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Qualitative Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.421
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 33  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1468-7941 - ISSN (Online) 1741-3109
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Engaging older people through visual participatory research: Insights and
           reflections

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      Authors: Sarah Quinton, Daniela Treveri Gennari, Silvia Dibeltulo
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Although there is an ageing population in Europe which acts as an increasingly influential social and economic force, there remains limited scholarship concerning the involvement of older people in research. This paper responds to the question of how visual participatory research engages older people through three illustrative case studies, set in England and Italy, all of which incorporated different visual elements within their participatory design. These cases highlight; the value of the visual as a trigger for memories as an entry point for research discussions, that the sharing of experiences is facilitated by both the participatory and visual elements of the approach and that greater engagement is forthcoming once trust is established through the socialisation of older research participants. Reflections and good practice suggestions are offered to other qualitative researchers on the practicalities of adopting this approach.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T03:49:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221110163
       
  • Enhancing participatory research with young children through
           comic-illustrated ethnographic field notes

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      Authors: Christina Tatham-Fashanu
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Conducting research with young participants presents numerous challenges, particularly in terms of representation as the researcher endeavours to listen to children’s voices in order to understand and portray their perspectives accurately. Since the 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of a Child established children have the right to express their views and have these taken seriously in matters that affect them, researchers have developed a variety of multimodal methods to capture the children’s perspectives. The aim of this paper is to describe an innovative methodological approach to recording ethnographic observations of young children (aged four to six) through a visual mode: the cartoon. The article describes the methodology of a specific research project that explored young children’s communicative practices in a super-diverse environment. Adopting a flexible approach to research and putting children’s suggestions into practice led to the co-production cartoons that used the participants’ self-portraits to visually portray the researcher’s written observations of the children. The paper presents vignettes, evidencing how the use of self-portraits meant the cartoons were more engaging, held greater personal significance and opened up spaces for dialogue, leading the researcher to uncover deeper insights. This has important implications for any research that endeavours to listen to the participants’ perspectives, but where verbal or written forms of communication are impeded.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T06:36:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221110186
       
  • Disturbing hierarchies. Sexual harassment and the politics of intimacy in
           fieldwork

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      Authors: Bethan Harries
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines how sexual harassment is often mediated through the making of imagined complicities that are constructed to imply that an alliance/compliance underpins the relationship and ‘justifies’ the harassment. It is concerned with how the making and doing of intimacies engages with broader hierarchical structures of power, including structures of inequality. Fieldwork is viewed as a site in which the politics of intimacy exposes normative expectations and structures of inequality. Specifically, the discussion exposes how processes of Othering are mobilised by participants as a means to cultivate imagined complicities but expose discrimination. The paper calls for a reappraisal of the focus placed on building rapport and/or a sense of familiarity in qualitative research to take account of multiple forms of intimacies and risks they can entail. This is increasingly prescient in light of the renewed emphasis on participatory methods and co-production which entail closer working relationships.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T08:10:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221098926
       
  • Online, offline, hybrid: Methodological reflection on event ethnography in
           (post-)pandemic times

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      Authors: Nona Schulte-Römer, Friederike Gesing
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper develops a methodological framework for event-ethnographic research in online and offline settings based on the authors’ ethnographic experiences in the fields of environmental governance and sociotechnical transition before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Drawing on empirical event studies, we outline the particularities of organized events as ethnographic research sites, identifying key challenges related to the spatio-temporal ephemerality, socio-material infrastructures and interactive unboundedness of events. We address these challenges along three axes of reflection, asking how we (1) attend, (2) infrastructure, and (3) take part in organized events. The framework we propose promotes a co-constructive understanding of organized events and raises broader methodological issues regarding power dynamics, our role as ethnographers in transdisciplinary contexts and fair and transparent ethnographic data collection. The framework is designed to explore how the (post-)pandemic transition from real-world to virtual event interactions affects both our research fields and our ethnographic research in transdisciplinary contexts.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T09:12:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221110172
       
  • Stop-motion storytelling: Exploring methods for animating the worlds of
           rare genetic disease

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      Authors: Richard Gorman, Bobbie Farsides, Tony Gammidge
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Qualitative research is increasingly challenged to think creatively and critically about how accounts of lived experience might be collected, collated, curated, and disseminated. In this article, we consider how forms of participatory filmmaking and animation might assist in the development of methodologies appropriate to accessing, revealing and representing the social worlds of families affected by rare genetic conditions. We trace how participatory animation, specifically stop-motion animation (a filmmaking technique involving incrementally manipulating objects to produce the semblance of motion) offers opportunities for enlivening qualitative research. We discuss the creation of a series of workshops which took participants through the process of producing their own animated film. Stop-motion storytelling as a method enabled us to encounter, and subsequently foreground, different narratives and emotions, whilst creating-together and watching-together prompted novel conversations. We move to reflect on how participatory animation can be a provocative and productive practice in the toolkit of qualitative research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T05:06:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221110168
       
  • Online synchronous focus group interviews: Practical considerations

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      Authors: Romy F Willemsen, Jiska J Aardoom, Niels H Chavannes, Anke Versluis
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a sudden shift was warranted from face-to-face to digital interviewing. This shift is in line with the existing trend of digitalization. However, limited literature is available on how to conduct focus group interviews online successfully. This research note provides practical guidelines, tips, and considerations for setting up and conducting online synchronous focus groups for eight relevant factors: preparation, the number of participants, the duration, a break, the usability of the online platform, the interaction between participants and researchers, support and roles of the research team, and privacy considerations. These guidelines were formulated based on the available literature and our own positive hands-on experiences. We consider online focus groups to be an excellent option when taking into account the considerations related to the eight factors.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T01:10:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221110161
       
