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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 243 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 399)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 237)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 214)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)

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Qualitative Social Work
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.518
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 26  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1473-3250 - ISSN (Online) 1741-3117
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Development of a theoretical framework for examining youth worker
           perspectives on their relationships with adolescents and emerging adults
           in the United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Patrice Forrester
      Pages: 1426 - 1440
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Volume 20, Issue 6, Page 1426-1440, November 2021.
      It is important to understand how youth workers perceive their work with clients to support them in facilitating positive outcomes (e.g., gainful employment, academic achievement) for those they serve. There is a paucity of peer-reviewed research that explores youth workers’ perspectives on their social service practices in the United States despite their integral role in supporting positive adolescent and emerging adult development. This article discusses a theoretical framework founded on anthropology and social work paradigms. Researchers can use this theoretical framework to examine youth worker perspectives on building relationships with adolescents and emerging adults in the United States.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-22T05:29:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211039513
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 6 (2021)
       
  • Troubling solutions through anthropological fieldwork: Mediation research
           in Ghana, Australia, and the United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alexandra Crampton
      Pages: 1441 - 1460
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Volume 20, Issue 6, Page 1441-1460, November 2021.
      Social workers and anthropologists encounter different representations of mediation as a professional practice: On the one hand, Social Work is grounded in mediation as expert knowledge that helps others to resolve interpersonal disputes. For example, mediation as Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) can enable court cases to resolve without formal trials. On the other hand, Anthropology is grounded in mediation as a research field site and by past intervention experience of anthropologists. As mediation professionalized and became mandated across public institutions, anthropologists became strong ADR critics. Academic debate between mediation proponents and critics ended as critics abandoned research in the 1990s and 2000s. My initial research goal was to pick up from past empirical study. Research was conducted in Australia, Ghana, and the United States in two areas of mediation practice; resolving parenting disputes between adults who are separating or not married, and “elder mediation” cases involving older adults. Initial findings reified past debate through data that supported proponents and critics. Further insight was gained through return to fieldwork using an expanded, ethnographic case study design. This article provides a journey through a seemingly intractable divide that was ultimately resolved through prolonged time in fieldwork focused on understanding client perspectives. I show how social work and anthropology scholars of professional mediation have been positioned on opposite sides of an expert knowledge/fieldwork research boundary. This boundary can be made productive through open exchange about mediation as a practice that evolves through an interplay of expert knowledge, intervention practice, and client engagement.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-22T05:29:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211039515
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 6 (2021)
       
  • Thoughts on files

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      Authors: Gary Clapton
      Pages: 1461 - 1476
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Volume 20, Issue 6, Page 1461-1476, November 2021.
      With the benefit of an anthropological attention to the importance of ‘things’ and the relations between ourselves and things (‘artefacts’), this paper gives attention to the Social Work File. Despite the rise of electronic recording, social work archives remain full of thousands of files that are increasingly accessed, especially by those who have been in care, and physical file-keeping remains a regular feature of practice. There is already a body of literature relating to the information in social work files, however this paper shifts the focus from this to the nature and role of the File itself. ‘Hidden in plain sight’ but laden with meaning and capacity, I identify the little we know already about the file. The various ways files and their authors and subjects, can interact are explored together with the file’s symbolic properties and the power held by the file’s owner, and the ability of the file to ‘other’ its subject. Whilst we understand that the practice shapes the file, how might the file shape practice'
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-22T05:29:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211039511
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 6 (2021)
       
  • Audit culture, accountability, and care: A phenomenological anthropology
           of child welfare

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      Authors: Robin Valenzuela
      Pages: 1477 - 1495
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Volume 20, Issue 6, Page 1477-1495, November 2021.
      Front-line child welfare workers have long since preoccupied social work, sociological, and anthropological scholarship. This article employs phenomenological anthropology to attend to the embodied, experiential, and sensorial dimensions of front-line child welfare work. However, rather than renew calls to improve casework through increased institutional support, resilience-building, or retention efforts, I draw on caseworkers’ lived experiences to engage in a critical examination of the state’s role as parens patriae. What do caseworkers’ experiences “on the inside” reveal about the state’s capacity to care—both for its own frontline staff and the families in its purview' How do such experiences problematize our understanding of state accountability' Ultimately, how can they shift the scholarly fixation on developing “better” workers who can accommodate the ever-increasing demands of casework, to a larger critique of the state’s ability to serve as “the guardian and ultimate guarantor of child welfare” (Boyden, 2005: 195)' By locating caseworkers’ experiences within a larger context of “audit culture”—a climate of suspicion and surveillance that forces workers to constantly account for their productivity and performance—this article problematizes the state’s model of accountability and care (Shore and Wright, 2000). I argue that, in light of the toxic social dynamics it creates, “audit culture” is incommensurable with the state’s role as parens patriae.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-22T05:29:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211039512
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 6 (2021)
       
  • What's the problem with disaster' Anthropology, social work, and the
           qualitative slot

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tisha Joseph Holmes, John Mathias, Tyler McCreary, James Brian Elsner
      Pages: 1496 - 1516
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Volume 20, Issue 6, Page 1496-1516, November 2021.
      On March 3, 2019, an EF4 tornado devastated the rural Alabama communities of Beauregard and Smith Station, killing 23 people and causing direct injuries to another 97. This storm was unusually devastating, with twice the predicted casualty rate based on the tornado’s power, the impacted population, and impacted housing stock. In this paper, we apply qualitative methods from anthropology, geography, and planning to better understand the social context of this unusually devastating tornado. Recognizing that there are multiple formulations of the problem of disasters, we aim to highlight how interdisciplinary qualitative research can deepen our understanding of tornado disasters. Combining policy analysis, political economic critique, and ethnographic description, we seek to showcase how qualitative research enables us to interrogate and reimagine the problem of disasters. Rather than simply juxtaposing qualitative and quantitative methods, we emphasize how the heterogeneity of qualitative research methods can strengthen interdisciplinary research projects by generating dialogue about the multiple contexts relevant to understanding a social problem. While problem definition remains a central challenge to establishing a dialogue between anthropology and social work, here, we intend to extend this discussion to larger interdisciplinary collaborations. Situating the issue of problem formation within a broader ecology of qualitative inquiry, we highlight how dialogue about problem definition can, itself, produce meaningful insights into how we understand disasters.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-22T05:29:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211039517
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 6 (2021)
       
  • Using auto-ethnography to bring visibility to coloniality

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      Authors: Giovanni Hernandez-Carranza, Mirna Carranza, Elizabeth Grigg
      Pages: 1517 - 1535
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Volume 20, Issue 6, Page 1517-1535, November 2021.
      This article traces how coloniality traps research and researchers in the Global North into maintaining the rigidity of its politics and logics through the meaning process. As International Social Work continues to gain popularity, supporting the proliferation of research across borders, the theoretical underpinnings must be unpacked with the context of the collaboration and the cultures involved that give meaning to both. The crux of the article rests within the implications for qualitative research in social work—both within, and across borders as a way of promoting social justice with marginalized communities. It also provides new possibilities for transcending and translating methodologies across the fields of social work and anthropology. To illustrate how research operates under the rubric of coloniality, this article uses autoethnography to uncover the on-the-ground realities of working across localities. The auto-ethnography revealed that despite the goal of sharing control of the research process, tensions related to coloniality emerged. As a result of working in different localities, each team’s processes became distinct—as it was informed by different historical, economic and geopolitical processes.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-22T05:29:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211039514
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 6 (2021)
       
  • Participatory photography and undocumented migration through Mexico at the
           intersection of social work and anthropology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: John Doering-White
      Pages: 1536 - 1551
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Volume 20, Issue 6, Page 1536-1551, November 2021.
      This article reflects on participatory photography in the context of ethnographic fieldwork at a humanitarian migrant shelter in Central Mexico to consider broader intersections between social work and anthropology. I describe how shifting immigration enforcement trends across Mexico reconfigured my original plan for integrating participatory photography into my work as a researcher and shelter worker. Tracing these changes through three cases examples, I highlight tensions between photography as a reflection of social experience and photography as a mechanism for enacting social change. In light of recent critiques surrounding formulaic and cursory discussions of empowerment in participatory photography, I argue that unexpected shifts in research and practice strategies are themselves meaningful data, especially in uncertain policy environments.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-22T05:29:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211039510
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 6 (2021)
       
  • Thanks to reviewers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1552 - 1555
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Volume 20, Issue 6, Page 1552-1555, November 2021.

