Subjects -> BIOLOGY (Total: 3268 journals)
    - BIOCHEMISTRY (248 journals)
    - BIOENGINEERING (143 journals)
    - BIOLOGY (1548 journals)
    - BIOPHYSICS (53 journals)
    - BIOTECHNOLOGY (243 journals)
    - BOTANY (233 journals)
    - CYTOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY (32 journals)
    - ENTOMOLOGY (67 journals)
    - GENETICS (165 journals)
    - MICROBIOLOGY (279 journals)
    - MICROSCOPY (13 journals)
    - ORNITHOLOGY (29 journals)
    - PHYSIOLOGY (73 journals)
    - ZOOLOGY (142 journals)

BIOPHYSICS (53 journals)

Showing 1 - 52 of 52 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Biochimica et Biophysica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advanced NanoBiomed Research     Open Access  
Annual Review of Biophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
BBA Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
BBA Bioenergetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
BBA Biomembranes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Biochemistry and Biophysics Reports     Open Access  
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - General Subjects     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Cell Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Proteins and Proteomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Bioinspired, Biomimetic and Nanobiomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Biophysical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Biophysical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Biophysical Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biophysical Reviews and Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Biophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Biophysics Reports     Open Access  
BMC Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Topics in Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Doklady Biochemistry and Biophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Biophysics Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Food Biophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Freshwater Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
GSTF Journal of BioSciences     Open Access  
IEEE Life Sciences Letters     Hybrid Journal  
IEEE Nanotechnology Express     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Indian Journal of Biochemistry and Biophysics (IJBB)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Biochemistry and Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Biophysics     Open Access  
Journal of Biopharmaceutical Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Biophotonics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Biophysical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Biophysics and Structural Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics     Open Access  
Journal of Physical Chemistry & Biophysics     Open Access  
Membranes and Membrane Technologies     Full-text available via subscription  
Nanomedicine Research Journal     Open Access  
Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Natural Products and Bioprospecting     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nature Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 310)
PMC Biophysics     Open Access  
Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Progress in Physical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Quarterly Reviews of Biophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Radiation and Environmental Biophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research & Reviews : A Journal of Life Sciences     Open Access  
Statistics in Biopharmaceutical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Quarterly Reviews of Biophysics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.282
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0033-5835 - ISSN (Online) 1469-8994
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [354 journals]
  • Macromolecular room temperature crystallography

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      Authors: Fischer; Marcus
      First page: 1
      Abstract: X-ray crystallography enables detailed structural studies of proteins to understand and modulate their function. Conducting crystallographic experiments at cryogenic temperatures has practical benefits but potentially limits the identification of functionally important alternative protein conformations that can be revealed only at room temperature (RT). This review discusses practical aspects of preparing, acquiring, and analyzing X-ray crystallography data at RT to demystify preconceived impracticalities that freeze progress of routine RT data collection at synchrotron sources. Examples are presented as conceptual and experimental templates to enable the design of RT-inspired studies; they illustrate the diversity and utility of gaining novel insights into protein conformational landscapes. An integrative view of protein conformational dynamics enables opportunities to advance basic and biomedical research.
      PubDate: 2021-01-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033583520000128
       
  • Setting up and operating a cryo-EM laboratory

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      Authors: Mills; Deryck J.
      First page: 2
      Abstract: Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has become the technique of choice for structural biology of macromolecular assemblies, after the ‘resolution revolution’ that has occurred in this field since 2012. With a suitable instrument, an appropriate electron detector and, last but not least, a cooperative sample it is now possible to collect images from which macromolecular structures can be determined to better than 2 Å resolution, where reliable atomic models can be built. By electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging of cryo-samples, it is also possible to reconstruct subcellular structures to sub-nanometre resolution. This review describes the infrastructure that is needed to achieve this goal. Ideally, a cryo-EM lab will have a dedicated 300 kV electron microscope for data recording and a 200 kV instrument for screening cryo-samples, both with direct electron detectors, and at least one 120 kV EM for negative-stain screening at room temperature. Added to this should be ancillary equipment for specimen preparation, including a light microscope, carbon coater, plasma cleaner, glow discharge unit, a device for fast, robotic sample freezing, liquid nitrogen storage Dewars and a ready supply of clean liquid nitrogen. In practice, of course, the available budget will determine the number and types of microscopes and how elaborate the lab can be. The cryo-EM lab should be designed with adequate space for the electron microscopes and ancillary equipment, and should allow for sufficient storage space. Each electron microscope room should be connected to the image-processing computers by fibre-optic cables for the rapid transfer of large datasets. The cryo-EM lab should be overseen by a facility manager whose responsibilities include the day-to-day tasks to ensure that all microscopes are operating perfectly, organising service and repairs to minimise downtime, and controlling the budget. Large facilities will require additional support staff who help to oversee the operation of the facility and instruct new users.
      PubDate: 2021-01-08
      DOI: 10.1017/S003358352000013X
       
