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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 243 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 395)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 212)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)

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Similar Journals
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Qualitative Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.421
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 35  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1468-7941 - ISSN (Online) 1741-3109
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Drawing in-situ: Matters of care and representation in daily life with
           dementia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Helena Cleeve, Lena Borell, Lena Rosenberg
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article brings methodological insight into in-situ drawings as representations of daily life with dementia. As part of ethnographic fieldwork in dementia care units in a nursing home, drawings were made on site by a researcher. We suggest that the ambiguity of in-situ drawings, and the ensuing possibilities to disambiguate them, is valuable. Inspired by Asdal and Moser’s (2012) concept of “contexting,” we experimented with arranging the drawings with fieldnotes, discussing them with staff members, as well as with configuring multiple drawings and fieldnotes in sequences. This led to reflexive engagements with the drawings, creating space for discussing concerns in research practices and care practices. Switching between different forms of contexting produced tensions, revealing that what was cared for through the practices of researchers, staff members, and residents, diverged. In this way, we argue that contexting in-situ drawings may intervene in ways of knowing, caring for, and living with dementia.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-10-15T11:02:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211049321
       
  • Binary blues: Exploring beyond dichotomized gender comparisons with a
           theory-driven approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cheryl Pritlove, Jan E Angus, Craig Dale, Lisa Seto Nielsen, Marnie Kramer
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      The call to move beyond binary conceptualizations of gender is not new, and yet, this categorical and contrastive approach to gender analysis remains common, particularly in health sciences. It has been posited that the problem of gender dualism rests partially in the minimal interplay between theory and method. Drawing on our experiences during a qualitative study of men’s and women’s involvement in cardiac rehabilitation, this article provides an account of the analytic and reflexive challenges of conducting research on gender and health and explores how the careful use of theory, specifically Bourdieu’s theory of practice, can facilitate a departure from narrow gender binaries. The analysis presented in this article adds to methodological writings on gender and health, offering a theory-driven process to help researchers address the fluidity of gender as lived and negotiated in the everyday social and material circumstances of men and women, particularly during times of illness.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-10-09T08:24:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211049323
       
  • Children as co-researchers and confessional research tales: Researcher
           positionality and the (dis)comforts of research

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sian Supski, Jane Maree Maher
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In a study on children, families and food messages in Victoria, Australia, we utilised a multi-methods approach that included visual data produced by primary-school aged children. Working with 50 families, we provided each child investigator with an iPad for 3–4 days and invited them to photograph family food events important to them. The analysis of visual data alongside child and family interviews revealed the diverse meaning-making practices children draw on to understand food practices at home and school. These research practices aspired to locate the researchers and children as co-creators. In this paper, we reflect on the challenges and (dis)comfort we faced as researchers as the implications of co-creation emerged and we engaged with children’s voices, photos and families inside their homes. The multi-methods approach supported a comprehensive and rich engagement with commensality and pleasure in food practices at home for children, but illuminated the complex emotional and intellectual terrain of such research practices.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T12:49:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211049325
       
  • In the groove and in the moment: epistemology and ethics in ethnography
           with Sudanese musician revolutionaries

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      Authors: Cathy A Wilcock
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study discusses the methodological component of a research project with Sudanese musicians and their associated activist groups. The methodology included song-writing and, as such, is an example of collaborative creative research practice. Proponents of collaborative creative practice argue that the combination of aesthetic methods with ethnographic and participatory research methods brings both epistemological and ethical dividends. This paper considers whether these alleged epistemological and ethical advantages bore out in this research project. While confirming some benefits, my study also shows evidence of underlying tensions between aesthetic ‘micro-methods’ and ethnographic and participatory traditions of knowledge production. In relation to the alleged epistemological dividends, I argue that autoethnographic embedding in collaborative creative practice is alone insufficient. It requires a theoretical framework which theorises the relationship between one player’s musical experience and another’s. Only with this, can the sensory experiences of the researcher be used to inform analysis of participant observations and interviews. The autoethnographic experiences of the researcher are not findings in themselves. In relation to the ethical dividends, unlike other arts-based research, I found that the aesthetic micro-methods in this study did not naturally lend themselves to participant empowerment. The pursuit of aesthetic goals has its own division of labour which can lead to the deprioritisation of self-expression and co-learning which constitute the primary aims of classical participatory research. Overall, collaborative creative practice did enhance this research project but there are important caveats. To reflect these, I aruge that creative collaboration should not be considered as a simple sub-set of either ethnographic or participatory research but as a method in its own right.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T11:34:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211047720
       
  • On staying: Extended temporalities, relationships and practices in
           community engaged scholarship

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      Authors: Will Mason
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the complexity and affordances of staying in ‘the field’. Time as a resource for qualitative research is widely experienced as diminishing. Yet increasingly, academic emphasis is also being placed on the merits of time intensive approaches, like participatory scholarship. This tension raises critical questions about the ethics and practices of collaboration within arguably narrowing parameters. Taking a view from the edges of conventional research practice, this article focuses on staying beyond the formal completion of a sociological research project. Drawing on over 10-years of collaboration with youth service providers in an English city, I examine the dynamics and complexities of staying, where temporalities, relationships and practices extend beyond research. In doing so, this article contributes to methodological debates about research exit and participation, by introducing staying as a practice that affords new collaborative freedoms and possibilities.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T11:04:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211049318
       
  • Young people engaging in event-based diaries: A reflection on the value of
           diary methods in higher education decision-making research

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      Authors: Zoe Baker
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper reflects on the value of diary methods in the context of a qualitative, longitudinal narrative inquiry exploring the higher education decision-making of further education students in England. Event-based diaries were used alongside interviews and focus groups over a 14-month period to gain in-depth insights into the reasons and influences informing their decision-making trajectories. I explore the challenges, successful approaches and advantages of employing diary methods with young people in this context. Challenges consisted of maintaining participant engagement, which was overcome by combining methods and incorporating a reactive co-participatory element. Yet, a number of advantages emerged from participants' engagement with diary keeping which enhanced the richness of the data; this inspired deeper reflections on decision-making and influences and provided a private space for participants to disclose personal difficulties that could not be obtained via interviews.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-10-04T08:18:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211048403
       
  • ‘So what’s arts got to do with it'’: An autoethnography of
           navigating researcher positionality while co-creating knowledge

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      Authors: Mtisunge Isabel Kamlongera
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this autoethnography, I share about my journey navigating multiple researcher positionalities. I commence with a reflection on how one of my positionalities as an ‘outsider-within’ influences my onto-epistemological stance and approach to the research. Through my shared case, where I am a ‘marginal intellectual’ with an intersectional researcher positionality, I highlight the complexities of negotiating power in co-creating knowledge with participants whilst navigating the insider/outsider/in-between researcher positions. I illustrate how a reflexive methodology incorporating Arts-Based processes (ABP) facilitated navigation of power dynamics in order to mitigate the ‘representation crisis’ often resulting from researcher positionalities.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-09-29T12:35:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211045611
       
  • Participatory action research and oral history as natural allies in mental
           health research

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      Authors: Verusca Calabria, Di Bailey
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the similarities and differences between oral history and participatory action research (PAR) as two qualitative research methods that both accord with an interpretivist paradigm. It examines how combining these two methodologies can benefit mental health research, offering opportunities for reflection and reciprocity. Drawing from the authors’ respective knowledge and experience of using oral history and PAR methods within social care and mental health settings in the UK, the article considers these opportunities in relation to key concepts, namely, the sharing of power, reciprocity and positionality that are inherent in both methodological approaches. The article concludes that PAR-led oral history offers a trans-disciplinary methodology that can offer fresh insights for improving practices and social outcomes and for reducing inequalities.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-09-29T07:59:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211039963
       
  • My dear diaries: Following, valuing and reflecting on moments with
           research materials

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lauren White
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how solicited paper diaries, and the accompanying materials, are carefully handled over the course of one research project. It foregrounds the value of attending to mundane moments with research materials, by tracing tangible material encounters together with intimate fieldnote reflections. Through drawing upon theories of materiality with feminist and relational ethics of care, this article centralises paper diaries as a key mediator of relationships and care within research. It considers the micro processes of choosing diaries, posting them, receiving and storing them and tracing the emotionally charged moments as a researcher in everyday research situations. Such reflections, from the perspective of the researcher, look to offer insights into research relationalities and care. It argues that these momentary fieldwork reflections extend understandings of material methodologies by emphasising relational intimacies as a researcher and connects material and sensory understandings with feminist ethics of care and researcher reciprocities.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-09-27T02:38:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211039409
       
  • Book Review: Art, Ritual and Trance Inquiry: Arational Learning in an
           Irrational World

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kelly Clark/Keefe
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-09-26T02:04:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211041938
       
  • A qualitative fallacy: Life trapped in interpretations and stories

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      Authors: Tore Dag Bøe, Bård Bertelsen, Inger Beate Larsen, Alain Topor
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper points out some problematic aspects of qualitative research based on interviews and uses examples from mental health. The narrative approach is explored while inquiring if the reality of life here is forced into the formula of a chronological story. The hermeneutic approach, in general, is also examined, and we ask if the reality of life in this scenario becomes caught up in a web of interpretations. Inspired by ideas from Bakhtin and phenomenology, we argue for interview-based research that stays with unresolvedness and constantly question the web of interpretations and narratives that determine our experiences. This also chimes with certain dialogical practices in mental health in which tolerance of uncertainty is the guiding principle. Concludingly, we suggest that interview-based research could be a practice of ‘un-resolving’ in which researchers, together with the participants, look for cracks, contradictions, and complexities to prevent the qualitative fallacies of well-organized meanings and well-composed stories.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-09-25T10:09:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211041916
       
