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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
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Research on Social Work Practice
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.883
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 29  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1049-7315 - ISSN (Online) 1552-7581
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Randomized Controlled Trial of Counseling Approach for Long-Term Welfare
           Recipients in Switzerland

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      Authors: Dorian Kessler, Simon Steger, Pascale Keller
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study examines the impact of “Change in Direction,” a counseling approach for long-term social assistance recipients in Switzerland.MethodThe results of the study are based on a randomized controlled trial (n intervention group = 31/32, n comparison group = 50/48). Outcome measures were obtained from a two-wave survey and administrative data.ResultsThe intervention increased clients’ mastery (= experience of competence, β = .46, p = .038) and vitality (= one aspect of well-being, β = .61, p = .008), reducing the gap with the general Swiss working age population by 35% and 54%, respectively. However, the intervention did not increase clients’ general life satisfaction or earnings, nor did it reduce health expenditures or cash transfer receipt.DiscussionFindings show that goal-oriented counseling can improve feelings of competence and well-being among long-term welfare recipients but that it cannot improve labor market outcomes and financial self-sufficiency.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T01:42:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315241232120
       
  • The NIMH Task Force on Social Work Research Report: Past Accomplishments
           and Current Challenges

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      Authors: Ronald A. Feldman
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Following the publication of the groundbreaking report by the National Institute of Mental Health Task Force on Social Work Research in 1991, major gains have been made in building a potent infrastructure for social work research. Since then, however, progress has faltered in key areas and complex new challenges have emerged. These developments are examined and suggestions are set forth regarding how best to address the most serious challenges.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T06:23:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315241232320
       
  • The 100 Most Impactful Global Contributors to Social Work Publications: An
           Update Based on 2023 Data

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      Authors: David R. Hodge, Patricia R. Turner
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T08:10:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315241231759
       
  • Corrigendum to Evaluating the Effectiveness of Mental Health First Aid
           Program for Chinese People in Hong Kong

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      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T05:31:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315241231362
       
  • The Perceived Informal Support Questionnaire: Validation and Clinical
           Correlates in People with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms

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      Authors: Hong Wang Fung, Anson Kai Chun Chau, Guangzhe Frank Yuan, Caimeng Liu, Vincent Wan Ping Lee
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study developed and validated a novel measure that captures the diverse positive experiences related to perceived informal support. We also examined its cross-sectional and longitudinal correlates in people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Method: We analyzed data from an international clinical trial. Participants with PTSD symptoms completed assessments at baseline (N = 230) and after 1 month (N = 80). Results: The 34-item Perceived Informal Support Questionnaire (PISQ) had a two-factor structure, was internally consistent, and showed convergent validity with a general measure of social support. Additionally, baseline emotional support predicted fewer depressive symptoms (β = -.356, p = .015) and lower levels of impairments (β = -.271, p = .018) at 1-month follow-up. Discussion: This study offers a novel measure that captures the diverse experiences related to perceived informal support. It also highlights the importance of involving and supporting caregivers of individuals with mental health struggles, specifically PTSD symptoms.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T05:48:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315241232134
       
  • Mental Health Social Work Practitioner Research: A Narrative Review of
           Papers Published From One Academic Program

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      Authors: Martin Webber, Nicola Moran, Ruth Naughton-Doe
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This narrative review explores papers published in peer-reviewed journals reporting research from a practice research module of a qualifying program to examine their potential contribution to knowledge in mental health social work. Methods: A narrative review was undertaken according to the PRISMA extension for scoping reviews of papers published by the first three cohorts of a practice research module. Results: Eleven papers were included in the review which found, for example, some deficits in practitioners’ knowledge, confidence and understanding. The studies were modest and had some common limitations, but a high number of online views indicate that the papers have the potential to impact on practice. Conclusion: This review found that it is possible to use a practice research module of a qualifying program to train social workers to undertake and publish high-quality research which has the potential to influence policy or practice beyond a students’ own learning.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T05:47:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315241230667
       
  • The Efficacy of an SFBT-Based Positive Psychology Intervention in
           Promoting University Students’ Post-Traumatic Growth and Psychological
           Resilience After the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Quasi-Experiment

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      Authors: Chun-Ying Wang, Li Shen, John Shields, Qian-Chuan Huang, Yu-Jia Wu, Jue-Wen Yin, Jia-Lin Zhao
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study examines the efficacy of a positive psychology intervention involving solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) techniques in promoting university students' post-traumatic growth and psychological resilience after the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: The research hypotheses were tested via a quasi-experimental design with pre- and post-tests including three groups: intervention (n = 28), active control (n = 25), and control groups (n = 57). We followed convenience sampling and recruited Chinese students after the peak of the pandemic. Results: Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed that there were significant main effects of groups in post-traumatic growth, F(2, 107) = 3.17, p 
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T07:37:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315241229667
       
  • Validation of a Multi-Dimensional Social Support Measure for Individuals
           Who Are Incarcerated

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      Authors: Elizabeth Curley, Michael Killian, Tanya Renn, Christopher Veeh, Carrie Pettus
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study sought to validate the psychometric properties of the Network Composition Survey (NCS), a multi-dimensional conceptualization of social support for individuals who are incarcerated. Methods: Data included 1,539 individuals recruited in 50 prisons across four states to participate in the pilot trial of a prison reentry program. Exploratory factor analysis using the first support person data identified a factor structure, and confirmatory factor analysis verified that structure using the second and third support person data conducted with Mplus 8.2. Results: Two of the hypothesized dimensions, informational and emotional support, were confirmed, and a third factor of companionship was identified. Conclusion: The reduced NCS is a reliable and valid measure of multi-dimensional social support for individuals during incarceration. The NCS reflects a more nuanced assessment of the complexities of interpersonal dynamics with support figures. The NCS also provides utility services targeted for social support during reentry.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T08:13:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315241229681
       
  • Practice Research Partnerships in Social Work: Addressing Impact and
           Credible Evidence

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      Authors: Ilse Julkunen, Lynette Joubert, Christa Fouché, Martin Webber, Monica Short, Louise Whitaker, Anna Metteri
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This article builds on the Practice Research Collaboratives (PRCs) as an initiative that developed from the Fifth Conference on Practice Research to provide a platform for practice researchers to engage actively around impact and influence. Research question: The unique features of research activities that enable transformational impact in three cases in social work practice research involving long-term community and university research partnerships. Methodology: Literature review and comparison of case studies. Results: The cases show how the processes of implementation are not only seen as linear, but constantly evolving at the same time as intervention fidelity in social work is crucial to improving outcomes for people, which can have transformative impacts for individuals and systems alike. Conclusion: We conclude by describing the importance of understanding the feasibility of complex problems and complex social situation which requires meaningful communication between partners, transparency and involvement of all players throughout the process.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T07:54:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315241229680
       
  • Effects of Self-Management Interventions on Challenging Behavior: A
           Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Tyler E. Smith, Aaron M. Thompson, Brandy R. Maynard, Anna M. Kim
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of self-management interventions on classroom behaviors and academic outcomes. Methods: Review procedures followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to search, select, and extract data from published and unpublished studies employing an experimental/quasi-experimental comparison group or single-case experimental design assessing the effects of a self-management intervention in schools. Seventy-five single-case design studies (236 participants; 456 effects) and 4 comparison group studies (422 participants; 11 effects) were included. Results: Single-case results indicated self-management interventions positively impacted challenging behaviors (LRRi = 0.69 [0.59, 0.78]) and academic outcomes (LRRi = 0.58 [0.41, 0.76]). A significant main effect for improving challenging behaviors was revealed in group design studies (g = 0.63 [0.08, 1.17]). Discussion: Limitations, including methodological shortcomings in the single-group design studies and the small number of comparison group studies, should be considered when interpreting findings. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T07:54:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231200351
       