      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-22T05:29:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211048319
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 6 (2021)
       
  • Managing role expectations and emotions in encounters with extremism:
           Norwegian social workers’ experiences

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      Authors: Håvard Haugstvedt, Hulda Mjøll Gunnarsdottir
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      To prevent radicalisation and violent extremism, many European countries have adopted a multiagency approach, consisting of both police, teachers and social workers. Such strategies have caused concern for a securitization of social policy and stigmatization of vulnerable groups. This study aims at gaining insight into how Norwegian social workers involved in prevention work against violent extremism experience and manage role conflicts and emotions during interaction with their clients. This article presents findings from 17 individual and two focus group interviews which indicate that social workers experience emotional strain caused by role conflicts and emotional dissonance within a securitized field of social work. To handle these challenges, social workers apply a dynamic combination of surface and deep acting strategies, at both the reactive and proactive level, such as ‘Keeping a brave face’, ‘Character acting’ and ‘Adopting the client’s perspective’. Our findings contribute to expanding both the empirical and conceptual understanding of emotion management at work, and provides a novel insight into how prevention work against violent extremism is perceived by social workers. Also, in a field influenced by security rhetoric, our study gives encouraging new knowledge about how social workers can resist falling into oppressive and controlling practices by seeking to engage with and understand their clients’ human side, and relate this to their own lives.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T07:30:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211051410
       
  • Understanding past experiences of suicidal ideation and behavior in the
           life narratives of transgender older adults

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      Authors: Eleni M Gaveras, Vanessa D Fabbre, Braveheart Gillani, Steff Sloan
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Transgender people (collectively referred to here as trans) experience disproportionate rates of suicidal ideation and behavior (plans and attempts) attributed to complex constellations of structural and individual factors. Interpretive methods in suicide research elucidate and contextualize intricate patterns of risk factors and strategies for recovery. The life narratives of trans older adults offer unique insights into past suicidal behavior and recovery after distress has diminished and perspective has been gained. This study aimed to illuminate the lived experiences of suicidal ideation and behavior in the biographical interviews of 14 trans older adults as part of the project To Survive on This Shore (N = 88). Data analysis was conducted using a two-phase narrative analysis. Trans older adults contextualized suicide attempts, plans, ideation, and recovery as navigating impossible to possible paths. Impossible paths were seen as hopelessness in their life direction, often after a significant loss. Possible paths were described as pathways to recovery from crises. Transitions from impossible to possible paths were narrated as a turning point or moment of strength combined with outreach to family, friends, or mental health professionals. Narrative approaches hold the potential to illuminate pathways to well-being among trans persons with lived experiences of suicidal ideation and behavior. For social work practitioners, therapeutic narrative work around past suicidal ideation and behavior with trans older adults holds promise for suicidal prevention by identifying important supportive resources and previously used coping skills in crises.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-06T04:53:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211051783
       
  • “Biculturation”: Transnational social workers navigating movement into
           indigenous space in Aotearoa New Zealand

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      Authors: Barbara Staniforth, Helene Connor
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      “Biculturation”: Transnational social workers navigating movement into indigenous space in Aotearoa New Zealand Based on 20 semi-structured interviews, participants identified their learning, including formal learning, learning through practice, and learning by being in relationship with Māori. Challenges identified by participants involved having little structured orientation to a new culture, feeling judged and significant cultural differences. Suggestions from participants to improve the process of transition include having a systemic approach to learning about the bicultural environment, provision of mandatory bicultural work induction and providing cultural supervision once in practice.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-06T04:53:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211052083
       
  • Victims, perpetrators, scapegoats and Russian dolls: Narrating violence
           within secure units for adolescents from a staff perspective

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      Authors: Peter Andersson
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      A rise of violent incidents at secure units for adolescents has been reported by the Swedish National Board of Institutional Care. Meanwhile, research aiming to understand how staff manage violence seems to be lacking. By examining an in-depth narrative by one staff member, “Meral”, this study aims to understand, on the one hand, how staff describe the violence they encounter in light of the context and situation, and on the other, how they describe their handling of violence from outside the immediate environment. Drawing on Georgakopoulou and Bamberg, identities are understood to be produced and performed within personal narratives from different positions in relation to one’s surroundings. The study shows how Meral’s professional identity is shaped and affected by violence. Of essential importance is the way Meral presents herself to herself: as “not afraid.” A narrative interpretation is that fear does not fit within the framework of the professional identity for staff. A key element of placing essential responsibility on staff to manage violence is keeping lines of communication open, which could be made clearer in policy documents, training and supervision. Therefore, studies like this one could result in the development of communication strategies for staff. This is important because emotional rules can generate emotional cultures that in the long run can be destructive for both staff and young people. Only when the emotional rules are identified can staff develop strategies for dealing with the violent incidents that are part of their professional life in a qualified way.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T01:46:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211050675
       
  • Ethical decision-making of social workers in Spain during COVID-19: Cases
           and responses

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      Authors: María-Jesús Úriz, Juan-Jesús Viscarret, Alberto Ballestero
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      In this article we address the ethical decision-making processes of social work professionals in Spain during the first wave of COVID-19. We present some of the findings from a broader international research project led by professor Sarah Banks and carried out in collaboration with the International Federation of Social Workers.The first wave of COVID-19 had a major impact in Spain, hitting harder the most vulnerable groups. In this unprecedented and unexpected context, social workers had to make difficult ethical decisions on fundamental issues such as respecting service-user’s autonomy, prioritizing wellbeing, maintaining confidentiality or deciding the fair distribution of the scarce resources. There were moments of uncertainty and difficult institutional responses.The broader international project was carried out using an online questionnaire addressed to social work professionals in several countries. In this article, through several specific cases, we examine the ethical decision-making processes of social work professionals in Spain, as well as the way to resolve that situations. We have used a qualitative content analysis with a deductive approach to analyze the responses and cases.Findings show many difficult situations concerning the prioritization of the wellbeing of users without limiting their autonomy, the invention of new organizational protocols to provide support and resources for vulnerable people… Social workers had to manage the bureaucracy and had to solve some emergency situations getting personally involved or developing other cooperation mechanisms. The pandemic forced them to look for new forms of social intervention.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-29T06:04:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211050118
       
  • Parents at war: A positioning analysis of how parents negotiate their loss
           after experiencing child removal by the state

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      Authors: Marte Tonning Otterlei, Eivind Engebretsen
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores how parents involved in care order processes in Norway perceive being positioned by Child Welfare Services (CWS) in this process, how they negotiate these positions and whether their loss is perceived as legitimate or illegitimate in the face of societal expectations of parenthood. The data consist of qualitative interviews with 13 parents who have experienced child removals initiated by CWS. Drawing on positioning theory, the article provides an analysis of parental experiences of being positioned by CWS and investigates how cultural notions may affect their perceptions. The analysis showed that parents experienced being at war against a highly powerful CWS, which they felt dehumanised them and positioned them as failing. Moreover, parents challenged such positions by introducing alternative explanations that presented themselves as victims. However, the analysis also showed that parents would adopt positions of becoming their own judge and internalising the stigma. Parents experienced disenfranchisement of their grief due to the perception of their loss as illegitimate. Nonetheless, several parents launched a position of becoming a renewed parental figure by turning their prior parental failure into a storyline of growth and prosperity. The article concludes that parents, through language, challenge stigmatising positions to negotiate parental failure, which could be interpreted as valuation work of their identities and parenthood.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-23T05:42:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211048546
       
  • Building research capacity in hospital-based social workers: A
           participatory action research approach

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      Authors: Mim Fox, Dominque Hopkins, Jenni Graves
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Research engagement can support a social work clinician, manager and educator in the complexity of everyday practice however in the hospital setting social workers find themselves challenged by the range of potential research questions and methodologies that do not align with their daily experience, professional values or ways of collaboratively working. Four metropolitan hospitals and a university partner worked together to explore the impact of a collaborative capacity building model on the ability for social workers to engage in research activity. Using a Participatory Action Research framework, the research team identified the elements that contribute to a non-hierarchical and successful research dynamic, as well as the challenges that committing to research activity brings in the clinical role. Through reflecting on and articulating the pracademic, or practitioner-researcher, model used and the dominant values that contribute to social work research this study is transferable to other similarly challenged hospital social work departments and health settings.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-23T05:42:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211048543
       
  • Messiness in international qualitative interviewing: What I did, what I
           didn’t do, and a little bit about why