  • Good listening: A key element in establishing quality in qualitative
           research

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      Authors: Einat Lavee, Guy Itzchakov
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      What is “good” qualitative research' Considerable literature articulates criteria for quality in qualitative research. Common to all these criteria is the understanding that the data gathering process, often interviews, is central in assessing research quality. Studies have highlighted the preparation of the interview guide, appropriate ways to ask questions, and especially the interaction between interviewer and interviewee. To a lesser extent, qualitative scholars mention the importance of the interviewer’s listening abilities in obtaining the interviewee’s cooperation. Based on results of listening studies in the fields of psychology and organizational behavior, we argue that good listening is crucial for assessing the quality of qualitative research, yet remains a blind spot in qualitative data gathering. Drawing on our experience as qualitative researcher and listening researcher, we present practices for enhancing good listening in qualitative research, thereby enabling researchers to calibrate themselves as research instruments and obtain richer data.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-09-25T02:17:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211039402
       
  • Participatory research in and against time

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      Authors: Rachel Rosen
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      The staccato rhythms of experiential time remain obscured in much of the literature on participatory research, where time is treated as a reassuring constant – a backdrop for human activity. This article addresses the discordances between lived temporalities and existing theorisations of participatory methodologies. It takes participatory research with lone child migrants as a particularly rich case to think with, given the proliferation of contradictory and often punitive applications of time these young people encounter in their interactions with migration and welfare regimes. The core argument developed is that unless temporality is given due theoretical and methodological attention, aims of contesting and unsettling inequities through participatory research will have limited success and can wind up reproducing exclusions and oppressions. In response to these critiques, the paper temporalizes participatory research through three reconstructions: working with and against time, de-centring shared time and collectivising the time of participatory research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-09-25T01:13:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211041940
       
  • Examining the value of using naturally occurring data to facilitate
           qualitative health research with ‘seldom heard’ ‘vulnerable’
           groups: A research note on inpatient care

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      Authors: Alison Drewett, Michelle O’Reilly
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This research note explores two inter-connected ideas. First, that the category of ‘vulnerable’ groups has expanded and has sometimes been used to exclude seldom heard groups from research. The underpinning protectionist polemic, whilst well-intended, has arguably led to disempowerment of the very groups they intended to safeguard. Learning lessons from advances in research with children can be utilised to develop a more inclusive and empowering approach with adults while simultaneously addressing safeguarding. Second, the note values the potential of using naturally occurring data as a mechanism for including vulnerable groups in research. An example is offered attending to frequently excluded inpatient voices in healthcare studies. The practical and ethical benefits of using naturally occurring data are explored for countering arguments against the inclusion of vulnerable groups using an example of autistic inpatient research from the UNITE study. Researchers are invited to make practical adjustments to maximise involvement opportunities, and a reminder that capacity to take part in research activity may be facilitated by these modifications. Naturally occurring data offer the possibility of understanding complex hospital practices without additional burdens of researcher-generated methods.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T02:10:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211039971
       
  • Book Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-09-20T10:19:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211046524
       
  • Riding shotgun – Front-seat research and the socio-material
           considerations of ethnography on the move

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      Authors: Johanne Yttri Dahl, Aksel Tjora
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we explore methodological considerations of using the car as space for ethnographic research on police work. With a socio-material perspective, we are concerned about how the car’s particular materiality and mobility shapes social interaction that takes place within it. We argue that this affects the researcher role, and that the researcher’s spatial position in the car affects the researcher role further. The position’s impact on interaction is made evident when the researcher is ‘riding shotgun’, rather than being placed in the back seat. We argue that this front-seat role comes with increased reciprocity towards the driver/officer, demanding a more (inter) active research practice. Hence, the riding shotgun position potentially increases the empirical input with the closer interaction between the researched and the researcher. More generally, the case illustrates the very delicate considerations of researcher positioning within ethnography on the move.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-09-20T03:44:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211046530
       
  • Reflecting on the use of Google Docs for online interviews: Innovation in
           qualitative data collection

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      Authors: Victoria Opara, Sabrina Spangsdorf, Michelle K Ryan
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Google Docs is a widely used online word processing software. Despite its broad popularity in business and education, Google Docs is under-utilised as a tool to facilitate qualitative interviews within research. In this article, we reflect on our experiences as two PhDs using Google Docs to conduct synchronous, online, written interviews. We present two case studies, which, to our knowledge, are the first to utilise Google Docs to conduct web-based written interviews. In doing so, we (a) outline the development and implementation of the methodology, (b) highlight the key themes we identified when considering the benefits and challenges of conducting interviews using this technology and (c) discuss possible future uses of the methodology. We argue that synchronous web-based written interviews via Google Docs offer unprecedented opportunities for qualitative research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-09-20T03:13:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211045192
       
  • Emotions in human research ethics guidelines: Beyond risk, harm and
           pathology

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      Authors: Rebecca E Olson
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on a discourse analysis of emotions in national human research ethics guidelines from Australia, Singapore, the United Kingdom and United States, I argue that such guidelines treat emotions as superfluous, harmful, risky and threats to rational decision-making. Such uncritical appreciation of emotions sees instructions to show ‘respect’ position non-Western participants as ‘the other’, sees directives to consider ‘emotional welfare’ undermine the autonomy of people from ostensibly vulnerable groups, and risks undermining qualitative research’s cathartic potential. These findings underpin a call to revise guidelines to position emotions as part of everyday life; and to encourage researchers to adopt embodied, caring and emotionally reflexive approaches to human research, where researchers draw on guidelines and emotions in deciding how to produce ethical research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-08-30T03:27:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211039965
       
  • Participatory video from a distance: co-producing knowledge during the
           COVID-19 pandemic using smartphones

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      Authors: Sonja Marzi
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, I outline an innovative remote participatory video (PV) methodology that makes use of participants’ smartphones. It was developed as an alternative to co-production research and can be employed when face-to-face contact is impossible or undesirable. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, face-to-face research interactions have been disrupted or become impossible. Yet it is vital to reach those who are most affected by emergencies and to include their voices. The research reported here was a collaboration between women in Medellín, Colombia, and a team of filmmakers and researchers. We developed an innovative remote PV methodology using participants’ smartphones, researching how women from poorer neighbourhoods were affected by the pandemic in their everyday lives. Here, I reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of the remote PV methodology, arguing that it offers new avenues for participants to take control of the filming and editing process, and builds technical skills and capacities that have value beyond the timeframe of the project. I conclude that the remote PV method has great potential as a stand-alone method, moving the landscape of co-production research away from a requirement for geographical co-presence and potentially shifting power and ownership towards local co-researchers and participants.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-08-20T12:31:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211038171
       
  • Recognizing the never quite absent: de facto usage, ethical issues, and
           applications of covert research in difficult research contexts

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      Authors: Karolina Kluczewska, Philipp Lottholz
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article scrutinizes and reconceptualizes covert research in social science. Surveying recent literature about this research method, we reflect on the ethical and safety implications stemming from the widespread, even if well-intended, lack of transparency characterizing many research projects, especially ones conducted in difficult research contexts. While the standard definition of covert research holds that researchers deliberately do not declare to research subjects that academic research is taking place, we argue that the remoteness of Western academia from most researched contexts often a priori renders field research at least partially covert, irrespective of the researcher’s intentions. This is because its aims, utility, and expected outputs are hard to understand for research participants unrelated to academia. We illustrate this argument by analyzing our own fieldwork experiences in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan. In conclusion, we emphasize the need to critically reflect on the de facto use of covert techniques by social researchers.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-08-14T08:54:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211033084
       
  • It’s a sprint, not a marathon: a case for building short-term
           partnerships for community-based participatory research

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      Authors: Lucero Radonic, Cara Jacob, Rowenn Kalman, E. Yvonne Lewis
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Academic calendars and university timelines set an urgent pace for researchers, which can hinder the establishment of long-term community partnerships. Given community-based participatory research’s (CBPR) emphasis on community-led research, time constraints can inhibit academic researchers’ commitments to collaborative methodologies and participatory research. This article considers how CBPR can be adapted for shorter-term engagements while still producing mutually beneficial research. In doing so, we contribute to the existing corpus on rapid assessment methodologies, characterized for adopting methods traditionally practiced over a longer duration to shorter time frames. We review the successes and limitations of a CBPR project executed within the timespan of six months in Flint, Michigan. In the case discussed, photo-voice enabled the inclusion of diverse ways of knowing, horizontal partnerships, reciprocal learning, and an accessible disemmination format within a CBPR framework. In conclusion we assert that there is value in short-term CBPR, especially for emergent issues where there is a need for rapid, responsive methodologies. However, short-term CBPR is a sprint, rather than a marathon; although shorter in duration, it is more intensive. It requires significant methodological commitments, flexibility, and an intensified workload for those involved.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-08-07T12:08:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211029477
       
  • Unpacking gatekeeping in medical institutions: A case study of access to
           end-of-life patients