  • The Effectiveness of School-Based Programs on Aggressive Behaviors among
           Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Liangqi Shen, Shan Jiang, Shilin Tan
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Present study investigated the effectiveness of school-based intervention programs on reducing aggression among children and adolescents. Method: A thorough search was carried out on 12 electronic databases. Seventeen studies were finalized, and meta-analyses were performed using a random effect model on RevMan software. Results: Findings reveal that existing school-based programs have a significant effect on reducing aggression (standardized mean differences = −0.35, 95% confidence interval [−0.53, −0.18], Z = 3.92, p 
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-01T07:31:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315241227147
       
  • Book Review: Social Work Practice in Health: An Introduction to Contexts,
           Theories and Skills by Melissa Petrakis

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      Authors: Vernando Y. Lameky
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T06:01:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231224041
       
  • Gaps between Supply and Utilization of Social Work Evidence in Mainland of
           China

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      Authors: Wenjie Duan, Xixi Sun, Zichuan Wang
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The comparison research involving two studies aimed to explore the gap between social work evidence production and utilization in Mainland of China. Methods: Study 1 was a scoping review to screen qualified publications in the Web of Science Core Collection. Study 2 conducted correlation analysis and an analysis of variance using the data from the China Social Work Longitudinal Study 2019. Results: In Study 1, 745 publications from 35 main social work journals represented the overall improving volume and quality of evidence in Mainland of China. Study 2 showed a low intention to use evidence among the Chinese Mainland social work practitioners, which could be influenced by working region, years of work, educational level, work position, professional level, awareness of evidence-based practice (EBP), and willingness to learn EBP. Conclusions: An education gap, an intention gap, a regional development gap, and a time lag were identified between social work evidence supply and utilization in Mainland of China. Well-established education and training, as well as practice-research networks may be the solutions to bridge these gaps.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T04:45:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231225151
       
  • Enhancing Social Workers’ Capacity Building for Career and Life
           Development Services: A Quasi-Experimental Outcome Study

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      Authors: Yuen-hang Ng, Steven Sek-yum Ngai, Chau-kiu Cheung, Wing-tsam Pang, Qiushi Zhou, Chunyan Mai, Elly Nga-hin Yu, Cornelia Meng-ting Liu, Hok-yee Siu
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study evaluated the effectiveness of a training program for social workers who provide services for promoting the career and life development (CLD) of non-engaged youth (NEY). Methods: A quasi-experimental design was utilized to compare the changes between the training (n = 58) and the comparison groups (n = 48). Focus groups and individual interviews with training participants (n = 13) and guest speakers (n = 2) were also conducted. Results: The training group showed greater improvement in all four aspects of capacity building—implementation, commitment, knowledge, and orientation—than the comparison group. The qualitative analysis generated four themes about how social workers benefited from the training program. Discussion: The findings provided evidence for the positive impact of the training program in building social workers’ capacity for facilitating NEY's CLD. As such, the Program offers a holistic framework of CLD-related theory and practice for social workers and evaluators.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-16T02:55:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231226406
       
  • Organizational Supports for Practice Research: Illustrations from an
           International Practice Research Collaborative

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      Authors: Michael J. Austin, Bowen McBeath, Bin Xu, Heidi Muurinen, Sidsel Natland, Rudi Roose
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Organizational support represents a critical driver of practice research projects. This analysis includes four international examples of such support (Norway, Finland, Belgium, and USA and China). The four studies capture the similarities and differences between university support and national government support. The analysis is placed within the context of defining practice research and the core components of organizational support. The findings emerged from presentations in a Practice Research Collaborative sponsored by the International Community on Practice Research in Social Work. The conclusion includes a discussion of a cross-case analysis along with the identification of implications for practice research studies in social work and affiliated professional disciplines.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T09:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231225138
       
  • A Comparative Analysis of the Strengths Perspective With the Theory
           Evaluation Scale

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      Authors: Rigaud Joseph
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The Theory Evaluation Scale (TES) is a psychometric tool for analyzing theoretical frameworks that guide practice. Its flexibility assumption contends that a single rater or a panel of experts can evaluate a given theory and the two sets of scores will be comparable. This study tests this assumption, using a popular practice model in social work: the Strengths Perspective (SP). Method: A panel of 50 social work faculty and administrators from five English-speaking countries used the TES to determine the theoretical quality of the SP. Their scores were first analyzed through common measures of central tendency and then compared to findings in an existing evaluation for the same theory. Results: The analysis yielded excellent overall TES scores for the SP (mean = 32.03, median = 33.00, mode = 36). These results reflect the 35 overall score that the theory received in Joseph et al.'s (2022) evaluation. Conclusion: Therefore, besides showing an excellent overall quality for the SP, these results support the flexibility assumption of the TES. These findings bear major implications for social work theory, practice, and research.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T07:51:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231223141
       
  • Book Review: Ethics for behavior analysts by J. Bailey & M. Burch

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      Authors: Dana M. Gadaire
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T07:51:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231222159
       
  • The Nonviolent Communication Behaviors Scale: Cross-Cultural Validity and
           Association with Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress

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      Authors: Hong Wang Fung, Anson Kai Chun Chau, Guangzhe Frank Yuan, Caimeng Liu, Stanley Kam Ki Lam
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study examined the cross-cultural validity of nonviolent communication (NVC) behaviors as measured using the Nonviolent Communication Behaviors Scale (NVCBS) and explored their potential relationship with post-traumatic stress (PTS). Methods: We analyzed data from two samples (N = 412 Chinese adults and N = 283 English-speaking adults). Results: The best-fitting model of NVCBS was the proposed three-factor model (“self-connection,” “authentic self-expression,” and “empathic listening”), with configural, metric, and scalar invariance established across samples with different languages and sociocultural backgrounds. The NVCBS had satisfactory internal consistency and convergent validity and was negatively associated with PTS. The findings were replicated across the two samples. Discussion: NVC behaviors can be reliably and validly measured using the NVCBS. Given its brevity and measurement invariance across cultures, the NVCBS is a promising tool to facilitate future studies on NVC. Moreover, a lack of NVC behaviors may be a social-behavioral feature associated with PTS.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-26T07:56:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231221969
       
  • When Research Learns From Practice: Synthesized Action Research on the
           BIKVA Model

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      Authors: Jacob Brix, Hanne Kathrine Krogstrup, Ilse Julkunen
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The article reports on 20 years application of a user involvement methodology that was developed in the context of social work – the BIKVA Model. Through an analysis of its practical implementation, a novel form of action research emerges: Synthesised Action Research (SAR). Method: A scoping review of 69 practitioner reports is conducted and inductive content analysis is used. Results: The application of the BIKVA Model by practitioners reveals new variations that represent empirical translations which make the model fit better to various purposes and levels of engagement. Moreover, it highlights its application in policy areas beyond the original scope: social work. Conclusion: By identifying and elaborating the SAR contribution, the article demonstrates that considerable insights can be gained from analysing practitioners use of academic models and methodologies, providing a more nuanced understanding that can be used to enrich and nuance what was originally intended.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-26T07:20:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231221786
       
  • Assessing Foster/Adoptive Parent Training Curriculum's Improvement of
           Resource Parent Knowledge and Skills

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      Authors: Amy M. Salazar, Angelique Day, Jenna Thompson, Emma Buckland Young, Jaidyanne Podsobinski, John Fowler, Lori Vanderwill, Sara S. Spiers, Metta Kongira
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeCaregiving for children in foster, kinship, and adoptive placements (hereon referred to as resource parenting) is a challenging role that requires unique knowledge and skills, but there is limited evidence for currently available trainings. The National Training and Development Curriculum for Foster and Adoptive Parents (NTDC) was recently developed with support from the US Children's Bureau.MethodsBaseline and 6-month follow-up surveys from 540 resource parents receiving NTDC training and 409 receiving training-as-usual (propensity score matched; group assignment based on location) were compared on a variety of knowledge types and skills.ResultsNTDC parents had larger growth in trauma-informed parenting, potential to promote positive child development, and key resource parent knowledge from baseline to post-training. NTDC parent growth in receptivity to working with biological parents approached but did not reach statistical significance.ConclusionsNTDC offers promise as a new training resource for improving resource parent knowledge and skills.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-26T07:00:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231222813
       