  • Hydrophobic interactions control the self-assembly of DNA and cellulose

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      Authors: Lindman; Björn, Medronho, Bruno, Alves, Luís, Norgren, Magnus, Nordenskiöld, Lars
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Desoxyribosenucleic acid, DNA, and cellulose molecules self-assemble in aqueous systems. This aggregation is the basis of the important functions of these biological macromolecules. Both DNA and cellulose have significant polar and nonpolar parts and there is a delicate balance between hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions. The hydrophilic interactions related to net charges have been thoroughly studied and are well understood. On the other hand, the detailed roles of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions have remained controversial. It is found that the contributions of hydrophobic interactions in driving important processes, like the double-helix formation of DNA and the aqueous dissolution of cellulose, are dominating whereas the net contribution from hydrogen bonding is small. In reviewing the roles of different interactions for DNA and cellulose it is useful to compare with the self-assembly features of surfactants, the simplest case of amphiphilic molecules. Pertinent information on the amphiphilic character of cellulose and DNA can be obtained from the association with surfactants, as well as on modifying the hydrophobic interactions by additives.
      PubDate: 2021-02-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033583521000019
       
  • Current limitations to high-resolution structure determination by
           single-particle cryoEM

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      Authors: D'Imprima; Edoardo, Kühlbrandt, Werner
      First page: 4
      Abstract: CryoEM has become the method of choice for determining the structure of large macromolecular complexes in multiple conformations, at resolutions where unambiguous atomic models can be built. Two effects that have limited progress in single-particle cryoEM are (i) beam-induced movement during image acquisition and (ii) protein adsorption and denaturation at the air-water interface during specimen preparation. While beam-induced movement now appears to have been resolved by all-gold specimen support grids with very small holes, surface effects at the air-water interface are a persistent problem. Strategies to overcome these effects include the use of alternative support films and new techniques for specimen deposition. We examine the future potential of recording perfect images of biological samples for routine structure determination at atomic resolution.
      PubDate: 2021-03-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033583521000020
       
  • A quantitative model of a cooperative two-state equilibrium in DNA:
           experimental tests, insights, and predictions

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      Authors: Schurr; J. Michael
      First page: 5
      Abstract: Quantitative parameters for a two-state cooperative transition in duplex DNAs were finally obtained during the last 5 years. After a brief discussion of observations pertaining to the existence of the two-state equilibrium per se, the lengths, torsion, and bending elastic constants of the two states involved and the cooperativity parameter of the model are simply stated. Experimental tests of model predictions for the responses of DNA to small applied stretching, twisting, and bending stresses, and changes in temperature, ionic conditions, and sequence are described. The mechanism and significance of the large cooperativity, which enables significant DNA responses to such small perturbations, are also noted. The capacity of the model to resolve a number of long-standing and sometimes interconnected puzzles in the extant literature, including the origin of the broad pre-melting transition studied by numerous workers in the 1960s and 1970s, is demonstrated. Under certain conditions, the model predicts significant long-range attractive or repulsive interactions between hypothetical proteins with strong preferences for one or the other state that are bound to well-separated sites on the same DNA. A scenario is proposed for the activation of the ilvPG promoter on a supercoiled DNA by integration host factor.
      PubDate: 2021-03-16
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033583521000032
       
  • Amphipathic environments for determining the structure of membrane
           proteins by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy

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      Authors: Le Bon; Christel, Michon, Baptiste, Popot, Jean-Luc, Zoonens, Manuela
      First page: 6
      Abstract: Over the past decade, the structural biology of membrane proteins (MPs) has taken a new turn thanks to epoch-making technical progress in single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) as well as to improvements in sample preparation. The present analysis provides an overview of the extent and modes of usage of the various types of surfactants for cryo-EM studies. Digitonin, dodecylmaltoside, protein-based nanodiscs, lauryl maltoside-neopentyl glycol, glyco-diosgenin, and amphipols (APols) are the most popular surfactants at the vitrification step. Surfactant exchange is frequently used between MP purification and grid preparation, requiring extensive optimization each time the study of a new MP is undertaken. The variety of both the surfactants and experimental approaches used over the past few years bears witness to the need to continue developing innovative surfactants and optimizing conditions for sample preparation. The possibilities offered by novel APols for EM applications are discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-03-31
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033583521000044
       
