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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 224 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 280)
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 141)
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 112)
Violence and Victims     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Asian Journal of Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Work With Groups     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Work and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Groupwork     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access  
Tidsskriftet Norges Barnevern     Full-text available via subscription  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for omsorgsforskning     Open Access  
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Socialinė teorija, empirija, politika ir praktika     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Bakti Budaya     Open Access  
Voces desde el Trabajo Social     Open Access  
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access  
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
Volunteer Management Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Work / Maatskaplike Werk     Open Access  
Argumentum     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
Trabajo Social Global - Global Social Work     Open Access  
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Tempo Social     Open Access  

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Research on Social Work Practice
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.883
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 29  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1049-7315 - ISSN (Online) 1552-7581
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Impact of Moderating Demographic Variables on a Health Intervention for
           People with Serious Mental Illness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Leopoldo J. Cabassa, Ana Stefancic, Jun-Hong Chen, Michael Park, Daniela Tuda, Mark R. Hawes, Shenyang Guo
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Healthy lifestyle interventions can improve the health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). Little is known whether demographic variables moderate the effectiveness of these interventions on health outcomes. Method: Data from an effectiveness trial of a peer-led healthy lifestyle intervention (PGLB) for people with SMI examine whether age, racial/ethnic minoritized status, and gender moderated the effectiveness of PGLB compared to usual care (UC) in achieving clinically significant improvements in weight, cardiorespiratory fitness, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduction. Results: Compared to UC, PGLB was most beneficial for participants age 49 and younger for achieving clinically significant weight loss and for racial/ethnic minoritized communities for achieving clinically significant weight loss and reductions in CVD risk. Conclusions: These findings suggest the impact of healthy lifestyle interventions for people with SMI may not be uniform and adaptations may be needed to make these interventions responsive to the needs of diverse populations.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T03:27:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221102403
       
  • Psychometric Properties of a European French Version of the PTGI

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Charlotte Henson, Didier Truchot, Amy Canevello, Marie Andela
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeTo validate a European French translation of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI).MethodsThis study examined the factorial and the convergent validity of the French version of the PTGI (PTGI-F). A first sample of 406 firefighters was used to test the psychometric structure of the PTGI. A second sample of 210 first responders was then used to test its convergent validity. Participants completed measures of growth, traumatic events, PTSD, anxiety and depression, and personality.ResultsThe PTGI-F was unrelated to Anxiety, supporting the convergent validity of the PTGI-F. Additionally, there was a positive correlation between the PTGI-F and the PCL-C. Finally, the PTGI-F had the same five-factor structure as the PTGI.DiscussionThe PTGI-F appears to be a valid tool. However, the contradictions that were put froward by other translated versions suggest that the PTGI should be reconsidered and improved to better assess the growth process.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T09:17:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221101906
       
  • Book Review: Program Development Grantwriting & Implementation: From
           Advocacy to Outcomes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hanni B. Flaherty
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-15T02:23:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221101903
       
  • Research to Consider while Effectively Re-Designing Child Welfare
           Services: A Response to Commentaries

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jill Duerr Berrick, Brett Drake, Richard P. Barth, Antonio R. Garcia, Melissa Jonson-Reid, John R. Gyourko, Johanna K. P. Greeson
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Barth et al. (2021) published an article in this journal identifying ten topics in the field of child welfare that are frequently discussed among professionals, advocates, and researchers in an effort to shape discussions of practice and policy reform. Concerned that these discussions are often poorly informed by the research evidence, Barth et al. intended to offer a corrective to these common, erroneous narratives. The Editor-in-Chief, Bruce Thyer, asked for suggestions for commentators and then invited some number of respondents to offer their perspectives on the original article. Here, we respond to each of the submitted papers, highlighting areas of agreement, and addressing other topics where we—sometimes sharply—disagree. We welcome an ongoing, fact-based, respectful dialogue to help shape child welfare reform. Efforts to improve the child welfare system are urgently needed; we stand by our view that large-scale practice and policy reform, in particular, must be guided by the best available research evidence.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-14T09:39:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221095497
       
  • Evaluating the Psychometric Properties of a Proposed Farsi Version of the
           Interpersonal Reactivity Index Using Item Response Theory

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      Authors: Parvaneh Yaghoubi Jami, Stefanie A. Wind
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Although researchers have examined empathy among many populations worldwide, investigations of empathy among Farsi-speakers are limited. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) for Farsi-speakers (IRI-Farsi). Methods: After translating, we explored psychometric properties of the IRI-Farsi with exploratory factor analysis and item response theory using a sample of Iranians (N = 517). Results: The IRI-Farsi appeared to exhibit a four-factor structure and acceptable item properties within each subscale. Moreover, the IRI-Farsi rating scale categories were generally ordered and distinct with emotion-triggering items as easier to endorse compared to more complex cognitively aroused statements. Conclusions: Results support using the IRI to measure dispositional empathy in mainland Iran. Social work researchers can use these results to inform research and practice related to empathy in this population and design more effective interventions to increase awareness of empathic feelings and understanding for practitioners and clients.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T11:58:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221089322
       
  • Adverse and protective childhood experiences: A developmental perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Edward Cohen
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T06:40:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221101929
       
