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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 243 journals)
Showing 1 - 135 of 135 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACOSS Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
African Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Argumentum     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Australian Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
AZARBE : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Bienestar     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bakti Budaya     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
British Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 104)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Care Management Journals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Social Work Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Columbia Social Work Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ConCienciaSocial     Open Access  
Contemporary Rural Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Critical and Radical Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Social Work : An Interdisciplinary Journal Dedicated to Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Trabajo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Developmental Child Welfare     Hybrid Journal  
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
European Journal of Social Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Families in Society : The Journal of Contemporary Social Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Geopolitical, Social Security and Freedom Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Global Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
HOLISTICA ? Journal of Business and Public Administration     Open Access  
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Human Service Organizations Management, Leadership and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Indonesian Journal of Guidance and Counseling     Open Access  
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Care and Caring     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of School Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
International Journal of Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
International Journal on Child Maltreatment : Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Islamic Counseling : Jurnal Bimbingan Konseling Islam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Janus Sosiaalipolitiikan ja sosiaalityön tutkimuksen aikakauslehti     Open Access  
Journal for Specialists in Group Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Baccalaureate Social Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Care Services Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Child and Adolescent Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Danubian Studies and Research     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Forensic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Rights and Social Work     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Occupational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 394)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Journal of Public Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Work in the Global Community     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Jurnal Guidena : Journal of Guidance and counseling, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Leidfaden : Fachmagazin für Krisen, Leid, Trauer     Hybrid Journal  
Links to Health and Social Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordisk välfärdsforskning | Nordic Welfare Research     Open Access  
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nusantara of Research: Jurnal Hasil-hasil Penelitian Universitas Nusantara PGRI Kediri     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Partner Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Policy Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Prospectiva : Revista de Trabajo Social e Intervención Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psikopedagogia : Jurnal Bimbingan dan Konseling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Qualitative Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de Tecnologias Sociais     Open Access  
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Serviço Social em Perspectiva     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
SER Social     Open Access  
Service social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Skriftserien Socialt Arbejde     Open Access  
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 2)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 212)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Policy Sciences
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.479
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-0891 - ISSN (Online) 0032-2687
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2658 journals]
  • Trade-offs versus reassurance: framing competing risks in the 2016 Zika
           outbreak

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      Abstract: Environmental threats increasingly entail important risks from government responses. In considering the risks of a new vector-borne disease, for example, decision-makers must also grapple with potential risks from responses such as the aerial spraying of pesticides. In communicating about these complex risks, public officials often choose different “frames” that promote different conceptualizations of the issue. Yet prior research has paid limited attention to how public officials frame the related risks of the environmental threat and the public response. This paper starts to fill that gap by conducting a content analysis of statements by public officials regarding risks from the threat of a local outbreak of the Zika virus in South Florida in 2016, as well as risks from the response of aerial pesticide spraying. Based on limited prior research, we hypothesize that public officials are likely to have adopted a “risk maximization” frame that stressed the high risks from exposure to Zika, but a “risk trade-off” frame when discussing aerial spraying. In actuality, we find that officials strongly favored a “reassurance” frame that downplayed both types of risks. Based on this analysis, we suggest framing strategies for disease outbreaks and other threats with potentially risky government responses may vary significantly depending on local contexts and that the South Florida experience was a missed opportunity to test the strategy of trade-off framing.
      PubDate: 2021-09-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09437-z
       
  • Reap what you sow: implementing agencies as strategic actors in policy
           feedback dynamics

