaking” (Weick, 1995) whereby practice researchers engage in disciplined imagination by reflecting on diverse forms of evidence, being attentive to specific practices and problems, and moving between intuition and reasoned explanation. The analysis includes the following components: 1) tools for theorizing from research findings (abductive analysis and problematization), 2) processes for theorizing about practice research findings (focusing on practice, researcher repertoire, and theory development processes), 3) an example of theorizing from key findings, and 4) the construction of interventive theory. It concludes with implications for social work practice research.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T12:29:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221078961
       
  • Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation in Treatment Engagement
           and Service (MH-RITES Center) at the University of Houston

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      Authors: Robin E. Gearing, Micki Washburn, Kathryne B. Brewer, Jamison V. Kovach, James M. Mandiberg, Sharon Borja, Juan Barthelemy, Shahnaz Savani, Limor Smith, Andrew Robinson, Jody Gardner
      First page: 743
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation in Treatment Engagement and Service (MH-RITES Center) at the Graduate College of Social Work, University of Houston is an international multidisciplinary research center focused on improving treatment engagement and outcomes for those experiencing mental health concerns. Established in 2017, the mission of the MH-RITES Center is to drive empirically supported and evidence-based innovation that achieves optimal treatment access and engagement in mental health services by individuals and families who need them, specifically in historically marginalized communities. This article describes the history and guiding principles, organizational structure, funding sources, and physical resources of the MH-RITES Center while highlighting completed, ongoing, and future projects supporting the Center's mission.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T05:33:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221120023
       
  • Inclusive Practice for Children with Special Education Needs: Training for
           Social Workers

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      Authors: Janet T.Y. Leung, Daisy C.S. Yew, Karen Y.K. Kwok, Lydia M.H. Kwok, Vincent W.T. Chua
      First page: 751
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe study evaluated the effectiveness of a training program for social workers to reduce their negative perceptions on children with special education needs (SEN), enhance their self-efficacy for inclusive practice, and promote their competencies in helping these children in Hong Kong.MethodA prospective quasi-experimental design was adopted in the evaluation, with 58 social workers (74% females) joining the program (the intervention group) and 39 (56.4% females) who did not join the program (the control group).ResultsParticipants of the intervention group showed a significant decrease in negative perceptions towards children with SEN and an increase of self-efficacy for inclusive practice and competencies after participating in the program when compared with the control group.DiscussionThe study provides encouraging evidence on the effectiveness of a training program for promoting social workers’ self-efficacy and competencies for inclusive practice, which is essential for social work intervention for children with SEN.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-16T07:25:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221083705
       
  • Pedagogical Methods of Teaching Social Justice in Social Work: A Scoping
           Review

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      Authors: Eunjung Lee, Toula Kourgiantakis, Ran Hu, Andrea Greenblatt, Judith Logan
      First page: 762
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeSocial justice is a foundational social work value, but social work education continues to experience ongoing challenges with how to teach students to embody social justice values. The aim of this scoping review is to map empirical studies on teaching methods that translate social justice value into teachable curricula.Methods: Following Arksey and O’Malley’s scoping review framework, we conducted a rigorous process in which we screened 5953 studies and included a final sample of 35 studies.Results: Our findings identified seven main teaching approaches: intergroup dialogue, online asynchronized discussion board, simulation and role play, group work and presentation, written reflection, community-engaged learning, and social action-oriented learning. In terms of competency development, most of the studies focused on awareness and knowledge versus skill-building. Most teaching methods emphasized students’ affective experiences during the social justice learning activities.Discussion: Challenges, lessons learned, and future recommendations of each teaching method are presented.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T05:15:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221085666
       
  • Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory Assessments as Predictors
           of Behavioral Change in Multisystemic Therapy and Functional Family
           Therapy in Norway

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      Authors: Silje Hukkelberg, Terje Ogden, Dagfinn Mørkrid Thøgersen
      First page: 784
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Multisystemic Therapy (MST) and Functional Family Therapy (FFT) are evidence-based Blueprint programs shown to be effective towards youth problem behaviors. Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate treatment outcomes following MST and FFT among Norwegian youths with serious behavior problems. Research design: Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) data of the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory at intake and post-test was used along with measures of five national treatment goals. Study sample: The study is based on two samples of youths assigned to MST (n = 2018) and FFT (n = 453). Analysis: Data were analyzed separately for MST and FFT, to explore changes during treatment and accomplishment of the treatment goals. Results: At intake youths in MST showed a significant higher level of risk factors compared to those referred to FFT. Significant reductions in risk factors and behavioral problems were evident for both interventions. Follow-up results demonstrated sustained reductions of problem behaviors. Conclusion: Both treatments decrease risk factors and increase the completion of outcome goals. Implications of the results are discussed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T04:33:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221086641
       
  • The Teaching and Learning of Communication Skills in Social Work Education

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      Authors: Emma Reith-Hall, Paul Montgomery
      First page: 793
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis article presents a systematic review of research into the teaching and learning of communication skills in social work education.MethodsWe conducted a systematic review, adhering to the Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews for Interventions and PRISMA reporting guidelines for systematic reviews and meta-analyses.ResultsSixteen records reporting on fifteen studies met the eligibility criteria. Studies consisted of randomised trials and quasi-experimental designs. Outcome measures included knowledge, attitudes and skills. Significant heterogeneity meant a narrative synthesis rather than meta-analysis was undertaken. Systematic communication skills training supports the development of students’ communication skills including the demonstration of expressed empathy and interviewing skills.DiscussionThe existing body of literature is limited but promising. Researchers conducting studies into communication skills training should seek to carry out robust and rigorous outcomes-focused studies. Further investigation into the theoretical underpinnings of the educational interventions and the roles played by key stakeholders is also required.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T04:23:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221088285
       
 
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