  • Parallel Parent–Child Mindfulness Intervention Among Chinese Migrant
           Families: A Mixed-Methods Feasibility Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shuang Lu, Renhui Lyu, Hui Hu, Kristy K. M. Ho, Tom J. Barry, David Black, Daniel F. K. Wong
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study examines the feasibility and effects of a parallel parent–child mindfulness intervention on parenting stress, child behavior, and parent–child relationship among low-income migrant families.MethodsUsing a quasi-experimental design, 21 Chinese migrant parents and one child of each parent were assigned to an 8-week intervention (n = 11 pairs) or waitlist control (n = 10 pairs). Semi-structured qualitative interviews and pre–post quantitative measures were used to assess intervention feasibility and effects.ResultsQualitative interviews suggest mindfulness training promotes family well-being through enhanced parental and child emotional regulation. Quantitative results suggest within-group parenting stress significantly decreased in the intervention group (partial η2 = .423) but not in controls (partial η2 = .000); between-group analyses showed a nonsignificant, medium effect size on parenting stress (partial η2 = .069).ConclusionsThe intervention shows good feasibility and initial support for reducing parenting stress. Future research requires a larger randomized controlled trial among high-stress populations such as migrant families.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T12:59:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221089684
       
  • Pre- and Post-Conception Relationship Duration and Parental Involvement
           Satisfaction among Noncustodial African American Fathers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Leon Banks, Gerry L. White, Junior Lloyd Allen, Kimberly Y. Huggins-Hoyt, Harold E. Briggs, Tony B. Lowe
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines how parental involvement satisfaction (PIS) in terms of accessibility, engagement, and responsibility (A-E-R) among of noncustodial African American fathers (NCAAFs) may be explained by the pre- and post-conception relationship durations they have with their children’s mothers, controlling for quality of communication satisfaction (QCS) with the mothers. Method: A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was performed with a sample size of N=163 NCAAFS who were surveyed participants in the Parenting Time Visitation Program (PTVP) in Atlanta and Savannah, Georgia communities. Results: There no significant relationships found between pre/post-conception relationship durations and PIS in terms of A-E-R, even when controlling for QCS. Correlational and crosstabulation analyses did reveal some interesting patterns of note. Discussion: This study extends the literature on noncustodial father involvement with their children and provides valuable insight to co-parenting studies.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:31:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221093542
       
  • Custodial and Noncustodial Parent Predictors of Noncustodial Father
           Involvement

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gerry L. White, Harold E. Briggs, Leon Banks, Junior Lloyd Allen, Tony B. Lowe
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study theorizes the interrelationship between African American noncustodial father’s (NCF) (a) income, (b) child support payment (CSP), (c) satisfaction with custodial parent (CP) communication, and (d) satisfaction with the way the CP is raising his child as predictors of father’s involvement. Method: Regression models were tested along a hypothesized framework to determine direct and indirect influences to NCF’s involvement. Results: Based on regression results, new direct and indirect relationships were identified. Discussion: These findings suggest healthier communication, and timely child support payments are critical to NCF’s satisfaction with involvement as well as his views toward the CP.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T05:19:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221089686
       
  • Independent Living Coordinators’ Effects on Intangible Domains in an
           Independent Living Program

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura L. Nathans, Lori J. Chaffers
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study involved an evaluation of the role of the Independent Living Coordinator (ILC) in a. Email multi-domain Independent Living program (ILP). It focused on the intangible domains of health/mental health, support, and prevention.MethodOne hundred and nineteen ILP plans from 97 foster youth were coded to determine which goals were achieved for foster youth between the ages of 14 and 21. Quotations from case notes and IL plans were selected to illustrate the role of the ILC.ResultsResults demonstrated that ILCs were effective in achieving goals regarding mental health counseling and medication management and practical support for finances and transportation. ILCs struggled to promote peer support, romantic relationships, and use of birth control.DiscussionILCs play roles in supporting foster youths’ transition into adulthood. ILCs were successful based on the types of goals, their understanding of developmental needs, and access to resources. Future research should involve randomized control trial evaluations.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T02:09:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221091520
       
  • Book Review: Welfare State 3.0: Social Policy After the Pandemic

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      Authors: William M. Epstein
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T08:31:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221091215
       
  • A Response to Barth et al. From the Perspective of a Child Protective
           Services Worker

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Brie Southall
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T03:07:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221095500
       
  • Extended Case Management Services Among Resettled Refugees in the United
           States

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      Authors: Stacey A. Shaw, Graeme Rodgers, Patrick Poulin, Jessica Robinson
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeEconomic self-sufficiency is the priority of U.S. refugee resettlement policy, and opportunities for economic integration are shaped by social service contexts. While reception and placement services are typically provided for 3–8 months, extended case management (ECM) involves 2 years of services. This study examines associations between economic integration outcomes—employment, income source, income, and employment satisfaction—and exposure to ECM.MethodWe compare 243 resettled refugees, including those resettled in Salt Lake City, Utah who received ECM and those resettled in Tucson, Arizona without ECM.ResultsParticipants at both sites experienced increased employment and income over time. Participants in Salt Lake City initially experienced higher rates of employment, income, and employment satisfaction than those in Tucson. Employment satisfaction increased more rapidly in Salt Lake City. Being female and older age were also associated with poorer outcomes.DiscussionFindings point to the benefits of ECM services in promoting economic integration.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T05:08:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221085014
       
  • Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing to Reduce Post-Traumatic
           Stress Disorder and Related Symptoms among Forcibly Displaced People: A
           Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mark J. Macgowan, Mitra Naseh, Maryam Rafieifar
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study is a meta-analysis on the efficacy of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) in reducing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and co-occurring depression, and anxiety symptoms among forcibly displaced people. Methods: A search was followed by data extraction and assessment of risk of bias. Within- and between-conditions effect sizes of posttest and follow-up outcomes using a random effects model were examined, with heterogeneity and subgroup analyses. Results: Twenty-two studies (N = 1964) were included and seventeen (N = 1652) had complete data for the meta-analysis. There were medium to large effect size reductions on PTSD, depression, and anxiety within-conditions. EMDR was more effective than other conditions at posttest for PTSD symptoms but outcomes for the posttests and follow-ups for depression and anxiety were inconclusive. Discussion: EMDR effectively reduced PTSD symptoms, depression, and anxiety among forcibly displaced people. More studies with larger samples and better designs are needed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T01:30:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221082223
       