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      Authors: Rebecca Soraya Field, Angela Barns, Donna Chung, Caroline Fleay
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This is a reflexive account of the messiness experienced by a Persian-Australian doctoral researcher interviewing social work and human service practitioners and people seeking asylum in Germany. This data collection was part of a cross-national comparative study of the impacts of policy on the experiences and perceptions of people seeking asylum and social work and human service practitioners in Bavaria and Western Australia. Through interview stories and the work of others, this article offers a first person account of the complexities, ambiguities and dilemmas that can occur before, during and after data collection, how these were navigated through the use of Finlay's (2012) five lenses for the reflexive interviewer, and some of the lessons learnt.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-16T09:15:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211043196
       
  • Fragile minds, porous selves: Shining a light on autoethnography of mental
           illness

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      Authors: Alison Fixsen
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article sheds light on autoethnographic accounts of mental illness, to address author and reader concerns and questions and to consider what practitioners can learn from these narrative accounts. Drawing from my own and others’ trajectories, I discuss the drawbacks and dangers of exposing a ‘flawed’ identity, the stigma of serious mental illness, intertextuality issues, the tangled nature of revelation and redemption, framing the ‘Other’ in mental illness autoethnography and depictions of ‘life in the asylum.’ I explain how in telling my own ‘psychiatric’ tale, I looked to the symbolic concept of ‘communitas’ as a means of examining inter-relational processes and collective experience in a psychiatric facility. I argue that, while the act of writing about one’s illness experience can be rightly perceived as a way of reclaiming personal ‘power’ and facilitating healing, attempts to ‘evidence’ recovery can run counter to the writer’s reality of life with or beyond mental illness as personally and socially messy. In answer to the question, ‘at what point does a ‘life in the asylum’ narrative become autoethnographic'' I argue for the potential of autoethnography to contribute to broader sociological, ethnographic and medical debates and thus impact on policy. Speaking up about mental health through autoethnography can help to promote awareness of the unpredictability and socially constructed nature of mental illness and can inform strategies toward reducing public stigma, tackle the cyclical impact of labels, highlight the need to change social and medical attitudes, and revisualize treatment and support.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-14T12:44:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211046657
       
  • Oscillations, boundaries and ethical care: Social work
           practitioner-researcher experiences with qualitative end-of-life care
           research

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      Authors: Felicity Moon, Christine Mooney, Fiona McDermott, Peter Poon, David W Kissane
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Policy and research acknowledge that the quality of end-of-life care in hospitals can be poor, with families reporting significant concerns regarding physical and psychosocial care. In order to design appropriate evidenced-based care approaches, we conducted qualitative research examining the perspectives of bereaved families of patients who received end-of-life care in our health network. This paper reports on ethical dilemmas facing practitioner-researchers conducting interviews with bereaved families. We recruited 40 bereaved family members to participate in semi-structured interviews discussing the care a loved one received while a patient under the general medicine units. Bereaved participants expressed grief, humour and anger regarding their experience, and several reported perceptions of negligent and harmful care. Irrespective of the protocols in place to mitigate distress, this posed an ethical dilemma for the practitioner-researcher as a member of the health network, who needed to balance clinical and research roles when responding to distress. The practitioner-researcher’s own bias and assumptions emerged when analysing families’ distressing recollections. More broadly, the issues discussed have clinical implications for models of hospital bereavement support. Participants’ use of photos and mementos jointly served to include the presence of the deceased in the research interview, but also highlighted the potential to utilise visual methods to examine sensitive research issues. It helps every practitioner-researcher to distinguish between research-oriented goals and clinical responsibilities to care provision as they consider their human research ethics application before beginning any research.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T12:15:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211045113
       
  • The “good” and the “bad” subject position in
           self-injury autobiographies

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      Authors: Nina Veetnisha Gunnarsson, Mikaela Lönnberg
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Utilizing published autobiographies, we explore how individuals who self-injure discursively construct their experiences of the self and self-injury. The authors construct their selves into two seemingly opposite subject positions, here named the “bad girl” and the “good girl.” For the most part, the authors identify themselves with the “bad girl” position. Although there is a struggle to uphold normalcy in front of others, they regard evidence of the “good girl” position as fake. We demonstrate how they, to a large extent, accept the dominant discourse of self-injury as an individual and pathological problem for which they tend to blame themselves. However, they also challenge the negative subject position by separating themselves discursively from the bad “side of the self.” Acts of self-injury are described as a way to cope with the negative perception of themselves and at the same time being what causes feelings of self-loathing. Thus, understanding how the psychomedical discourse affects individuals who self-injure as well as the consequences of the medicalization of self-injury are of importance. Furthermore, social workers may be in a legitime position to work with the self-representations and the social factors that may underlie an individual’s need to cut or in other ways physically hurt oneself.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-31T06:13:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211043933
       
  • Older adults’ experiences of being at a senior summer camp—A
           phenomenographic study

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      Authors: Veronika Wallroth, Kjerstin Larsson, Agneta Schröder
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Senior summer camps are arranged by more and more municipalities in Sweden with the purpose of creating a place where older adults can meet and mitigate their social isolation. The aim of the study is to understand, from their own point of view, how the participants experienced senior summer camp. A phenomenographic approach was used to surface the older adults’ experiences and analyze the data. Three descriptive categories evolved: “A pleasant environment to be in”, “Something to do for everyone” and “Breaking one’s loneliness”. Findings from this study suggest that just getting away, not having to cook, seeing and experiencing something else, and having company when eating food or doing activities meant a lot to the participants, who all have different experiences of loneliness. Knowing that other people were lonely made the participants at the senior summer camp realize that they were not to blame for their loneliness.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T02:01:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211042063
       
  • “Some days it’s like she has died.” A qualitative exploration of
           first mothers’ utilisation of artefacts associated with now-adopted
           children in coping with grief and loss

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      Authors: Emma Geddes
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, I take a critical approach to the marginalisation of the grief experienced by first mothers who have experienced the non-consensual adoption of a child in England, in a context within which welfare benefits and services intended to support the most disadvantaged families have been dramatically curtailed. With reference to the concepts of disenfranchised grief and ambiguous loss, and in light of some identified parallels between the death of a child and the loss of a child to adoption, I draw upon literature from the field of bereavement studies in presenting findings arising from semi-structured interviews in which 17 first mothers sorted through artefacts such as toys, clothing and blankets associated with their now-adopted children and reflected upon the meanings that such keepsakes had taken on in their lives after loss. Respondents’ accounts revealed that artefacts were invested with high value, and could operate as vehicles for memories of time spent caring for children. It was found that interacting with artefacts could bring comfort, evoking in mothers sensory memories of the smell and feel of their now-adopted child. Interactions with artefacts were found to hold capacity to affirm respondents’ maternal status, as well as symbolising oppression and injustice, sometimes evoking strong feelings of anger directed towards professionals involved in children’s adoption.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-20T08:47:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211039008
       
  • Participatory research in a pandemic: The impact of Covid-19 on
           co-designing research with autistic people

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      Authors: Danielle Rudd, Se Kwang Hwang
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Social work research should adopt a critical approach to research methodology, opposing oppression that is reproduced through epistemological assumptions or research methods and processes. However, traditional approaches to autism research have often problematised and pathologized autistic individuals, reinforcing autistic people’s positions as passive subjects. This has resulted in autistic people being largely excluded from the production of knowledge about autism, and about the needs of autistic people. Participatory approaches promote collaborative approaches to enquiry and posit autistic people as active co-constructors of knowledge, a stance that is congruent with social work values of social justice and liberation. However, Covid-19 is not only altering our everyday life but also upending social research. This paper discusses the challenges faced by a participatory study involving autistic people during the Covid-19 pandemic. This paper examines how Covid-19 increased the individual vulnerability of autistic participants and changed their research priorities, increased the researcher’s decision-making power, and placed greater emphasis on barriers created by inaccessible methods. Covid-19 did not present novel challenges, but rather exacerbated existing tensions and inevitable challenges that are inherent in adopting an approach that aims to oppose oppression.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-10T10:54:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211040102
       
  • “It’s my life they are talking about” – On children’s
           participation in decision-making for secure placement

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      Authors: Ann-Karina Henriksen
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      In Denmark, secure institutions are the most intrusive form of out-of-home placement. This article explores how children and young people experience participating in decisions involving secure placement. The analysis draws on a qualitative study, which includes interviews with young people, their case manager and case file data. The young people have all been placed in a secure institution for either observation or on grounds of being a danger to themselves or others, typically defined as a range of behavioral problems like absconding, abuse of drugs, transactional sex and/or crime involvement. Young people’s experiences of participating in these decisions provide important insights for understanding the barriers and factors, which facilitate participation for some of the most vulnerable children and young people in the child welfare system. Drawing on a three-dimensional definition of participation inspired by Kloppenborg and Lausten, the analysis shows that young people in the ‘deep-end’ of child welfare services navigate an adult-centered system of assessment and decision-making, which curtails their possibilities to have a voice and influence decisions. The analysis contributes to a limited research field studying case work practices in relation to care orders, restrictive measures and the confinement of children and young people, where young people’s perspectives are largely missing. Their voices provide important insights for the development of a child-centered approach to service provision, that balances their right to participation, protection and care.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-08-03T02:21:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211036173
       