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      Authors: Karen Lutfey Spencer, Emily Hammad Mrig, Elizabeth Gage Bouchard
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      We use end-of-life decision making as a case for examining processes of gatekeeping in medical settings. End-of-life is an exemplar in a broader context of research in professionalized and institutionalized medical settings. Influences of biomedicalization, increases in consumer (patient) options, decreases in physician authority, and a proliferation of treatment options all contribute to a context in which ethnographic study of medical settings is more complex, more urgently needed, and potentially more difficult at the same time. Building on existing literature, we suggest that gaining access to a research site is less a matter of entrée through a gate and more a long-term navigation of a dynamic social web of actors, relationships, and organizations. Further, we borrow from Nader’s (1974) concept of ‘studying up’ to examine how elite power processes may be reflected in gatekeeping. Our discussion of lessons learned considers methodological and conceptual implications with broad relevance for qualitative researchers.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T05:58:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211034975
       
  • Shifting power dynamics in interviews with children: a minority ethnic,
           working-class researcher’s reflections

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      Authors: Imane Kostet
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to contribute to the literature on power dynamics and researchers’ positionality in qualitative research, by shedding light on the experiences of a minority ethnic researcher with a working-class background. Drawing on Bourdieusian concepts, it discusses how middle-class children confronted the researcher with language stigma and how they, while drawing boundaries vis-à-vis those who ‘lack’ cultural capital, (unintentionally) drew boundaries against the researcher herself. In turn, it illustrates how during interviews with working-class children, manners had to be adopted with which the researcher is no longer familiar. This article calls on ethics committees to more strongly consider how researchers might become ‘vulnerable’ themselves during fieldwork and to acknowledge intersectional experiences that potentially cause power dynamics to shift, even in research involving groups that are socially believed to have little power, such as children.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T10:53:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211034726
       
  • Freeplaying with narrative: A Jogando method in/as Capoeira research

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      Authors: Joshua Cruz, Lauren Griffith, Idera Lawal
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we rethink the ways that analysis within narrative research might occur based on the topic being studied and provide an example using the Afro-Brazilian martial art capoeira. Locating our work at the intersection of Derridean freeplay and the spirit of play present in the Afro-Brazilian martial art capoeira, we reconceive of the ways that narratives may be constructed, and suggest that the topic under study, capoeira, may actually become an analytic. This piece offers one of many potential directions for rethinking analysis of narrative data and representing participant experiences and suggests blurring lines between content and method of analysis. While our own analysis occurs using play as it appears in capoeira, we suggest that any number of research topics may be used to inform the ways that we analyze data.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-07-30T06:31:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211016164
       
  • “You have the right to love and be loved”: participatory theatre for
           disability justice with self-advocates

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      Authors: Leyton Schnellert, Leah Tidey, RRR Co-creators, Rachelle Hole
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Individuals with intellectual disability are often left out of and overlooked in discussions on sexual health and sexuality. Given this, we undertook a participatory theatre research project to better respond to the needs of the individuals with intellectual and developmental disability regarding their sexual agency and sexual citizenship. The project, entitled Romance, Relationships, and Rights arose when the executive director of a community living agency approached researchers at the University of British Columbia’s Canadian Institute for Inclusion and Citizenship to learn about how they, as an agency, could better support their community. To disrupt sexual ableism and traditional theatre hierarchies, we collaboratively turned to participatory and disability theatre with the aim to advance and promote the sexual citizenship of individuals with intellectual and developmental disability, who refer to themselves as self-advocates - those who speak and act with agency. The challenges of equitable co-creation arose throughout the theatre process; the themes of deconstruction/co-construction and uncertainty and liminality reveal the iterative process of centering self-advocate voices.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-07-28T12:56:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211034963
       
  • Archives of place, feeling, and time: Immersive historical field research
           in the (Finnish) U.S. Midwest

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      Authors: Samira Saramo
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In Summer 2018, I set out to find the feel of the places I have long studied as a historian, resulting in an expansion of my research process and ‘archive’. This article introduces and reflects on key moments and ideas from this research journey through historic strongholds of Finnish settlement in the U.S. Midwest. I discuss how following community leads and engaging with local knowledge-carriers made clear that my search for the past was intimately entangled with the present realities and future implications of demographic and economic change. I reflect on moments of being in place that allowed me to think through the inter-workings of historical memory and sensory imagination. This resulted in the integration of a photographic practice that serves as both a source and a tool for (re-)articulating feelings of particular moments in the field. I conclude by analyzing the fluid and multiple processes at play in the creation of research and archives. As a whole, this exploration aims to further embolden qualitative researchers to engage in sensitive research that makes space for feeling – both through emotions and senses – the productive and powerful pulls of time and place operating within our sites of research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-07-26T04:49:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211033086
       
  • Out of the blue and into it: Autoethnography, emotions and complicated
           grief

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      Authors: Georgie Akehurst, Susie Scott
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Autoethnography can be an appropriate method for researching complex emotional experiences. However, the highly self-reflexive processes involved in mining personal data are subject to a set of cultural feeling and display rules, which obscure and interfere with emotional engagement. To illustrate this, we present one author’s account of using autoethnography to research traumatic bereavement. We critically revisit three myths about the method: one negative (autoethnography is narcissistically self-indulgent) and two positive (autoethnographic techniques are therapeutic and autoethnographic writing is authentic). Observing some parallels between topic and method, we suggest that both are complicated and non-linear, following convoluted paths. Autoethnographic tales may defy the social rules of verbal tellability, failing to reveal personal insights or offer moral lessons. We conclude that, while we can admire the autoethnographic endeavour towards ‘heartfelt’ scholarship, this should be tempered by a cautiousness about the costs of digging deep.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-07-22T06:45:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211033456
       
  • Thinking with autoethnography in collaborative research: A critical,
           reflexive approach to relational ethics

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      Authors: Louise Phillips, Maria Bee Christensen-Strynø, Lisbeth Frølunde
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we propose a distinctive critical, reflexive approach to relational ethics in ‘collaborative, democratic and transformative’ research. Underpinning the approach is the view that the buzzwords of ‘collaboration’ and ‘co-creation/co-production’ may signify equitable, symmetrical power relations and, as a result, romanticise collaborative research as straightforward processes of inclusion. The approach integrates critical, reflexive analysis of the play of power in the ‘with’ in ‘research with, not on, people’ and the ‘co’ in ‘co-creating knowledge’ into the ongoing collaborative research process. As a main method for critical, reflexive analysis, the approach uses ‘thinking with’ autoethnography. In the article, we illustrate the approach by showing how we ‘think with’ autoethnographic texts to respond to discomfort and analyse the tensions in the co-constitution of knowledge and subjectivities in the preliminary phase of a collaborative, participatory research project on dance for people with Parkinson’s disease and their spouses.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-07-21T06:24:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211033446
       
  • A performative paradigm for post-qualitative inquiry

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      Authors: Tone Pernille Østern, Sofia Jusslin, Kristian Nødtvedt Knudsen, Pauliina Maapalo, Ingrid Bjørkøy
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, the authors explore and contribute to producing a performative research paradigm where post-qualitative as well as artistic research might dwell and breathe. Entering a thread of discussion that started with Haseman’s A manifesto for performative research in 2006, and building on their own friction-led research processes at the edges of qualitative research, the authors plug in with performativity, non-representational theories and methodologies, post-qualitative inquiry and post approaches. A performative paradigm for post-qualitative inquiry is proposed, where knowledge is viewed as knowledge-in-becoming as the constant creation of difference through researcher entanglement with the research phenomenon and wider world. A performative paradigm produces a space for movement, (artistic) freedom, (post-qualitative) experimentation and inclusion. A performative research paradigm also offers provocations that shake long-established notions about what research is and should be. Within a performative research paradigm, learning/be(com)ing/knowing is always in-becoming – as is the performative paradigm itself.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-07-08T06:50:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211027444
       
  • Making ‘meanwhile. . .’: representing queer African youth through
           spontaneous collaborative graphic autoethnography

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      Authors: Talia Meer, Alex Müller
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      We present a participatory creative research project about the embodied experience of queer African youth, which brought together queer young people, academics and artists from Southern and East Africa (as the Qintu Collab) to produce popular media. We describe objectives and process and argue that this work can best be understood as collaborative graphic autoethnography. By working together, the Collab produced the anthology Meanwhile. . .: Graphic Short Stories About Everyday Queer Life in Southern and East Africa, that challenges dominant representations of African queerness, including pathologising public health discourses and heteronationalist political propaganda. This work also dialogically generated socially experienced embodied knowledge about the wellbeing, relationships, fears and aspirations of young queer people. Such collaboration pushes the boundaries of collaborative, autoethnographic and visual methods. Examining our experience shows the co-constructed nature of knowledge and reveals the considerable power of comics as analytical texts, and as basis for further analysis.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-07-07T12:32:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211028801
       
  • Digital mapping as feminist method: critical reflections

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      Authors: Bianca Fileborn
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Digital maps have been taken up as a productive tool in both activism and academic research. However, there has been less consideration of their use as a research method in qualitative social sciences research. This paper aims to contribute towards scholarship on qualitative research by providing a critical reflection on the use of digital mapping as a research method in a feminist research project on street-based harassment in Australia. Drawing on practices of reflexivity, as well as comments made by participants across 46 qualitative interviews, I consider how digital mapping can be used to facilitate feminist research, arguing that it represents a generative instrument which lends itself to the development of in-depth insights from participants. Yet, mapping also delimits the epistemological possibilities of qualitative research, and I consider how this method simultaneously constrains what can be known about street harassment.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-07-07T12:28:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211028797
       