  • Virtual Support and Intimate Partner Violence Services: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Stephanie L. Baird, Sarah Tarshis, Catherine Messenger, Michaeline Falla
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This article reports on a scoping review that maps the empirical research on virtual intimate partner violence (IPV) interventions. Method: Following the Joanna Briggs Institute’s nine-step scoping review methodology, 25 studies were selected. Results: The majority of the studies (72%) were published in the United States, and included quantitative (56%), mixed methods (24%), and qualitative study designs (20%). The most frequent focus of the virtual interventions to support survivors of IPV included safety (52%), with other interventions focusing mainly on treatment (36%), and education and prevention (12%). Forms of interventions included interactive, internet-based (72%), smartphone apps (16%), live videoconferencing (8%), and an asynchronous chatroom (4%). Barriers and strengths of virtual IPV interventions are identified. Discussion: From this analysis, emerging models in virtual IPV intervention are identified, as well as next steps necessary in virtual IPV practice and research. The article concludes with implications for social work practice and research.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T12:19:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221087232
       
  • Pedagogical Methods of Teaching Social Justice in Social Work: A Scoping
           Review

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      Authors: Eunjung Lee, Toula Kourgiantakis, Ran Hu, Andrea Greenblatt, Judith Logan
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeSocial justice is a foundational social work value, but social work education continues to experience ongoing challenges with how to teach students to embody social justice values. The aim of this scoping review is to map empirical studies on teaching methods that translate social justice value into teachable curricula.Methods: Following Arksey and O’Malley’s scoping review framework, we conducted a rigorous process in which we screened 5953 studies and included a final sample of 35 studies.Results: Our findings identified seven main teaching approaches: intergroup dialogue, online asynchronized discussion board, simulation and role play, group work and presentation, written reflection, community-engaged learning, and social action-oriented learning. In terms of competency development, most of the studies focused on awareness and knowledge versus skill-building. Most teaching methods emphasized students’ affective experiences during the social justice learning activities.Discussion: Challenges, lessons learned, and future recommendations of each teaching method are presented.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T05:15:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221085666
       
  • An Instrumental Variable Approach for Head Start Attendance on Low Income
           Children

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      Authors: Kyunghee Lee, Ryota Nakamura, Kristin Rispoli, Mackenzie Norman
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study examined (1) the causal impact of Head Start on children’s comprehensive outcomes and (2) why families did not comply to the original assignment. Method: Based on the Head Start Impact Study data, children between the ages of 3 and 4 years (N = 3780) were examined for assignment, attendance, and causal impacts on outcomes. Results: Effect of instrumental variable analysis was greater than that of assignment and attendance for measured outcomes. Assignment to the Head Start, older child age (age 4 over age 3), urban residence, and higher family income were associated with non-compliance. Inclusion of care quality into the model illustrated important nuances in predicting families’ compliance with Head Start versus control condition. Discussion: Head Start participation among low income children should be maintained for its positive causal effects on children. Quality of childcare as well as several child and family barriers to access to Head Start needs to be addressed to enhance Head Start enrollment.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T05:40:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221087231
       
  • The Teaching and Learning of Communication Skills in Social Work Education

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      Authors: Emma Reith-Hall, Paul Montgomery
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis article presents a systematic review of research into the teaching and learning of communication skills in social work education.MethodsWe conducted a systematic review, adhering to the Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews for Interventions and PRISMA reporting guidelines for systematic reviews and meta-analyses.ResultsSixteen records reporting on fifteen studies met the eligibility criteria. Studies consisted of randomised trials and quasi-experimental designs. Outcome measures included knowledge, attitudes and skills. Significant heterogeneity meant a narrative synthesis rather than meta-analysis was undertaken. Systematic communication skills training supports the development of students’ communication skills including the demonstration of expressed empathy and interviewing skills.DiscussionThe existing body of literature is limited but promising. Researchers conducting studies into communication skills training should seek to carry out robust and rigorous outcomes-focused studies. Further investigation into the theoretical underpinnings of the educational interventions and the roles played by key stakeholders is also required.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T04:23:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221088285
       
  • Feasibility of Self-Guided Online Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for
           University Students During COVID-19

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      Authors: Daniel K. W. Young, Per Carlbring, Petrus Y. N. Ng, Qi-rong J. Chen
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: This study aimed to test the feasibility and efficacy of a self-guided online cognitive behaviour therapy (iCBT) for university students in Hong Kong during COVID-19. Method: One group pre-post-test design with convenient sampling was adopted in this study, involving 84 university students who received a newly developed iCBT within an 8 week intervention period. The iCBT offered eight online modules for students to learn the skills of CBT at home through an online platform which was accessible any time anywhere anonymously with technical support only. Standardized assessment tools were used for outcomes assessment at the pre- and post-intervention periods. Results: Three quarters of participants completed all iCBT modules. The results of paired t-tests showed that, after completing the iCBT, participants showed reduction in anxiety, depression, and perceived stress. Conclusion: This study provides preliminary evidences to support the feasibility and efficacy of the self-guided iCBT for university students during COVID-19.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T04:01:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221087904
       
  • Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory Assessments as Predictors
           of Behavioral Change in Multisystemic Therapy and Functional Family
           Therapy in Norway

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      Authors: Silje Hukkelberg, Terje Ogden, Dagfinn Mørkrid Thøgersen
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Multisystemic Therapy (MST) and Functional Family Therapy (FFT) are evidence-based Blueprint programs shown to be effective towards youth problem behaviors. Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate treatment outcomes following MST and FFT among Norwegian youths with serious behavior problems. Research design: Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) data of the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory at intake and post-test was used along with measures of five national treatment goals. Study sample: The study is based on two samples of youths assigned to MST (n = 2018) and FFT (n = 453). Analysis: Data were analyzed separately for MST and FFT, to explore changes during treatment and accomplishment of the treatment goals. Results: At intake youths in MST showed a significant higher level of risk factors compared to those referred to FFT. Significant reductions in risk factors and behavioral problems were evident for both interventions. Follow-up results demonstrated sustained reductions of problem behaviors. Conclusion: Both treatments decrease risk factors and increase the completion of outcome goals. Implications of the results are discussed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T04:33:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221086641
       