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      Abstract: Government agencies responsible for policy implementation have expertise on policy practicability, efficiency and effectiveness, and knowledge which is provided to policymakers as feedback. However, we know very little about the feedback dynamics in which implementing agencies provide different types of feedback with the intention that it is used by policymakers, and the strategic decisions underlying these dynamics. This article connects the literature on policy feedback and knowledge use to develop a typology of implementation feedback which can account for these strategic actions. While existing distinctions between positive and negative feedback lead to confusion when applied to implementation feedback, our typology moves beyond this confusion, by classifying implementation feedback on the basis of two dimensions: preferences of implementing agencies and whether feedback is in response an agenda for change, or existing policy instruments. To illustrate the typology, we look at implementation feedback surrounding the post-2013 reform of the Common Agricultural Policy. We find that implementing agencies engage predominantly in problem-solving and mitigating types of implementation feedback, which are the types of feedback most likely to be used instrumentally by policymakers. Moreover, role perception of implementing agencies limits feedback focused on agenda removal, which is more politically sensitive and contested. These insights are important for our understanding of policy feedback on the level of policy instruments and settings. Moreover, future research can use this typology to structure feedback by other actors.
      PubDate: 2021-08-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09436-0
       
  • Policy experimentation and policy learning in Canadian cultural policy

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      Abstract: This article examines policy experimentation in the context of policy learning in Canadian cultural policy. Despite the attraction of experimentation to encourage learning and thus improved policy outcomes, much of the literature on experimentation does not give sufficient attention to how it is operationalized in practice. Drawing from a novel dataset based on interviews with key actors, this article focuses on how the governance of experimentation impacts learning resulting from experimentation. Findings ultimately demonstrate that while learning occurred, it was constrained overall by a hierarchical, top-down approach to experimentation. Lessons from this case study can therefore be useful for both policy scholars and public administrations embarking on experimentation or other types of public sector innovation in Canada and beyond.
      PubDate: 2021-08-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09433-3
       
  • Do think tanks generate media attention on issues they care about'
           Mediating internal expertise and prevailing governmental agendas

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      Abstract: Think tanks are expected to cut through the prevailing short-term government agenda of the day, and to inject long-term perspectives and research-based expertise into policy debates. In order to do so, they need to attract media attention to themselves in connection with those issue areas in which they have expertise, even if government is focusing elsewhere. Yet, existing studies of media attention among organized interests have thus far ignored the issue context. We argue that sinking costs into research in specific policy areas pays off for think tanks by funnelling more media attention towards them. This is notwithstanding the importance of governments’ own issue agendas, which, if a think tank’s expertise aligns with them, further raises media attention. We substantiate these claims with a content analysis of news coverage of 62 Australian think tanks in 19 different policy issue areas. The results broadly support our argument and contribute to studies of policy advisory systems, organized interests, and group-media relations.
      PubDate: 2021-08-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09434-2
       
  • Vaccine alliance building blocks: a conjoint experiment on popular support
           for international COVID-19 cooperation formats

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      Abstract: The design principles of institutions that visibly and significantly affect citizens’ lives are likely to be politically salient. Popular support for these principles is in turn crucial for institutional viability and effectiveness. Transboundary pandemics are a case in point. Understanding citizens’ preferences regarding the design of international alliances set up to mass-produce and distribute vaccines is likely to determine citizens’ subsequent cooperation with vaccination campaigns. This study explores Germans’ preferences for international COVID-19 vaccine alliance design principles. We conducted a conjoint experiment at a recurring cognitive moment in many pandemics’ cycles, between the initial outbreak and a more devastating but still-unknown second wave, when infection rates were very low, yet no policy solutions had been developed. We analyzed preferences regarding four building blocks: (1) alliance composition (size; EU-centrism), (2) alliance distribution rules (joining cost; vaccine allocation), (3) vaccine nationalism (cost per German household; coverage in Germany) and (4) vaccine producer confidence (origin; type). Distribution rules, political ideology and personal perceptions of pandemic threat matter little. But a larger alliance size and dominant EU-country composition increase alliance support. And vaccine nationalism is key: support increases with both lower costs and larger coverage for own-nation citizens. Moreover, support goes down for Chinese and American producers and increases for Swiss and especially own-nation producers. In sum, a realist and technocratic outlook is warranted at the cognitive stage in pandemic cycles when no solutions have been found, yet the worst already seems to be over, as national self-interest reigns supreme in popular attitudes.
      PubDate: 2021-08-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09435-1
       