  • Managing neutrality, rapport, and antiracism in qualitative interviews

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      Authors: Tianhao Zhang, Ryo Okazawa
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines interviewers’ practices in managing conflicting institutional expectations of neutrality and rapport in interview interaction which are complicated by the normative expectation of antiracism. By applying conversation analysis and membership categorization analysis to sequences of interaction after interviewees’ possibly racist talk, we demonstrate that the interviewer deploys various interactional resources to orient to antiracism, while maintaining a neutralistic stance and sustaining rapport with interviewees. The interviewer’s orientation towards antiracism becomes more explicit as the interactions unfold. We argue that these practices are both constrained and enabled by the unique institutional features of qualitative interviews. Implications for research on race using interview data are also discussed.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T05:18:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221110183
       
  • Ethically important moments: Researching the intimate lives of adults
           labeled/with intellectual disabilities

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      Authors: Alan Santinele Martino
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      People labeled/with intellectual disabilities are rarely given the opportunity to “speak” about their sexual and romantic experiences on their own behalf. Persisting stereotypes and (over)protectionism sometimes serve as social mechanisms that silence disabled people in knowledge creation. Although further protections need to be implemented, people labeled/with intellectual disabilities must have an opportunity to share their perspectives and experiences with love and intimacy. This research note discusses some of the “ethically important moments” I have encountered as a researcher looking at the romantic and sexual lives of adults labeled/with intellectual disabilities, as well as how my embodied experience in the field led me to reflect on my own positionality as a researcher and sexual being.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T09:11:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221110179
       
  • Absence, multiplicity and the boundaries of research' Reflections on
           online asynchronous focus groups

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      Authors: Ana Estrada-Jaramillo, Mike Michael, Hannah Farrimond
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      During the COVID 19 pandemic, Online Asynchronous Focus Groups (OAFG) through WhatsApp were conducted to explore women’s experiences in the context of Congenital Syphilis prevention in Colombia. This paper discusses issues raised by the OAFGs (not least in relation to face-to-face focus groups). After a review of the literature on online and offline focus groups, there is a consideration of some key features of our OAFGs. In particular, we note how silence, presence, attention, continuity and multiplicity manifested in our OAFGs. We suggest that rather than regarding OAFGs as inferior to the ‘gold standard’ of face-to-face focus groups, our OAFGs raise important questions about our assumptions about focus group methodology. For instance, what counts as participant engagement, what comprises ‘useful’ social data, and what constitute the boundaries of a focus group all emerge as critical issues. We go on to reflect on some of the implications of these issues for the fruitfulness of OAFG methods.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T07:23:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221110169
       
  • Structures for Indigenous sovereignty in research: Disrupting settler
           colonial methods and relations in research partnerships

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      Authors: Jenni Conrad
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      How can researchers in settler colonial states align their research and partnership practices to demonstrate reciprocity and solidarity with Indigenous communities and nations—especially researchers with dominant identities and training' This self-study investigates a recent research-practice partnership focused on Native curriculum implementation in schools on Coast Salish Lands (Washington State, USA). Using research memos, journals, and correspondence, I analyze my experiences as a white settler and dominantly-trained researcher conducting and relearning qualitative inquiry with eight Native education leaders during a participatory design-based study. Findings show that researcher actions and decision-making consistent with goals of solidarity and reciprocity depended on embedded structures of Indigenous sovereignty across multiple levels and phases of the project. Clarified through relationships with Indigenous advisors/co-designers and others, these structures created mechanisms of accountability to Coast Salish nations and knowledges that counteracted slippage into colonizing and less participatory research methods and relationships. By connecting researcher agency to specific research structures supporting Native sovereignty, this inquiry offers implications for participatory research and research-practice partnerships that support Indigenous sovereignty in ongoing and accountable ways.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T01:31:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221110178
       
  • Gendered fieldwork with Chinese police: Negotiations among a researchers,
           gatekeeper, and participants

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      Authors: Wenqi Yang
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study is a reflexive analysis of my fieldwork experience studying Chinese police officers’ responses to domestic violence, focusing on recruitment and access. As one of the first qualitative works that investigate the gender quality of China’s street-level police subculture, it examines how having a female gatekeeper and studying a gendered topic in a male-dominated and chivalrously sexist subculture can shape female researchers’ fieldwork. This article clarifies the multiple roles a gatekeeper plays. The findings also highlight that doing gender in fieldwork involves a mutual categorization by emphasizing the participants’ gender performance in response to the researcher’s gender identity as well as the research topic. Finally, this work also provides tips that fellow researchers working in the field may find helpful in managing gender performance, avoiding sexist treatments, and enhancing the trustworthiness of the findings.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T01:03:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221110165
       
  • Digitally dispersed, remotely engaged: Interrogating participation in
           virtual photovoice

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      Authors: Jinwen Chen
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, pushed particularly by COVID-19 restrictions and lockdowns, virtual photovoice studies have emerged as an alternative modality of photovoice. Alongside this trend are questions about virtual photovoice practice and methodological questions of participation. This paper interrogates these questions using an Australian photovoice research with LGBTQ+ multicultural older people. Threading through the photovoice stages of conceptualisation, recruitment, photovoice production and discussions, it discusses participation in relation to both in-person and virtual photovoice literatures, highlights challenges and new opportunities. Reflecting on virtual photovoice as a method and a methodology, it positions virtual photovoice as a comparable choice that researchers can make.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T09:44:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221110175
       