  • Adapted, Adopted, and Novel Interventions: A Whole-Population
           Meta-Analytic Replication of Intervention Effects

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      Authors: Tina M. Olsson, Ulrica von Thiele Schwarz, Henna Hasson, Emily G. Vira, Knut Sundell
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundA challenge to implementation is management of the adaptation-fidelity dilemma or the balance between adopting an intervention with fidelity while assuring fit when transferred between contexts. A prior meta-analysis found that adapted interventions produce larger effects than novel and adopted interventions. This study attempts to replicate and expand previous findings.MethodsMeta-analysis was used to compare effects across a whole-population of Swedish outcome studies. Main and subcategories are explored.ResultsThe 523 studies included adapted (22%), adopted (33%), and novel (45%) interventions. The largest effect was found for adapted followed by novel and adopted interventions. Interventions in the mental health setting showed the highest effects, followed by somatic healthcare and social services.ConclusionsThese results replicate and expand earlier findings. Results were stable across settings with the exception of social services. Consistent with a growing body of evidence results suggest that context is important when transferring interventions across settings.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-06T10:29:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231218646
       
  • Book Review: Child sexual abuse in black and minoritized communities:
           Improving legal, policy and practical responses by Aisha K. Gill and
           Hannah Begum

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      Authors: Vernando Yanry Lameky
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-17T07:50:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231215129
       
  • Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Social Worker Satisfaction Scale

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      Authors: Aubrey E. Jones, Jayme E. Walters, Zachary Stickley, Kristel J. Scoresby, Aaron R. Brown
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Job satisfaction in social work has been widely studied, and yet continuity measurement tools utilized to assess job satisfaction among social workers are rare. The purpose of this study was to validate the use of the Social Work Satisfaction Scale (SWSS) with U.S.-based social workers. Moreover, we sought to examine the validity of the scale across rural, suburban, and urban designations. Method: A sample of U.S.-based social workers (N = 1,764) were recruited via social media to participate in an online survey that collected demographic information and assessed job satisfaction using the SWSS. Descriptive statistics were generated. MPlus (8.5) was used to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis of the SWSS. Results: Results indicate the SWSS is an appropriate measure to use with U.S.-based social workers across geographic settings. Discussion: The SWSS can assist social work-employing organizations seeking to better understand the multidimensional nature of job satisfaction.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-16T06:05:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231214326
       
  • Corrigendum to Evolution of the Assisted Outpatient Treatment (AOT)
           Program Through the Application of a Social Work Lens

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      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T08:33:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231212718
       
  • My Time as President of NADD: Lessons Learned in Leadership

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      Authors: Martell L. Teasley
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T08:33:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231212191
       
  • Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial: Project Support Positive Parenting
           Module Following Sexual Abuse

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      Authors: Caitlin Rancher, Renee McDonald, Katrina Cook, Ernest N. Jouriles
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Support from a nonoffending caregiver can play a critical role in helping children recover from sexual abuse. However, many caregivers lack the skills to effectively support their child during the aftermath of a sexual abuse disclosure. This randomized controlled pilot trial examined a brief parenting intervention (Project Support Positive Parenting module) delivered by paraprofessionals to families waiting for intensive, trauma-focused therapy at a children's advocacy center. Methods: After a pretreatment assessment, 21 families were randomized to the intervention or a treatment-as-usual control group. Families also completed a posttreatment assessment. Results: Caregivers who received the Project Support module reported improved caregiver support and parenting self-efficacy, and their families were more likely to engage in trauma-focused therapy. Caregivers and service providers reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. Discussion: Although the results should be interpreted as preliminary, they offer promising evidence for brief parenting programs following a sexual abuse disclosure.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-06T06:12:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231212195
       
  • A Parenting Program to Prevent Child Maltreatment in China: A
           Pretest–Posttest-Follow-Up Study

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      Authors: Huiping Zhang, Haiying Yang, Yu Liu, Xinger Xia, Yixuan Wang, Zihui Li, Honglin Li, Weiwei Wang
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of adapted Parenting for Lifelong Health for Young Children to prevent child maltreatment in the Mainland China. Methods: A pre–post-follow-up study was designed and 54 Chinese parents received the eight-session online parenting intervention between February 4 and March 25, 2023. Results: Forty-one participants (75.9%) completed post-assessment and 36 (66.7%) completed 3-month follow-up assessment. Participants reported reduced child maltreatment, especially in emotional abuse and corporal punishment after the intervention, and the effect was maintained in 3-month follow-up. Improved positive parenting behaviors and decreased child externalizing behaviors were also observed for pre-, post-, and 3-month follow-up assessments. However, there were no significant changes in parental stress, parent–child relationship, parental depressive symptoms, and social support. Conclusions: The online Parenting for Lifelong Health for Young Children program for Chinese parents has shown promise in reducing child maltreatment, improving positive parenting, and decreasing children's problem behaviors, although randomized controlled trials are needed in future studies.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-01T07:12:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231209748
       
  • Is Self-Care Sustainable Without Structural Support' A Systematic Review
           of Self-Care Interventions

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      Authors: Kristi Kaapu, Catherine E. McKinley, Lauren Barks
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Social workers navigate systemic stressors while managing self-care amid scant institutional support. The purpose of this systematic review is to critically examine the state of social work intervention research for self-care practices. Methods: This review includes empirical research articles focusing on self-care interventions in social work between 2011 and 2022 (N = 22). Results: All self-care interventions focused on modifying individual behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge. Discussion: Most (83%) research on self-care interventions focused on mindfulness, which tended to be associated with improvements in mindfulness, distress management, and clinical self-efficacy. The remaining interventions tended to be associated with improvements in self-care attitudes, knowledge, practices, and wellness. Conclusion: Structural factors and socioeconomic privilege have been found to be predominant predictors of whether social work students, educators, and practitioners engaged in self-care practices, yet no interventions incorporated structural or institutional variables. Multilevel interventions addressing structural, institutional, and relational determinants of burnout are needed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T07:26:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231208701
       
  • Partially Nested Designs in Social Work Research: Principles and Practices

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      Authors: Kyle Cox, Ben Kelecy, Jada Deiderich
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Group-administered and shared facilitator treatments can induce nested data in a treatment arm that is not present in the control arm. Failure to accommodate these partially nested data structures produces study design inefficiencies, biased parameter estimates, and inaccurate inferences. This work introduces partially nested data structures. Method: We began by describing the features of partially nested data then discuss best practices and guidelines for study planning and analysis through examples commonly found in social work research. Results: The totality of this work provides social work researchers with the knowledge and tools to accommodate partially nested data in study planning and analysis including integration of comprehensive effects (i.e., mediation and moderation). Discussion: Improved understanding of partially nested data structures help researchers avoid the detrimental effects associated with disregarding them. Broadly, these methodological advances increase the capacity and quality of research in the field of social work.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T10:22:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231208700
       
  • The Mediating Role of Resilience and Living in Care on Psychosocial
           Outcomes

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      Authors: Michael Ungar, Mehrdad Shahidi, Philip Jefferies, Mahnaz Shojaee, Elizabeth Alexandra Clark
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study examined the mediating role of resilience and living in care experiences between risk exposure (victimization by community and adverse childhood experiences) and psychosocial outcomes (housing instability, delinquency, and post-traumatic stress reactions) for youth receiving child welfare and community services.MethodTwo hundred and fifty-one youths (14–19 years old) who are receiving interventions from the Department of Community Services in Nova Scotia, Canada, were recruited. Multiple measures were administered to the youth.Results and conclusionResilience and experiences of living in care significantly mediated the relationship between risk factors and outcomes, with youth demographic characteristics influencing the pattern of these relationships. Findings suggested that resilience and living in care experiences could reduce the effects of risk factors on psychosocial outcomes. These findings demonstrate a role for Child Welfare agencies in promoting youth access to the resilience-enabling resources necessary to sustain well-being.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T08:29:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231209490
       