  • Embodied graffiti and street art research

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      Authors: Malin Fransberg, Mari Myllylä, Jonna Tolonen
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Graffiti and street art research (GSAR) has become more acknowledged within the academic discourse; however, it has much to gain from theorising its methodological aspects. As a multidisciplinary field, GSAR has mostly used qualitative research methods, exploring urban space through methods that range from visual recordings to ethnography, emphasising the researchers’ reflexivity. This qualitative approach has, however, paid little attention to the role of embodied practices. In this paper we discuss how embodied methodologies provide multisensory research results where the experienced moments, the participant’s and researcher’s senses, cognition and mobility in urban spaces are connected. Our discussion draws on the authors’ fieldwork experiences of walking and edge working, and on the literature concerning embodiment and embodied methodology related to the context of GSAR.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T10:28:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211028795
       
  • Reflexivity in research teams through narrative practice and
           textile-making

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      Authors: Beatriz E. Arias López, Christine Andrä, Berit Bliesemann de Guevara
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses narrative practice and textile-making as two techniques of researcher reflexivity in diverse teams conducting qualitative-interpretive research. Specifically, it suggests definitional ceremonies—a collective structured method of storytelling and group resonances—as a useful tool to interweave diverse researchers as a team, while maintaining the plurivocity that enables deeper reflexivity. Additionally, textile-making is introduced as a material and embodied way of expression, which complements narrative practice where words fail or need a non-linguistic form of elicitation. We illustrate the two techniques with examples from our international, collaborative qualitative-interpretive research project with demobilized guerrilla fighters in Colombia.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T09:54:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211028799
       
  • Transnational online research: recognising multiple contexts in
           Skype-to-phone interviews

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      Authors: F. Melis Cin, Clare Madge, Dianne Long, Markus Breines, Mwazvita Tapiwa Beatrice Dalu
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper lies at the intersection of discussions surrounding digitally mediated research methods and transnational research projects. It contributes to the current methodological debate surrounding online interviewing by focusing on tensions and affordances involved in Skype-to-phone interviewing in a transnational research context. While the Skype-to-phone facility does indeed increase further access to global participants, complex power hierarchies and ethical concerns continue to exist in relation to technological access/infrastructure, research governance regimes in different places and interpersonal research relations. We, therefore, propose that online researchers involved in transnational research projects using Skype methods move towards consideration of multiple competing constituencies and diverse social and spatial connectivities and power hierarchies in which they are researching. These social differences and spatial registers are not swept away through research conducted in a uniform virtual digital environment; rather transnational researchers must make explicit the multiple place-based contexts of their digitally mediated research, as they shape the research process in distinct ways. Thus, specific consideration must be given to ethical concerns that emanate from transnational online research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T08:11:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211024824
       
  • Book review: Doing excellent social research with documents – Aimee
           Grant

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      Authors: Jennifer S Leigh
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-07-02T01:58:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211028804
       
  • COVID times make ‘deep listening’ explicit: changing the space between
           interviewer and participant

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      Authors: Dorinda’t Hart
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article draws on the research project Post-abortion narratives shared by Perth women via face-to-face interviews. The project was subsequently disrupted by the arrival of COVID-19 in Perth, Australia, making it necessary to conduct interviews via video call. The experience of using an online platform to conduct interviews became an opportunity to consider more carefully the practice of ‘deep listening’. This kind of listening involves creating an emotional connection with the participant so that the interviewer is able to hear multiple layers of meaning and context. It includes listening mixed with perception in which one can hear the emotions of the other. In a paradigm where the interview is seen as an interaction between two embodied individuals and the interviewer herself is the instrument of research, this article examines the communication that occurs in the space between two co-present, embodied individuals and explicates the practice of deep listening. While interviewing via video call is an excellent tool, I argue that a layer of meaning is removed by the technological medium, which impacts the researcher relationship and thus the ability to listen deeply.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-06-25T11:32:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211027780
       
  • Seven theses on critical empathy: a methodological framework for
           ‘unsavory’ populations

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      Authors: Alexis de Coning
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Qualitative researchers of ‘unsavory’ populations experience a complex range of emotions as they sustain close contact with people and communities that are deemed reprehensible, dangerous, or toxic. Empathy, in particular, raises ethical and methodological challenges for scholars who must build rapport with people who may perpetuate racism, sexism, xenophobia, and so on. Drawing on existing qualitative literature and ethnographic fieldwork, I propose critical empathy as a methodological framework to account for the difficult and sometimes problematic emotional dimensions of research on ‘unsavory’ populations. Instead of trying to resolve the tensions between empathy and critique, critical empathy compels us to grapple with these tensions and make them apparent in our work.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-06-19T07:38:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211019563
       
  • Starting with the archive: principles for prospective collaborative
           research

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      Authors: Rachel Thomson, Liam Berriman
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      What are participants and researchers agreeing to when they consent to having data archived and what do they imagine the future life of their data to be' In this paper, we reflect on a project that deliberately started rather than ended with the archive. The Everyday Childhoods project invited children and their families to take part in the creation of an open access public archive documenting everyday childhoods using a range of multimedia data. Families and researchers were invited into the archive, encouraged to imagine different kinds of secondary use and to speak directly to future user of their data through short films and postcards. This paper raises questions concerning the place of the archive in different disciplinary traditions; the roles of researcher and archivist in safekeeping, gatekeeping and caring for data collections; and the place of qualitative longitudinal research as a site of innovation within a new data landscape.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-06-18T09:18:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211023037
       
  • Student voices that resonate – Constructing composite narratives that
           represent students’ classroom experiences

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      Authors: Olivia Johnston, Helen Wildy, Jennifer Shand
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Words and stories have the power to resonate with people. Composite narratives can be constructed using multiple participant accounts, representing their experiences while also capturing the properties and categories of qualitative research findings. The ability of composite narratives to represent the multiple facets of theory construction through a singular narrative point-of-view is unique and provides a concise and credible method to present research findings. This paper explains how composite narratives can be constructed to present the research data that findings are built upon through an illustrative example of the process. The example of a composite narrative presented in this article is one of a larger set from a grounded theory study about a substantive group of Australian students’ experiences of their interactions in the classroom that communicate their teachers’ expectations of them. Narratives have the power to affect change in society by enhancing the transferability of research findings, presenting research findings with impact because they are engaging and memorable for readers. Qualitative researchers who are interested in composing composite narratives to reflect multiple participants’ different experiences, through interview data, will benefit from the justification and example of the technique, which provides a model for future research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-06-16T10:16:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211016158
       
  • Can everyone hear me' Reflections on the use of global online
           workshops for promoting inclusive knowledge generation

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      Authors: Beatrice Egid, Kim Ozano, Guillermo Hegel, Emily Zimmerman, Yaimie López, Maria Roura, Payam Sheikhattari, Laundette Jones, Sónia Dias, Nina Wallerstein
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Online research methods have risen in popularity over recent decades, particularly in the wake of COVID-19. We conducted five online workshops capturing the experiences of participatory health researchers in relation to power, as part of a collaborative project to develop global knowledge systems on power in participatory health research. These workshops included predominantly academic researchers working in 24 countries across Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Here, we reflect on the opportunities, limitations, and key considerations of using online workshops for knowledge generation and shared learning. The online workshop approach offers the potential for cross-continental knowledge exchange and for the amplification of global South voices. However, this study highlights the need for deeper exploration of power dynamics exposed by online platform use, particularly the ‘digital divide’ between academic partners and community co-researchers. Further research is needed to better understand the role of online platforms in generating more inclusive knowledge systems.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T09:05:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211019585
       
  • Imagining research together and working across divides: Arts-informed
           research about young people’s (post) digital lives

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      Authors: Diane R Collier, Mia Perry
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Research that ‘grows apart’ from its original design and proposal is not uncommon, especially when involving participatory and creative methods. However, the disconnect between research intentions and research realization is seldom probed for the insights offered; this paper addresses this gap. Taking up the conceptual lens of research imaginaries, this paper dives into the tensions and discoveries experienced in between the design and the practice of a multi-site participatory research project. The study involved two groups of young people, in two cities in two countries, with a focus on digital lives. In a commitment to collaboration with artists, senior researchers, research assistants, and young people in community spaces, a complex project emerged. This paper describes the tensions and possibilities of an emergent methodology and in doing so argues for increased attention to the movement of research designs; rather than the adherence to them.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T12:17:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211010029
       
  • Researching tribute bands: tools, counter-interpretations and extending
           research relations to Facebook in a tight network

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      Authors: Nuné Nikoghosyan
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses methodological, ethical, and epistemological issues that arise when research is conducted in a tight-knit network of respondents: in this case, artists in search of fame and recognition, while performing in a tribute band – a relatively downgraded form of music. The study was conducted in Switzerland and used qualitative methodology, consisting mainly of observations of concerts and semi-structured interviews with musicians, cultural intermediaries and audience members. With an aim to contribute to the reflexivity of sociology as a discipline and ideally provide methodological traces for future research in similar conditions, the article first presents the general methodology used in this study. Then, the discussion turns to the uses and difficulties of certain methodological elements such as Howard Becker’s advice on ‘playing dumb’ for obtaining more subtle information, dealing with ‘counter-interpretations’ by study participants, or the extension of research relations to the online realm.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-06-07T06:21:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211019534
       
  • Reframing temporality in participatory visual research with timelapse
           video

