Subjects -> BIOLOGY (Total: 3134 journals)
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CYTOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY (32 journals)

Showing 1 - 29 of 29 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Cytology and Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Immunohistochemistry & Molecular Morphology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Cell Discovery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comparative Cytogenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Protocols in Cytometry     Hybrid Journal  
Cytogenetic and Genome Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cytokine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cytokine & Growth Factor Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Cytokine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cytology and Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cytometry Part A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cytometry Part B: Clinical Cytometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cytopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Cytoskeleton     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cytotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Diagnostic Cytopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Genetics And Cytology     Open Access  
European Journal of Histochemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Folia Cryptogamica Estonica     Open Access  
Histochemistry and Cell Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cytology & Histology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Histotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Molecular Histology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the American Society of Cytopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the History of Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Single Cell Biology     Open Access  
Vegetation History and Archaeobotany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Histochemistry and Cell Biology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.044
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1432-119X - ISSN (Online) 0948-6143
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • The secretome from human-derived mesenchymal stem cells augments the
           activity of antitumor plant extracts in vitro

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      Abstract: Abstract Cancer is understood as a multifactorial disease that involve multiple cell types and phenotypes in the tumor microenvironment (TME). The components of the TME can interact directly or via soluble factors (cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, extracellular vesicles, etc.). Among the cells composing the TME, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) appear as a population with debated properties since it has been seen that they can both promote or attenuate tumor progression. For various authors, the main mechanism of interaction of MSCs is through their secretome, the set of molecules secreted into the extracellular milieu, recruiting, and influencing the behavior of other cells in inflammatory environments where they normally reside, such as wounds and tumors. Natural products have been studied as possible cancer treatments, appealing to synergisms between the molecules in their composition; thus, extracts obtained from Petiveria alliacea (Anamu-SC) and Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et) have been produced and studied previously on different models, showing promising results. The effect of plant extracts on the MSC secretome has been poorly studied, especially in the context of the TME. Here, we studied the effect of Anamu-SC and P2Et extracts in the human adipose-derived MSC (hAMSC)–tumor cell interaction as a TME model. We also investigated the influence of the hAMSC secretome, in combination with these natural products, on tumor cell hallmarks such as viability, clonogenicity, and migration. In addition, hAMSC gene expression and protein synthesis were evaluated for some key factors in tumor progression in the presence of the extracts by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and Multiplex, respectively. It was found that the presence of the hAMSC secretome did not affect the cytotoxic or clonogenicity-reducing activities of the natural extracts on cancer cells, and even this secretome can inhibit the migration of these tumor cells, in addition to the fact that the profile of molecules can be modified by natural products. Overall, our findings demonstrate that hAMSC secretome participation in TME interactions can favor the antitumor activities of natural products.
      PubDate: 2024-02-24
       
  • Molecular characterization of ANKRD1 in rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines:
           expression, localization, and proteasomal degradation

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      Abstract: Abstract Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue malignancy in children and adolescents. Respecting the age of the patients and the tumor aggressiveness, investigation of the molecular mechanisms of RMS tumorigenesis is directed toward the identification of novel therapeutic targets. To contribute to a better understanding of the molecular pathology of RMS, we investigated ankyrin repeat domain 1 (ANKRD1), designated as a potential marker for differential diagnostics. In this study, we used three RMS cell lines (SJRH30, RD, and HS-729) to assess its expression profile, intracellular localization, and turnover. They express wild-type ANKRD1, as judged by the sequencing of the open reading frame. Each cell line expressed a different amount of ANKRD1 protein, although the transcript level was similar. According to western blot analysis, ANKRD1 protein was expressed at detectable levels in the SJRH30 and RD cells (SJRH30 > RD), but not in the HS-729, even after immunoprecipitation. Immunocytochemistry revealed nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of ANKRD1 in all examined cell lines. Moreover, the punctate pattern of ANKRD1 staining in the nuclei of RD and HS-729 cells overlapped with coilin, indicating its association with Cajal bodies. We have shown that RMS cells are not able to overexpress ANKRD1 protein, which can be attributed to its proteasomal degradation. The unsuccessful attempt to overexpress ANKRD1 in RMS cells indicates the possibility that its overexpression may have detrimental effects for RMS cells and opens a window for further research into its role in RMS pathogenesis and for potential therapeutic targeting.
      PubDate: 2024-02-23
       