  • Effectiveness of an LGBTQ+ E-Learning Module for Social Workers: A
           Randomized Controlled Trial

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      Authors: Jason Schaub, Jolie R. Keemink, Willem J. Stander, Paul Montgomery
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of an e-learning training module for improving children's social workers’ knowledge of, and attitudes toward, LGBTQ+ young people. Methods: A pragmatic randomized, CONSORT-compliant controlled trial to compare an intervention group (N = 304) with a business-as-usual comparison group (N = 310). After attrition, the analysis included 188 (intervention) and 278 (comparison) participants. The main outcome measures were the Heteronormative Attitudes and Beliefs Scale and a perceived LGBTQ+ knowledge measure, controlling for several covariates. Results: A significant effect of intervention on both outcome measures, using several rigorous analysis approaches and missing data imputation methods. Participants who undertook the training decreased their heteronormative attitudes and beliefs and increased their perceived LGBTQ+ knowledge compared to business as usual. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the effectiveness of an e-learning training intervention in improving knowledge of, and attitudes toward, LGBTQ+ young people. Implications for research, practice, and policy are outlined.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-24T04:13:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231208199
       
  • Advocates of Research-Supported Treatments for PTSD are Losing in Lots of
           Ways: What Are We Going to Do About It'

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      Authors: Keith S. Cox, R. Trent Codd
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Most individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) do not receive science-based treatment. This is a massive problem and the systems and individuals best able to address it misunderstand key components of the problem. Advocates of Research Supported Treatments (ARSTs) have substantial influence/authority in federal agencies, university settings, and medical centers and limited influence/authority with the public at large and with many providers, especially those in private practice settings. Figures such as Bessel van der Kolk and Peter Levine, who are not consistently science-based, have limited influence in government and research settings and enormous influence with the public and many individual providers. We see such figures as a main contributor to the problem. We consider four responses, (1) ARST collective action, (2) aim to reduce influence of non-ARSTs, (3) dialogue with non-ARSTs, and (4) maintain current practices. We argue for prioritizing ARST collective action. This could increase usage of high-quality PTSD treatment.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-24T04:13:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231206754
       
  • Validation of the Revised Chen Internet Addition Scale for Chinese Older
           Adults

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      Authors: Tianyuan Liu, Yu Jia, Yang Yang, Jinglu Yan, Wenlong Mu
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study aimed to revise the Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS-R) among older adults in China. Method: 1,107 participants were recruited through an online survey. The factorial structure, reliability, and validity of the CIAS-R were tested. Latent profile analysis (LPA) was employed to distinguish individuals’ Internet addiction membership. Results: The first-order five-factor model was demonstrated to best explain the underlying structure of the CIAS-R among the elderly in China. Time spent online, sense of loneliness, and depression provided evidence for the criterion validity of the CIAS-R. The magnitude of the correlation coefficients indicated Internet addiction may lead to psychological problems. LPA analysis showed the elderly could be clustered into four types based on their Internet addiction severity. Conclusion: The CIAS-R is a reliable and valid measure of Internet addiction among the elderly. This study offers a feasible way to intervene in the addicted aged for social workers and clinicians.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-20T05:24:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231209492
       
  • Role of Competencies and Attitudes in Training for Family Prevention
           Programme Facilitators

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      Authors: Carmen Orte, Lidia Sánchez-Prieto, Belén Pascual, Joan Amer
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Research-supported family programmes are proven to be effective in reducing dysfunctional behaviours in youth. A fundamental role is played by professionals with high competence levels and a positive attitude to evidence-based practice (EBP). The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of prior training for the facilitators of the PCF-AFECT, in order to ascertain whether it led to improvements in their competence levels and whether favourable attitudes to evidence-based practice were associated with higher competence levels. Method: A quantitative method was used, with a sample of professionals from Spain (N = 150). Results: Results showed that the training was effective in the case of four categories of professional competencies. Favourable attitudes to EBP were associated with clusters of professionals with higher competencies. Discussion: Both findings contribute scientifically to the identification of the core components or gold standards of training that are needed for the facilitators of research-supported family programmes.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-20T05:23:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231208197
       
  • Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of First Step Next for Preschoolers with
           Social-Emotional Needs

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      Authors: Andy J. Frey, Jason W. Small, Bixi Zhang, Samantha Bates, Margaret R. Kuklinski, Hill M. Walker, Edward G. Feil
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Few cost-effectiveness studies have been conducted on social-emotional interventions for students in preschool settings. The current study is a cost-effectiveness analysis of the First Step Next (FSN) intervention for preschool students. Method: Our approach involved a secondary analysis of a randomized control trial that utilized the ingredients method to estimate costs (Levin & McEwan, 2001). In addition, effect sizes were used to generate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios representing the cost of improving student outcomes by one standard deviation (1 SD). Results: FSN was more cost-effective for improving behavior in the school setting than in the home setting, with an average cost per 1 SD improvement of $3,833 and $6,329, respectively. Additionally, the intervention had greater cost-effectiveness for social skill-related outcomes than problem behavior-related outcomes among preschool students. Discussion: This study advances our understanding of the costs and outcomes of practices designed to improve the school success of our youngest learners.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-19T07:43:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231208400
       
  • Cost–Benefit of Treatment Foster Care Oregon (TFCO) Versus
           Residential Care in Illinois

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      Authors: Ka Ho Brian Chor, Cody Oltmans
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This pilot study evaluated the cost–benefit of research-based Treatment Foster Care Oregon (TFCO) as an alternative treatment setting to residential care for children in the Illinois child welfare system. Methods: Using secondary analysis of child welfare administrative data, this study observed, for 2 years, 52 children enrolled in TFCO and 67 children who were eligible for TFCO but remained in or entered residential care. Results: Over the 2-year period, the average daily cost of care for children in TFCO was $249, compared to $320 for children in residential care, resulting in cost-savings of $51,058 per child and an overall net benefit of $94,294 per child. Conclusions: The promising cost–benefit evidence of TFCO as implemented in a state child welfare system has implications on social work services and placement decision-making, and system capacity in scaling up short-term therapeutic foster homes for children who might otherwise languish in residential care.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-12T07:17:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231206752
       
  • Evaluation of an Electronic Service-Learning Course Utilizing Regular and
           Intensive Delivery Modes: The Hong Kong Experience

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      Authors: Xiaoqin Zhu, Xue Wu, Shunhao Zhang, Daniel T. L. Shek
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This paper evaluated an electronic service-learning (e-SL) course utilizing regular and intensive delivery modes offered to undergraduate students in the 2020–2021 academic year. Methods: We collected pretest–posttest data (N = 130) and students’ subjective evaluations of the course (N = 148) and the services they had provided (N = 160). Results: Students showed significant positive changes in both e-SL modes on positive youth development attributes, service leadership qualities, and life satisfaction, with greater changes among students taking the intensive mode. Students’ views towards the e-SL course and the services they provided were positive, and students in the two e-SL modes did not differ significantly in their subjective evaluations. In addition, students’ changes in outcome measures were positively associated with their subjective evaluations. Conclusions: The study provides additional support for the potential effectiveness of e-SL and suggests the promising application of intensive mode in implementing e-SL projects.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-11T06:58:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231207054
       
  • Are Universal and Guaranteed Basic Income Programs Effective in the United
           States' A Review