  • Historiography of empathy: Contributions to social work research and
           practice

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      Authors: Tracy Watson, David Hodgson, Lynelle Watts, Rebecca Waters
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Empathy has long been considered critical to good social work practice, and is supported by extensive research and literature. However, empathy is a contested concept with divergent theoretical origins that complicates its place in social work research and practice. This article provides a historical review of empathy, highlighting the evolution of the concept of empathy, its contested history, and subsequent emergence into therapeutic contexts, particularly within social work. Findings show that empathy has multiple definitions and meanings, thus, creating a challenge to research efforts and social work activities. This review lays the groundwork for further constructive debate and research into the theory and practice of empathy for social work.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-15T01:00:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211033012
       
  • Research with children in rural China: Reflecting on the process

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      Authors: Shuang Wu, Viviene E Cree
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Conducting research with children raises significant ethical and practical difficulties; when the context is rural China, where there has been no tradition of qualitative research with children, these become especially heightened. This article, written by a student and her supervisor, introduces a pilot study conducted in 2018 as part of a Master’s degree programme at a Scottish university. The study was designed to trial two child participatory methods with the aim of scaling these up in a full PhD project; the research focused on the experiences and needs of ‘left-behind children’ in a town of South-West China. The study threw up a number of challenges for the student which are explored in the article. Whilst not wishing to over-claim on the basis of a student project, we suggest that these highlight the reality that methodologies and ‘good practice’ guidelines developed in a ‘Western’/’minority world’ context may not always be wholly compatible with a very different research environment such as this one. This conclusion presents a significant challenge for all those who are conducting research with children in the ‘Global South’/’majority world’, as well as for those who are supporting research students who may experience similar dilemmas in the ‘real world’ of research.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T11:56:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211031959
       
  • Social work undergraduates students and COVID-19 experiences in Nigeria

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      Authors: Chigozie Donatus Ezulike, Uzoma Odera Okoye, Prince Chiagozie Ekoh
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Following the highly contagious nature of the coronavirus disease and the increase in confirmed cases, the Nigerian government, imposed lockdowns, quarantines, and various social distancing measures to curb the rate of infection. Schools were closed, and examinations were postponed indefinitely. Students of private schools were able to resume academic activities online. However, most public schools could not do so, due to lack of infrastructure. This study aimed to qualitatively investigate the impacts of the novel coronavirus on final-year students of social work, at the University of Nigeria. Data was collected from 20 undergraduates using in-depth interviews. Findings showed that the pandemic had negative effects on different aspects of the students’ lives. It was also revealed that some of the students were resilient and were able to use various coping strategies to avoid being overwhelmed by the situation. A policy implication of this study is the need for revitalization of Nigerian public universities, as the continued lockdown of schools shows how public universities are poorly managed in the country. This poor management of public schools has made it impossible for a switch to virtual learning.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-02T10:06:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211029705
       
  • Baraza as method: Adapting a traditional conversational space for data
           collection and pathways for change

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      Authors: Laura A. Chubb, Christa B. Fouché, Karen Sadeh Kengah
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The call to decolonise research processes and knowledge produced through them has spawned a powerful shift in working relationships between community researchers and members of local communities. Adaptation of a traditional conversational space in a community-based participatory research study offers a context-specific example of a decolonising method for data collection and as pathways for change. This article reports on learnings encountered while adapting the space and highlights the relevance for other cultural contexts. We present principles to adapt traditional conversational spaces both for collecting data and as a means of working in partnership with indigenous communities to enable different ways of knowing and action.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-07-01T08:14:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211029346
       
  • Older immigrant Latino gay men and childhood sexual abuse: Findings from
           the Palabras Fuertes project

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      Authors: David Camacho, César V Rodriguez, Kiara L Moore, Ellen P Lukens
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Childhood Sexual Abuse (CSA) and maltreatment have long-term negative impacts on survivors, including older adults. Yet, limited qualitative examinations of how these experiences impact the lives of older adults exists and even fewer among older Latino gay men. We drew data from life-history narratives the first author conducted with five Spanish speaking older Latino gay men in New York City. Our analyses were guided by an Ecological Model, a Suffering lens, and our clinical social work experience with older adults, sexual minorities and people of color. All participants reported sexual experiences prior to the age of 15 and possible emotional and physical maltreatment. Yet, not all participants perceived these experiences as abuse. Our findings indicate how cultural, linguistic and contextual factors may affect disclosure and coping. Despite the fact that CSA and maltreatment occurred decades ago, these early experiences affected long-term psychosocial functioning. Our findings support a need for future research and clinical practice that considers the subjective perceptions of childhood sexual experiences and maltreatment and how these relate to psychosocial functioning in Latino gay men during older adulthood.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-28T09:44:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211027644
       
  • Mental health in subsidized housing: Readiness to assist residents with
           mental health issues in subsidized housing from the perspectives of
           housing employees

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      Authors: Hyejin Jung, Jose Jaime, Sharon Lee
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      People in subsidized housing are likely to suffer from mental health issues. However, little is known about subsidized housing employees’ readiness to address the residents’ mental health needs. This qualitative study explores the perspectives of housing employees on their readiness to assist subsidized housing residents’ mental health needs. A total of 32 subsidized housing employees participated in five focus groups. Thematic analysis revealed four key themes: prevalence of mental health issues, unexpected role as housing employees, multi-level barriers in assisting residents with mental health needs, and the need for mental health support in subsidized housing. Findings highlight the need for integrated care, including social work services in subsidized housing. Social workers may have various potential roles to serve the mental health needs of subsidized housing residents. Also identified was the need for mental health education and training among subsidized housing employees.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-24T08:27:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211027630
       
  • Emotional intelligence as a part of critical reflection in social work
           practice and research

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      Authors: Mari D Herland
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Social workers often experience higher levels of burnout compared with other healthcare professionals. The capacity to manage one’s own emotional reactions efficiently, frequently in complex care settings, is central to the role of social workers. This article highlights the complexity of emotions in social work research and practice by exploring the perspective of emotional intelligence. The article is both theoretical and empirical, based on reflections from a qualitative longitudinal study interviewing fathers with behavioural and criminal backgrounds, all in their 40 s. The analysis contains an exploration of the researcher position that illuminates the reflective, emotional aspects that took place within this interview process. Three overall themes emerged – first: Recognising emotional complexity; second: Reflecting on emotional themes; and third: Exploring my own prejudices and preconceptions. The findings apply to both theoretical and practical social work, addressing the need to understand emotions as a central part of critical reflection and reflexivity. The argument is that emotions have the potential to expand awareness of one’s own preconceptions, related to normative societal views. This form of analytical awareness entails identifying and paying attention to one’s own, sometimes embodied, emotional triggers.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T10:57:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211024734
       
  • Questioning policy representations of women’s alcohol consumption:
           Implications for social work

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      Authors: Tania L Smith, Carole Zufferey, Snjezana Bilic, Cassandra Loeser
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This study draws on Carol Bacchi’s What’s the problem represented to be' (WPR) framework, to deconstruct policy discourses of women’s alcohol consumption. It examines Australian policies such as in the National Alcohol Strategy (2019–2028) and Australian Guidelines to Reduce Health Risks from Drinking Alcohol (NHMRC, 2009, 2020). It found that policy discourses particularly focus on the effects of women’s alcohol consumption as ‘harms’ to unborn children, by emphasising women’s assumed reproductive roles, such in pregnancy and when breastfeeding. Social policy tends to reproduce medicalising and normative gendered discourses about women’s alcohol consumption, with disempowering effects on women. This discourse analysis of drug and alcohol policies can contribute to broadening how social workers understand policy representations and the effects of policy discourses on women. The disciplinary power of the medicalisation and acceptable/unacceptable categorisation of women’s alcohol consumption means that women can internalise shame and stigma, which is often an obstacle for women attempting to seek assistance. More research is needed about how social workers can co-design policies and research projects with women of diverse sexualities and cultural backgrounds who have been subjugated by these policy discourses.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-21T01:34:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211025086
       