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      Authors: Bethany Monea, Amy Stornaiuolo, Emily Plummer Catena
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, the authors offer ‘timelapse’—removing frames from video footage to effectively ‘speed up’ visual activity—as an experimental method for engaging in the practice of seeing the emergence and contingency of activity across different timescales and in collaboration with participants. Building on previous calls to zoom up and out in analysis in order to understand the cumulative impact of moments, events, and episodes across different timescales, this article frames timelapse video as a means of visually representing activity in a way that emphasizes not only its multimodal dimensions but its temporal ones. The authors explicate how the ‘zoomed out’ temporal perspective of timelapse video offers two intertwined analytic affordances in qualitative research: (1) insight into how activity is coordinated across micro-, meso-, and macro-timescales, and (2) insight into how activity is emergent from and contingent upon macrosocial factors. They argue that these analytic affordances of timelapse are particularly well suited to being collaboratively realized alongside participants, illustrating these participatory affordances through data collected from a two-year study about literacy and arts-based practices in a US public high school. This article suggests that the participatory practice of seeing what circulates across different scales of time in timelapse video not only highlights the contingency and partiality inherent in all visual representations, thus unsettling notions of video as depicting ‘reality’ or ‘truth’, but also emphasizes the importance of multiscalar perspective taking for considering how macrosocial dimensions of meaning unfold across longer timescales and in relation to micro-interactional ones.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-06-03T11:33:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211019524
       
  • Book Review: Research Exposed: How Empirical Social Science Gets Done in
           the Digital Age

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      Authors: Dr Wil Chivers
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-06-01T06:16:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211019554
       
  • Autopsy as a site and mode of inquiry: de/composing the ghoulish hu/man
           gaze

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      Authors: Neil Carey, Nikki Fairchild, Carol Taylor, Mirka Koro, Constanse Elmenhorst, Angelo Benozzo
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      For centuries the autopsy has been a key technology in Western culture for generating clinical/medical as well as cultural knowledge about bodies. This article hails the anato-medical autopsy as a generative trope and apparatus in reconfiguring Western humanist knowledge of bodies and bodies of knowledge and takes up the possibilities of working with the concept of autopsy in disrupting qualitative research methodology. In doing so, the article outlines and returns (to) a series of research-creation experiments assembled at an academic conference, which engaged with the challenges for social science knowledge laid out by Law’s (2004) After Method book. Our research-creation experiments centred autopsy as a theoretical-methodological gaze and apparatus for de-composing qualitative research methodology by engaging with post-humanist and new material feminist thinking.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-05-31T08:07:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121999005
       
  • Notes from a field: a qualitative exploration of human–animal relations
           in a volunteer shepherding project

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      Authors: Matthew Adams, James Ormrod, Sarah Smith
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      There is a burgeoning interest in human–animal relations across the social sciences and humanities, accompanied by an acceptance that nonhuman animals are active participants in countless social relations, worthy of serious and considered empirical exploration. This article, the first of its kind as far as the authors are aware, reports on an ongoing qualitative exploration of an example of contemporary human–animal interaction on the fringes of a British city: volunteer shepherding (‘lookering’). Participants are part of a conservation grazing scheme, a growing phenomenon in recent years that relies on increasingly popular volunteer programmes. The primary volunteer role in such schemes is to spend time outdoors checking the welfare of livestock. The first section of the article summarises developments in more-than-human and multispecies research methodologies, and how the challenges of exploring the non- and more-than-human in particular are being addressed. In the second section, we frame our own approach to a human–animal relation against this emerging literature and detail the practicalities of the methods we used. The third section details some of our findings specifically in terms of what was derived from the peculiarities of our method. A final discussion offers a reflection on some of the methodological and ethical implications of our research, in terms of the question of who benefits and how from this specific instance of human–animal relations, and for the development of methods attuned to human–animal and multispecies relations more generally.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-05-25T07:11:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211018043
       
  • Partisanship and positionality in qualitative research: Exploring the
           influences of the researcher’s experiences of serious crime on the
           research process

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      Authors: Melissa Mendez
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Debates on positionality and partisanship in the research process are long-standing, complex and often highly contentious. Engaging with, and contributing to, both these key debates, this paper introduces the concept of victim-as-researcher. This draws from the author’s experiences of undertaking research in Trinidad and Tobago with a group of offenders who had committed similar offences to that which the researcher was herself a victim. There is a paucity of literature which speaks to the experiences of victims of serious, violent crime who subsequently engage in qualitative research with offenders who have been convicted of offences similar to the ones experienced by the researcher and which, therefore, can elicit trauma whilst in the field and through analysis. This paper aims to extend the methodological literature on positionality and victimology by foregrounding the victim-as-researcher as an important category in reflexive sociological and criminological research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-05-25T07:09:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211016154
       
  • Implementing continuous consent in qualitative research

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      Authors: Fride Haram Klykken
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines ways of approaching informed consent as a relationally constituted process in qualitative research practices. It argues that a researcher’s operationalization of informed consent should be coherent with the overall epistemological framework of the project. Based on empirical examples from an ethnographic inquiry in an educational setting, the principle of informed consent is discussed as a reflexive and ethical tool throughout the inquiry, including its pre-fieldwork, fieldwork and post-fieldwork phases. Strategies of explicitly and implicitly (re)negotiated consent and dissent are discussed and illustrated by drawing on some of the recent discussions of continuous consent practices. The article’s conceptualization of a continuous, situated and relational approach to informed consent is also supported by the concepts of response-ability and thinking with care in research ethics.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-05-10T06:07:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211014366
       
  • Taking Live Methods slowly: inhabiting the social world through dwelling,
           doodling and describing

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      Authors: Katherine Quinn
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article contributes to literatures on sociological by advocating for ‘playing’ with the concept of slow methods. Slow methods include a reflexive disposition towards the unfolding of social life in ordinary spaces (dwelling), the use of drawing as an embodied tool for understanding this unfolding (doodling) and the combination of these approaches into writing which deliberately seeks to evoke the liveness of the social world (describing). It draws on an ethnography of a joint-use public-academic library and several scenes selected from its fieldwork. I make three arguments: first, I argue for analogue methods to compliment digitally focussed live methods. Second, I explore the value of slow methods for being drawn into a scene and drawn to see its micro-happenings, particularly in spaces where the social world unfolds in mundane and uneven ways. Third, I argue the approach allows ‘shy researchers’ to engage attentively and reflexively in the field.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-05-08T07:02:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211012222
       
  • The afterlife of interviews: explicit ethics and subtle ethics in
           sensitive or distressing qualitative research

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      Authors: Carla Pascoe Leahy
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      When conducting interviews about sensitive subject matter such as family life, powerful emotions may arise. The kinds of unexpected distress that can surface in interviews concerning topics laden with personal significance are different to the readily anticipated trauma that accompanies interviews in post-crisis or post-conflict situation. This article analyses the ethical considerations that accompany such research, drawing upon literature from oral history and qualitative sociology. The article traces ethical issues during the temporal phases of qualitative research – before, during and after an interview – before proposing three strategies that interviewers can adopt to help protect narrators from ongoing harm or distress after an interview. Such ethical safeguards include the self-interview, the post-interview follow-up with the narrator, and adopting an ethics of reciprocity that allows the narrator to feel that they are contributing to a larger purpose through involvement in research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-05-06T06:32:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211012924
       
  • Telling visual stories of loss and hope: body mapping with mothers about
           contact after child removal

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      Authors: Susan Collings, Amy Conley Wright, Margaret Spencer
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Visual research methods reduce reliance on verbal communication and offer an avenue for non-verbal storytelling. Body mapping is a visual arts-based research method with its origins in art therapy and community development. It has been successfully used to explore embodied experiences of marginalised social groups. Participants engage in sensory and multimodal storytelling by tracing a life-size body outline and adorning it with fabrics, drawings and images to symbolise their views during a guided interview. This approach was used in research to explore birth family contact experiences in New South Wales, where children have ongoing direct contact with birth relatives in long-term care, guardianship and open adoption. Twelve mothers of children in permanent care took part in body mapping to explore their feelings about contact and the support they need to nurture a relationship with their children. Immersion in the artistic process of bringing a representational body to life granted these mothers access to hidden memories about their experience of child removal. They used evocative images to depict system violence and their fight against the erasure of their mother identity as well to envision a positive future relationship with their children. Body mapping potently revealed that traumatic loss resides in the body and resurfaces in encounters with child welfare systems. This has important policy and practice implications, highlighting a need for post-removal therapeutic services to process trauma and sensitive casework to rebuild parent trust and to help carers respond with empathy to their child’s mother at contact. This lends support to the usefulness of body mapping not only for research with vulnerable parents, but to its enormous potential as a creative engagement tool for child welfare practitioners.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-30T09:03:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211004218
       
  • Re-thinking research interview methods through the multisensory
           constitution of place

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      Authors: Anne-Lene Sand, Helle Marie Skovbjerg, Lene Tanggaard
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper highlights a methodological vagueness within the existing qualitative research interview literature related to reflecting where interviews takes place. The aim is to interrogate how the use of the concept of emplaced participation can account for the multisensory constitution of place within interviews as well as how the place can provide an opportunity to generate knowledge about participants’ everyday practices. Casey’s understanding of place as a gathering and Pink’s perspectives on emplaced participation provide a sensitive epistemological approach that can be applied by researchers outside the field of ethnography. Based on empirical ethnographic material from fieldwork in Denmark, this paper makes a novel contribution to how researchers can use sensory and emplaced experience before and during an interview. We argue that, if we cease taking emplaced dimensions for granted, new methodological techniques can be developed, which, in turn, can lead to new types of knowledge of practice.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-30T09:03:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121999009
       
  • Using crystallization to understand loneliness in later life: integrating
           social science and creative narratives in sensitive qualitative research