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      Authors: Beth Okantey
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Poverty continues to be a pervasive social problem within the United States despite a plethora of services and government assistance programs. Currently, universal and guaranteed basic income programs are being actively promoted. Method: This review incorporated universal or guaranteed basic income primary reports open to any country and in English from four academic databases including grey literature between January 1, 2013, and April 8, 2023, using randomized controlled trials or quasi-experimental study designs with no specified outcome. Results: Out of an initial 147 articles, four of the primary studies utilized a randomized controlled trial and one used a quasi-experimental design. One study occurred in the United States. Discussion: Despite the increasing implementation of such programs throughout the United States and their associated high cost, evidence is lacking based on their long-term impact and effectiveness. Further study is recommended including stronger evaluations of current and future programs.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-03T06:42:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231202781
       
  • Effectiveness of Adolescent School-Based Digital Mental Health
           Interventions: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Gloria Akello Abura-Meerdink, David L. Albright
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This review aimed to investigate the effectiveness of digital school-based mental health interventions for adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa. Method: The authors conducted a comprehensive search of digital school-based mental health interventions to identify studies conducted in Sub-Saharan Africa targeting adolescents between the ages of (10–19) years. Peer-reviewed studies published in English between 2009 and May 2023 were obtained through electronic bibliographic databases. Result: Only one study met the full inclusion criteria for this review. The included study tested a digital mental health intervention (“Shamiri Digital”) for treating depression, anxiety, and well-being in adolescents. The “Shamiri Digital” intervention demonstrated positive outcomes on depressive symptoms within the full sample. Discussion: The dearth of studies investigating digital mental health solutions for adolescents in low-income countries demonstrates a critical gap in intervention and research for adolescent mental health in resource constrictive settings
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-28T10:07:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231201140
       
  • Social Work Research and Mixed Methods: Stronger With a Quality Framework

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      Authors: Lori A. Foote
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Mixed methods are a useful approach chosen by many social work researchers. This article showcases a quality framework using social work examples as practical guidance for social work researchers. Combining methodological literature with practical social work examples, elements of a high-quality approach to mixed methods are showcased in this article. Specific components of a quality framework are used to ground the discussion. This framework helps researchers attend to important aspects of a mixed methods project's design, particularly as related to integration. Additional resources are provided for those interested in further deepening their mixed methods capabilities. Attending to components within this quality framework will help the researcher or consumer of research to think carefully about how the design helps to maximize the benefits that can be achieved by taking a mixed methods approach.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T08:11:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231201157
       
  • Outcomes of a Design Thinking Program on Social Workers: An Evaluation
           Study

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      Authors: Siu-ming To, Johnson Chun-Sing Cheung, Man-yuk Adam Chan, Cheryl Danielle Lau, Rui-ling Zhao
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study explored the outcomes of a youth empowerment program guided by design thinking on social workers’ innovations in youth service. Method: Forty-seven practitioners joined this program with two stages: the capacity-building stage and the implementation stage. A pretest-intermediate test-posttest design survey was used to explore practitioners’ changes. Results: Significant differences were found in creative self-efficacy and innovative behavior, with the posttest mean scores of these indicators being higher than those of the pretest. Additionally, the results indicated significant differences in youth-practitioner partnerships and inter-professional learning. The posttest mean score of youth-practitioner partnerships was higher than those of the pretest and intermediate test, while the posttest and intermediate test mean scores of interprofessional learning were higher than that of the pretest. Conclusion: The findings suggest that participants need both opportunities to learn about design thinking through capacity-building and to integrate what they have learned during project implementation.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-22T05:48:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231203923
       
  • Evolution of the Assisted Outpatient Treatment (AOT) Program Through the
           Application of a Social Work Lens

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      Authors: Robin E. Gearing, Micki Washburn, Jamison V. Kovach, Lindamarie Olson, Kana Lastovica, Danny Clark, Andrew Robinson, Samantha Foo, Kimberly Cunningham, Cindy Johnson, David Rose, Aileen Renteria, Hiba Alkhadra, Audrey Brown, Kendra Collins, Cheryl Gadison, Kaisha Nelson, Dominique McCullum, Kyle Woods, Darian Garlic, Nicole Elwood, Mary Frank, Richard Guzman, Stephen Hailey, Jason Cox, Amy Parsons, Shaan Sheth, David Bobb, Dana Drexler, Lokesh Shahani, Monalisa Jiles, Kendra Thomas, Sylvia Muzquiz, Lance Britt, Wayne Young
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Assisted Outpatient Treatment (AOT) is a court-mandated program intended to engage adults with serious mental illness who have challenges with voluntary treatment adherence. AOT programs are designed to promote outpatient treatment participation, reduce emergency care, and decrease justice involvement. Research has found AOT programs to be effective in reducing hospitalizations and justice involvement. Yet, concerns have been raised, including limiting individual autonomy and self-determination and overrepresentation of individuals from BIPOC backgrounds. This article describes the evolution the AOT Houston Model. Through applying the social work lens, this innovative model builds on AOT strengths and addresses limitations. The Houston AOT Model has five goals guided by the core tenets of client empowerment and self-determination. This Model prioritizes six elements including housing, employment, access to public benefits, transportation, service continuity, and care coordination/communication. Implications for practice and policy are presented with strategies for successful implementation of comprehensive AOT programs in other jurisdictions.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-19T07:23:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231199423
       
  • Domestic Violence and Alcohol and Other Drug Use: Australian Pilot
           Intervention Findings

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      Authors: Silke Meyer, Nicola Helps, Jasmine McGowan, Harley Williamson
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Problematic alcohol and drug use (AOD) is a contributing factor to escalate domestic violence (DV). Yet, combined DV and AOD interventions remain limited. This article examines a combined pilot intervention for men with comorbid AOD and DV use. Methods: Mixed methods with concurrent triangulation design. Data comprises victim-survivors' reports of abuse at intake and exit, interviews with men and victim-survivors at exit and 6-month followup, and 12-month follow-up court data. Study participants included 30 male program participants and 14 female victim-survivors. Results: Findings suggest reduced AOD and DV use at program exit, that appears maintained for most men at 6-month followup. The victim-survivor data suggests more positive outcomes among men who maintained or resumed their relationship with the victim-survivor than separated men. Conclusions: Findings indicate benefits of combined early interventions addressing comorbid AOD and DV use and highlight the importance of victim-survivor voices in program reviews.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-19T06:54:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231201366
       
  • Technology-Based Cancer Survivorship Care Interventions: A Systematic
           Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Jung-won Lim, Anao Zhang, Bradley Zebrack
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of technology-based cancer survivorship care interventions according to the types of intervention and participant characteristics for adult cancer survivors; and the extent to which the types of intervention and participant characteristics moderate the observed effects. Methods: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing technology-based survivorship care interventions with control groups for posttreatment adult cancer survivors. Results: A total of 50 RCTs with 422 effect sizes suggested an overall significant treatment effect of technology-based survivorship care interventions. Survivorship care domains, comparison groups, and targeted outcomes were significant moderators influencing treatment effects. Conclusions: Our findings reinforce the value and applicability of technology-based survivorship care interventions that promote skill-building specifically. Interventions addressing multidimensional domains for survivorship care should be developed with advances in technology, which in turn influence enhancing cancer survivors’ capacities to address psychosocial challenges.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-11T06:11:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231199940
       
  • Adult Depression and Anxiety Outcomes at a Student-Staffed Mental Health
           Clinic

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      Authors: Sandra Moncrief-Stuart, Amy Cressman, Jimmie Roberson
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Student-staffed behavioral health clinics may increase low-cost access to mental health services, but there is a need to assess these models. This retrospective study evaluates the effect of a community-based, nonprofit, and student-staffed mental health program on adult clients’ depression, anxiety, and global distress to determine if this program model improves outcomes. Method: Historical, de-identified client demographic and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) data (n = 627) was evaluated using paired sample t-tests to determine the effectiveness of treatment from graduate students working at a community mental health clinic. Results: As clients progressed in therapy, their depression, anxiety, and overall global severity index significantly improved. Over the course of treatment, there was an 18% decrease in the number of clients presenting with clinically relevant scores. Discussion: It is recommended that community-based student-staffed behavioral health clinics be considered as they have the potential to provide effective, low-cost services for many in need.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-07T07:25:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231199421
       