  • Giving up the ghost: Findings on fathers and social work from a study of
           pre-birth child protection

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      Authors: Ariane Critchley
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article reports findings from an ethnographic study of pre-birth child protection, conducted in an urban Scottish setting. The study was designed to explore the interactions between practitioners and families in the context of child protection involvement during a pregnancy. This research aimed to understand the activities that constituted pre-birth child protection assessment, and the meaning attached to those activities by social workers and expectant parents. Very different perspectives on fathers and fatherhood emerged through the study. Fathers shared their feelings of familial tenderness in the context of research interviews. Yet social workers often focused on the risks that the fathers posed. This focus on risk led professionals to ignore or exclude fathers in significant ways. Fathers were denied opportunities to take an active role in their families and care planning for their infants, whilst mothers were over-responsibilised. Children meanwhile were potentially denied the relationship, care and identity benefits of involved fatherhood. This article shows how pre-birth child protection processes and practice can function so as to limit the contribution of expectant fathers. The way that fathers and fathering are understood continues to be a wider problem for social work, requiring development through research and practice. This study was not immune to the challenge of involving men in social work research in meaningful ways. Nevertheless, the findings highlight how participation in social work research can create a forum for fathers to share their concerns, and the importance of their perspective for practice.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-06-07T03:26:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211019463
       
  • Experiences of secure transport in outdoor behavioral healthcare: A
           narrative inquiry

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      Authors: Will W Dobud
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Often synonymous with wilderness therapy, outdoor behavioral healthcare (OBH) is a residential treatment in the United States for young people, more than half of whom are sent via secure transport services. While empirical evidence suggests the secure transport of adolescents to OBH does not impact quantitative outcomes, limited research exists exploring client voice and the lived experience of OBH participants. This qualitative study, utilizing narrative inquiry, builds knowledge on experiences of secure transport services from nine past OBH adolescent participants. Findings are analyzed, interpreted, and discussed through a social work and trauma-informed lens. Recommendations for ethical practice, linking with human rights, and future research are provided.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-30T11:44:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211020088
       
  • Grandparenting in rural China: A culture-centered approach (CCA) to
           understand economic inequality and rural labor change

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      Authors: Kang Sun, Mohan Dutta
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The large-scale rural-to-urban migration in China has resulted in separated families and left-behind family members in the countryside. Various socioeconomic changes took place in rural China’s daily life due to migration, which provides unique perspectives to understand the hidden costs of the national discourse on development. This study aims to reveal how rural grandparenting resulted from the uneven economic development between a Chinese city and a village. A dual-site ethnographic study was conducted in one Northern village and one Southern city. Interviews, focus groups, and participant observation were used to form methodological triangulation to understand how socioeconomic features have made grandparenting necessary. Instead of focusing only on grandparents' daily responsibilities of taking care of their grandchildren, we compared grandparents' and parents' views on the changes in grandparents' socioeconomic roles, feelings of loneliness, and economic independence, as well as grandchildren's socialization processes. The study showcases grandparenting as having a social significance larger than being individualized acts of family care.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-29T01:03:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211018731
       
  • Social workers’ constructions of parents to children in foster care

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      Authors: Therése Wissö, Anna Melke, Irene Josephson
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Parents of children in out-of-home care receive little support from social services. Drawing on qualitative data collected in the project ‘Parent at a distance’, in which social services in seven municipalities in Sweden aimed to improve support to parents whose children are placed in foster care, this paper explores social workers’ discourses about parents to children in care. The analysis is based on focus group data in which a total of 52 social workers reflected on parents to children in care and how they can be supported by social services. The concept of interpretive repertoires was used to analyse how social workers in interaction construct parents and their support needs. The identified repertoires of change, acceptance, permanency, biology and non-biology may contribute to the understanding of why so few parents receive support, even though legislation stipulates that placements should be temporary. The paper concluded that discourses may shape support practices and thus it is crucial that social workers reflect on and develop their awareness about their constructions of parents and their role for children in out-of-home care.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-27T08:44:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211019455
       
  • Life routinization and clandestine photo-taking behavior among young
           people in Hong Kong: Implications for social work practice

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      Authors: Hau-lin Tam, Siu-ming To, Diana Kan Kwok, Doris Ka Yin Chan
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      With a growing number of reported offenses, clandestine photo-taking has become an increasingly noticeable phenomenon in Hong Kong and other parts of the world. This behavior is usually seen as a selfish act as it invades people’s privacy and sexual autonomy to satisfy one’s own sex drive. However, the present study provides new and varying insights into the problem. This is the qualitative section of an impact assessment including three focus group interviews with 10 young sexual offenders aged between 18 and 25 years who were either arrested or under probation. The results suggest that more than being sexually driven, people engaged in clandestine photo-taking to eliminate their sense of loneliness and break through the routinization of their everyday lifestyle. Living in a fast-paced and highly demanding metropolitan city, they felt lost and occupied to the extent that they were unaware of their purpose and meaning in life. In contrast, clandestine photo-taking allowed them to have a sense of control and satisfaction that they were lacking in their everyday lives. Based on the young offenders’ experiences and responses in the present study, social and parental understanding with early and preventive measures such as curriculum-based sexual education, and sufficient sexual and counseling support will be more important than imposing strong legal sanctions or social control to handle their sexually offending behavior. To assist young people in their need to overcome their everyday life’s boredom, stress, and routine, in combination with existing treatments, a meaning-centered approach is suggested for future practices.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-27T08:44:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211020348
       
  • Latinx immigrants raising children in the land of the free: Parenting in
           the context of persecution and fear

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      Authors: Fernanda Lima Cross, Deborah Rivas-Drake, Jasmin Aramburu
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Anti-immigrant rhetoric generated by the sociopolitical climate under the current U.S. presidential administration has exacerbated the fear of deportation and family separation within the unauthorized Latinx community. Consequently, millions of families, including U.S. citizen children living in mixed-status households, are experiencing stressful environments as they adapt and respond to their social context. This study explored how harsh immigration discourse impacts mixed-status families living in a new-immigrant destination. Twenty-two unauthorized mothers participated in semi-structured interviews regarding their experiences as immigrants raising children in the U.S. Two main themes arose from this analysis: (1) ever-present fear and stress and (2) obeying the law and avoiding others. Parents explained how they had been living in fear since the elections took place, and the different scenarios they had to prepare for in case of deportation. Moreover, some parents choose to minimize conversations around incidents happening in their community to avoid additional stress for children, whereas others addressed children’s concerns to reassure them and placate their apprehension. Participants also reported avoiding unnecessary trips outside of the home to prevent interactions with others, especially law enforcement. These results provide important insights regarding the experiences of unauthorized Latinx immigrant parents in the context of sociopolitical adversity. Due to the limited resources often available in new immigrant destinations, social workers must leverage their networks to support families undergoing difficult transitions with special attention to altered family structures and parenting practices. As unauthorized parents attempt to withstand the double burden of basic survival and effective parenting, it is imperative that practitioners provide tools for parents to effectively engage with their children to sustain healthy environments.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-27T03:23:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211014578
       
  • Philosophical pragmatism, pragmatic agency, and the treatment of evidence
           in social work

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      Authors: Pablo Garces
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      From the influential evidence-based practice (EBP), to the increasingly persuasive evidence-informed practice (EIP), in the last decades, the field has sought to adequately allocate scientific evidence within social work’s practice. While this development suggests a move away from positivism, it is less clear towards where. Thus, this article advances classical pragmatism as a plausible philosophy of science for the treatment of evidence to account for this transition and the way forward. Pragmatism regards humans and their contexts as part of a continuity, constantly changing each other, always becoming. As such, it challenges what counts as ‘evidence’ and demands healthy awareness and criticism of preferences and biases, whether personal or contextual, in the self and in the subjects of interest. This opens up the door to plurality, to harness practical reason to solve practical problems, turning indeterminate situations into determinate ones, thereby generating warranted assertions.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-26T08:40:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211019102
       
  • “The pain is real”: A [modified] photovoice exploration of disability,
           chronic pain, and chronic illness (in)visibility

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      Authors: Shanna K Kattari, Ramona Beltrán
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This study uses an innovative modification to Photovoice methodology to explore the lived experiences of people who have non-apparent disabilities, chronic pain and/or chronic illness. Responding to limitations to mobility, movement, transportation, capacity, and access, the project provided a series of studio sessions with a professional photographer, in which participants directed the content and quality of photographs documenting their experiences with disability, chronic pain and/or chronic illness. Four themes emerged from the images and writing: unfettered anger, challenging expectations, duality of reality, and resistance/resilience. Social workers can use these findings and arts-based methodology to help build community among marginalized groups.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T06:50:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211010902
       