  • Sociocultural contexts and power dynamics in research interviews:
           Methodological considerations in Confucian society

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      Authors: Geena Kim
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this reflexive essay, I raise issues about power dynamics between interviewers and interviewees based on my experiences conducting research interviews in South Korea. I focus on the sociocultural contexts that drive social agents’ behaviors in the interview process, which in Korean Confucian contexts include respect for adults and educational fervor. A particular configuration of authority relationships was evident in each scenario, showing how sociocultural contexts underlie the complicated power dynamics of interview situations, which can be further complicated by topics that require participants to share their intellectual notions. Based on my interview experiences, I argue that acknowledging these social contexts and their impacts on power relations will serve to strengthen the depth of engagement in interviews and therefore the quality and potential impact of qualitative interview research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T05:46:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221110189
       
  • Researching masculinities and food protein practices: A trio of
           more-than-human participatory workshops

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      Authors: Paul Hurley, Emma Roe
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Whilst there is research around men and masculinities as they relate to practices of caring in the ecological crisis, less is written about methodologies that can address intersectional challenges, and ways of engagement that can support behaviour change. A process-based workshop methodology is discussed for researching the male-gendered and material performances of environmental caring related to personal food protein consumption practices. It works creatively to address relational inequalities in status both between different masculine positionalities and different food proteins. It contributes to more-than-human participatory methodologies by exploring male-gender – food protein relations, via positioning and inviting practical-engagement with foodstuff as a process for destabilising social and cultural hierarchies attached to thinking about, as well as preparing, cooking and eating, different food proteins. We argue that novel research findings can emerge around individual, collective and community responses to the ecological crisis through the careful methodological attention to masculine inequalities.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T11:09:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221098924
       
  • Learning danger: Cultural difference and the limits of trust in dangerous
           fieldworks

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      Authors: Axel Rudi
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Reflecting on personal experiences from conducting fieldwork in Iraqi and Turkish Kurdistan between 2015 and 2017, the article supplements existing literature on how to navigate dangerous fieldwork by considering the limits of trust with regards to estimating safety, and the necessity of learning local definitions of danger. Trust, the article shows, may provide a false sense of security, particularly when working with revolutionary organizations, due to the socio-cultural differences in attitudes toward what qualifies as danger. Similarly, the article argues that dangers connected with uncertainty may also be better understood through analyzing people’s cultural responses. To better grasp these emic attitudes, the article advocates for taking “steps of faith,” supplemented by an ongoing reflexive process, aimed at assimilating local practices. To conclude, the article argues that an attentiveness to the skills needed to navigate a dangerous terrain, may assist in moving the field away from a scientistic “securitization of research.”
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T04:05:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221096607
       
  • Developing African oral traditional storytelling as a framework for
           studying with African peoples

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      Authors: Araba A Z Osei-Tutu
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Oral traditions have played and continue to play a critical role in the lives of African peoples albeit changes in context and usage. In this article, I discuss the development of what I term the African Oral Traditional Storytelling (AOTS) Framework as an ethical and culturally centered approach to studying with African peoples. Akin to narrative inquiry methodology, the AOTS Framework is developed as an alternative approach to studying or working with African peoples by centering African oral storytelling, African philosophies and worldviews, languages, and cultures as relevant and essential to understanding the experiences of African peoples. The collaborative philosophical underpinnings of the AOTS Framework rest on the communal and the collaborators’ engagement in the study not just as people who provide information but as co-creators in the narratives, meanings, and understandings that are brought to bear.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T10:15:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221082263
       
  • Hopes and challenges of creating and using a smartphone application.
           Working on and working with a digital mobile tool in qualitative
           sociospatial research

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      Authors: Maciej Frąckowiak, Łukasz Rogowski, Vivien Sommer
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      The article focuses on developing and using a mobile application in the research of spatial practices along the Polish-German border region. The goal is to broaden the frame of thinking about the use of mobile applications in social research and understand it as a network of human and non-human actors. Based on observations and interviews conducted both with the study participants using the application and ourselves as members of the research team, who developed the app, we will examine expectations and potentials regarding the use of this application. We explore how it shaped our relationships and contacts and the perception of the data collected, and we conclude by proposing a framework allowing to consider more factors in the development of the application to enhance efficiency and reliability and to see how it transforms the research process and its environment.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T09:28:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221098923
       
  • Hierarchy and inequality in research: Navigating the challenges of
           research in Ghana

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      Authors: Magnus Mfoafo-M’Carthy, Jeff Grischow
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper provides insights from experiences in data gathering and recruitment from two research projects on disability/mental health in Ghana. The focus of the study explores stigma amongst individuals diagnosed with mental illness and their caregivers. The study investigates the positioning of the researcher in a superior light by participants which often wrests power from those who should be considered the true experts of their own circumstances. Inequality in the interview process thus carried the risk of impacting the quality of the data, as some participants did not consider themselves as ‘experts’ of their condition. The paper explores strategies for addressing these challenges of hierarchy and inequality in the research process in the Global South. Based on the study, we report on our experiences as follows: (1) ensuring that participants are empowered to engage with researchers; and (2) training local researchers to engage in culturally sensitive research processes.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-15T04:24:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221098927
       
  • Moving beyond ‘shopping list’ positionality: Using kitchen table
           reflexivity and in/visible tools to develop reflexive qualitative research
           