  • Licensed Clinical Social Workers’ Perceptions of Complementary and
           Alternative Interventions

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      Authors: Tina Vitolo, Morgan E. Cooley, Darren Weissman
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This article explored Licensed Clinical Social Workers (LCSWs) beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge of Complementary and Alternative Interventions (CAI). Method: We utilized a cross-sectional online survey among a sample of 193 LCSWs. Results: Approximately 60% of LCSWs assessed for and utilized CAI professionally, and 90% personally utilized CAI. LCSWs had moderately positive beliefs, neutral attitudes, and high baseline knowledge of CAI. Age and years of practice were the only significant correlates, and the only significant predictor for assessment and utilization of CAI was positive attitudes. Discussion: As the largest group of mental health providers, we found that it is vital for LCSWs to have a solid understanding of CAI to provide effective and safe services to the clients they serve. It is hoped that the results of this study will serve as a starting point for future research on CAI among social workers, with the goal of enhancing client-centered practice.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-31T06:37:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231195829
       
  • Preschool-Based Program on Parenting and Child Behavior for Working
           Parents: Cluster RCT

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      Authors: Cynthia Leung, Huijing Lu, Charlotte Wong, Kam Yiu Chun, Heidi Szeto
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study evaluated the effectiveness of an eight-session universal parent training program for working parents using a parallel cluster randomized controlled trial design. The program was facilitated by preschool-based social workers in preschools. Method: Participants included 242 parents of children attending 16 preschools under the Pilot Scheme on Social Work Service for Pre-Primary Institutions, with 150 (seven preschools) randomly allocated to the intervention group and 92 (nine preschools) to the waitlist control group, with no blinding. Participants completed questionnaires on their parenting stress, parenting practices and emotion coaching (primary outcomes), and children's behavior problems (secondary outcomes). The study was registered with the ISRCTN registry (39415). Results: Mixed effects regression analysis (intention-to-treat) with preschool as a random factor indicated a significant decrease in over-reactivity, and an improvement in emotion coaching. Conclusions: The results provided promising research on the effectiveness of a preschool-based parenting program for working parents.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-08T07:04:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231191575
       
  • Behavioral Skills Training to Teach Identification of Choking Hazards to
           Substitute Caregivers

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      Authors: Asha A. Fuller, Madison L. Molve, Kimberly A. Crosland
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Choking is a leading cause of mortality in children. Over half of choking injuries occur due to food, and the remaining injuries involve common household objects. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate Behavioral Skills Training (BST) to teach choking hazard identification and correction to substitute caregivers. Method: This study evaluated the efficacy of using BST to teach nonedible choking hazard identification (Phase 1) and edible choking hazard identification and correction (Phase 2) to substitute caregivers following guidelines from the Home Accident Prevention Inventory-Revised Protocol. Results: The results found that all participants significantly improved their hazard identification and correction following BST in both phases. Generalization probes were high in baseline for all participants across phases; however, all participants scored 100% correct on the final generalization probes. Discussion: Implications for practice and future research considerations for choking prevention training are discussed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-01T07:18:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231192982
       
  • Behavioral Health Interventions for Incarcerated Adults With Histories of
           Trauma: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Melissa D. Grady, Stephen Tripodi, Lauren Herod, Michael Rudzinski
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The majority of incarcerated individuals have experienced traumatic events in their lifetime, contributing to related behavioral health issues, including post-traumatic stress, mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. The purpose of this article is to understand the existing state of the literature through a scoping review on correctional-based programs that address both trauma and behavioral health. Methods: Proquest and EBSCO databases were searched to identify studies focused on trauma and behavioral health that focused on incarcerated adults in the United States. Results: A total of 25 studies evaluating correctional-based programming on trauma and behavioral health problems. Most included studies reported improvement of behavioral health symptoms as a result of the intervention. Discussion: The findings indicated a need for additional research on behavioral health interventions for incarcerated adults with a history of trauma. Specifically, future research should focus on increasing the methodological rigor of intervention studies and expanding the diversity of included samples.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-01T07:17:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231189177
       
  • Preventing Depressive Symptoms in Chinese Adolescents: A Pilot Cluster
           Randomized Controlled Trial

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      Authors: Xinfeng Tang, Siming Jia, Xiaoyu Zhuang, Daniel Fu Keung Wong
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Depressive symptoms are prevalent among Chinese adolescents. However, there is a lack of effective prevention programs to reduce depressive symptoms. Methods: A pilot cluster randomized controlled trial was implemented in a sample of senior secondary school adolescents. Participants in the intervention group (N = 148) received a 6-week universal prevention course, whereas the control group (N = 131) received a routine course focusing on career development. Results: The linear mixed models showed that the group × time interaction was significant for depressive symptoms measured by DASS-21 (F(2, 550) = 5.72, p = .003) and marginally significant for that measured by SMFQ (F(2, 549) = 2.41, p = .09). Likewise, the level of anxiety and stress were significantly reduced after the program, but not maintained in the follow-up. Conclusions: This pilot study showed that a universal prevention program is promising in reducing adolescent depressive symptoms.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-19T06:32:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231189179
       
  • Is Social Work Research in Crisis'

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      Authors: Daniel J. Dunleavy, Jeffrey R. Lacasse
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, the veracity of scientific findings has come under intense scrutiny in what has been called the “replication crisis.” This crisis is marked by the propagation of scientific claims which were subsequently contested, found to be exaggerated, or deemed false. This article describes the replication crisis and identifies examples of unreproducible results and irreplicable findings from across the biomedical and social sciences. Purported causes and potential remedies to the crisis are examined. It is argued that social work research suffers from the many analytic and methodological vices described here and that the profession is likely in crisis itself. Consequences for the discipline, as both a research and practice-based profession, are explored and paths forward are proposed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-18T07:08:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231188684
       
  • Touching the Other’s Life in Turkey: Empathy-Focused Group Work as a
           Randomized Controlled Trial

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      Authors: Yunus Kara, Ayşe Sezen Serpen
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study evaluated the possible effects of empathy-focused group work on the participants, which is designed by bringing together cisgender heterosexual and LGBTQ+ people. Method: The study group of the research consists of 28 people (14 people in each of the experimental and control groups) who receive social service from a municipality in Istanbul, Turkey. The empathy-focused group work lasted 8 weeks, and pretest and posttest measurements were performed using the Affective and Cognitive Measure of Empathy (ACME) Scale and the Social Dominance Orientation Scale. Results: The result of this study showed that the participants were able to experience positive contact experiences in group work with heterogeneous groups, and an increase in the emotional and cognitive empathy levels of the participants and a decrease in their social dominance orientation. Conclusions: Implications for future research and professional practice are discussed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-10T07:52:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231186780
       
  • Data Sharing for Randomized Controlled Trials in Social Work

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      Authors: Ashley A. Edwards, Wilhelmina van Dijk, Stephen J. Tripodi, Sara A. Hart
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Sharing data publicly can provide numerous benefits to the data owner, data user, as well as the social work research community as a whole. Given the time and resources required to collect data in randomized controlled trials, gleaning the maximum amount of information from this data is highly desirable. Data sets considered to be exhausted by the primary research team often have valuable information that can be used by researchers with different research interests or analytic skill sets. Sharing these data allows other researchers to use these data to answer their research questions without duplicating the data collection efforts. Sharing data can also increase attention to the work of the primary research team, with papers with open data receiving more citations than those without public data. Engaging in open science practices such as data sharing can lead research to be seen as more trustworthy and reliable.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-10T02:43:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231186799
       
  • A Scoping Review to Guide Social Work Policy-Practice for Pandemic
           Recovery