  • Role of Wisteria floribunda agglutinin binding glycans in carcinogenesis
           and metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma

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      Abstract: Abstract Aberrant glycosylation is an important factor in facilitating tumor progression and therapeutic resistance. In this study, using Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA), we examined the expression of WFA-binding glycans (WFAG) in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). The results showed that WFAG was highly detected in precancerous and cancerous lesions of human CCA tissues, although it was rarely detected in normal bile ducts. The positive signal of WFAG in the cancerous lesion accounted for 96.2% (50/52) of the cases. Overexpression of WFAG was significantly associated with lymph node and distant metastasis (P < 0.05). The study using the CCA hamster model showed that WFAG is elevated in preneoplastic and neoplastic bile ducts as early as 1 month after being infected with liver fluke and exposed to N-nitrosodimethylamine. Functional analysis was performed to reveal the role of WFAG in CCA. The CCA cell lines KKU-213A and KKU-213B were treated with WFA, followed by migration assay. Our data suggested that WFAG facilitates the migration of CCA cells via the activation of the Akt and ERK signaling pathways. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the association of WFAG with carcinogenesis and metastasis of CCA, suggesting its potential as a target for the treatment of the disease.
      PubDate: 2024-02-23
       
  • The impact of apelin-13 on cisplatin-induced endocrine pancreas damage in
           rats: an in vivo study

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      Abstract: Abstract Apelin-13 is a peptide hormone that regulates pancreatic endocrine functions, and its benefits on the endocrine pancreas are of interest. This study aims to investigate the potential protective effects of apelin-13 in cisplatin-induced endocrine pancreatic damage. Twenty-four rats were divided into four groups: control, apelin-13, cisplatin, and cisplatin + apelin-13. Caspase-3, TUNEL, and Ki-67 immunohistochemical staining were used as markers of apoptosis and mitosis. NF-κB/p65 and TNFα were used to show inflammation. β-cells and α-cells were also evaluated with insulin and glucagon staining in the microscopic examination. Pancreatic tissue was subjected to biochemical analyses of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Apelin-13 ameliorated cisplatin-induced damage in the islets of Langerhans. The immunopositivity of apelin-13 on β-cells and α-cells was found to be increased compared to the cisplatin group (p = 0.001, p = 0.001). Mitosis and apoptosis were significantly higher in the cisplatin group (p = 0.001). Apelin-13 reduced TNFα, NF-κB/p65 positivity, and apoptosis caused by cisplatin (p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001). While cisplatin caused a significant increase in MDA levels (p = 0.001), apelin caused a significant decrease in MDA levels (p = 0.001). The results demonstrated a significant decrease in pancreatic tissue GSH levels following cisplatin treatment (p = 0.001). Nevertheless, apelin-13 significantly enhanced cisplatin-induced GSH reduction (p = 0.001). On the other hand, the serum glucose level, which was measured as 18.7 ± 2.5 mmol/L in the cisplatin group, decreased to 13.8 ± 0.7 mmol/L in the cisplatin + apelin-13 group (p = 0.001). The study shows that apelin-13 ameliorated cisplatin-induced endocrine pancreas damage by reducing oxidative stress and preventing apoptosis.
      PubDate: 2024-02-18
       
  • Fibrosis and expression of extracellular matrix proteins in human
           interventricular septum in aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation

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      Abstract: Abstract Valvular heart disease leads to ventricular pressure and/or volume overload. Pressure overload leads to fibrosis, which might regress with its resolution, but the limits and details of this reverse remodeling are not known. To gain more insight into the extent and nature of cardiac fibrosis in valve disease, we analyzed needle biopsies taken from the interventricular septum of patients undergoing surgery for valve replacement focusing on the expression and distribution of major extracellular matrix protein involved in this process. Proteomic analysis performed using mass spectrometry revealed an excellent correlation between the expression of collagen type I and III, but there was little correlation with the immunohistochemical staining performed on sister sections, which included antibodies against collagen I, III, fibronectin, sarcomeric actin, and histochemistry for wheat germ agglutinin. Surprisingly, the immunofluorescence intensity did not correlate significantly with the gold standard for fibrosis quantification, which was performed using Picrosirius Red (PSR) staining, unless multiplexed on the same tissue section. There was also little correlation between the immunohistochemical markers and pressure gradient severity. It appears that at least in humans, the immunohistochemical pattern of fibrosis is not clearly correlated with standard Picrosirius Red staining on sister sections or quantitative proteomic data, possibly due to tissue heterogeneity at microscale, comorbidities, or other patient-specific factors. For precise correlation of different types of staining, multiplexing on the same section is the best approach.
      PubDate: 2024-02-12
       