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      Authors: Barbara Barbosa Neves, Josephine Wilson, Alexandra Sanders, Renata Kokanović
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article draws on crystallization, a qualitative framework developed by Laurel Richardson and Laura Ellingson, to show the potential of using sociological narratives and creative writing to better analyze and represent the lived experiences of loneliness among older people living in Australian care homes. Crystallization uses a multi-genre approach to study and present social phenomena. At its core is a concern for the ethics of representation, which is critical when engaging with vulnerable populations. We use two case studies from research on loneliness to illustrate an application of crystallization through different narrative types. To supplement our sociological narratives, we invited author Josephine Wilson to write creative narratives based on the case studies. Josephine was awarded the prestigious Miles Franklin Literary Award in 2017 for Extinctions, a novel exploring themes such as later life and loneliness. By contrasting the two approaches—sociological and creative narratives—we discuss the implications of crystallization for qualitative research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T07:15:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211005943
       
  • Researching death, dying and bereavement: tales of grounded theory,
           reflexivity and compassion

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      Authors: Carla Jane Kennedy, Fiona Gardner
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Immersing researchers in sensitive and emotive topics such as death, dying and bereavement may result in periods of conflicting logical thoughts and subjective feelings that need to be acknowledged and supported.The question to be answered in this research was ‘How do we create compassionate schools'’ which led to the interviewing of bereaved school community members in regional areas in Victoria, Australia. As anticipated, Carla, one of the researchers who had experienced recent family deaths was challenged by particular issues arising in interviews and through the transcribing process. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to discuss this complexity, with grounded theory as a conduit, reflexivity and critical reflection as combined tools and compassion as a way forward. We draw upon Carla’s methodological reflective journal and current health literature concerning sensitive topics in qualitative research.Recommendations of how to support researchers and research teams managing sensitive topics are provided and suggestions of how compassion can be achieved and extended to researchers are offered.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-17T06:43:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211000560
       
  • The smell of lockdown: Smellwalks as sensuous methodology

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      Authors: Louisa Allen
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores a form of sensuous methodology known as smellwalks. Smellwalks are a method which require a reorientation of the senses to temporarily emphasize the information received from the nose. During a smellwalk, the researcher employs an active form of smelling to examine their environment that diverges from normal smell perception. In this research, smellwalks are deployed to investigate the experience of lockdown in a suburban town in Aotearoa-New Zealand. Six solo walks were undertaken, three during lockdown and three out of it, to compare the presence and absence of smells during these periods. In attuning to the invisible, intangible, mundane, and small details of life via smell, smellwalks opened opportunities for new embodied and material knowledge about lockdown experience. It is argued that smellwalks offer a sensory and embodied method with the capacity to attend to more than vision and representation.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T10:56:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211007663
       
  • Visibilities and invisibilities in data reuse: video records of practice
           in education

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      Authors: Elizabeth Yakel, Rebecca D Frank, Kara Suzuka, Jasmine Smith
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates data reuse or the secondary analysis of qualitative data, specifically video records of practice in education, which are used to study the complex cognitive, social, and logistical issues involved in teaching and learning processes. It examines reuse through the lens of the invisibilities experienced by educational researchers who perform secondary analysis on video records of practice. Drawing on 22 in-depth interviews with educational researchers, we examine how they conceptualize secondary analysis of qualitative video data and cope with invisibilities in the data. For example, knowing the original research question was not sufficient: reusers needed to understand more about the intentionality of the data producer. They also sought more information on the reflexivity of the original researcher and how this influenced data production. Additionally, reusers discussed the creation of evidence from the video during secondary analysis as teaching and learning themselves entail invisible processes.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T10:55:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211005955
       
  • Diverse teams researching diversity: Negotiating identity, place and
           embodiment in qualitative research

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      Authors: Brenda Mathijssen, Danny McNally, Sufyan Dogra, Avril Maddrell, Yasminah Beebeejaun, Katie McClymont
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Fieldwork encounters are not only contingent to biographical subjectivities, but are mediated by a confluence of identity, place and embodiment. This paper offers reflexive accounts of researchers with various socio-cultural and disciplinary backgrounds, who collaborated as a team to examine the varied funerary experiences and needs of established minorities and recent migrants in England and Wales. Focusing on the researchers’ varied personal experiences with death and bereavement and on their performances of minority and majority ethnic and migrant identities, the paper highlights the mediated and embodied nature of fieldwork. It argues that reflection on the various aspects of intersectional researcher identity is necessary for a rigorous fieldwork practice that takes transparency and politics into account. This facilitates a deeper understanding of the positionality of both researchers and interlocutors, and the situated co-production of knowledge. In doing so, the paper illustrates that conducting research with a diverse team of researchers contributes to better understanding the complexity and multifacetedness of social phenomena.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T11:11:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211006004
       
  • Silhouettes analysis: a posthuman method for visualizing and examining the
           material world

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      Authors: Grit Höppner
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In recent decades, postmodern, poststructuralist, and social constructivist theories, and the methodologies and methods they have informed, have been criticized for focusing primarily on human actors, discourses, and actions. Simultaneously, so-called posthuman theories have been developed that decentralize the human, reject an unquestioned use of the dualism of human/nonhuman, and emphasize the importance of the material world in the production of the social. A key concern for current qualitative inquiry is to develop methods that contribute to the critique of human-centered analysis. In this article, I explore what we learn about the material world when we do not use verbal methods or written data but image details of moveable formations, which are made into silhouettes using Karen Barad’s agential realism. After introducing posthuman methodology I perform a silhouettes analysis focusing on old age. The intention is to demonstrate that silhouettes analysis makes it possible to gain new insights into the features of materialities of old age in a way that classical image analysis would not allow. In addition, silhouettes analysis produces an alienation effect that disturbs practiced viewing habits and assumptions, and can thus serve as a research tool promoting reflection. I conclude with a discussion of the advantages and limitations of silhouettes analysis for gerontological and posthuman research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T06:11:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121999015
       
  • Doing research into Indigenous issues being non-Indigenous

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      Authors: Eivind Å Skille
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Based on research into Indigenous people and sport, this article discusses the opportunities and challenges for a non-Indigenous researcher to study Indigenous issues. The author shares personal experiences from research into Sámi sport (Sámi are the Indigenous people of the North Calotte) and compares these with the literature relating to post-colonial methodologies. It concludes with some overarching elements to take into consideration when researching Indigenous peoples: reflection including critical self-reflection (as in any qualitative research); reciprocity, including respect, dialogue and that the research must benefit the Indigenous people under study and in general; and awareness about the heterogeneity within Indigenous groups and consciousness about the interface between researcher and Indigenous peoples. Given the heterogeneity, the interfaces vary.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T09:55:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211005947
       
  • Covid-19 and research in conflict-affected contexts: distanced methods and
           the digitalisation of suffering

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      Authors: David Mwambari, Andrea Purdeková, Aymar Nyenyezi Bisoka
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This research note explores the pressing ethical challenges associated with increased online platforming of sensitive research on conflict-affected settings since the onset of Covid-19. We argue that moving research online and the ‘digitalisation of suffering’ risks reducing complexity of social phenomena and omission of important aspects of lived experiences of violence or peace-building. Immersion, ‘contexting’ and trust-building are fundamental to research in repressive and/or conflict-affected settings and these are vitally eclipsed in online exchanges and platforms. ‘Distanced research’ thus bears very real epistemological limitations. Neither proximity not distance are in themselves liberating vectors. Nonetheless, we consider the opportunities that distancing offers in terms of its decolonial potential, principally in giving local researcher affiliates’ agency in the research process and building more equitable collaborations. This research note therefore aims to propose a series of questions and launch a debate amongst interested scholars, practitioners and other researchers working in qualitative research methods in the social sciences.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T09:51:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121999014
       
  • Using ATLAS for Mac to enact narrative analysis: metaphor of generativity
           from LGBT older adult life stories

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      Authors: Kyle L Bower, Denise C Lewis, Trena M Paulus
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      The relationship between qualitative data analysis software (QDAS) and the development of new methods remains underexplored. While scholars argue that software tactics are used only to implement analytic strategies, some strategies are made possible only with new software developments. Aligned with the Five-Level QDA method, we aim to address the gap in the literature by thoroughly presenting the methodological aspects of an existing narrative inquiry. To be systematic in our explanation of QDAS integration, we begin by offering background information about the original project, followed by an analytical plan, which was informed by our researcher’s subjectivity and generativity theory. We then introduce our translational process that merges our subjective narrative strategy with objective ATLAS.ti tactics into a comprehensive framework for analysis. The findings, presented as a conceptual mapping of the data, informed deeper metaphorical exploration of generativity which is discussed as a life-long process of intergenerational connectedness.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T02:02:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121999008
       
  • (De)colonising outcomes of community participation – a South African
           ethnography of ‘ethics in practice’

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      Authors: Michelle R Brear, Cias T Tsotetsi
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Theoretically, community participation decolonises research ethics in settings where a ‘coloniality of power’ persists. We used ethnographic methods to document our experiences of ‘ethics in practice’, and interrogate the (de)colonising outcomes, of community participation in voluntary informed assent and consent (VIAC) procedures with 16–17-year-old Black South African youth and parents. Community participation decolonised by: (1) disrupting and problematising the power dynamics of written VIAC procedures and (2) minimally shifting power to youth and parents. However, community participation sometimes reinforced existing power hierarchies. In postcolonial qualitative research settings, community participation has potential to, but will not necessarily, decolonise ethics in practice.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-03T09:57:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211004417
       