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      Authors: Rachelle Ashcroft, Amina Hussain, Simon Lam, Toula Kourgiantakis, Stephanie Begun, Shelley Craig, Susan Cadell, Keith Adamson, Michelle Nelson, Andrea Greenblatt, Frank Sirotich, Benjamin Walsh, Sally Abudiab, Deepy Sur
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The aim of this scoping review is to systematically scope the literature on social work, the COVID-19 pandemic, and health policy. The research question guiding the scoping review is: What are the policy issues emerging during the COVID-19 pandemic that are of importance for social workers working in health and mental health' Method: Scoping review methodology following Arksey and O’Malley's five-stage framework. Results: A final sample of 191 articles were included in the scoping review. The five themes identified are: (a) strengthening social work's capacity to address structural issues in practice, (b) gaps in social work education, (c) need for new and updated standards and guidelines, (d) need for professional clarity and professional supports, and (e) inadequate government response. Conclusions: By strengthening uptake of the policy-practice framework, social work practitioners concurrently address immediate client issues and address upstream factors perpetuating inequities emerging during the pandemic.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T07:04:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231185754
       
  • Comparing an In-Person and Online Continuing Education Intervention to
           Improve Professional Decision-Making: A Mixed Methods Study

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      Authors: Cheryl Regehr, Arija Birze, Michael Palmer, Karen Sewell, Jane Paterson, Dale Kuehl, Barbara Fallon
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This paper compares two iterations (in-person and online) of a multi-stage continuing education program for improving high-risk decision-making among mental health workers. Methods: The mixed-methods study analyzed the following: (1) physiological and psychological arousal during simulated patient interviews; (2) physiological and psychological arousal recorded during real-time decision-making over four months; and (3) thoughts on the process and outcomes of the intervention raised in reflective interviews. Findings: Quantitatively, there were no statistical differences in stress measures between in-person and online simulated interviews or decision-making logs, suggesting they were effective in eliciting reactions commonly found in challenging clinical situations. Qualitatively, participants in both iterations indicated that the intervention caused them to reflect on practice, consider a wider range of factors related to the decisions, and enact approaches to improve decision-making. Conclusions: A carefully constructed online continuing education experience can result in outcomes for experienced social workers that are equivalent to an in-person iteration.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-30T06:06:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231185534
       
  • Layperson-Supported Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for
           Depression Among Older Adults

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      Authors: Xiaoling Xiang, Jay Kayser, Skyla Turner, Chuxuan Zheng
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study explores the feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcomes of Empower@Home, a digital cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for geriatric depression.MethodParticipants with depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 ≥ 5) underwent a nine-session remote intervention supported by a lay coach (N = 103).ResultsMost participants (91%) completed all nine sessions (mean = 8.5). According to the Treatment Evaluation Inventory, participant attitudes toward the program were largely positive. A medium effect in depression reduction was observed following the intervention (Cohen's d = 0.75) and at a 10-week follow-up (Cohen's d = 0.60). This reduction was large (Cohen's d = 1.31 at posttest and Cohen's d = 1.18 at 10-week follow-up) among those who presented with moderate depression at baseline (PHQ-9 ≥ 10). Significant improvements were also reported in anxiety, social isolation, loneliness, and behavioral activation.DiscussionEmpower@Home is a promising, acceptable digital mental health intervention for treating depression in older adults.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-26T07:50:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231184143
       
  • Reducing College Student's Stigma Toward People With Schizophrenia: A
           Pilot Trial

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      Authors: SiYu Gao, Siu-Man Ng
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: A new 1-day intervention grounded on the inter-group contact theory was developed and implemented to reduce college students’ stigma toward people with schizophrenia (PWS). We hypothesized that the stigmatizing situation could be alleviated by different levels of contact. Method: A pilot trial was conducted in Hong Kong with 41 college students participating in the intervention. Participants’ perception, stigmatizing attitudes, and social distance toward PWS were measured pre-, post, and 1-month after the intervention. Results: Significant changes were found in all outcome variables with moderate to high effect sizes. Knowledge session without direct contact contributed most to participants’ knowledge improvement, and higher levels of contact led to an obvious improvement in stigmatizing attitudes and social distance changes. Discussion:The current study provided evidence supporting the efficacy of the new intervention based on inter-group contact theory and practical experience for future stigma research.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-26T07:49:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231184142
       
  • Assessing Shared Trauma Among Master of Social Work Students: A Validation
           Study

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      Authors: Lisa A. Henshaw, Hanni B. Flaherty, Charles Auerbach, Nancy L. Beckerman
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study reports on the validation of the COVID-19 Quality of Professional Practice Survey (C19QPPS) among Master of Social Work (MSW) students in field training. Method: The C19QPPS measures the unique construct of shared trauma among social work practitioners related to COVID-19 but has yet to be validated with any population. To determine validity, data were collected from 145 graduate students and a model-generating form of structural equation modeling was employed. Results: The priori theory of three shared traumatic stress factors, Technique, Growth, and Trauma were confirmed. The best-fitting model consisted of three factors with acceptable fit statistics (χ2  =  66.45, p  =  .00; RMSEA  =  0.07, 90% CI [0.04, 0.10]; CFI  =  0.95; TLI  =  0.93). Discussion: Results validated the C19QPPS for evaluating MSW students’ shared trauma related to COVID-19. The findings support utilizing the C19QPPS to evaluate shared trauma among professional social workers.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-26T07:48:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231183442
       
  • Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Interventions to Improve Children's
           Social Information-Processing Skills

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      Authors: Jin Peng, Jiyue Li, Danyi Li, Yihua Fang, Chi Zhang, Mark W. Fraser, Shenyang Guo
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of intervention research studies focused on strengthening the social information-processing (SIP) skills of children. Methods: A systematic search and review process was employed to identify, screen, and summarize research on SIP-guided interventions. Results: The search recovered 183,184 citations published from 1997 to 2022. After screening, 42 articles were retained for a full-text review. Findings from the 15 studies using more rigorous designs [i.e., 8 individual-level randomized control trials (RCTs), 5 cluster-level RCTs, and 2 quasi-experimental studies with statistical controls for selectivity] suggest that SIP-focused interventions produced statistically significant treatment effects on cognitive skills, with mean effect sizes of 0.35 on encoding, 0.13 on hostile attribution bias, 0.13 on goal formulation, 0.16 on response decision, and—more behaviorally—0.37 on aggressive and disruptive comportment. Conclusions: SIP-focused interventions are effective. If widely implemented, they hold the potential to reduce aggressive behavior in childhood.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-23T10:54:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231182449
       
  • Corrigendum to Blueprint for Social Work Blended Learning Curriculum in
           the Chinese Context

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      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-21T06:30:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231183556
       
  • Development of a Measure of Child Welfare Practice Excellence

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      Authors: Sarah Dow-Fleisner, Megan Stager, Nina Gregoire, Kyler Woodmass, Jeffrey W. More, Susan J. Wells
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Many elements contribute to practice excellence within child welfare services, yet there are limited measures available to assess these elements. This article describes the process of developing and pilot-testing a measure of child welfare practice excellence. Method: The Elements of Child Welfare Practice (ECWP) measure was developed following an extensive literature review, with input from child welfare research experts and an anti-colonial practitioner. The ECWP was part of a comprehensive online survey administered during site visits with three Indigenous child welfare agencies in Canada. Results: Polychoric correlations and ordinal alpha revealed the ECWP had strong internal consistency and convergent validity. The ECWP had three subscales related to the importance and delivery of practice elements, and workers’ perception of their practice. Conclusions: This measure showed the potential to be useful in assessing the degree to which child welfare workers intend to and actually engage in elements associated with practice excellence.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-08T06:41:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231180296
       
  • Poverty Indicators in the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System
           Child File: Challenges and Opportunities