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      Authors: Louise Folkes
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Within qualitative research, much can be learned from the influence of researcher positionality on the research process. Reflecting upon ethnographic fieldwork undertaken for a doctoral study, this paper explores how researcher positionality not only shapes research motivations but also situates the researcher and the ‘researched’, impacting how data is created and interpreted. There is a long history of engaging with positionality in qualitative research, however, oftentimes this engagement is purely descriptive, providing a ‘shopping list’ of characteristics and stating if these are shared or not with participants. It is important for engagement with reflexivity to go beyond providing a ‘shopping list’ of positionality statements to develop deeper discussions about the fluidity of positionality across the research process. Using the previously established concept of ‘kitchen table reflexivity’, I reflect on how talk allows researchers to outline shifts and adaptability in positionality as research progresses. I expand this concept to argue that kitchen table reflexivity can occur in conversations during fieldwork with participants, utilising a range of in/visible tools at the researcher’s disposal. For example, the spaces between fieldwork encounters, the ‘waiting field’, is often where observations and informal discussions with participants take place. Using fieldnotes and interview data, this paper outlines how positionality fluctuates and interweaves with the theoretical, methodological, and analytical approach taken. The paper concludes by restating the importance of meaningful engagement with positionality throughout qualitative research, in order to avoid static and hollow positionality statements.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T06:29:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221098922
       
  • Hierarchy and inequality in research: Practices, ethics and experiences

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      Authors: Lars Frers, Lars Meier
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Research as a social practice enacts social hierarchies in the relation between researcher and the researched. Taking up the critique of the consequences of such hierarchies in the production of knowledge, participatory methods aim to decolonize this power relation. This article contributes to this topic by discussing limits of participation, highlighting the often unexpected reemergence of power and hierarchies in a leveled research field. We take a closer look at how inequalities are emerging and negotiated in the research process. Troublings of hierarchies during the research process are considered as eminently productive for the analysis of social inequalities and for maintaining a precarious ethics of care in the research process. Other articles that also contribute to the special issue opened by this contribution analyze sources and expressions of hierarchy and power troubles during qualitative research by putting a specific focus on unforeseen challenges, inversions, and obstacles that arise during research processes. The contributions demonstrate what specific insights into social inequalities can be gained through an analytical focus on such troubles. It is demonstrated that a critical reflection of inequalities in research relations can also be a contribution to research on social inequalities in general.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T03:36:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221098920
       
  • Solidarity as methodological praxis

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      Authors: Karen Ross, Peiwei Li, Meagan Call-Cummings
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we explore the concept of solidarity in the context of empirical social inquiry, a concept that is underdeveloped in the research methodology literature. We do so by drawing connections and contrasts to other more established methodological concepts such as reflexivity and positionality. We draw upon existing literature as well as reflection and analyses of our personal experiences and research endeavors to illustrate the nature of solidarity as a relationally grounded transformational practice. Through our exploration, we aim to articulate principles that can be utilized to understand solidarity as a methodological concept, based on our assertion that through such an understanding, we are better placed to engage in transformative and justice-oriented research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T03:33:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221098919
       
  • “He/his/she/her/father/mother/son/daughter”: A critical reflection of
           reproductions of cis-normativity and cis-dominance in preparing
           qualitative data for analysis

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      Authors: Maria Liegghio, Renée Sloos, Skyler Fantin, Hannah Ciordas
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this research note, we present a critical moment we had as a research team in our work preparing qualitative data for its analysis in which an unanticipated social justice issue was triggered. The moment was related to determining the best ways to anonymize the information—in particular, how to replace what were perceived as “male” and “female” gendered names, family relationships, and roles with the labels of “she/her/mother/daughter” or “he/his/father/son”. The paper begins with a review of the main “do’s and don’ts” of data preparation, followed by our reflections of the social justice issue. Through our differently positioned reflections, we complicate the task of data preparation by revealing the ways in which cis-dominance is upheld by cis-normativity, cis-genderism, and heteronormativity. We end with recommendations for practices that uphold the values and goals of social justice by resisting cis-dominance and challenging the erasures of peoples with fluid genders and identities.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T01:58:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221096592
       
  • Co-constructing participatory ethics to address hierarchy and inequality:
           Social work ethics in research practice

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      Authors: Mattias De Backer
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Research on a sensitive and potentially stigmatising topic such as ‘radicalisation’ begs for a robust ethical framework. Ethical procedures, issuing from an institutional ethics commission, are not sufficient to manage these risks. Arguably, collaborative and participatory research is best suited to overcome the risks of doing research on such a sensitive topic as well as the hierarchy and inequality in the relationship between researchers, gatekeepers and participants. To co-construct a participatory ethical framework in this context, 22 social workers were asked about the core ethical values of their own professional context. In this paper, these social work ethics are brought in tension with the practice of doing research. The paper concludes with the insight that social work ethics are not transferrable to the research context in a straightforward manner. Hierarchy and inequality (as well as much frustration) will persist if only this strategy is adopted.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T12:06:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221098931
       
  • Methodological reflections on curating an artistic event with African
           youth in a Norwegian city

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      Authors: Henry Mainsah, Nicole Rafiki
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we remember experiences of our participation in an artistic event for youth of African descent in a Norwegian city to reflect on the potential of arts-based methods for exploring migrant and diasporic youth identities. Reflecting on the process of curating an event titled Afrikanske Dager in Drammen (African days in Drammen) involving young Africans in a Norwegian city, we demonstrate the methodological potential photography making, exhibition and dance performance. We show how processes of collaborative photography making provide spaces for participants to negotiate and think through identity and self-representation. We tease out the potential of dance choreography and performance as avenues for participants to embody and retell old histories from the archive of African presence in Norway. We discuss how the event making process was the site of unstable hierarchies where roles and positions constantly changed and highlight the power relations involved in the collaborative production of knowledge from artistic practice.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T03:11:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221096599
       