  • Temporary stays with housed family and friends among older adults
           experiencing homelessness: Qualitative findings from the HOPE HOME study

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      Authors: Kelly R Knight, Jeremy Weiser, Margaret A Handley, Pamela Olsen, John Weeks, Margot Kushel
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe proportion of adults age 50 and older experiencing homelessness is growing. People at risk for homelessness may stay with family and friends during homelessness episodes. Moving in with housed family and friends is a strategy used to exit homelessness. Little is known about these stays with family and friends. This study examined the motivations for and challenges of older adults experiencing homelessness staying with or moving in with family or friends.MethodsWe purposively sampled 46 participants from the HOPE HOME study, a cohort of 350 community-recruited adults experiencing homelessness age ≥50 in Oakland, CA. Inclusion criteria included having stayed with housed family/friends for ≥1 nights in the prior 6 months. We sampled 19 family/friends who had hosted participants experiencing homelessness. We conducted separate, semi-structured interviews, summarized, memoed and coded data consistent using a grounded theory approach.ResultsOlder adults experiencing homelessness reported primarily temporary stays. Motivations for stays on the part of participants included a need for environmental, physical, and emotional respite from homelessness. Both individuals experiencing homelessness and hosts cited the mutual benefits of stays. Barriers to stays included feelings of shame, concerns about burdening the hosts, and interpersonal conflicts between older adults experiencing homelessness and host participants.ConclusionsThere are potential opportunities and concerns surrounding temporary stays between older adults experiencing homelessness and their family or friends. Policy solutions should support the potential mutual benefits of temporary stays, while addressing interpersonal barriers to strengthen kinship and friendship networks and mediate the negative impacts of homelessness.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-05-06T07:37:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211012745
       
  • Shelter-based services for survivors of human trafficking in Cambodia:
           Experiences and perspectives of survivors

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      Authors: Laura Cordisco Tsai, Vanntheary Lim, Channtha Nhanh
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      In Southeast Asia, services for survivors of human trafficking have historically been centralized within shelter programs. Minimal research has, however, been conducted regarding trafficking-specific shelters, particularly research that highlights the perspectives of survivors themselves. This manuscript presents the perspectives of survivors of human trafficking and sexual exploitation on their own experiences pertaining to trafficking-specific shelter services. We analyzed data from the Butterfly longitudinal research (BLR) study, a 10-year longitudinal study exploring the lives, trajectories, and viewpoints of survivors of human trafficking and sexual exploitation in Cambodia. We analyzed 236 in-depth interviews and narrative summaries of interviews conducted between 2011 and 2016 using an interpretive phenomenological approach (n = 79). Four themes were identified: feeling privileged to live in a shelter; lacking freedom and feeling imprisoned by rules; limited engagement with family; and mixed experiences with counseling. Findings inform critical recommendations for implementing trauma-informed care and strengthening mental health services for survivors, including services provided within shelter programs and within the anti-human trafficking movement more broadly.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T07:44:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211010901
       
  • ‘Becoming more confident in being themselves’: The value of cultural
           and creative engagement for young people in foster care – Dawn Mannay,
           Phil Smith, Catt Turney, Stephen Jennings and Peter Davies

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      Authors: Dawn Mannay, Phil Smith, Catherine Turney, Stephen Jennings, Peter Henry Davies
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      There is evidence that engagement with the arts can engender transformative effects on young people’s views of themselves and their futures, this can be particularly useful for children and young people in care. This paper draws on a case study of an arts-based programme delivered in Wales, UK. Field observations of the arts-based sessions were conducted, and the participant sample included young people in foster care (n = 8), foster carers (n = 7) and project facilitators (n = 3). The study employed interviews, observations, reflexive diaries, and metaphor work to explore the subjective accounts of these different stakeholders. This provided an insight into their experience of being involved with the arts-based programme, the impacts of this involvement, and what steps they felt could be taken to improve the model. The paper argues that arts and cultural engagement can be transformative in improving the confidence and social connectedness of young people in foster care, but that attention needs to be given to how programmes are delivered. The paper documents the often overlooked mundane, yet important, aspects of planning arts-based programmes, exploring the involvement of foster carers, interpersonal relationships, and the provision of refreshments. It calls for investment in developing carefully designed extracurricular opportunities for young people in care, where they can experience ‘becoming more confident in being themselves’.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T11:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211009965
       
  • From critical reflection to critical professional practice: Addressing the
           tensions between critical and hegemonic perspectives

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      Authors: Shachar Timor-Shlevin, Tamar Aharon, Sharon Segev, Shani Mazor, Emily Ishai
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Critical reflection processes are fundamental to critical social work practice. Nevertheless, these processes have been criticized for lacking a coherent translation to direct professional practice. Existing models of critical reflection culminate in the formulation of critical professional perspectives, leaving the translation of critical perspectives into direct practice underdeveloped. This gap requires attention, specifically in the contemporary context of social services that operate under the hegemony of conservative and neoliberal discourses, which impede critical rationality and practice. Therefore, a nuanced conceptualization of the process that links critical reflection and critical practice is required. This article provides such a conceptualization by describing an undergraduate social work course that used a collaborative inquiry group to explore critical participatory practices. Building on our collaborative inquiry experiences and findings, we portray a process that included critical reflection, direct critical practice, and the development of a critical professional perspective. Based on the conceptual framework of action science, our conceptualization demonstrates how the process of addressing the tension between critical and hegemonic perspectives enables professionals to create critical practice within the hegemonic field. In this way, we provide a theoretical contribution to the construction of critical reflection models and a practical contribution to professional developmental processes that promote critical professionalism.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-09T09:00:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211006765
       
  • Connecting in resettlement: An examination of social support among
           Congolese women in the United States

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      Authors: Karin Wachter, Lauren E Gulbas, Susanna Snyder
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines how refugees rebuild social support in resettlement from the perspectives of women who fled the Democratic Republic of Congo and ultimately resettled in the U.S. The qualitative study involved in-depth individual interviews in 2016 with 27 adult women who lived in a mid-size U.S. town. The findings shed light on strategies women engaged to rebuild social support in a resettlement context. Using an inductive analytical approach, researchers identified five inter-related themes: (1) reconfiguring family support; (2) engaging multiple sources for practical support; (3) accessing mentorship; (4) attending places of worship; and (5) sustaining a relationship with God. Additionally, the analysis revealed crosscutting types and sources of social support women sought and valued in resettlement. Types of social support included emotional, informational, mentorship, practical, relational, and spiritual. Sources of social support included family and loved ones spanning local, national, and transnational geographies, God, neighbors, places of worship, and the resettlement agency. These findings contribute to developing context-specific conceptualizations of social support, with implications for research and practice.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-04-09T08:33:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211008495
       
  • “When we talk about intimate partner violence we talk in an adult way”
           – Social workers’ descriptions of intimate partner violence between
           teenagers

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      Authors: Emmy Högström Tagesson, Carina Gallo
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines how seven social workers within the Swedish social services describe intimate partner violence between teenagers (IPV-BT). The article adds to the literature by examining IPV-BT outside a U.S. context, where most studies have been conducted. Based on semistructured qualitative interviews, the authors analyze descriptions of IPV-BT in relation to Charles Tilly’s notion of category making through transfer, encounter, negotiation, and imposition. They also analyze how the social workers’ descriptions of IPV-BT relate to the intersection between age and gender. The results show that the social workers mostly described IPV-BT by referring to encounters with teenagers and by transferring knowledge and theoretical definitions from their specialized working areas, primarily intimate partner violence between adults (IPV-BA) and troubled youth. More rarely, the social workers based their definitions of IPV-BT upon negotiating dialogues with teenagers. Also, those who worked in teams specialized on IPV had the mandate to impose their definitions of IPV-BT to other professionals and teenagers. When taking age and gender hierarchies in consideration, the results show IPV-BT risks being subordinate IPV-BA on a theoretical level, a practical level and in terms of treatment quality. The study suggests that social work with IPV-BT needs to be sensitive to the double subordinations of the teenage girl and of the teenagers who do not follow gender expectations.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T05:30:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211002890
       