  • Inclusive Practice for Children with Special Education Needs: Training for
           Social Workers

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      Authors: Janet T.Y. Leung, Daisy C.S. Yew, Karen Y.K. Kwok, Lydia M.H. Kwok, Vincent W.T. Chua
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe study evaluated the effectiveness of a training program for social workers to reduce their negative perceptions on children with special education needs (SEN), enhance their self-efficacy for inclusive practice, and promote their competencies in helping these children in Hong Kong.MethodA prospective quasi-experimental design was adopted in the evaluation, with 58 social workers (74% females) joining the program (the intervention group) and 39 (56.4% females) who did not join the program (the control group).ResultsParticipants of the intervention group showed a significant decrease in negative perceptions towards children with SEN and an increase of self-efficacy for inclusive practice and competencies after participating in the program when compared with the control group.DiscussionThe study provides encouraging evidence on the effectiveness of a training program for promoting social workers’ self-efficacy and competencies for inclusive practice, which is essential for social work intervention for children with SEN.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-16T07:25:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221083705
       
  • Validation of Chinese Version Emotional Labor Scale for Social Workers in
           Mainland China

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      Authors: Miao Wang, Fan Wu, Peilun Wu, Ning Wang
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Social work practice needs emotional labor input, the level of which is related to job satisfaction, and well-being. The aim of this study was to validate the Chinese version of the Emotional Labor Scale (ELS) for social workers in Mainland, China. Method: Using a quota sampling method, 476 social workers in Mainland China were selected, and the reliability, and validity of the translated ELS was tested. Results: Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis revealed a six-factor structure, which was consistent with the original scale. The Chinese version of ELS was indicated to have good factorial validity (KMO = 0.75, Bartlett’s test of sphericity: χ2 = 882.65, df = 91, p < 0.001) and reliability (Cronbach’s α = 0.69). Conclusions: The validated Chinese version of ELS was applicable in future assessments of emotional labor of social workers in recruitment, training and supervision work in Mainland China. Cutoff scores were also suggested.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T09:49:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221082551
       
  • Interventions Designed to Improve Financial Capability: A Systematic
           Review

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      Authors: Julie Birkenmaier, Brandy Maynard, Youngmi Kim
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study’s aim is to review and synthesize the scientific evidence for financial capability interventions that combine financial education and financial products and services to affect financial behavior. Method: A systematic review process was used to search for, screen, and extract data from relevant studies. Following descriptive analysis, we calculated effect sizes. Results: After excluding duplicates, non-relevant and ineligible reports, this review included 24 unique studies. This review identified several different types of previously evaluated financial capability interventions. Few interventions were evaluated by more than one study that measured the same or similar outcomes. Therefore, evidence is sparse about whether financial capability interventions improved participants’ financial behaviors and/or outcomes. Conclusion: While each type of financial capability intervention has a unique evidence base, this lack of evidence across financial capability interventions points to the need to develop a more definitive evidence base for financial capability interventions about the financial outcomes.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T06:09:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221080127
       
  • Connecting Practice Research With the Process of Theorizing

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      Authors: Michael J. Austin, Bowen McBeath
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In this analysis, we contend that theorizing strengthens the connections between practice and research by requiring researchers to check their working assumptions, premises, conclusions, and implications for research, theory, and practice. Our exploration of the process of theorizing in practice research is rooted in the concept of “sensemaking” (Weick, 1995) whereby practice researchers engage in disciplined imagination by reflecting on diverse forms of evidence, being attentive to specific practices and problems, and moving between intuition and reasoned explanation. The analysis includes the following components: 1) tools for theorizing from research findings (abductive analysis and problematization), 2) processes for theorizing about practice research findings (focusing on practice, researcher repertoire, and theory development processes), 3) an example of theorizing from key findings, and 4) the construction of interventive theory. It concludes with implications for social work practice research.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T12:29:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221078961
       
  • Redesigning State Intervention on Behalf of “Neglected”
           Children

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      Authors: Michael S. Wald
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T10:06:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221080934
       
  • Pursuing Common Ground Instead of Specious Misconceptions: Response to
           Barth and Colleagues

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      Authors: William Cabin
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article is a reaction paper to the article in this issue of Research on Social Work Practice entitled Research to Consider While Effectively Redesigning Child Welfare Services by Richard P. Barth and colleagues. As such, it addresses two significant questions about the article. One question is: What are the methodological limitations' The second question is: What are the implications on the methodological limitations'
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T07:39:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221077630
       
  • Reflections on the Use of Evidence in Child Welfare: A Commentary on Barth
           et al

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      Authors: Sarah A. Font
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      To create a child welfare system that meets the needs of abused and neglected children, it is essential to critically evaluate core claims and assumptions about how the current child welfare system operates and its impacts on children and families. Yet, misleading and false claims are frequently repeated in academic, professional, and media outlets. Barth and colleagues (2021) sought to name and evaluate some of these claims, reasserting the central role of research evidence in policy and practice debates. In this commentary, I argue that a commitment to “consider the evidence” may do little to improve the quality of policies or practices in the child welfare system. Rather, I assert that because research findings are commonly mischaracterized and overgeneralized, we are left with widespread disagreement about what to conclude from existing research and how certain those conclusions are.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T05:05:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221079283
       