  • Effectiveness of cannabidiol (CBD) on histopathological changes and gene
           expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model in male rats: the role
           of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway

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      Abstract: Abstract The third most prevalent malignancy to cause mortality is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is activated by binding to the transmembrane receptor Patched-1 (PTCH-1), which depresses the transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor Smoothened (SMO). This study was performed to examine the preventative and therapeutic effects of cannabidiol in adult rats exposed to diethyl nitrosamine (DENA)-induced HCC. A total of 50 male rats were divided into five groups of 10 rats each. Group I was the control group. Group II received intraperitoneal (IP) injections of DENA for 14 weeks. Group III included rats that received cannabidiol (CBD) orally (3–30 mg/kg) for 2 weeks and DENA injections for 14 weeks. Group IV rats received oral CBD for 2 weeks before 14 weeks of DENA injections. Group V included rats that received CBD orally for 2 weeks after their last injection of DENA. Measurements were made for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), malondialdehyde (MDA), and alpha fetoprotein (AFP). Following total RNA extraction, Smo, Hhip, Ptch-1, and Gli-1 expressions were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT–PCR). A histopathological analysis of liver tissues was performed. The liver enzymes, oxidant–antioxidant state, morphological, and molecular parameters of the adult male rat model of DENA-induced HCC showed a beneficial improvement after CBD administration. In conclusion, by focusing on the Hh signaling system, administration of CBD showed a beneficial improvement in the liver enzymes, oxidant–antioxidant status, morphological, and molecular parameters in the DENA-induced HCC in adult male rats.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
       
  • In focus in HCB

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      PubDate: 2024-02-01
       
  • Effects of royal jelly on the antisenescence, mitochondrial viability and
           osteogenic differentiation capacity of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal
           stem cells

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      Abstract: Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that have the ability to self-renew and regulate paracrine signalling and immune system processes. MSCs have extensive clinical applications in regeneration, functional reconstruction and cellular therapies. However, studies are needed to discover ways to improve the properties of MSCs, such as differentiation, and prevent senescence in culture, which are both very important for cell therapies. Royal jelly (RJ) is a nutritional substance produced by worker bees that contains a substantial amounts of proteins that are beneficial for cell growth and proliferation. RJ is widely used in traditional medicine today, and due to the specific components in its content, it has been reported to have antioxidant, antiproliferative, antimicrobial, neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-ageing properties. In our study, human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs) derived from umbilical cord matrix were grown in culture medium supplemented with RJ. The control group comprised minimum essential medium (MEM) and 10% foetal bovine serum (FBS); RJ groups were formed using MEM, 10% FBS and 0.075 mg/ml or 0.150 mg/ml RJ. In our study, we evaluated the effect of RJ on WJ-MSC growth by MTT assay, proliferating cell nuclear antigen ELISA, β-galactosidase activity assay, MitoTracker Green staining and differentiation tests in adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic cell lines. It was observed that the number of mitochondria increased, senescence decreased and osteogenic differentiation increased after differentiation induction after the addition of RJ to MSC culture. In general, the results of this study indicate that WJ-MSCs enhance mitochondrial numbers and important cellular activities, such as antisenescence and osteogenic differentiation, and with increasing evidence from further studies, RJ supplementation may be found beneficial for the use of MSCs in bone engineering regenerative medicine or cell therapy.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
       
  • Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in burn wound healing: uncovering
           the mechanisms of local regeneration and tissue repair