  • Digital social work: Conceptualising a hybrid anticipatory practice

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      Authors: Sarah Pink, Harry Ferguson, Laura Kelly
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      While the use of digital media and technologies has impacted social work for several years, the Covid-19 pandemic and need for physical distancing dramatically accelerated the systematic use of video calls and other digital practices to interact with service users. This article draws from our research into child protection to show how digital social work was used during the pandemic, critically analyse the policy responses, and make new concepts drawn from digital and design anthropology available to the profession to help it make sense of these developments. While policy responses downgraded digital practices to at best a last resort, we argue that the digital is now an inevitable and necessary element of social work practice, which must be understood as a hybrid practice that integrates digital practices such as video calls and face-to-face interactions. Moving forward, hybrid digital social work should be a future-ready element of practice, designed to accommodate uncertainties as they arise and sensitive to the improvisatory practice of social workers.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T05:30:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211003647
       
  • ‘We shouldn’t be told to shut up, we should be told we can speak
           out’: Reflections on using arts-based methods to research disability
           hate crime

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      Authors: Leah Burch
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The concept of hate crime has been subject to ongoing debate among academics, practitioners and policy-makers. Yet for many disabled people, this concept remains to be ambiguous and conceptually ‘fuzzy.’ In this article, I reflect upon the use of arts-based methods in order to explore disabled people’s understandings and experiences of hate crime. Specifically, I offer methodological reflections on how the process of making mood-boards can invite participants to revisit personal experiences, prompt sensitive and supportive discussions, and present knowledge in more creative ways. I also consider some of the difficulties involved with arts-based methods, particularly where such activities can evoke discomfort. Despite these methods creating some challenges, this article supports the use of arts-based methods as enabling a more collaborative and participatory research process. In particular, I argue that these alternative methods provide an opportunity to sensitively explore potentially upsetting topics such as hate crime.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-17T06:53:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211002888
       
  • A meta-ethnographic synthesis of lived experience of spouse caregivers in
           chronic illness

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      Authors: Manjusha G Warrier, Arun Sadasivan, Bhuvaneshwari Balasubramaian, Meera G Nair, Saraswati Nashi, Seena Vengalil, A Nalini, Priya Treesa Thomas
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Social workers routinely work with chronically ill, providing support for long term care. Several qualitative studies describe the experiences of the person and carer in a chronic illness. There is a limited synthesis of these experiences to aid practice. The current review aims to present a synthesis of the experiences of the spouses of chronically ill persons reported in the literature. A comprehensive search of electronic databases was done, and the studies were selected using PRISMA guidelines. The selected studies were subjected to quality check using CASP guidelines and a score was assigned to each of those studies. Later, qualitative synthesis of the results of the selected studies was done using the principles of meta-ethnography. 2407 studies published between 1999–2019 were identified and 22 studies were included in the final synthesis. The number of participants in the studies reviewed was 309, with more representation of females. The reciprocal synthesis of these studies identified loss, change, caregiving and exhaustion, barriers in providing care, illness experience, coping, socio-cultural norms and support as common themes from the accounts of the participants. ‘Continuity of change’ was identified as the core concept in the lived experience of the spouses of chronically ill persons. ‘Illness, loss and Lived experience’ is proposed as a model of the lived experience of the spouses. Through this synthesis, the factors influencing the lived experience of spouse caregivers is understood, which can help social work professionals in the health sector in planning interventions for the spouses of chronically ill persons.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-10T06:16:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021999706
       
  • Assessing and assisting prospective adoptive parents: Social workers’
           communicative strategies in adoption assessment interviews

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      Authors: Madeleine Wirzén, Asta Čekaitė
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      The assessment of prospective adoptive parents is a complex task for professional social workers. In this study, we examine the structure and function of professional social workers’ follow-up questions in assessment talk with adoption applicants. The analysis shows that adoption assessment through interviews involved a delicate and complex task that was accomplished by using a particular genre of institutional talk. This both invited the applicants’ extended and ‘open-ended’ responses and steered these responses and their development towards the institutionally relevant topics. Detailed interaction analysis demonstrates that social workers used a broad range of question types to steer and guide applicants’ responses, organising talk about specific assessment topics. On the basis of initial open-ended topic initiations and applicants’ responses, the social workers steered topic development by using follow-up moves such as polar questions and clarifying questions that asked for specification, challenged applicants’ ideas, confirmed their knowledge and encouraged self-reflection. These follow-up moves allowed social workers to achieve the progression of talk into relevant areas of investigation and constituted a central and characteristic feature of assessment interviews. We suggest that they allow social workers to accomplish two hybrid institutional goals: i) the assessment of applicants’ suitability and ii) applicants’ preparation for future parenthood.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-03-05T11:30:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021989425
       
  • Lifting the veil: Considering the conceptualizations of racism-based
           trauma among social workers

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      Authors: Samantha Francois, Curtis Davis
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      There is often a superficial veil that divides those willing to discuss the construct of race and those participating in racial ambivalence or color blindness. Talking about race, racism, and the traumatic effects of racism is a discussion that society is still learning how to navigate. This qualitative study, utilizing the narratives of 13 social workers, was the first to question how social workers, in the role of justice system advocates, engage with the construct of racism-based trauma experienced by the incarcerated person. Data analysis revealed that participants conceptualized racism-based trauma as an often unbeknownst and persistently stressful reaction to a covert or overt racially oppressive situation potentially accentuated by place or locale. Results highlight the importance of increasing knowledge in the construct of racism-based trauma to be beneficial in practice while confronting white privilege and allyship were identified challenges. Participants, varying in their education, indicated having received no training on racism-based trauma. An engagement with one’s racial identity before and during a critique of racialized systems was also posited as being beneficial. The aims of engaging with construct ultimately strengthen and diversify social work pedagogy, training, and policies regarding marginalized groups.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T05:39:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021997542
       
  • Toward a conceptual model for successful transgender aging

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      Authors: Steffany Sloan, Jacquelyn J Benson
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Transgender older adults have been subject to life-long stigma and marginalization, resulting in significant social and health consequences. Despite these challenges, this population commonly reports thriving in later life. In order to attend to nuanced experiences of older transgender adults, theoretical models of successful aging must reflect complexities presented by gender minority status. In order to address theoretical gaps, a systematic qualitative meta-synthesis was conducted to summarize findings across the body of qualitative transgender aging research. Findings indicated that transgender older adults conceptualize successful aging through the process of embracing gender identity. Themes were identified to conceptualize successful transgender aging such as gender expression, shedding internalized stigma, and championing a resilience mindset. Implications for social work practice are provided, suggesting a more comprehensive understanding of both challenges and resilience factors amongst the aging transgender population.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-02-19T06:34:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021994666
       
  • Narratives and processes – Developing a responsive parent–child
           program to empower local facilitators in a remote Aboriginal community

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      Authors: Carolin Stock, Maggie Kerinaiua Punguatji, Carmen Cubillo, Gary Robinson
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents the results of a retrospective study that critically examines the development of a responsive parent–child program from conceptualisation to pilot implementation. The development of the Play to Connect program was a continuation of research translation work of the Let’s Start parenting program which was delivered in remote Aboriginal communities across the Northern Territory, Australia from 2005–2016. The impetus for the Play to Connect program came from the community need for parenting support that could be delivered by local Aboriginal workers living in the community. The aim was to bring research and community together through the co-creation of contextually relevant knowledge directly useful for local Aboriginal facilitators. Embedded in a dynamic cycle of planning, delivery, observation and reflection, the team of local Aboriginal staff and visiting practitioners designed and piloted an innovative, user-friendly and adaptable parent–child program which was underpinned by the evaluation findings of an existing program, drawing on the framework of play therapy. The 2.5 year long process of development brought about action and change for the local Aboriginal staff. They valued the co-creation of the program and resources and reported increased knowledge of child development and confidence to deliver family support in their community. This study shows that the development of Play to Connect was more than “tailoring” a parenting program – it was a way of creating sustainable support around a program to increase the chances of continuity of implementation and successful community engagement and development.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-02-04T07:30:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021992413
       
  • What creates the public’s impression of social work and how can we
           improve it'

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      Authors: Barbara Staniforth, Slade C Dellow, Catherine Scheffer
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents results from a study in Aotearoa New Zealand which explored the ideas of social work practitioners on public perceptions of social work and how to improve them. This qualitative research was part of a Master’s project for two of the authors and followed on from two previous quantitative studies on this topic in Aotearoa. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 social work practitioners. Thematic analysis was used to create themes concerning what the perceived public perception was, what contributed to it, and how to improve it. The findings have implications for being better able to understand factors that contribute to the public perception of social work so that it may be improved, for increasing the public’s understanding of social work, and for recruitment of students into the profession.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-02-04T07:30:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021992104
       
  • Vietnamese social work practitioners’ conceptions of practice with
           sexual minorities