  • Do governments delay the implementation of parliamentary requests'
           Examining time variation in implementing legislative requests in
           Switzerland

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      Abstract: This paper investigates time variations in the implementation of legislative requests by the Swiss government. Combining the literature on executive–legislative relations with findings from implementation research, we focus on the procedural level and argue that implementation delays can occur because the government does not want to, cannot or should not implement faster. We test these mechanisms using a unique database, which enables us to analyse a systematic collection of all legislative requests that have been approved between the parliament’s 2003 winter session and its 2018 spring session. Our results show that the considerable variation in the time needed for the legislative mandates’ implementation is mostly related to the Swiss government’s inability to transpose faster, i.e. to factors like highly busy administrative offices or complex and controversial issues. In contrast, there is no support for the ideas that the government “shall not” or “does not want to” transpose faster.
      PubDate: 2021-07-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09432-4
       
  • Engines of learning' Policy instruments, cities and climate governance

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      Abstract: This contribution investigates how combinations of instruments, often called policy mixes, enhance policy learning processes at different levels. It analyzes the European Union’s (EU) Covenant of Mayors (CoM) that is underpinned by a set of learning instruments, to promote local action for sustainable energy and climate. The piece offers an original framework to explore whether and how the Covenant enhances learning at the level of European institutions and among local governments. Drawing on an extensive documentary review and elite interviews in four countries (Germany, Italy, Poland and the UK), the analysis shows that the CoM instrument mix has enhanced certain elements of learning within the actors leading the Covenant as well as many of the local governments within and outside the EU, but only if certain conditions operate, such as political leadership, individual motivation and knowledge and regional coordination mechanisms.
      PubDate: 2021-07-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09431-5
       
  • Power struggles in policy feedback processes: incremental steps towards a
           circular economy within Dutch wastewater policy

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      Abstract: Environmental problems are usually not tackled with path-departing policies but rather with incrementally adjusted or unchanged policies. One way to address incremental change is the policy feedback approach, which initially focussed on self-reinforcing feedback and path-dependency. Today, self-undermining feedback is also increasingly being studied, centring on agency and change. However, it is unclear precisely how actors use power in policy feedback processes. Therefore, this study applied a power perspective and the policy arrangement approach to a case study of the reorientation towards a circular economy in Dutch wastewater policy between 2008 and 2018, which resulted in incremental instead of fundamental policy change. Here it was observed that self-undermining feedback was generated from 2008 onwards but the balance quickly shifted back to self-reinforcing feedback, indicating that the analysed power struggles led to incremental change. These dynamics resemble a shift from the so-called paths and forks (i.e. fork in the road) towards the boomerang pattern (i.e. returning to its original position) of policy change. The patterns are explained by focussing on powerful actors that resist change through the use of incremental reforms, the ongoing struggles of these actors in facilitating self-reinforcing feedback and the role of interpretation in using feedback as a resource. Overall, this study provides a nuanced understanding of incremental change by directing attention to the power struggles of actors in policy feedback processes. For practitioners, the study emphasises the importance of power struggles in enabling a circular economy.
      PubDate: 2021-06-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09430-6
       
  • The importance of policy design fit for effectiveness: a qualitative
           

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      Abstract: Policy design has returned as a central topic in public policy research. An important area of policy design study deals with effectively attaining desired policy outcomes by aligning goals and means to achieve policy design fit. So far, only a few empirical studies have explored the relationship between policy design fit and effectiveness. In this paper, we adopt the multilevel framework for policy design to determine which conditions of policy design fit—i.e., goal coherence, means consistency, and congruence of goals and means across policy levels—are necessary and/or sufficient for policy design effectiveness in the context of policy integration. To this end, we performed a qualitative comparative analysis of Dutch regional transport planning including all twelve provinces. Outcomes show no condition is necessary and two combinations of conditions are sufficient for effectiveness. The first sufficient combination confirms what the literature suggests, namely that policy design fit results in policy design effectiveness. The second indicates that the combination goal incoherence and incongruence of goals and means is sufficient for policy design effectiveness. An in-depth interpretation of this counterintuitive result leads to the conclusion that for achieving policy integration the supportive relationship between policy design fit and policy design effectiveness is less straightforward as theory suggests. Instead, results indicate there are varying degrees of coherence, consistency, and congruence that affect effectiveness in different ways. Furthermore, outcomes reveal that under specific circumstances a policy design may be effective in promoting desired policy integration even if it is incoherent, inconsistent, and/or incongruent.
      PubDate: 2021-06-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09429-z
       