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      Abstract: Abstract Burn injuries pose a significant healthcare burden worldwide, often leading to long-term disabilities and reduced quality of life. To explore the impacts of the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on the healing of burns and the levels of serum cytokines, 60 fully grown Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 20 each): group I (control), group II (burn induction), and group III (burn induction + bone marrow (BM)-MSC transplantation). Groups II and III were further divided into four subgroups (n = 5 each) based on euthanasia duration (7, 14, 21, and 28 days post transplant). The experiment concluded with an anesthesia overdose for rat death. After 7, 14, 21, and 28 days, the rats were assessed by clinical, laboratory, and histopathology investigations. The results revealed significant improvements in burn healing potentiality in the group treated with MSC. Furthermore, cytokine levels were measured, with significant increases in interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon alpha (IFN) observed, while IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) decreased at 7 days and increased until 28 days post burn. Also, the group that underwent the experiment exhibited increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 when compared to the control group. Histological assessments showed better re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and collagen deposition in the experimental group, suggesting that MSC transplantation in burn wounds may promote burn healing by modulating the immune response and promoting tissue regeneration.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
       
  • The histomorphological and stereological assessment of rat dorsal root
           ganglion tissues after various types of sciatic nerve injury

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      Abstract: Abstract Peripheral nerve injuries lead to significant changes in the dorsal root ganglia, where the cell bodies of the damaged axons are located. The sensory neurons and the surrounding satellite cells rearrange the composition of the intracellular organelles to enhance their plasticity for adaptation to changing conditions and response to injury. Meanwhile, satellite cells acquire phagocytic properties and work with macrophages to eliminate degenerated neurons. These structural and functional changes are not identical in all injury types. Understanding the cellular response, which varies according to the type of injury involved, is essential in determining the optimal method of treatment. In this research, we investigated the numerical and morphological changes in primary sensory neurons and satellite cells in the dorsal root ganglion 30 days following chronic compression, crush, and transection injuries using stereology, high-resolution light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and behavioral analysis techniques. Electron microscopic methods were employed to evaluate fine structural alterations in cells. Stereological evaluations revealed no statistically significant difference in terms of mean sensory neuron numbers (p > 0.05), although a significant decrease was observed in sensory neuron volumes in the transection and crush injury groups (p < 0.05). Active caspase-3 immunopositivity increased in the injury groups compared to the sham group (p < 0.05). While crush injury led to desensitization, chronic compression injury caused thermal hyperalgesia. Macrophage infiltrations were observed in all injury types. Electron microscopic results revealed that the chromatolysis response was triggered in the sensory neuron bodies from the transection injury group. An increase in organelle density was observed in the perikaryon of sensory neurons after crush-type injury. This indicates the presence of a more active regeneration process in crush-type injury than in other types. The effect of chronic compression injury is more devastating than that of crush-type injury, and the edema caused by compression significantly inhibits the regeneration process.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
       
  • Early growth response 2, a novel target of pelvic organ prolapse, is
           highly expressed in anterior vaginal wall tissues with pelvic organ
           prolapse

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      Abstract: Abstract Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a common disorder among women that negatively affects women’s quality of life. Early growth response 2 (EGR2) is a transcription factor that regulates cell growth. The present study aimed to explore the role of EGR2 in POP progression and provided a new target for the treatment and prevention of POP. Firstly, we extracted primary vaginal anterior wall fibroblasts from POP tissues and non-POP tissues and then constructed an EGR2-silencing lentivirus for further study. Immunoblotting, qPCR, TUNEL assay, CCK-8 assay, dual luciferase assay, and ELISA assay were carried out. EGR2 expression was much higher in POP tissues than in control tissues, and EGR2 expression positively correlated with cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) expression. Knockdown of EGR2 increased cell proliferation, upregulated PCNA expression, and reduced apoptosis in POP fibroblasts. Moreover, we found that the knockdown of EGR2 increased COL1A1, COL3A1, and Elastin expression and decreased MMP2 and MMP9 activities, and knockdown of EGR2 increased TGF-β/Smad pathway activity in POP fibroblasts. Interestingly, the results of dual luciferase assay demonstrated that EGR2 was able to increase SOCS3 transcriptional activity. EGR2 knockdown alleviated the apoptosis of POP fibroblasts by reducing SOCS3 expression and improving the proliferation and collagen synthesis of POP fibroblasts. Overall, our study illustrated that EGR2 was highly expressed in POP tissues, and knockdown of EGR2 alleviated apoptosis and reduced matrix degradation in POP fibroblasts. This study might provide a new insight into the pathogenesis of POP.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
       
  • Addressing radiotherapy-induced fibrosis: the potential of platelet-rich
           plasma and infliximab for improved breast cancer management