  • Interventions to Improve Outcomes of Grandchildren Raised by Grandparents:
           A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Yanfeng Xu, Sarah Pace, Lauren P. McCarthy, Theresa M. Harrison, Yao Wang
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This systematic review aims to examine the effectiveness of interventions that seek to improve outcomes of grandchildren raised by grandparents. Method: A systematic review following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines was undertaken. We searched in Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), Family Studies Abstracts, PubMed, PsycINFO, Social Work Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Results indicated that grandchildren who participated in these interventions had improvement in their socio-emotional, mental, and behavioral outcomes but had mixed educational outcomes, regardless of research designs and evaluation methods. Two out of eight studies were of high quality, while the rest needed improved rigor in designs and analyses. Conclusions: The review summarized evidence for interventions to improve grandchildren’s outcomes and pointed out directions for future research and practice.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T02:12:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221079352
       
  • My Love Affair with Practice-Research: A “Virtue Friendship” Based on
           Methodological Pluralism

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      Authors: Irwin Epstein
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-23T04:41:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221083706
       
  • Trauma-Related Knowledge and Practice Changes among Brokers in a
           Community-Based Learning Collaborative

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      Authors: Funlola Are, Benjamin Saunders, Samuel Peer, Elizabeth Ralston, Rochelle F. Hanson
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Broker professionals serve an important intermediary role in improving service access for youth but are often trained separately from clinicians. Community-Based Learning Collaboratives (CBLCs) include specific training/implementation strategies to foster collaboration and build community capacity for EBPs. Methods: The current study examined changes in trauma-related knowledge, practices, organizational culture, and interprofessional collaboration among 63 brokers. Brokers reported significant positive changes in trauma-related knowledge, practices, organizational culture, and interprofessional collaboration following CBLC participation. Results: Hierarchical regression analyses indicated statistically significant improvements in knowledge of treatment planning/case monitoring (r = .41) and organizational culture (r = .30) as significant predictors of changes in brokers’ use of child trauma evidence-based practices following CBLC participation. Discussion: Findings emphasize tailoring training to include topics and strategies most relevant to participants’ day-to-day responsibilities.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-13T06:39:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211032615
       
  • Findings from a Structured Adaptation Process for the SafeCare Parenting
           Program to Address Family Needs in a Diverse Refugee Community

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      Authors: Shannon Self-Brown, Erin A. Weeks, Elizabeth W. Perry, NaeHyung Lee, Danielle E. S. Rivers, Katherine Reuben, Nikita Rao, Mary Helen O’Connor, Iris Feinberg, Cathleen Willging, Daniel J. Whitaker
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Social workers can promote resiliency among refugee families by referring them to evidence-based programs to reduce the stressors of resettlement. The purpose of this study was to complete a structured adaptation process with the SafeCare® program for implementation in a refugee resettlement community. Participants included 21 members of an adaptation team made up of administrators, supervisors, and family service providers from three community agencies and community health workers. Quantitative findings suggested that content, process, and literacy-related adaptations were necessary to ensure cultural relevance of program materials. Qualitative feedback suggested the adaptation approach was a meaningful process that engaged community members and resulted in an acceptable and feasible curriculum for delivery in the refugee resettlement community, which will be further tested in a forthcoming implementation trial. The multi-pronged, community-engaged approach to SafeCare adaptation is presented as a potential framework for other programs that could benefit refugee children and their families.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T12:06:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221079237
       
  • Telephone-Supported Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for People
           With Depression: Users’ Perspective

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      Authors: Daniel KW YOUNG, Per CARLBRING, Petrus YN NG, Joseph Chen Qi-rong
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundLittle is known from the perspective of service users on the quality and benefits of receiving telephone counseling in a guided Internet-based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (iCBT).PurposeThis study aimed to investigate, from the user’s perspective, the feasibility, quality, and benefits of a telephone-supported iCBT which provided eight self-learned online modules and weekly telephone counseling from a social worker for people with depression.Research designThis study adopted interpretive qualitative research, involving semi-structural in-depth individual interviews with participants.Study samplePurposive sampling method was adopted, involving ten adults receiving a diagnosis of depression and completing the telephone-supported iCBT.Data collection and/or analysisQualitative content analysis was adopted, involving coding data and identifying themes.ResultsThe telephone-supported iCBT was appreciated by service users by offering convenience, efficiency, anonymity, privacy, synchronous and asynchronous support. Additionally, the counselor demonstrated competence in counseling via telephone, and provided various support, including: delivering CBT, handling personal issues outside the scope of iCBT, encouragement, guiding & monitoring learning progress, and solving technical difficulties. Perceived outcomes included improved abilities in cognitive restructuring, emotion regulation, and self-awareness.ConclusionsThe guided iCBT with telephone-supported is a feasible, effective, and preferable intervention for people with depression in Chinese societies.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T11:05:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221079236
       
  • Quasi-Experimental Study Comparing CBT, MBCT, Activity-Based Supportive
           Counselling for Hongkong Delinquent Youth

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      Authors: Daniel Fu Keung Wong, Yves Cho Ho Cheung, Yu-Te Huang, Cherry Hau Lin Tam, Wilson Man Ho Chan, Kenneth Kin Wa Yeung
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This study compared Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), and Activity-based Supportive Counselling (treatment-as-usual; TAU) for reducing delinquency, psychological risk factors, mental health symptoms, and improving the quality of life among at-risk youths in Hong Kong outreaching social services. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, non-custodial youths with delinquency and mental health issues underwent eight sessions of CBT (n = 24), MBCT (n = 30), or TAU (n = 61). Results: Dependent-sample t-test showed CBT reduced mental health symptoms and delinquency. TAU reduced mental health symptoms and improved quality of life. MBCT resulted in no significant change. Time x group ANCOVA underscored TAU in improving quality of life. Hierarchical linear regression showed decreases in delinquency and mental health symptoms mediated by decreases in psychological risk factors. Discussion: Results suggest that outreaching social service agencies in Hong Kong could enhance their intervention by augmenting the sports and leisure activities of TAU with structured CBT programs.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T07:19:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221077651
       