  • Political ideology and vaccination willingness: implications for policy
           design

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      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has forced governments to impose major restrictions on individual freedom in order to stop the spread of the virus. With the successful development of a vaccine, these restrictions are likely to become obsolete—on the condition that people get vaccinated. However, parts of the population have reservations against vaccination. While this is not a recent phenomenon, it might prove a critical one in the context of current attempts to manage the COVID-19 pandemic. Consequently, the task of designing policies suitable for attaining high levels of vaccination deserves enhanced attention. In this study, we use data from the Eurobarometer survey fielded in March 2019. They show that 39% of Europeans consider vaccines to cause the diseases which they should protect against, that 50% believe vaccines have serious side effects, that 32% think that vaccines weaken the immune system, and that 10% do not believe vaccines are tested rigorously before authorization. We find that—even when controlling for important individual-level factors—ideological extremism on both ends of the spectrum explains skepticism of vaccination. We conclude that policymakers must either politicize the issue or form broad alliances among parties and societal groups in order to increase trust in and public support for the vaccines in general and for vaccines against COVID-19 in particular, since the latter were developed in a very short time period and resulted—in particular in case of the AstraZeneca vaccine—in reservations because of the effectiveness and side effects of the new vaccines.
      PubDate: 2021-06-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09428-0
       
  • Inaction, under-reaction action and incapacity: communication breakdown in
           Italy’s vaccination governance

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      Abstract: This article explores why governments do not respond to public compliance problems in a timely manner with appropriate instruments, and the consequences of their failure to do so. Utilising a case study of Italian vaccination policy, the article considers counterfactuals and the challenges of governing health policy in an age of disinformation. It counterposes two methods of governing vaccination compliance: discipline, which uses public institutions to inculcate the population with favourable attitudes and practices, and modulation, which uses access to public institutions as a form of control. The Italian government ineffectively employed discipline for a number of years. Epistemological and organisational constraints stymied its efforts to tackle a significant childhood vaccination compliance problem. With a loss of control over the information environment, vaccinations were not served well by exogenous crises, the sensationalism of the news cycle and online misinformation. Hampered by austerity, lack of capacity and epistemic shortcomings, the Italian government did not protect the public legitimacy of the vaccination programme. Instead of employing communications to reassure a hesitant population, they focused on systemic and delivery issues, until it was too late to do anything except make vaccinations mandatory (using modulation). The apparent short-term success of this measure in generating population compliance does not foreclose the need for ongoing governance of vaccine confidence through effective discipline. This is evident for the COVID-19 vaccination campaign, with many Italians still indicating that they would not accept a vaccine despite the devastation that the disease has wrought throughout their country.
      PubDate: 2021-06-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09427-1
       
  • Coping with intelligence deficits in poverty-alleviation policies in
           low-income countries

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      Abstract: Poverty-alleviation initiatives in lower-income countries are challenged by intelligence deficits that cause suboptimal designs that threaten their effectiveness, targeting, and sustainability. The uncertainty of theory and information, the adverse consequences of conventional family-level “means testing,” and unpredictable future events and conditions call for auto-targeting and auto-correcting policy designs with built-in adaptive capacity. Numerous categories and examples of these designs from multiple countries are presented.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-020-09412-0
       
  • When multiple streams make a river: analyzing collaborative policymaking
           institutions using the multiple streams framework