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      Authors: Dylan Jones, Brett Drake, Hyunil Kim, Jun-Hong Chen, Sarah Font, Emily Putnam-Hornstein, Richard P. Barth, Tzu-Hsin Huang, Melissa Jonson-Reid
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS) Child File, the only national dataset cataloging child maltreatment reports. It includes variables representing economic distress frequently used in published research. At the national level, these variables are demonstrably implausible, substantially underestimating economic distress. Method: This paper reviews recent work using these variables, analyzes the NCANDS data directly, demonstrates why the economic variables in NCANDS are unusable at a national level, and provides recommendations for incorporating economic measures using NCANDS. Results: We find 19 articles that have used these variables within the past 10 years. Most states provide implausible estimates. Economic measures can be incorporated into NCANDS data by either subsetting to s states with plausible estimates of these variables in given years, or appending county-level economic Census data. Discussion: Without addressing these variables’ issues in plausibility, use of them will yield biased estimates.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T07:15:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231179658
       
  • Who Benefits More From IBMS or Qigong' Clinical Data-Mining RCT Data

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      Authors: S.M. Ng, M.H.Y. Fung, M.X.C. Yin, C.L.W. Chan, I. Epstein
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: A recent three-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) with depressed Hong Kong adults demonstrated the comparable effectiveness of integrative Body-Mind-Spirt (IBMS) and Qigong interventions in relieving sleep disturbance and depression, but not which is best for whom' Guided by concept and theory-based hypotheses, clinical data-mining (CDM), the RCT data answers the more clinically relevant question: who responds best to which intervention' Method: Paired-sample t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-ranked tests were adopted to compare the within-subgroup differences; linear mixed models for normally distributed outcomes and generalized linear mixed models for non-normally distributed outcomes were used to compare the between-subgroup differences. Results: Results indicate that IBMS is more efficacious for older, more educated females, suffering from physical pain and illness; whereas younger, less educated males, not in full-time employment benefit more from Qigong. Discussion: This productive joining together of RCT and CDM recommends itself to both past and future RCTs, further informing evidence-based practice decision making.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-01T05:13:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231175368
       
  • A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of a Multicomponent Positive
           Psychological Intervention: The Potential Mechanism of Altruism

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      Authors: Jinghan Hu, He Bu, Iris Kam Fung Liu, Nancy Xiaonan Yu
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Although multicomponent positive psychological interventions (MPPIs) effectively improve well-being, it is crucial to examine which intervention component plays a critical role. Method: This cluster randomized controlled trial assigned 221 immigrants from mainland China to Hong Kong to either an MPPI arm (n  =  116, 11 clusters) or an MPPI  +  Information arm (n  =  105, 11 clusters). Both arms aimed to enhance three intervention outcomes: resilience, happiness, and mental health. The MPPI part in the two arms included four components: self-efficacy, positive thinking, altruism, and goal setting. The information part provided information about Hong Kong. Results: Both arms effectively improved the four intervention components and three intervention outcomes. MPPI  +  Information increased the immigrants’ knowledge of Hong Kong. The network analysis showed that altruism had the greatest strength in the network. Conclusions: Future studies should focus on the specific intervention component of altruism to understand how the MPPI works.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-31T05:47:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231179097
       
  • Interventions for Adolescent Suicide Ideation and Suicide Attempts in
           Latin America and Spain: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Catalina Cañizares, Mark J. Macgowan
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Adolescents are particularly vulnerable to suicide attempts, which is a major risk factor for completed suicide in this age group. However, most research on suicide prevention interventions comes from high-income countries with predominantly white participants and English protocols. This study examines interventions that have been tested in Latin America and Spain. Methods: A systematic review was conducted to include interventions aimed at reducing suicide ideation, attempts, and increasing knowledge about it in these regions. Results: Sixteen articles were selected, and Dialectical Behaviour Therapy, Problem Solving Therapy, and Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioural Therapy were found to be more effective than standard treatments or wait-list conditions in reducing the outcomes. Discussion: This review highlights the need for more research on preventive interventions in Latin America and Spain. While all interventions evaluated were effective, further research and replication studies are necessary to strengthen the evidence base for these interventions.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-31T05:46:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231178462
       
  • The Effects of Tax-Time Interventions on Savings Rate and Amount: A
           Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Julie Birkenmaier, Youngmi Kim, Brandy R. Maynard, Terri Pigott
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This systematic review examined the effects of tax-time saving interventions that promote saving with tax refunds from relevant experimental or quasi-experimental studies of interventions aimed toward low- and moderate-income adults delivered when filing U.S. income taxes. Method: A systematic review process was used to search for published and unpublished studies from sources through September 2021. Two reviewers screened studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias, and effects on savings rate and amount were synthesized using robust variance estimation. Results: This review included 14 unique studies. Five studies reporting 13 effect sizes for savings amount found a small, statistically significant effect (d  =  0.06, 95% CI [0.05, 0.08]). Nine studies reporting 35 effect sizes found no statistically significant effect for savings rate (LOR =  4.11, 95% CI [0.42, 40.44]). Discussion: Results suggest some evidence that tax-time savings can be a relatively simple method for increasing the amount low- to moderate-income adults save.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T08:13:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231173380
       
  • Feasibility and Acceptability of Parenting for Lifelong Health Program in
           Mainland China

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      Authors: Weiwei Wang, Shiqin Liu, Yuzhu Liang, Jamie M. Lachman, Zuyi Fang, Huiping Zhang
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Parenting for Lifelong Health for Young Children (PLH-YC) is a program to prevent child maltreatment. This study aimed to examine the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary effects of the adapted program for Chinese parents. Methods: A pre–post single-arm pilot trial was conducted with 21 Chinese parents. A mixed-method design was utilized to collect questionnaire-based quantitative data and qualitative data of interviews and focus group discussions. Results: Program implementation was feasible, with overall high recruitment, enrollment, attendance, acceptability and fidelity. Quantitative results demonstrated reductions in general child maltreatment, physical and emotional abuse, child behavioral problems, and improvements in positive parenting. Thematic analyses identified reduced violent discipline, psychological aggression, and child behavioral problems, strengthened parent–child bonds, increased parenting confidence, and decreased family conflict. Conclusion: The adapted PLH-YC program for Chinese parents has shown good feasibility and acceptability, and exhibited a significant association with reduced child maltreatment. Further randomized controlled trials are required.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-10T05:41:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231174395
       
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression Among Chinese Diabetes
           Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Zhan Yu, Qiuling An, Jaclynn Hawkins, Anao Zhang
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for Chinese diabetic patients suffering from depression. Method: Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, we researched seven electronic databases and two professional websites. Publication bias was assessed using funnel plot. Meta-analysis was conducted using meta-regression with robust variance estimation. Results: Final analysis included a total of 23 controlled trials containing 201 effect size estimates (including 5025 participants). Subgroup analyses indicated significant treatment effects for (1) depression outcomes, anxiety outcomes, psychological stress/distress outcomes, physiological outcomes, and general wellness outcomes, (2) studies with/without manuals, (3) studies using individual-based/group-based CBT, (4) studies in person/assisted with technology, and (5) studies providers with/without training. The treatment outcomes and intervention composition (CBT only versus CBT plus other approaches) were significant moderators. Conclusions: Findings of the study suggested CBT is a promising treatment option for depression among Chinese diabetes patients.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-03T05:57:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231171374
       
  • Solution-Focused Brief Therapy in Community-Based Services: A
           Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Studies

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      Authors: Cynthia Franklin, Xiao Ding, Johnny Kim, Anao Zhang, Audrey Hang Hai, Kristian Jones, Melissa Nachbaur, Ashley O’Connor
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) is practiced by social workers in clinical, community-based services, but no reviews of the outcome research have been completed. Methods: A meta-analysis of randomized studies. Outcome domains included depression, anxiety, behavioral health, health and wellbeing, family functioning, and psychosocial adjustment. Results: Twenty-eight studies with 340 effect sizes were analyzed in meta-regression with robust variation estimation (RVE). Overall, statistically significant and medium treatment effect sizes were found across outcome domains, g = 0.654, 95% CI: 0.386–0.922, p 
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2023-04-21T06:13:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315231162611
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
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Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Third World Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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