  • The Adapted DUKE-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire in a
           Community Sample of Portuguese Parents

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      Authors: Silvana Martins, Cátia Martins, Ana Almeida, Lara Ayala-Nunes, Andrea Gonçalves, Cristina Nunes
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Social support measures have generated empirical evidence of helping relationships and their role in family functioning and well-being. Social support networks affect parental practices and the ways in which families overcome stressful life events. Thus, it is important to gather knowledge about the different forms of support that families can benefit from. The aim of this study was to translate, adapt, and validate the Portuguese version of the Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire (FSSQ), a three dimension measure (confidant support, affective support, and instrumental support), Method: 1058 Portuguese parents participated in the study. They were mostly married/cohabiting and employed mothers. The Portuguese version of the FSSQ contained 13 items distributed into 3 subdimensions. The data were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis and the study of Pearson correlations. Results: The FSSQ original three-factor structure was supported by confirmatory factor analysis and the instrument showed good internal consistency. Confidant support and Instrumental support were negatively associated with Permissive parenting and Affective support was negatively associated with Authoritative parenting and Permissive parenting. All three dimensions showed low and positive correlations with Authoritarian parenting. Discussion: The Portuguese version of the FSSQ met adequate psychometric criteria and can be confidently used in family assessments of social support, whenever a brief, self-administered questionnaire would be useful for community services providers
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T09:24:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221076039
       
  • Poverty or Racism': Determinants of Disproportionality and Disparity
           for African American/Black Children in Child Welfare

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      Authors: Harold E. Briggs, Kimberly Y. Huggins-Hoyt, Martell L. Teasley, June Gary Hopps
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      For decades, the incessantly tethered over-involvement of African American/Black (AA/BL) families with the U.S. Child Welfare System (CWS) has been uniquely troubling. Child welfare researchers have asserted “poverty” over “racism” as the root determinant of the historical disproportionate overrepresentation of AA/BL children in CWS. This commentary explores the extent this assertion holds once an apples-to-apples comparison of poor AA/BL and WH children in the CWS is examined. Using 2018 and 2019 National Child Abuse and Neglect Data Systems (NCANDS) Child File data, rates of disproportionality and disparity for AA/BL and White (WH) children receiving public assistance (PA) (2018: N = 333,640; 2019: N = 321,273) were computed at two CW decision points [disposition of maltreatment investigation and subsequent services administered]. Among these poor children, AA/BL were found to be disproportionately overrepresented and WH children underrepresented compared to their proportion of the U.S. child population at each decision point. AA/BL children were also found to be three times more likely to have their maltreatment substantiated and subsequently be placed in foster care compared to their WH counterparts. The issues of racial disproportionality and disparities still exists when comparing poor AA/BL to poor WH children, which suggests “racism” is operational at decision points in the U.S. CWS and should not be minimized or omitted as a consequential determinant.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T10:15:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221076830
       
  • Book Review: Understanding the Mental Health Problems of Children and
           Adolescents: A Guide for Social Workers

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      Authors: Amy Cressman
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T09:35:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221078320
       
  • Ensuring Authentic Representation and Collaboration Along with Research to
           Re-Design Child Welfare

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      Authors: Lisa Schelbe, Jennifer M. Geiger
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In this invited paper, we critique Barth and colleagues’ (2021). “Research to Consider While Effectively Re-Designing Child Welfare Services” paper that presents 10 commonly held misconceptions in child welfare to provide a foundation for child welfare system reform. We argue that research alone cannot guide the reform of the child welfare system. Rather, we argue that people with lived expertise in the child welfare system and programs must be involved in all parts of collaborations in order to re-design child welfare. Research has limitations and privileging it in setting any reform agenda and efforts is potentially dangerous. We conclude that for effective child welfare system re-design to occur, research-policy-practice partnerships must be built with people with lived expertise in the child welfare system and programs.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T08:32:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221074937
       
  • What Counts as Evidence in Child Welfare Research'

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      Authors: Emiko A. Tajima, Angelique G. Day, V. Kalei Kanuha, Jessica Rodriquez-JenKins, Jessica A. Pryce
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In this commentary, we respond to Barth and colleagues and critique their premise that Western-based research with population-level administrative data is the best and only valid evidence on which to base child welfare policy and practice changes. We offer an alternative viewpoint on what forms of evidence should be brought to bear as we consider re-envisioning the child welfare system, highlighting the importance of lived experience and the need to consider the evidence regarding all marginalized racial and ethnic groups. We argue that evidence should represent the perspectives of those with lived experience and that collaborative child welfare research can strengthen the validity of analyses and interpretations. We hold that Barth et al. ask and answer the wrong questions. We press for deeper critical reflection, a more nuanced intersectional lens, and urgent action to address structural and institutional racism in the child welfare system.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-01-09T03:52:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211069549
       
  • Are the Average Effects of Foster Care Placement Really Close to Zero'

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      Authors: Sara Wakefield, Christopher Wildeman
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In their provocative article, Barth and colleagues interrogate existing research on a series of claims about the child welfare system. In this reply, we focus on just one of their conclusions: that foster care placement does little, on average, to cause the poor outcomes of children who are ever placed in care. Our argument proceeds in three stages. In the first, we dispute the claim that the average effects of foster care placement on children are “settled” in any scientific sense. In the second, we note that the lack of agreement about what constitutes the appropriate counterfactual makes the idea of average effects of foster care placement in this area problematic. In the third, we problematize the idea that near-zero average effects equate to unimportant effects by showing how different types of effect heterogeneity may lead us to think differently about how the system is working.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T10:05:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211065418
       