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      Abstract: Abstract Breast cancer treatment encompasses various therapeutic modalities, including surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Breast-conserving surgery has been an integral part of breast cancer management. However, radiotherapy, an important component of breast cancer management, can lead to complications, particularly fibrosis, affecting reconstructive surgery outcomes. We conducted an in vivo study using 48 female Wistar Albino rats, employing segmental mastectomy and radiotherapy to simulate post-mastectomy conditions. The rats were divided into six groups: control, mastectomy, mastectomy + radiotherapy, mastectomy + platelet-rich plasma (PRP) + radiotherapy, mastectomy + infliximab + radiotherapy, and mastectomy + infliximab + PRP + radiotherapy. Edema, hyperemia, inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed as indicators of tissue response. Histopathological analysis revealed that mastectomy + infliximab and mastectomy + infliximab + PRP groups showed significant reductions in fibrosis compared to other groups. Edema, hyperemia, and inflammation were also less severe in these groups compared to the control group. Radiotherapy-induced fibrosis is a major concern in breast reconstruction. Our study suggests that local PRP application and systemic infliximab administration, either alone or in combination, could mitigate the adverse effects of radiotherapy. This approach has the potential to improve reconstructive outcomes in patients undergoing or having the possibility to undergo radiotherapy. This is the first study showing the effectiveness of infliximab and PRP combination on wound healing. The provided experimental rat model might offer guidance for further research. This study provides insights into optimizing outcomes in reconstructive breast surgery, paving the way for further research and clinical studies.
      PubDate: 2024-01-28
       
  • The peroxisome: an update on mysteries 3.0

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      Abstract: Abstract Peroxisomes are highly dynamic, oxidative organelles with key metabolic functions in cellular lipid metabolism, such as the β-oxidation of fatty acids and the synthesis of myelin sheath lipids, as well as the regulation of cellular redox balance. Loss of peroxisomal functions causes severe metabolic disorders in humans. Furthermore, peroxisomes also fulfil protective roles in pathogen and viral defence and immunity, highlighting their wider significance in human health and disease. This has sparked increasing interest in peroxisome biology and their physiological functions. This review presents an update and a continuation of three previous review articles addressing the unsolved mysteries of this remarkable organelle. We continue to highlight recent discoveries, advancements, and trends in peroxisome research, and address novel findings on the metabolic functions of peroxisomes, their biogenesis, protein import, membrane dynamics and division, as well as on peroxisome–organelle membrane contact sites and organelle cooperation. Furthermore, recent insights into peroxisome organisation through super-resolution microscopy are discussed. Finally, we address new roles for peroxisomes in immune and defence mechanisms and in human disorders, and for peroxisomal functions in different cell/tissue types, in particular their contribution to organ-specific pathologies.
      PubDate: 2024-01-20
       
  • Studying the topology of peroxisomal acyl-CoA synthetases using
           self-assembling split sfGFP

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      Abstract: Abstract Peroxisomes are membrane-bounded organelles that contain enzymes involved in multiple lipid metabolic pathways. Several of these pathways require (re-)activation of fatty acids to coenzyme A (CoA) esters by acyl-CoA synthetases, which may take place inside the peroxisomal lumen or extraperoxisomal. The acyl-CoA synthetases SLC27A2, SLC27A4, ACSL1, and ACSL4 have different but overlapping substrate specificities and were previously reported to be localized in the peroxisomal membrane in addition to other subcellular locations. However, it has remained unclear if the catalytic acyl-CoA synthetase sites of these enzymes are facing the peroxisomal lumen or the cytosolic side of the peroxisomal membrane. To study this topology in cellulo we have developed a microscopy-based method that uses the previously developed self-assembling split superfolder (sf) green fluorescent protein (GFP) assay. We show that this self-assembling split sfGFP method can be used to study the localization as well as the topology of membrane proteins in the peroxisomal membrane, but that it is less suited to study the location of soluble peroxisomal proteins. With the method we could demonstrate that the acyl-CoA synthetase domains of the peroxisome-bound acyl-CoA synthetases SLC27A2 and SLC27A4 are oriented toward the peroxisomal lumen and the domain of ACSL1 toward the cytosol. In contrast to previous reports, ACSL4 was not found in peroxisomes.
      PubDate: 2024-01-19
       