  • An un/familiar space: children and parents as collaborators in
           autoethnographic family research

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      Authors: Sabine Little, Toby Little
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper, coauthored by mother and son (aged 10 at the time of writing, 12 at time of revisions), reports on the collaborative research experience during a 2.5-year-long autoethnographic study, which focused on bringing back the family heritage language after a 2-year break. Through a joint research diary, we regularly and rigorously chronicled both language-related conversations and our emotions linked to the process of bringing back the heritage language. Frustration, guilt, joy, exasperation, and pride were jointly discussed via what we call an un/familiar space. This paper explores the evolution of this space, linking it to Bhabha’s third space theory and Gadamer’s fusion of horizons. We present the un/familiar space both as an epistemological stance and as a methodological tool for intergenerational autoethnography, enabling both parents and children to engage with each other in a more neutral space, deliberately removed from traditional family roles. Further, we critically engage with the role of children as co-creators of knowledge within this space, contributing longitudinal data of co-construction and critical reflection from two generations to the research community.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-30T09:00:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121999018
       
  • Adapting participatory research methods for reflexive environmental
           management

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      Authors: Jesse Rodenbiker
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses methodological adaptations to participatory methods for reflexive environmental management. Reflexive approaches to research methods as process, this article contends, can elucidate social dynamics that standard sampling frames and rote procedures may elide. This argument is supported through a discussion of key insights from scholarship about participatory research methods, as well as auto-reflections on methodical adaptations undertaken while conducting photovoice research on environmental management in peri-urban villages of Southwest China. Reflexive adaptations to participatory methods discussed in this paper include ethnographic attention to forms of refusal, suspended participation, and individual interviews with and without visual aids. These methodological adaptations highlight relations of power between researchers and participants, as well as amongst participants. They also highlight diverse social needs and uneven environmental management processes. Although reflexive approaches to participatory methods are key to producing more widely representational findings and socially just sustainability practices, they are not a panacea for universal inclusivity. Reflexive methodological adaptations have their own limitations and introduce new power relations between participants and researchers. The article concludes with a discussion of how reflexive methodological adaptations bear on research praxis. In particular, the conclusion highlights how reflexive adaptations to research methods are crucial to socially just environmental management and sustainability practices.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T10:19:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121990966
       
  • Rethinking digital ethnography: A qualitative approach to understanding
           interfaces

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      Authors: Christian S Ritter
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Contemporary everyday cultures are increasingly pervaded by digital platforms, making a rethinking of observational research into sociocultural phenomena necessary. Observational practices that remain confined to physical localities face various impasses in the era of digital platforms. Combining participant observation in workplaces where digital platforms are accessed with technical walkthroughs of their interfaces, I make a case for renewing interface ethnography. On one hand, technical walkthroughs reveal the sociocultural assumptions embedded in interfaces and the ways in which their affordances generate symbolic meanings. However, on the other hand, participant observation foregrounds emic perspectives on digital platforms within communities of practice. Based on an ethnographic study of a Norwegian software firm, I argue that the integration of the walkthrough method with participant observation enables researchers to trace the twofold meaning construction inherent in communities of practice whose skilled labor is orientated toward digital platforms. This fusion of methods expands the scope of ethnographic knowledge across the digital-physical continuum.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-24T09:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687941211000540
       
  • Beyond listening: the value of co-research in the co-construction of
           narratives

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      Authors: Sandra Lyndon, Becky Edwards
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we discuss how co-research – two researchers working together at each stage of the research process – can be used to analyse narratives created from qualitative interviews (drawing on Brown and Gilligan’s Listening Guide). We argue that co-research affords a richness and depth of analysis and propagates multiple, layered interpretations through a process of co-reflection. To illustrate our approach, we present an analysis of two case studies from the ‘From Adversity to University’ project, a longitudinal qualitative study evaluating the effectiveness of a bridging module as a way into higher education for students who have been affected by homelessness in England. We co-reflect on how our participants, our relationship with our participants and our relationship with each other as researchers has changed over time. We conclude that a co-researcher approach to analysing narratives is textually and emotionally enriching, as the co-constructed multiple interpretations transform not just the analysis of the text but also the relationship between researchers and their participants in new and unexpected ways.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T09:54:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121999600
       
  • Researching ‘non-sexualities’ via creative notebooks: epistemology,
           embodiment and empowerment

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      Authors: Karen Cuthbert
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article contributes to and extends critical scholarship on the philosophy and practical application of creative methods. I suggest that claims commonly made regarding the ‘potential’ of creative methods can be (re)organised as claims relating to (1) epistemology, (2) embodiment and (3) empowering participants. I evaluate these claims through the contextual lens of a research project on ‘non-sexualities’ wherein I incorporated a creative element (creative notebooks) into the research design. Through analysis of research artefacts and observations of the research process, I reflect upon how the notebooks were particularly good for ‘getting at’ embodiment and had a clear epistemological value in facilitating expressions of complexity, contradictions and ambiguities. However, I also discuss my scepticism with regard to claims made about the empowering potential of creative methods, as the notebooks potentially worked to reproduce certain power dynamics rather than eliminate them. I argue that class in particular needs to be given more attention in critical accounts of creative methods.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-18T06:36:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121999011
       
  • Challenges and strategies of translation in a qualitative and sensitive
           research

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      Authors: Zeynep Turhan, Claudia Bernard
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Key strategies and challenges of translating the interview data should be considered to do justice to the meanings and voices of the participants and remove misrepresentation. This article aims to investigate the key issues around translation in qualitative and sensitive research of the examination of the men’s engagement in domestic violence interventions in the UK. While many studies report on the importance of providing credibility to the meanings of the participants’ stories, there are limited studies that explore how researchers deal with difficulties and the techniques for translating the data. This research focuses on the key issues around the translation of interview data from Turkish to English. It highlights how the researcher’s position as a translator and a researcher impacted on collecting the data from the participants in a native language and presenting them in English. This addresses methodological and ethical questions that many migrant researchers might encounter during the translation of data.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-16T06:42:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121999003
       
  • More-than-human methodologies in qualitative research: Listening to the
           Leafblower

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      Authors: Maureen A. Flint
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the methodological possibilities of listening to more-than-human sounds as an entry point to critical analysis. Through attending to the sound of a leafblower as it resonates across a university campus, this article draws lines between the resonances of the leafblower, higher education, and white supremacy to explore how sounds become embedded in bodies and spaces. In addition, this article offers a methodology of listening as a process of attunement that provokes readings beyond what is immediately heard, seen, or felt. To listen to the sound of the leafblower and what it does, how it resonates is to attune to how that sound works, how it operates in the production and discourses of place. In other words, this article wonders how listening, as a methodological practice, provokes critical questions about place and space, and how sound (and particularly nonhuman or more than human sounds) functions in qualitative methodology.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-15T11:23:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121999028
       
  • Book Review: Gary Barkhuizen, (Ed)., Qualitative Research Topics in
           Language Teacher Education

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      Authors: Honggang Liu
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-15T11:23:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121994478
       
  • How to tackle variations in elite interviews: Access, strategies, and
           power dynamics

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      Authors: Lantian Li
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Existing work on elite interviewing methods falls short in two ways: first, there is no systematic comparison between the practices of interviewing different elite groups; second, most reflections are confined to Anglo-American contexts. To address these gaps, I reflect on how to tackle variations in elite interviews by analyzing my experience conducting over 150 interviews with a diverse set of elite stakeholders in a Chinese high-tech sector. I aim to make two arguments. First, the elite interviewee’s sphere of influence—national or local—is crucial to shaping interview access and power dynamics. Two distinct reference modes are compared: formal national networks and informal local connections, with university professors and government officials as gatekeepers, respectively. Second, to carve out a space for meaningful engagement with an informant, researchers need to adopt different positioning strategies according to the elite interviewee’s identity: a trustworthy, policy-oriented scholar for political elites; a neutral, non-profit stakeholder for economic elites; and, a perceptive, well-informed sociologist for professional elites.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-27T06:44:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121994475
       
  • Book review: Sophie Woodward, Material Methods: Researching and Thinking
           with Things

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      Authors: Lydia C. Cole
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-27T06:43:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121994472
       
  • Rethinking the concept of ‘subaltern-researcher’: different D/deaf
           identities and communicative modalities as conflict factors in in-depth
           interviews

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      Authors: Nomy Bitman
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the communicative, cultural, and practical aspects of being a hard-of-hearing (HH) researcher who studies D/deaf people’s smartphone use through 20 in-depth interviews. This context presents the conflict between seeing deafness as a disability and seeing Deaf people as members of a cultural minority. This complexity of ‘subaltern-researcher’ concept combines with the limitations caused by conducting research as a marginal member of the academy, which in turn prompts the researcher’s conflict between the commitment to marginalized research participants and the able-bodied academic obligation to act according to able-bodied research, analysis, and standards for publication of findings. This paper suggests a reflexive description of identity, culture, senses, and communication, which interacts with the social responsibility of the disabled researcher, and the interviewees’ expressed agency. As such, this article contributes methodological and communicative insights on inclusive qualitative methods regarding both disabled participants and researchers.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-26T05:52:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121994461
       