  • Social Work at the Crossroads: The Empirical Highway or the
           Postmodern/Critical Off-Ramp'

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      Authors: Brett Drake, David R. Hodge
      First page: 363
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The social work profession may be at a paradigmatic inflection point. Social work’s emphasis on evidence and scientific evaluation of knowledge is being challenged by what we term a “Postmodern/Critical Theory” perspective. To facilitate understanding of this crossroads and some of the issues involved, we trace the lineage of both perspectives and describe the core components of each. We conclude with a section laying out some of the advantages and disadvantages of either staying the “Empirical Highway” or taking the “Postmodern/Critical Off-Ramp”.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T12:42:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221077450
       
  • Racial Disparities in Social Workers’ Licensing Rates

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      Authors: Joy Jeounghee Kim
      First page: 374
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis study aimed at examining how racial disparities in social workers’ licensing rates are explained by the major sources of the disparities: racial differences in educational eligibilities, the field of practice, and demographic vulnerabilities of social workers.MethodsDrawing a nationally representative sample of 3990 social workers from the Current Population Survey, this study tested how the probabilities of their licensing were explained by the major sources of racial disparities.ResultsFor master’s level social workers, African American–White differences in the field of practice and the type of employers explained away the disparity in required licensing rates. The Hispanic–White and other race–White disparities were largely due to non-White social workers’ limited educational eligibilities and the states of residence that might have imposed varying occupational regulations.ConclusionsAs licensing disparities reflect socioeconomic injustice that confronts many non-White social workers, they call for more purposeful research and interventions within the profession.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T09:36:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211066907
       
  • Building Program Evaluation Capacity of Non-Governmental Organizations
           Practitioners in Hong Kong

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      Authors: Steven Sek-yum Ngai, Chau-kiu Cheung, Yunjun Li, Lifen Zhao, Shan Jiang, Lin Wang, Hon-yin Tang
      First page: 434
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Despite the growing interest in program evaluation capacity building (PECB), its impacts have been rarely studied in the existing literature. This study aims to evaluate a PECB initiative in Hong Kong called the Jockey Club MEL Institute Project. Methods: A pretest–posttest quasi-experimental design was adopted to compare the changes between the training (N = 226) and comparison groups (N = 213). Focus groups with training participants, mentors, and trainers were also conducted. Results: The quantitative results reported that the training group showed greater improvements in all three core aspects of program evaluation capacity—evaluation mindset, evaluation implementation, and evaluation communication—than the comparison group. The qualitative findings further indicated how NGO practitioners benefited from the project. Discussion: The findings provide support for the positive impacts of PECB on NGO practitioners. As such, implications for researchers and evaluators in effectively conducting PECB activities are also discussed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-01-20T03:25:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211067809
       
  • A Ugandan Parenting Programme to Prevent Gender-Based Violence:
           Description and Formative Evaluation

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      Authors: Daniel Wight, Richard Sekiwunga, Carol Namutebi, Flavia Zalwango, Godfrey E. Siu
      First page: 448
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: To develop a culturally-sensitive intervention for the early prevention of gender-based violence (GBV) in Uganda. Methods: Programme design followed the 6SQuID model of intervention development and multi-sectorial advice. A formative evaluation was conducted in two communities with six groups and 138 participants. Findings: Four familial predictors of GBV were identified as potentially malleable: poor parent–child attachment, harsh parenting, inequitable gendered socialization and parental conflict. A community-based parenting programme was developed to address them. Its programme theory incorporates Attachment Theory, the concept that positive behavioural control develops emotional control, and Social Learning Theory. Its rationale, structure and content are presented using the TIDieR checklist. A formative evaluation showed the programme to be widely acceptable, culturally appropriate, and perceived to be effective, but also identified challenges. Conclusion: The careful development of this community-based parenting programme shows promise for the early prevention of GBV.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T03:03:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211056246
       
  • The Online Strength-Informed Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Among
           COVID-19-Affected Adolescents

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      Authors: Wenjie Duan, Yansi Kong, He Bu, Qiujie Guan, Zheng Chen, Qiansheng Luo, Jing Zhang
      First page: 465
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study develops and investigates the changes in anxiety symptoms and quality of life (QoL) among participants of the online Strength-informed Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (SACT) across three tests. Methods: A small-scale, quasi-experiment with no control group was conducted. Repeated-measures analysis was employed to assess the changes of the three tests, which were the pre-experimental, post-test, and 3-month follow-up test. A total of 47 adolescents (ages 10–12) completed the 45-min intervention that lasted 10 weeks. Results: Compared with the pre-experimental, the post-test indicated significant anxiety symptoms reduction but not a statistically significant increase in QoL. The 3-month follow-up test indicated reduced anxiety symptoms and improved QoL compared with the pre-experimental. The with-in subject changes were substantial. Conclusions: The online SACT is a promising model to reduce anxiety symptoms and promote QoL among adolescents during the current COVID-19 pandemic, which show both short- and long-term benefit to the participants.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-02-11T08:10:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211067270
       
  • Key Debates in Social Work and Philosophy

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      Authors: Sharlene Allen-Milton, Cherése Godwin
      First page: 475
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T03:04:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211036675
       
  • Book Review: School Social Work: Practice, Policy, and Research

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      Authors: Aaron Clark
      First page: 476
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T11:05:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315221078323
       
  • Research to Consider While Effectively Re-Designing Child Welfare Services

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      Authors: Richard P. Barth, Jill Duerr Berrick, Antonio R. Garcia, Brett Drake, Melissa Jonson-Reid, John R. Gyourko, Johanna K. P. Greeson
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      An intense appetite for reforming and transforming child welfare services in the United States is yielding many new initiatives. Vulnerable children and families who become involved with child welfare clearly deserve higher quality and more effective services. New policies, programs, and practices should be built on sound evidence. Reforms based on misunderstandings about what the current data show may ultimately harm families. This review highlights 10 commonly held misconceptions which we assert are inconsistent with the best available contemporary evidence. Implications for better alignment of evidence and reform are discussed.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T02:22:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211050000
       