  • Embracing the ‘inverted commas’, or How COVID-19 can show us new
           directions for ethnographic ‘fieldwork’

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      Authors: Kristin Anabel Eggeling
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Qualitative researchers often refer to the sites they study as a ‘field’ and the work they do there as ‘fieldwork’. Setting both terms in inverted commas implies that their meaning stretches beyond clean categorisation of places or methods. Taking the example of ethnographic research during the coronavirus pandemic, I argue that embracing this excess meaning opens new research perspectives when fieldwork gets disrupted. As a more hopeful intervention into a debate currently focused on lost access, immobility and professional frustration, this article puts forward alternative readings of ‘fieldwork’ as a relational and emergent process in which proximity and knowledge production are bound to sensitive research practice more than to physical (co)presence. By tragic serendipity, I argue, COVID-19 has the potential to normalise such readings against the traditional gold standard of fieldwork as extended (and often expensive) research stays in places far-away from ‘home’.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T04:33:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221096594
       
  • Seeing bodies in social sciences research: Body mapping and violent
           extremism in Kenya

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      Authors: Sahla Aroussi, Fathima A Badurdeen, Xavier Verhoest, Michaelina Jakala
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      While violence is often targeted at and experienced by bodies with different identities or appearance, studies of violence in social sciences research often neglect the body as a data source and site of analysis. This article makes an original contribution to the literature on visual methods in general and arts-based approaches specifically, by focusing on the understudied and underutilised method of body mapping. It is novel in developing techniques for using body mapping as a tool for seeing violent extremism in international politics. The approach here enables researchers to engage with a potentially difficult topic and interrogate the nuances of how violent extremism is understood, experienced and resisted at a local community level. In so doing, it produces a rich, original data set of 20 body maps, interviews and focus group discussions with 10 men and 10 women from Muslim communities from around the coast in Kenya created during two 5-day intensive body mapping workshops held in Mombasa in November 2019. This embodied storytelling challenges dominant ideas about violent extremism and makes visible otherwise marginalised and obscured personal narratives and lived experiences of violence. This is of fundamental importance because everyday violence and exclusion not only go unaddressed in the efforts to tackle violent extremism but are also exacerbated by the excessive security measures used by the government in its effort to counter the threat of groups such as Al-Shabaab. The techniques we develop in this article have significant advocacy potential and societal impact: body mapping creates a platform and a tool for highlighting and challenging everyday practices such as female genital mutilation, violence against women, discrimination, racism, police brutality, tribalism and marginalisation. It can also transcend linguistic and educational barriers to enable access to a diverse audience and create bridges between divided communities.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T07:11:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221096598
       
  • “Nothing about us without us”: Tending to emancipatory ideologies and
           transformative goals in participatory action research partnerships

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      Authors: Camille M Wilson, Dana Nickson, Carolyn Hetrick, Dawn Wilson-Clark
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, a collaborative group of university researchers and a community organizer who participated in a 2-year participatory action research (PAR) partnership reflect upon their inquiry process and analyze its effects.
      Authors examine the benefits, challenges, and potential of using PAR to advance educational justice and transformative goals amidst austere neoliberal education reforms, such as public school closure and state sanctioned privatization.
      Authors consider ways PAR can reflect emancipatory ideologies, enable social and political change, and disrupt oppressive dynamics that many urban education organizers and activists oppose. Insights pertain to cultivating community-based norms that foster collective learning, agency, and social action, while also confronting methodological tensions in the work. Such tensions pertained to varied ideas about emotionality in research, research design, and the layered power dynamics of university-community relations.
      Authors highlight implications for implementing justice-oriented PAR in urban education arenas affected by intensifying neoliberal political contexts.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T06:22:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221087869
       
  • The borders of theory: Towards an artful ontology of knowing in
           qualitative research

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      Authors: Cristina Valencia Mazzanti, Melissa Freeman
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article considers the ontology of theory as a shaping phenomenon in qualitative research by opening up its intersection with artistic dimensions of knowing and knowledge. We argue that the plurality of practices and perspectives for research hinges on what theory is understood to be. Thus, rather than approaching theory as something predefined, we draw on conceptualizations of the experience of art to articulate the being of theory as an aesthetic renewal of a shared human movement of becoming. We then illuminate theory's potential as a multidimensional artful being by engaging with a subset of photographs of street art collected in Colombia.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T06:02:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221096595
       
  • A side-by-side methodological approach: Shared experience, informality and
           adaptation

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      Authors: Eric Lepp
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In shifting environments common to peace and conflict research, methodological grounding is rooted in the fluctuating roles undertaken by the researcher through time and space as one seeks a worldview that is experienced by research participants. This article introduces a side-by-side methodological approach, which developed through research of cross-community interaction amongst ice hockey supporters in Belfast. Influenced by qualitative research that sought to access local voices, this article moves from conceptual guidance and planning into the stands of the SSE Arena, where interviews were conducted with the person in the seat beside the researcher during ice hockey games. In doing so, this immersive methodology offers a contribution to unearthing unheard voices in this oft-studied region through the opportunity to make connection that was unscripted, aided by the informality of the research setting and the limited face-to-face interaction.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T08:46:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221096604
       
  • Everyday power dynamics and hierarchies in qualitative research: The role
           of humour in the field