  • JNK inhibition enhances cell–cell adhesion impaired by desmoglein 3
           gene disruption in keratinocytes

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      Abstract: Abstract c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 are stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) that are phosphorylated by various stimuli. It has been reported that the loss of desmoglein (DSG) 3, a desmosomal transmembrane core molecule, in keratinocytes impairs cell–cell adhesion accompanied by p38 MAPK activation. To understand the biological role of DSG3 in desmosomes and its relationship with stress-activated MAPKs, we established DSG3 knockout keratinocytes (KO cells). Wild-type cells showed a linear localization of DSG1 to cell–cell contacts, whereas KO cells showed a remarkable reduction despite the increased protein levels of DSG1. Cell–cell adhesion in KO cells was impaired over time, as demonstrated by dispase-based dissociation assays. The linear localization of DSG1 to cell–cell contacts and the strength of cell–cell adhesion were promoted by the pharmacological inhibition of JNK. Conversely, pharmacological activation of JNK, but not p38 MAPK, in wild-type cells reduced the linear localization of DSG1 in cell–cell contacts. Our data indicate that DSG1 and DSG2 in KO cells cannot compensate for the attenuation of cell–cell adhesion strength caused by DSG3 deficiency and that JNK inhibition restores the strength of cell–cell adhesion by increasing the linear localization of DSG1 in cell–cell contacts in KO cells. Inhibition of JNK signaling may improve cell–cell adhesion in diseases in which DSG3 expression is impaired.
      PubDate: 2024-01-16
       
  • The crucial role of SETDB1 in structural and functional transformation of
           epithelial cells during regeneration after intestinal ischemia reperfusion
           injury

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      Abstract: Abstract Su (var) 3–9, enhancer of seste, trithorax (SET)-domain bifurcated histone lysine methyltransferase (SETDB1) plays a crucial role in maintaining intestinal stem cell homeostasis; however, its physiological function in epithelial injury is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of SETDB1 in epithelial regeneration using an intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) mouse model. Jejunum tissues were sampled after 75 min of ischemia followed by 3, 24, and 48 h of reperfusion. Morphological evaluations were performed using light microscopy and electron microscopy, and the involvement of SETDB1 in epithelial remodeling was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Expression of SETDB1 was increased following 24 h of reperfusion and localized in not only the crypt bottom but also in the transit amplifying zone and part of the villi. Changes in cell lineage, repression of cell adhesion molecule expression, and decreased histone H3 methylation status were detected in the crypts at the same time. Electron microscopy also revealed aberrant alignment of crypt nuclei and fusion of adjacent villi. Furthermore, increased SETDB1 expression and epithelial remodeling were confirmed with loss of stem cells, suggesting SETDB1 affects epithelial cell plasticity. In addition, crypt elongation and increased numbers of Ki-67 positive cells indicated active cell proliferation after IRI; however, the expression of PCNA was decreased compared to sham mouse jejunum. These morphological changes and the aberrant expression of proliferation markers were prevented by sinefungin, a histone methyltransferase inhibitor. In summary, SETDB1 plays a crucial role in changes in the epithelial structure after IRI-induced stem cell loss.
      PubDate: 2024-01-13
       
  • From complexity to clarity: unravelling tumor heterogeneity through the
           lens of tumor microenvironment for innovative cancer therapy

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite the tremendous clinical successes recorded in the landscape of cancer therapy, tumor heterogeneity remains a formidable challenge to successful cancer treatment. In recent years, the emergence of high-throughput technologies has advanced our understanding of the variables influencing tumor heterogeneity beyond intrinsic tumor characteristics. Emerging knowledge shows that drivers of tumor heterogeneity are not only intrinsic to cancer cells but can also emanate from their microenvironment, which significantly favors tumor progression and impairs therapeutic response. Although much has been explored to understand the fundamentals of the influence of innate tumor factors on cancer diversity, the roles of the tumor microenvironment (TME) are often undervalued. It is therefore imperative that a clear understanding of the interactions between the TME and other tumor intrinsic factors underlying the plastic molecular behaviors of cancers be identified to develop patient-specific treatment strategies. This review highlights the roles of the TME as an emerging factor in tumor heterogeneity. More particularly, we discuss the role of the TME in the context of tumor heterogeneity and explore the cutting-edge diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that could be used to resolve this recurring clinical conundrum. We conclude by speculating on exciting research questions that can advance our understanding of tumor heterogeneity with the goal of developing customized therapeutic solutions.
      PubDate: 2024-01-08
       