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      Authors: Trang Mai Le, Nilan Yu
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents the findings of a study that examined Vietnamese social work practitioners’ conceptions of practice with people who identified as lesbian or gay. The findings presented in this article, drawn from semi-structured interviews with 12 social work practitioners in Hanoi, Vietnam, form part of the findings of a bigger study that looked into the attitudes of Vietnamese social work practitioners toward sexual minorities and how they conceptualise practice in relation to this segment of the population. A notable proportion of the interview participants, all of whom presented as having moderate to positive attitudes toward sexual minorities, were found to hold a heterosexist assumption with regards to the sexual identity of their clients. And while there was consensus in the need for a social work response, there were differences in the practitioners’ conceptions of what form this should take. The participants were open to direct practice with individuals and a limited degree of community engagement but were apprehensive with the prospect of undertaking policy advocacy. It is argued that these conceptions of practice are informed by limitations imposed by their political environment as well as dominant ideological and philosophical influences.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-02-03T07:41:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021990874
       
  • Children helping to co-construct a digital tool that is designed to
           increase children’s participation in child welfare investigations in
           Sweden

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      Authors: Helena Blomberg, Gunnel Östlund, Philip Rautell Lindstedt, Baran Cürüklü
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      How do children (aged 6–12 years) understand and make use of a digital tool that is under development' This article builds on an ongoing interdisciplinary research project in which children, social workers (the inventers of this social innovation) and researchers together develop an interactive digital tool (application) to strengthen children’s participation during the planning and process of welfare assessments. Departing from social constructionism, and using a discursive narrative approach with visual ethnography, the aim of the article is to display how the children co-construct the application and contribute with “stories of life situations” by drawing themselves as characters and the places they frequent. The findings show that the children improved the application by suggesting more affordances so that they could better create themselves/others, by discovering bugs, and by showing how it could appeal to children of various ages. The application helped the children to start communicating and bonding when creating themselves in detail, drawing places/characters and describing events associated with them, and sharing small life stories. The application can help children and social workers to connect and facilitate children’s participation by allowing them to focus on their own perspectives when drawing and sharing stories.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-02-03T07:41:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021990864
       
  • Montage and the illumination of developmental thinking in welfare work

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      Authors: Stine Thygesen, Trine Øland
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article illuminates and interrupts the existence of progress as an imperative haunting welfare work. The article argues that there are forces and structures of welfare work that the dominating ways of approaching history leave unexamined and that this insight calls for a more complex relationship with history. Based on Walter Benjamin’s philosophy of history, the article explores how the montage as an analytical performance can illuminate the hauntings of modern welfare work, which makes us see the depth and persistence of progress. The article concludes by making it possible for welfare workers to think differently; to listen to and let the ghosts of development and progress pass, and to get along with the unreason and irrationality of the other. The actual montage of the article is composed with reference to a study of welfare work with foster children in Denmark.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-01-29T06:32:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021990872
       
  • “Depends who it is”: Towards a relational understanding of the use of
           adult-child touch in residential child care

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      Authors: Lisa Warwick
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      This article theorises adult-child touch in residential child care as a relational practice, contributing to an emergent literature on residential child care, and conceptualises residential child care as a Lifespace. It responds to an on-going debate surrounding the use of touch in the sector, which has attracted academic attention since the early 1990s as a result of abuse scandals, the ensuing ‘no touch’ policies and a growing body of research identifying touch as an important aspect of child development. The paper draws upon a six-month ethnographic study of residential child care, which was explicitly designed to observe everyday interactions between residential care workers and young people. The findings suggest that touch cannot be discussed in isolation from either relationships or a contextual understanding of relationships in the specific context of residential child care. The study found that touch is unavoidable, relational and that dichotomous understandings of touch continue to present issues for both theory and practice.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-01-27T07:48:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021990875
       
  • Slow scholarship for social work: A praxis of resistance and creativity

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      Authors: Stéphanie Wahab, Gita R Mehrotra, Kelly E Myers
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Expediency, efficiency, and rapid production within compressed time frames represent markers for research and scholarship within the neoliberal academe. Scholars who wish to resist these practices of knowledge production have articulated the need for Slow scholarship—a slower pace to make room for thinking, creativity, and useful knowledge. While these calls are important for drawing attention to the costs and problems of the neoliberal academy, many scholars have moved beyond “slow” as being uniquely referencing pace and duration, by calling for the different conceptualizations of time, space, and knowing. Guided by post-structural feminisms, we engaged in a research project that moved at the pace of trust in the integrity of our ideas and relationships. Our case study aimed to better understand the ways macro forces such as neoliberalism, criminalization and professionalization shape domestic violence work. This article discusses our praxis of Slow scholarship by showcasing four specific key markers of Slow scholarship in our research; time reimagined, a relational ontology, moving inside and towards complexity, and embodiment. We discuss how Slow scholarship complicates how we understand constructs of productivity and knowledge production, as well as map the ways Slow scholarship offers a praxis of resistance for generating power from the epistemic margins within social work and the neoliberal academy.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-01-27T07:48:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021990865
       
  • Unpacking the worlds in our words: Critical discourse analysis and social
           work inquiry

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      Authors: Sandra M Leotti, Erin P Sugrue, Nichole (Nick) Winges-Yanez
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Critical discourse analysis is a rapidly growing, interdisciplinary field of inquiry that combines linguistic analysis and social theory to address the way power and dominance are enacted and reproduced in text. Critical discourse analysis is primarily concerned with the construction of social phenomena and involves a focus on the wider social, political, and historical contexts in which talk and text occur, exploring the way in which theories of reality and relations of power are encoded and enacted in language. Critical discourse analysis moves beyond considering what the text says to examining what the text does. As an interdisciplinary and eclectic field of inquiry, critical discourse analysis has no unifying theoretical perspective, standard formula, or essential methods. As such, there is much confusion around what critical discourse analysis is, what it is not, and the types of projects for which it can be fruitfully employed. This article seeks to provide clarity on critical discourse analysis as an approach to research and to highlight its relevance to social work scholarship, particularly in relation to its vital role in identifying and analyzing how discursive practices establish, maintain, and promote dominance and inequality.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-01-27T07:48:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021990860
       
  • The scarred body: A personal reflection of self-injury scars

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      Authors: Nina Veetnisha Gunnarsson
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      Self-injury is deemed a pathology and a deviant practice that is not socially sanctioned and culturally accepted as soothing and healing the self. The marked female body is also pathologized and perceived as deviant; hence, having self-inflicted scars may easily lead to social stigma, shame, and the need to hide the scars. In this personal reflection I explore how self-inflicted scars can have the same meaning as self-injury to control the self and act as self-expression, and how the marked female body can be a resistance to the cultural idea of femininity. I draw upon my own personal experiences of self-inflicted scars and how these scars have become intertwined with my identity. I have carved or burnt my body in different situations and from different moods in the past, but they are all with me at the present and will be with me in the future. Without the scars, I am not the person that others see me as or I see myself as. I sometimes feel that I would be nothing without my scars.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-01-25T06:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021990868
       
  • Weighing the options: Service user perspectives on homeless outreach
           services

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      Authors: Lynden Bond, Christina Wusinich, Deborah Padgett
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.
      On a single night in 2018, over 194,000 individuals experienced unsheltered homelessness across the United States. Homeless outreach programs are often a first point of contact for these individuals, providing essential services, including connecting them to emergency shelter. Guided by the socio-rational choice model, this qualitative study aimed to address two questions: 1) How do experiences with outreach workers affect the way individuals experiencing unsheltered homelessness determine the utility of services offered by outreach programs' 2) What specific factors related to outreach interactions are involved in street homeless individuals’ decision to utilize or reject services from homeless outreach programs' Thirty-eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with street homeless individuals who had experience with homeless outreach in New York City. Interviews were first coded using a template approach followed by the use of a theory-guided approach for further analysis. Five main themes were identified that provided an understanding of individuals’ decision to engage with outreach services: credibility, transparency, offering choices, bureaucracy, and opportunity cost. This study provides insight into unsheltered individuals’ perspectives on homeless outreach workers and programs and offers suggestions for implementing micro- and macro-level changes to better meet the needs of our homeless neighbors.
      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-01-25T06:14:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1473325021990861
       
  • Social work and anthropology: Traversing, trading, and translating across
           boundaries

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      Authors: Lauren E Gulbas, Tam E Perry, Matthew Chin, John Mathias
      First page: 1415
      Abstract: Qualitative Social Work, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Social Work
      PubDate: 2021-09-20T01:05:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14733250211048320
       
 
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