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      Abstract: Although the Multiple Streams Framework (MSF) is frequently used to explain agenda setting and decision making across a variety of policy domains, it has been criticized for failing to contribute to theoretically rigorous and empirically falsifiable policy scholarship. This study argues that by explicitly attending to the institutional context in which a policy process occurs—a previously under-articulated aspect of the MSF—scholars can better develop and test theory about the framework’s components under delimited conditions. This approach is demonstrated through the development and analysis of a case study of transnational policymaking in the Colorado River Delta. By attending to how key MSF variables interact with features of the process’s collaborative institutional context, this study identifies case-specific drivers of policy change and develops broader theory about the mechanisms by which these factors may influence policymaking in similar institutional settings.
      PubDate: 2021-05-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09425-3
       
  • Rethinking disproportionate policy making by introducing proportionate
           politics

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      Abstract: This article seeks to critique and extend recent work in the policy sciences, by Maor in particular, on disproportionate policy making—including policy overreaction and underreaction. While the disproportionate policy making thesis does help address assumptions that something is amiss in the policy process by capturing an imbalance between policy problems and the interventions to address them, we argue that it does not pay sufficient attention to politics. We present a heuristic which includes political perception of both programme and political threats. Our core argument is that much of what is considered disproportionate policy making, can in fact also be considered proportionate politics. Our analysis paves the way for a more holistic and political understanding of policy dynamics.
      PubDate: 2021-05-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09426-2
       
  • Dealing with cross-sectoral policy problems: An advocacy coalition
           approach to climate and water policy integration in Northeast Brazil

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      Abstract: The governance of several cross-cutting challenges, such as food security, climate change, and sustainable development, calls for integrative policy approaches. However, efforts to better theorize the drivers of integration beyond listing explanatory factors remain weak. Viewing integration as a process of policy change for dealing with complex problems, this study argues that policy integration analysis can benefit from an advocacy coalition approach (ACF) to address this theoretical gap. It illustrates the analytical framework by empirically investigating the drivers of policy (dis)integration in Brazil’s subnational water policy introduced in the 2010s. The level of conflict between coalitions, adjustment of policy beliefs, coordination within and across coalitions, and existence of venues for interaction and policy-oriented learning were presented as factors that can foster or hinder the integration of public policies. Moreover, the study discusses the potential to acknowledge in ACF the mechanisms for coordinating policy actors and instruments, which would facilitate the analysis of the policy processes of cooperation. It also demonstrates that recent droughts in Northeast Brazil have been increasingly related to the local impacts of climate change, contributing to reframing water management as a cross-sectoral climate and water governance issue. The analysis was based on a literature review, semi-structured interviews, and social network analysis.
      PubDate: 2021-05-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09422-6
       
  • Privatization of Canadian housing assistance: how bureaucrats on a
           budget added market-based progams to the toolbox

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      Abstract: Social policy scholarship assumes that left-wing governments favour a stronger public provision of services, while right-wing politics promote privatization, largely as a matter of ideology. Yet the findings on Canadian provinces’ market-based housing instruments suggest that alternative views are possible. Left-leaning governments introduced private delivery mechanisms for economic as well as non-economic reasons. The archival research and thematic analysis of interview responses with key actors (n = 56) suggest that the introduction of housing allowances in the policy toolbox largely results from bureaucratic initiatives, regardless of the party in power. Rather than political forces or advocacy by power interests, this policy change is mostly driven by considerations of equity and efficiency on the part of officials ‘muddling through’. The concept is revisited in the final discussion, where important strands of the privatization literature are challenged, as well as the political assumptions associated with the notion of users’ freedom.
      PubDate: 2021-04-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09421-7
       
  • Policy learning as complex contagion: how social networks shape
           organizational beliefs in forest-based climate change mitigation