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      Authors: Maarja Kaaristo
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Negotiating the relationships influenced by a combination of identity markers during fieldwork is an important aspect of qualitative data co-creation. Based on ethnographic research with the canal boating and enthusiast communities in the UK, this paper focuses on the mundane power dynamics and hierarchies in research situations. The paper discusses the role of humour in negotiating the interpersonal dynamics and argues for the consideration of power (im)balances in the field beyond assumptions of the researcher as definitely the advantaged side. Joking plays an important role and is used by both research participants and researchers to level the researcher–participant hierarchies as well as to reproduce and reaffirm them. This takes place on a conceptual continuum: first, in terms of their relative rigidity, whereby certain norms, opinions or value systems are reinforced; and secondly, flexibility, whereby the notions about norms and preconceived ideas might shift during the research encounter.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T07:45:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221096597
       
  • I am not alone – we are all alone: Using masturbation as an ethnographic
           method in research on shota subculture in Japan

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      Authors: Karl Andersson
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      I wanted to understand how my research participants experience sexual pleasure when reading shota, a Japanese genre of self-published erotic comics that features young boy characters. I therefore started reading the comics in the same way as my research participants had told me that they did it: while masturbating. In this research note, I will recount how I set up an experimental method of masturbating to shota comics, and how this participant observation of my own desire not only gave me a more embodied understanding of the topic for my research but also made me think about loneliness and ways to combat it as driving forces of the culture of self-published erotic comics.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T01:48:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221096600
       
  • Self-care for gender-based violence researchers – Beyond bubble
           baths and chocolate pralines

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      Authors: Philipp Schulz, Anne-Kathrin Kreft, Heleen Touquet, Sarah Martin
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Researching sensitive topics often carries immediate effects on researchers, yet discussions about the emotional and psychological impacts of conducting this type of research remain rare. In recent years, debates begun to emerge about the emotional and psychological toll that qualitative field-based research on violence in general, and on gender-based violence (GBV) in particular, can have on those conducting this research. Most of the existing support and self-care strategies in response to these effects, however, are primarily tailored towards practitioners, but not specifically for researchers, who often face unique challenges and experiences. At the same time, most existing self-care guidelines in the fields of violence research typically centre around neo-liberalized strategies, which fail to take into account the structural dimensions of researchers’ challenges and the long-term nature of vicarious traumatization. In this article, we move beyond such approaches and instead adopt relational and collaborative ways of taking care of ourselves and each other. Drawing on our experiences of researching GBV, we propose that strategies of coping with the emotional and psychological toll of GBV research require relationships and collaborations. This collaborative and communal approach becomes particularly acute within the absence of support and care at the structural and institutional level, within universities and organizations. The collaborative and relational approaches that we propose in this article specifically include forms of peer-support and fostering ‘caring communities’, in the form of groups, collectives or networks.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T04:05:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221087868
       
  • Using Talanoa as a Research Method can Facilitate Collaborative Engagement
           and Understanding between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Communities

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      Authors: Pam Feetham, Franco Vaccarino, Victoria Wibeck, Björn-Ola Linnér
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Inclusion of indigenous knowledge and voices is paramount if societal transformations relative to climate change are to be fully and appropriately considered. However, much of the research in this area still uses Western-based research methodologies rather than methodologies driven by the local Indigenous communities. Therefore, it is highly likely that large numbers of affected communities remain excluded from global discussions and decisions around climate change solutions and policy. This article presents talanoa, a qualitative culturally centred research methodology used in many Pacific Island countries. As non-Indigenous researchers, we present our exploration of Indigenous research methods and talanoa experiences in a framework that confirms the importance of relationships when conducting research with Indigenous communities. We also propose that talanoa is a crucial component for qualitative research as it can help facilitate knowledge exchange and understanding among Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T08:54:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221087863
       
  • The Performative Narrative Interview: A creative strategy for data
           production drawing on dialogical narrative theory

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      Authors: Sebastián Collado, Zoë Boden-Stuart
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents a novel methodological approach to data collection/production: the Performative Narrative Interview (PNI). This approach was developed as part of an empirical study on the processual construction of the sexual identity of sexually diverse men* in Santiago de Chile. By drawing upon narrative-dialogic theoretical frameworks of subjectivity, the PNI makes explicit three aspects of narrative interviews that tend either to remain unaddressed or are treated separately within narrative inquiry: the performative, the creative and the intersubjective. The PNI utilizes these three aspects to generate a creative interview framework, detailed here, in which multiple versions of subjectivity can emerge. We suggest that methods like the PNI, which support this multiplicity to surface, lead to the production of deeper and more complex narrative data on subjectivity than traditional narrative interviews are able to produce.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T09:23:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221082264
       
  • Book Review: The politics and ethics of representation in qualitative
           research: Addressing moments of discomfort

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      Authors: Will Mason
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T02:05:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221082262
       
  • ‘Do I have to say I’m gay': Using a video booth for public
           visibility and impact

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      Authors: Anna Einarsdóttir, Karen A Mumford, Melisa Sayli, Sudthasiri Siriviriyakul
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Using data generated from a ‘video booth’, this paper explores how LGBT+ identifying individuals and allies navigate public visibility in front of a video camera. The video booth was set up in eight different NHS organisations in the UK to enable users to record short messages (30 s maximum) about their working life and/or experiences of LGBT+ employee networks, using a self-operated tablet system. The workplace context had an impact on how people represented themselves in front of the camera with prioritisation of professional identities and positive work-self. LGBT+ visibility was further masked by the inclusion of allies. We also discuss ethics and privacy issues related to using video booth methodology and signal how this methodology can best be used for future research purposes.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T01:38:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221082268
       
  • Drawing the researcher into data: drawing as an analytical tool in
           qualitative research