  • Researching event-centred projects: Showcasing grounded aesthetics

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      Authors: Frances Howard
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Showcasing plays a fundamental role in arts education programmes. This paper presents an approach to research scenarios which explore ‘event-centred’ projects. Drawing on arts-based methodologies and research projects, this approach could be extended to the study of seasonal rituals, festivals and other types of organisational settings in which creative work culminates in some type of public display. This paper defines the key features of this method, which draw on Paul Willis’ concept of ‘grounded aesthetics’ and Sarah Pink’s work on the sensorial and embodied experience. I discuss the experimentation with various digital media and documentation strategies which adopt a participatory and collaborative perspective. I focus on how the sensorial, multimodal and collaborative approaches to ethnography are used within event-centred research projects which complement more ‘traditional’ ethnographic approaches. Finally, this paper offers a methodological contribution regarding how to unpack the ‘grounded aesthetics’ of specific contexts and communities.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-17T09:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794121990973
       
  • Researching research affects: in-between different research positions

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      Authors: Lotta Johansson, Merete Moe, Kjersti Nissen
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      A significant amount of research has highlighted the different ontological and epistemological dimensions of insider and outsider research positions. In the field of education, this topic could benefit from more research. In this study, three researchers and former early childhood centre directors discussed their own research positions in a completed research project. Based on field notes from following the daily work of the centre leaders – positions the researchers formally held themselves – it is illustrated that the research affects continued to flow after the project had ended, raising new questions about how specific situations and the data had been handled. This study, a folding, unfolding and re-folding of data, highlights the ethical considerations actualised in the movements between research positions. The movements between research positions are understood as a source of tension that can produce affects, becomings and data with the ability to question given positions and established knowledge.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-01-22T06:12:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794120985683
       
  • Using WhatsApp for focus group discussions: ecological validity, inclusion
           and deliberation

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      Authors: Anna Colom
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      WhatsApp’s ubiquity in many people’s everyday lives points at new possibilities for conducting online and mobile focus groups. Yet, research on the benefits and potential pitfalls of this is negligible. This paper offers new empirical insights from using the method as part of a digital ethnography with young activists in Western Kenya. The presence of WhatsApp in participants’ everyday lives offers a context with high ecological validity. The paper suggests that this opens up new options for designing online focus groups, transcending the traditional categorisation between synchronous and asynchronous interactions and some limitations of both approaches. WhatsApp also offers opportunities for creating more inclusive group discussions. Using discourse analysis of the WhatsApp focus group, the paper also finds that this familiarity and inclusivity affords the potential for group deliberation, which can be particularly valuable in participatory research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-01-22T04:57:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794120986074
       
  • Uncertainty and practical judgement in research: a call for attentive
           ‘listening’

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      Authors: Daniela Mercieca, Duncan P. Mercieca, Sarah Piscopo Mercieca
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This paper draws upon research projects in which efforts have been made to find ways of listening to young children’s voices in early years contexts. This listening, namely in the mosaic approach, helps us to see how children make sense of their world, and adopt our planning and ‘being with’ young children. After setting the context of early years pedagogy and ideology of mosaic approach, this paper focuses on the researcher’s journey to turn her gaze inward before making any claims about her engagement with and listening to young children. Since this approach purposely leaves unanswered the question what kind of data is going to be collected, researchers have to decide what data is in the course of a research project, through their engagement with children. We argue for befriending uncertainty and dilemmatic thinking as it provides us with a different way of seeing, knowing and listening the hard to know. Through writing about phronêsis, this paper focuses on the process of decision-making and judgements that researchers undertake. The final argument calls for attentiveness and aims to acknowledge practical judgements as a fundamental part of researching early years.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T06:23:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794120985685
       
  • Writing sociological fiction

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      Authors: Ash Watson
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      The value of fiction for public sociology and within qualitative research is well established. However, questions about process remain. Drawing from three contemporary projects – a novel, a series of short stories, and a collection of micro-fiction – this article focuses methodological attention on how sociological imagination may be crafted in and with fiction. In particular I discuss the poetics and aesthetic form of a story: the language, mode of storytelling and voice(s) with which a story is told; and the imagery and sensory qualities which bring a story-world to life. By bringing conceptual considerations together with practical concerns, this article aims to extend the considerable body of work on the value of fiction for the production and dissemination of social research.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-01-18T08:52:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794120985677
       
  • Deepening reflexivity through art in learning qualitative research

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      Authors: Audra Skukauskaite, Inci Yilmazli Trout, Kaye A Robinson
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Reflexivity involves examining one’s background and perspectives in relation to the research topic, participants, and the processes and practices of research. Building on the growing field of utilizing arts-based practices in teaching qualitative research, in this article we examine how one doctoral student’s engagement with drawing and painting within and beyond a qualitative research class supported her developing reflexivity. Guided by an interactional ethnographic perspective, we conducted domain, taxonomic, and discourse analyses of the student’s art, reflection journals, video of a class presentation, and retrospective reflections she wrote three years later. Through these analyses we make visible that reflexivity through art creates potentials for understanding and transcending one’s background to create new opportunities for learning about self and research. We also argue that deepening reflexivity requires a commitment to engage in the discomforts of learning in order to develop new ways of thinking and researching.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-01-18T08:51:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794120985676
       
  • Identity, language and culture: Using Africanist Sista-hood and Deaf
           cultural discourse in research with minority social workers

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      Authors: Chijioke Obasi
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Central to any anti-oppressive research endeavour is the importance of reflexivity and the genuine attempt from researchers to turn the research tools on themselves (Hermans, 2019). Beyond research, the social work profession has much to learn from the reflexive accounts of researchers. Issues of identity, language and culture are widely recognised as important when working with service users and carers in social work; however, this is much less the case when considering identities of social work practitioners. Starting with personal and professional positions of Black female and Deaf female social workers, this article reveals the reflexive journey of the Black female hearing researcher undertaking the research. The article takes an original approach to theory construction by introducing ‘Africanist Sista-hood in Britain’ and marrying this with Deaf cultural discourse in the form of Deafhood, Deaf ethnicity and Deaf Gain, all of which make valuable contribution to existing debates in identity politics and the importance of self-naming and self-actualisation. Within the article the author discusses epistemological challenges in theory construction, data collection, language, transcription and dissemination, as they linked to power, privilege and the different forms this took within the research.The article makes a number of significant contributions. It introduces Africanist Sista-hood in Britain as a useful theoretical framework in research and at the same time encourages theoretical alliances across other marginalised groups. In discussing issues of knowledge production beyond existing hegemonic frames, it offers a broadening of the lens beyond the ways in which identity, culture and ethnicity are currently understood in the mainstream. In discussing Deaf cultural discourse and its influence on methodological choices it invites researchers to better engage with these issues from perspectives articulated by Deaf people.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-01-18T08:50:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794120982827
       
  • Looking at the ‘field’ through a Zoom lens: Methodological reflections
           on conducting online research during a global pandemic

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      Authors: Marnie Howlett
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      For many social science scholars, the COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to re-think our approaches to research. As a result of new social distancing measures, those of us who conduct in-person qualitative and ethnographic research have faced significant challenges in accessing the populations and fields we study. Technology served as an incredibly useful tool for social interaction and research prior to the pandemic, and it has since become even more important as a way to engage with others. Although not all types of social research, or even all projects, lend themselves to online activities, digital communication platforms like Zoom, Skype, and Facebook have allowed many of us to continue our studies from a distance—in some cases, significant temporal and spatial distances away from our research sites. As such, it is important to consider how these different methodological approaches challenge our understandings of fieldwork. While the disadvantages of not physically accessing the places we study are clear, can mediated approaches offer (any) hope of the immersion we experienced with in-person fieldwork' If many of us are able to continue ethnographic research (in some form) without co-locating with our participants in our field sites, how are our studies fundamentally affected, as well as the ways we conceptualize the ‘field’ more largely' This paper explores these methodological and epistemological questions through reflections on conducting online research during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-01-16T10:59:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794120985691
       
  • Participatory action research with and for undocumented college students:
           Ethical challenges and methodological opportunities

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      Authors: Cinthya Salazar
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      Scholarship on undocumented college students has been growing for the past 10 years; yet, the engagement of students without documentation in the research process is typically limited to the role of participants. A participatory action research (PAR) methodology provides critical scholars with the opportunity to involve undocumented college students as co-researchers and producers of knowledge. At the same time, the risks associated with the immigration status of undocumented students can significantly challenge how scholars design and conduct ethically responsible PAR studies. In this article, the author examines the ethical challenges and methodological opportunities of conducting a PAR study with and for undocumented college students. In particular, the author discusses the ethical tensions she considered in relation to the principles of respect, beneficence, and justice when conducting a qualitative PAR study with students without documentation as co-researchers.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-01-15T05:34:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794120985689
       
  • ‘Lasses are much easier to get on with’: The gendered labour of a
           female ethnographer in an all-male group

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      Authors: Kate Haddow
      Abstract: Qualitative Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article addresses the complexities of being a female ethnographer studying an all-male group, as well as the advantages and the effects this had on the researcher. It draws on research undertaken for a doctoral research project, employing ethnography and semi-structured interviews to explore ‘hidden’ food insecurity in the town of Middlesbrough, with predominantly male participants. The existing literature surrounding research and gender addresses the problems associated with gender differences in the field such as fitting in, sexualisation and sexist treatment and confinement to traditional gender roles. This research highlighted many problems associated with being a female ethnographer but that ultimately gender was beneficial in gaining and maintaining access to the field. It concludes by arguing for academia to develop the notion of ‘hidden ethnography’, alongside a recognition that researchers should be supported emotionally in problems they face in the field.
      Citation: Qualitative Research
      PubDate: 2021-01-09T10:46:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468794120984089
       
 
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