  • In focus in HCB

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      PubDate: 2024-01-01
       
  • Differences and similarities in biophysical and biological characteristics
           between U87 MG glioblastoma and astrocyte cells

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      Abstract: Abstract Current cancer studies focus on molecular-targeting diagnostics and interactions with surroundings; however, there are still gaps in characterization based on topological differences and elemental composition. Glioblastoma (GBM cells; GBMCs) is an astrocytic aggressive brain tumor. At the molecular level, GBMCs and astrocytes may differ, and cell elemental/topological analysis is critical for identifying potential new cancer targets. Here, we used U87 MG cells for GBMCS. U87 MG cell lines, which are frequently used in glioblastoma research, are an important tool for studying the various features and underlying mechanisms of this aggressive brain tumor. For the first time, atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) accompanied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are used to report the topology and chemistry of cancer (U87 MG) and healthy (SVG p12) cells. In addition, F-actin staining and cytoskeleton-based gene expression analyses were performed. The degree of gene expression for genes related to the cytoskeleton was similar; however, the intensity of F-actin, anisotropy values, and invasion-related genes were different. Morphologically, GBMCs were longer and narrower while astrocytes were shorter and more disseminated based on AFM. Furthermore, the roughness values of these cells differed slightly between the two call types. In contrast to the rougher astrocyte surfaces in the lamellipodial area, SEM–EDS analysis showed that elongated GBMCs displayed filopodial protrusions. Our investigation provides considerable further insight into rapid cancer cell characterization in terms of a combinatorial spectroscopic and microscopic approach.
      PubDate: 2024-01-01
       
  • Local fractal dimension of collagen detects increased spatial complexity
           in fibrosis

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      Abstract: Abstract Increase of collagen content and reorganization characterizes fibrosis but quantifying the latter remains challenging. Spatially complex structures are often analyzed via the fractal dimension; however, established methods for calculating this quantity either provide a single dimension for an entire object or a spatially distributed dimension that only considers binary images. These neglect valuable information related to collagen density in images of fibrotic tissue. We sought to develop a fractal analysis that can be applied to 3-dimensional (3D) images of fibrotic tissue. A fractal dimension map for each image was calculated by determining a single fractal dimension for a small area surrounding each image pixel, using fiber thickness as the third dimension. We found that this local fractal dimension increased with age and with progression of fibrosis regardless of collagen content. Our new method of distributed 3D fractal analysis can thus distinguish between changes in collagen content and organization induced by fibrosis.
      PubDate: 2023-11-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s00418-023-02248-8
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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  Subjects -> BIOLOGY (Total: 3134 journals)
    - BIOCHEMISTRY (239 journals)
    - BIOENGINEERING (143 journals)
    - BIOLOGY (1491 journals)
    - BIOPHYSICS (53 journals)
    - BIOTECHNOLOGY (243 journals)
    - BOTANY (220 journals)
    - CYTOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY (32 journals)
    - ENTOMOLOGY (67 journals)
    - GENETICS (152 journals)
    - MICROBIOLOGY (265 journals)
    - MICROSCOPY (13 journals)
    - ORNITHOLOGY (26 journals)
    - PHYSIOLOGY (73 journals)
    - ZOOLOGY (117 journals)

CYTOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY (32 journals)

Showing 1 - 29 of 29 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Cytology and Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Immunohistochemistry & Molecular Morphology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Cell Discovery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comparative Cytogenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Protocols in Cytometry     Hybrid Journal  
Cytogenetic and Genome Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cytokine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cytokine & Growth Factor Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Cytokine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cytology and Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cytometry Part A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cytometry Part B: Clinical Cytometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cytopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Cytoskeleton     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cytotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Diagnostic Cytopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Genetics And Cytology     Open Access  
European Journal of Histochemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Folia Cryptogamica Estonica     Open Access  
Histochemistry and Cell Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cytology & Histology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Histotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Molecular Histology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the American Society of Cytopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the History of Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Single Cell Biology     Open Access  
Vegetation History and Archaeobotany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
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HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.220.62.183
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-