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      Authors: Pleuntje Jellema, Margo Annemans, Ann Heylighen
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In qualitative research, visual methods often entail engaging with images as the subject of analysis. Yet, images may be of value also as a means of analysis. This article reflects on this analytical value in relation to drawings. To this end, the authors explore drawings made by researchers in various phases of qualitative research. Drawings made ‘in the margin’ are put centre stage to better understand their role in data analysis. They allow revisiting situations; and they supplement the audio-to-text act of transcribing. Actively drawing involves and stimulates a sensory engagement with the phenomena under study and the data. Drawings furthermore play an important role in arranging and re-arranging concepts when formulating conclusions. Examples highlight how researchers may explicitly incorporate drawing in data analysis to harness the potential of a multisensory skill set and engage with transcribing in new ways.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T02:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221079530
       
  • Life history mapping: Exploring journeys into and through housing and
           homelessness

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      Authors: Jan Flaherty, Elisabeth Garratt
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article illustrates the value of in-depth life history interviews using life mapping in qualitative research. We draw on our recent research into people’s experiences of homelessness, where all 39 participants were currently, or recently, homeless. Using the life mapping method, participants generated a visual representation of their transitions across housing and homelessness, beginning in childhood and ending in the present day. We critically discuss the potential for life mapping to move beyond rehearsed stories, briefly note further associated benefits, and acknowledge some potential drawbacks. We argue that the method can confer considerable depth and reflection, going beyond a traditional qualitative interview, and is especially valuable when examining sensitive topics.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T05:32:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211072788
       
  • Violent re-presentations: Reflections on the ethics of re-presentation in
           violence research

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      Authors: Anette Bringedal Houge
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      How comfortable a read can research that has violence at its core become, before the distance created by language becomes an ethical—and analytical—challenge in its own right' In this article, I explore and reflect on ethical dilemmas of re-presenting violent experiences, following the traction of my m research. The article addresses a challenge that scholars are faced with as we conduct, write up, and communicate research on issues to do with violence in general and atrocity crimes in particular. It seeks to stir inter-disciplinary scholarly self-reflection, and feed a discussion on researchers’ responsibilities for the stories we ask for, hear, read, analyze, and re-tell by addressing the ethics of re-presenting stories and the people they involve in our teaching and publications, particularly concerning mass violence and war crimes.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T04:27:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941221079532
       
  • Listen to her: Re-finding culturally responsive poetic inquiry as home
           knowing for women of African descent

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      Authors: Lori A Chambers
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In response to critical turns in knowledge production, scholars of African descent have developed culturally responsive arts-based methodologies. Congruent with culturally responsive research is incorporating home knowing practices such as the poetics of many African and Africentric storytelling practices. This article presents my reflections as a Canadian researcher of African descent on “re-finding” culturally responsive poetic inquiry to interpret, represent, and re-tell the HIV service work experiences of African immigrant women living with HIV. I argue that researchers should strive to decolonize their research with, for and by peoples of African descent by incorporating knowledge precepts and practices grounded in participants’ home knowing. Using arts-based methodologies such as poetic inquiry creates an opportunity to critically reflect on knowledge production in research: who produces knowledge, what ways of knowing are valued, and what messages are conveyed through knowledge production and dissemination.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-26T06:19:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211072792
       
  • Ethical challenges in participatory action research: Experiences and
           insights from an arts-based study in the pacific

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      Authors: Emma Heard
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Approaches to participatory action research present unique and nuanced ethical challenges, particularly when working in culturally diverse contexts and with marginalised groups. There is a paucity of literature that considers researchers’ experiences of ethical challenges and a need to enhance this knowledge to alert researchers to potential concerns, and to develop dialogue around ways to strengthen approaches to ethical challenges. This article contributes to the budding international dialogue regarding ethical challenges in participatory action research. This article outlines key ethical challenges I faced, as an Australian (outsider) researcher, conducting a participatory action research study with young people in Samoa. Discussions provide insights and considerations for participatory researchers, as well as procedural ethics committees and funding bodies, working in the Pacific region and more widely. This article encourages exploratory thinking around approaches to mitigating potential complex ethical challenges when using participatory action approaches to qualitative research in culturally diverse contexts, including through consideration of innovative and arts-based methods that are appropriate and familiar within a community and can upset power imbalances between researchers and participants.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-24T01:49:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211072797
       
  • Drawing social worlds: a methodological examination of children’s
           artworks

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      Authors: Rachel Payne
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents one aspect of a sociocultural micro-ethnographic study examining how 11- and 12-year-old children formulate meanings when working with an artist in a contemporary art gallery. My primary focus is an examination of methodological contributions emerging from an imaginative coding and analysis of children’s art. Ninety-nine artworks were created in collaboration with the artist and were organised and interpreted using a constructionist interviewing coding scheme. This unorthodox approach to visual analysis unearthed information that oral accounts cannot provide alone revealing meanings which would otherwise remain dormant. By intuitively applying the coding framework I expose how participants’ meanings are negotiated by appropriating and re-organising cultural concepts into personalised narratives. As such, artworks reveal participants’ desires, interpretations and intentions, operating as agentic cultural producers as well as unconsciously reproducing visual epistemologies ubiquitous in Western cultures.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T05:52:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211052273
       
  • Disability and fieldwork: A personal reflection

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      Authors: Janine Natalya Clark
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This short Note offers a personal reflection about disability and fieldwork. It is not about how my disability, a long-term neurological condition, has affected my fieldwork. Rather, it is a series of thoughts about how my mobility issues might impact on my future fieldwork, but not only in a negative sense. The Note primarily discusses some of the ways that, potentially, my disability – which has changed how I interact with the world around me – might actually enhance my research and help to take it in new directions. I wrote the Note primarily for myself and for other researchers with disabilities, whether visible or hidden.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T03:15:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211072789
       