  • A quantitative model of a cooperative two-state equilibrium in DNA:
           experimental tests, insights, and predictions - CORRIGENDUM

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      Authors: Schurr; J. Michael
      First page: 7
      PubDate: 2021-05-18
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033583521000056
       
  • A molecular view of DNA flexibility

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      Authors: Marin-Gonzalez; Alberto, Vilhena, J. G., Perez, Ruben, Moreno-Herrero, Fernando
      First page: 8
      Abstract: DNA dynamics can only be understood by taking into account its complex mechanical behavior at different length scales. At the micrometer level, the mechanical properties of single DNA molecules have been well-characterized by polymer models and are commonly quantified by a persistence length of 50 nm (~150 bp). However, at the base pair level (~3.4 Å), the dynamics of DNA involves complex molecular mechanisms that are still being deciphered. Here, we review recent single-molecule experiments and molecular dynamics simulations that are providing novel insights into DNA mechanics from such a molecular perspective. We first discuss recent findings on sequence-dependent DNA mechanical properties, including sequences that resist mechanical stress and sequences that can accommodate strong deformations. We then comment on the intricate effects of cytosine methylation and DNA mismatches on DNA mechanics. Finally, we review recently reported differences in the mechanical properties of DNA and double-stranded RNA, the other double-helical carrier of genetic information. A thorough examination of the recent single-molecule literature permits establishing a set of general ‘rules’ that reasonably explain the mechanics of nucleic acids at the base pair level. These simple rules offer an improved description of certain biological systems and might serve as valuable guidelines for future design of DNA and RNA nanostructures.
      PubDate: 2021-07-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033583521000068
       
  • Where in the cell is my protein'

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      Authors: DeRosier; David J.
      First page: 9
      Abstract: The application of cryo-correlative light and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM) gives us a way to locate structures of interest in the electron microscope. In brief, the structures of interest are fluorescently tagged, and images from the cryo-fluorescent microscope (cryo-FM) maps are superimposed on those from the cryo-electron microscope (cryo-EM). By enhancing cryo-FM to include single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM), we can achieve much better localization. The introduction of cryo-SMLM increased the yield of photons from fluorophores, which can benefit localization efforts. Dahlberg and Moerner (2021, Annual Review of Physical Chemistry, 72, 253–278) have a recent broad and elegant review of super-resolution cryo-CLEM. This paper focuses on cryo(F)PALM/STORM for the cryo-electron tomography community. I explore the current challenges to increase the accuracy of localization by SMLM and the mapping of those positions onto cryo-EM images and maps. There is much to consider: we need to know if the excitation of fluorophores damages the structures we seek to visualize. We need to determine if higher numerical aperture (NA) objectives, which add complexity to image analysis but increase resolution and the efficiency of photon collection, are better than lower NA objectives, which pose fewer problems. We need to figure out the best way to determine the axial position of fluorophores. We need to have better ways of aligning maps determined by FM with those determined by EM. We need to improve the instrumentation to be easier to use, more accurate, and ice-contamination free. The bottom line is that we have more work to do.
      PubDate: 2021-06-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S003358352100007X
       
  • The mechanics of mitotic chromosomes

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      Authors: Man; T., Witt, H., Peterman, E. J. G., Wuite, G. J. L.
      First page: 10
      Abstract: Condensation and faithful separation of the genome are crucial for the cellular life cycle. During chromosome segregation, mechanical forces generated by the mitotic spindle pull apart the sister chromatids. The mechanical nature of this process has motivated a lot of research interest into the mechanical properties of mitotic chromosomes. Although their fundamental mechanical characteristics are known, it still remains unclear how these characteristics emerge from the structure of the mitotic chromosome. Recent advances in genomics, computational and super-resolution microscopy techniques have greatly promoted our understanding of the chromosomal structure and have motivated us to review the mechanical characteristics of chromosomes in light of the current structural insights. In this review, we will first introduce the current understanding of the chromosomal structure, before reviewing characteristic mechanical properties such as the Young's modulus and the bending modulus of mitotic chromosomes. Then we will address the approaches used to relate mechanical properties to the structure of chromosomes and we will also discuss how mechanical characterization can aid in elucidating their structure. Finally, future challenges, recent developments and emergent questions in this research field will be discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-09-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033583521000081
       
 
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