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      Abstract: Policy learning can alter the perceptions of both the seriousness and the causes of a policy problem, thus also altering the perceived need to do something about the problem. This then allows for the informed weighing of different policy options. Taking a social network perspective, we argue that the role of social influence as a driver of policy learning has been overlooked in the literature. Network research has shown that normatively laden belief change is likely to occur through complex contagion—a process in which an actor receives social reinforcement from more than one contact in its social network. We test the applicability of this idea to policy learning using node-level network regression models on a unique longitudinal policy network survey dataset concerning the Reducing Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) initiative in Brazil, Indonesia, and Vietnam. We find that network connections explain policy learning in Indonesia and Vietnam, where the policy subsystems are collaborative, but not in Brazil, where the level of conflict is higher and the subsystem is more established. The results suggest that policy learning is more likely to result from social influence and complex contagion in collaborative than in conflictual settings.
      PubDate: 2021-04-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09418-2
       
  • Policy capacities and effective policy design: a review

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      Abstract: Effectiveness has been understood at three levels of analysis in the scholarly study of policy design. The first is at the systemic level indicating what entails effective formulation environments or spaces making them conducive to successful design. The second reflects more program level concerns, surrounding how policy tool portfolios or mixes can be effectively constructed to address complex policy objectives. The third is a more specific instrument level, focusing on what accounts for and constitutes the effectiveness of particular types of policy tools. Undergirding these three levels of analysis are comparative research concerns that concentrate on the capacities of government and political actors to devise and implement effective designs. This paper presents a systematic review of a largely scattered yet quickly burgeoning body of knowledge in the policy sciences, which broadly asks what capacities engender effectiveness at the multiple levels of policy design' The findings bring to light lessons about design effectiveness at the level of formulation spaces, policy mixes and policy programs. Further, this review points to a future research agenda for design studies that is sensitive to the relative orders of policy capacity, temporality and complementarities between the various dimensions of policy capacity.
      PubDate: 2021-04-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09420-8
       
  • Why does the combination of policy entrepreneur and institutional
           entrepreneur roles matter for the institutionalization of policy
           ideas'

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      Abstract: Public administration, public policy, and political economy literatures are increasingly preoccupied with the role of agency in policy and institutional change, and the effects of institutions on the agency of individual actors. However, linkages between policy and institutional entrepreneurship in processes of institutionalization remain a black box. This article aims to fill this void. It contributes to our understanding of processes underlying the institutionalization of policy ideas in the public sector that have not been investigated adequately. Based on an exploratory case study of the introduction and institutionalization of macroprudential policies to contain macro-financial risks in Turkey, this article argues that policy and institutional entrepreneurship processes are inextricably intertwined and fundamental to the institutionalization of policy ideas: the institutionalization of new policy ideas that resolve conflicting institutional logics and facilitate cooperation and/or collaboration in inter-bureaucratic policy formulation and implementation is most likely when an individual agent with the requisite resources and capabilities builds coalitions through combining the policy and institutional entrepreneur roles while undertaking discursive and powering strategies.
      PubDate: 2021-03-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-021-09417-3
       
  • Uncertainty, risk and the use of algorithms in policy decisions: a case
           study on criminal justice in the USA

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      Abstract: Algorithms are increasingly used in different domains of public policy. They help humans to profile unemployed, support administrations to detect tax fraud and give recidivism risk scores that judges or criminal justice managers take into account when they make bail decisions. In recent years, critics have increasingly pointed to ethical challenges of these tools and emphasized problems of discrimination, opaqueness or accountability, and computer scientists have proposed technical solutions to these issues. In contrast to these important debates, the literature on how these tools are implemented in the actual everyday decision-making process has remained cursory. This is problematic because the consequences of ADM systems are at least as dependent on the implementation in an actual decision-making context as on their technical features. In this study, we show how the introduction of risk assessment tools in the criminal justice sector on the local level in the USA has deeply transformed the decision-making process. We argue that this is mainly due to the fact that the evidence generated by the algorithm introduces a notion of statistical prediction to a situation which was dominated by fundamental uncertainty about the outcome before. While this expectation is supported by the case study evidence, the possibility to shift blame to the algorithm does seem much less important to the criminal justice actors.
      PubDate: 2021-01-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s11077-020-09414-y
       
 
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