  • My face turned red, but it led me … nowhere. Notes on epistemically
           pointless embarrassment in ethnographic practice

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      Authors: David Wästerfors
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      The personal character of ethnography makes it meaningful to pay attention to emotions during fieldwork, not the least of which is awkwardness or embarrassment. To make a fool of oneself or to commit a faux pas in the field belongs to the palette of the ethnographic experience, and is often defined as helpful for obtaining new knowledge about the setting. But whereas many ethnographers emphasize the didactic quality of shameful mistakes, this article takes a closer look at instances which proved to be epistemically pointless. By analysing five different instances of embarrassment during fieldwork, the author argues that not all situations in which ethnographers do the ‘wrong’ thing lead somewhere. Embarrassment may present itself in more prosaic manners, stemming from the ethnographer being relatively uninformed, incompetent or out of place, and they need not enrich field knowledge. Attending to such instances may help us further understand and discuss the conditions of ethnographic practice.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T07:03:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211072800
       
  • Being in the wood: Using a presuppositional interview in hermeneutic
           phenomenological research

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      Authors: Lewis Barrett-Rodger, Sally Goldspink, Hilary Engward
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this paper is to explain and describe the use of presuppositional interviews as means of the researcher being able to expose their own, often unknown, assumptions about the phenomena of interest. Within this, we provide a philosophical and practical account for the development and use of a presuppositional interview from an insider perspective to expose insights which influence researcher reflexivity and directly impact on the research process. Author A’s hermeneutic phenomenological study seeks to gain insights into the lived experience of children learning mathematics in outdoor environments, such as forests and woodland. The paper describes how the reflexive method of presuppositional interviewing helped him to understand more about his research position and find a clearing in his ‘Being in the Wood.’ A template for a presupposition interview schedule is presented.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-11T05:27:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211061055
       
  • Methodological challenges in researching email consultations as a form of
           communication in patient-provider interactions

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      Authors: Ditte Laursen, Line Maria Simonsen, Anette Grønning
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Email is a born-digital form of communication, which can be studied in a number of ways using a variety of methods, as with any other socially and culturally mediated phenomenon. However, despite a great number of studies, the methodologies of the studies have attracted only little attention. In this paper, we wish to extend our knowledge regarding methodological challenges in studying emails. In particular, we will consider the methodological challenges, which any scholar will encounter when email in its digital form is transformed to and preserved as an object of study. Based on a review of existing studies’ archiving strategies as well as our own study on email consultations in a healthcare setting, we will examine and discuss analytical and methodological consequences of different approaches to archiving and data management of emails. We demonstrate that the archived record is shaped by its context of creation. Since collection methods and archiving tools are not neutral, we call for a greater attentiveness to this part of the research process. We conclude by outlining implications for systematic empirical research into emails as a form of communication.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T01:10:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211061058
       
  • Fostering habits of care: Reframing qualitative data sharing policies and
           practices

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      Authors: Susie Weller
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues that navigating the formalized, regulated and institutionalized data sharing landscape is challenging for researchers tasked with making qualitative data available for re-use. Archiving empirical material has progressively become a requirement enshrined in the policies of UK research institutions. Yet, how qualitative researchers feature – as data (co)creators and curators – within a process governed largely by quantitative data management strategies remains undocumented. Using examples from the ESRC Timescapes initiative, this article argues that to advance ethical practice in qualitative secondary analysis (QSA), data sharing policies and practices need to be re-framed to respect, value and care for the particularities of qualitative data and the emotional, intellectual and temporal investments made by qualitative researchers working in an increasingly pressurized Higher Education (HE) environment. Accordingly, ideas from the ethics of care literature are employed to propose areas where ‘habits of care’, attuned to the needs of qualitative researchers and data, can be fostered.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T10:24:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211061054
       
  • Trust and temporality in participatory research

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      Authors: Andrea Armstrong, Emma Flynn, Karen Salt, Jo Briggs, Rachel Clarke, John Vines, Alistair MacDonald
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper argues that trust cannot be taken for granted in long-term participatory research and promotes greater consideration to conceptualizing the trusting process as fluid and fragile. This awareness by researchers can reveal to them how the passing of time shapes and reshapes the nature of trusting relationships and their constant negotiation and re-negotiation. The paper draws together literature from different disciplines on the themes of trust, temporality and participatory research and outcomes from interviews and workshops undertaken for The Trust Map project to focus on two key moments that reveal the fragility of trust. These are the subtlety of disruption and trust on trial and trust at a distance. We discuss how trust was built over time through processes of interaction that were continually tested, incremental and participatory.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T08:03:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211065163
       
  • Drawing as a method of researching social representations

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      Authors: Jari Martikainen, Eemeli Hakoköngäs
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the possibilities of drawing as a method of researching social representations. The theory of social representations focuses on studying the forms, contents, and functions of socially shared common knowledge. In this paper, we (1) present the central premises of social representations theory, (2) elaborate drawing as a visual research method, and (3) synthesize how the drawing method may promote and diversify our understanding of social representations. We suggest that the drawing method is especially fruitful in the analysis of objectification process (how something abstract is made tangible); cognitive polyphasia (the idea of the simultaneous existence of diverse and contradicting social representations); and the different levels of analysis in which social representations become observable: ontogenesis (individual level), microgenesis (social interaction level), and sociogenesis (societal level). Through these insights, this paper advances the current understanding of the drawing method in qualitative social representations research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T05:33:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211065165
       
 
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