  • Social Work as Mediocracy: A Response to Gambrill, Esptein, Cabin, and
           Teasley, Dettlaff, and Abrams

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      Authors: David Stoesz
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2021-08-12T03:04:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211036369
       
  • Is It Human Service Cartels or the Power Elite That Promote Societal
           Control and Repression' A Reaction to David Stoesz’s Human Services
           Cartels Article

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      Authors: William Cabin
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article is a reaction paper to the article in this journal issue entitled Human Service Cartels: The Soft Repression of the Mediocracy by David Stoesz. As such, it addresses two significant questions about the Stoesz article. One question is as follows: Are we really talking about a cartel' The other question is as follows: Isn’t it the power elite that promotes societal control and repression'
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2021-05-28T08:41:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211017643
       
  • Squatting at Bethlehem: A Response to Stoesz’s Human Service Cartels

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      Authors: William M. Epstein
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Stoesz’s essay is largely an institutional critique of social work—attentive to the field’s choices as though they were autonomous of the society. The analysis is broadened to acknowledge the systemic underpinnings of social work’s institutional presence. Reference is made to contemporary and historical events.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T09:29:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1049731520986606
       
  • Solution-Focused Brief Therapy for Depression Among Adolescents and Young
           Adults Diagnosed With Cancer: An Open Pilot Trial

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      Authors: Anao Zhang
      First page: 388
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis pilot study evaluates the acceptability and preliminary efficacy of solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) for depression, anxiety, and hope among adolescent and young adult (AYA) diagnosed with cancer. Method: 10 AYAs with a primary sarcoma diagnosis participated in an open pilot of SFBT for their depression between January and June 2019 delivered by trained social work interns.ResultsAll participants completed four planned sessions and reported strong acceptability of SFBT. Statistically significant improvements were observed for pre- and post-treatment scores for depression, anxiety, and levels of hope. These improvements were maintained at 1-month follow up, with significant patterns of difference in study participants’ depression, anxiety, and levels of hope over time.ConclusionsSFBT is an acceptable intervention approach for depression (and anxiety) among AYAs diagnosed with cancer. SFBT offers a brief, strength-based, and hope-engendering approach to address mental health concerns among young adult diagnosed with cancer.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2021-12-24T10:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211062508
       
  • The Effects of Service Coordination on Disadvantaged Parents’
           Participation in Activation Programs and Employment: A Randomized
           Controlled Trial

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      Authors: Krisztina Gyüre, Anne G Tøge, Ira Malmberg-Heimonen
      First page: 402
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis randomized controlled study evaluates the effects of coordinated follow-up within a family intervention project on parents’ participation in activation programs and employment. The trial has been registered on Clinicaltrials.gov (Identifier: NCT03102775).MethodsOf 2634 families, 1429 families were randomized to be offered follow-up by a family coordinator, while 1205 families participated in ordinary follow-up without a family coordinator. An analysis of longitudinal administrative data was performed to estimate the effects of the intervention on parents’ participation in activation programs and employment by comparing the two follow-up methods.ResultsBased on fixed effects logistic models, the follow-up with a family coordinator is associated with non-significant effects on participation in activation programs (OR = 1.05, 95% CI [0.81, 1.37]) and employment (OR = 1.11, 95% CI [0.67, 1.82]).DiscussionThe results provide no significant evidence on the effectiveness of coordination efforts for disadvantaged families on activation and employment.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T04:27:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211046523
       
  • A Culturally Adapted Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Group: A Randomized
           Controlled Trial

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      Authors: Daniel K. W. Young, Petrus NG Yat-nam
      First page: 415
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThis study aimed to evaluate a culturally adapted cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) group for Chinese people with depression that aimed to alter participants’ negative beliefs of themselves, which were influenced by traditional Chinese cultural values.MethodIn this randomized controlled trial, 43 participants diagnosed with depression were randomly allocated to a 10-session culturally adapted CBT group or treatment as usual (TAU). A research assistant, who was blinded to the group allocation process, used the Chinese Beck Depression Inventory-II to assess participants’ depressive symptoms during the pre-treatment and post-treatment periods.ResultsThe results of the mixed linear model for repeated measures showed that the CBT group had significantly greater improvement in depressive symptoms than treatment as usual, with a medium effect size.ConclusionThis study supports the efficacy and effectiveness of the culturally adapted CBT group in facilitating clinically significant improvement in Chinese people with depression.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2021-12-30T10:23:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211063627
       
  • An Age Simulation Program Promoting Positive Attitudes Toward Older People
           in Hong Kong: Further Evidence of Integration of Natural Social Network
           Effects

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      Authors: Qian Sun, Justin Chun Ting Cheung, Ngai Teck Alice Wan, Wong Shum-Yee Pauline, Vivian W. Q. Lou
      First page: 426
      Abstract: Research on Social Work Practice, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThis study examines an age simulation program in Hong Kong concerning the possible integrative impacts of an experiential education approach and contact experience within a natural social network among younger individuals. Method: A sample of 1121 younger individuals participated in this study. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the impact of the age simulation program. Results: The results of structural equation modeling indicated the effective impact of the age-simulation program on promoting positive attitudes toward older adults among the younger participants (β = 0.28, p < .001). The significant results of contact experience highlighted the way in which familial contact experience could bring about more positive attitudes toward the older adults (β = 0.08, p < .01) than peer group contact can (β = −0.08, p < .05). Discussion: The protocol of the presented program could provide an actionable framework for social workers and allied professionals to launch related service plans in the communities.
      Citation: Research on Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2021-12-31T06:47:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497315211063626
       
 
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