Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 2346 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (10 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (38 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1996 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (140 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (42 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (14 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (40 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (38 journals)

EDUCATION (1996 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Showing 401 - 600 of 857 Journals sorted alphabetically
Educació i Història : Revista d'Història de l'Educació     Open Access  
Educacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Educación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Educación Física y Ciencia     Open Access  
Educación Química     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Educación y Educadores     Open Access  
Educación y Humanismo     Open Access  
Educación, Lenguaje y Sociedad     Open Access  
Educar     Open Access  
Educare : International Journal for Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Educate~     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Education     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education 3-13     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Education and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Education and Information Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Education and Linguistics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Education and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Education and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Education and Treatment of Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Education and Urban Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Education as Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Education Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Éducation et francophonie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Éducation et socialisation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Education Finance and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Education for Chemical Engineers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Education for Primary Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Éducation francophone en milieu minoritaire     Open Access  
Education in the Health Professions     Open Access  
Education in the Knowledge Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Education in the Knowledge Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Education Inquiry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Education Next     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Education Policy Analysis Archives     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Education Reform Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Éducation relative à l'environnement     Open Access  
Education Research International     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Education Review // Reseñas Educativas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Education, Citizenship and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Education, Knowledge and Economy: A journal for education and social enterprise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Educational Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Educational Administration Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Educational and Developmental Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Educational and Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Educational Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Educational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Educational Considerations     Open Access  
Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Educational Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Educational Guidance and Counseling Development Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Educational Leader (Pemimpin Pendidikan)     Open Access  
Educational Management Administration & Leadership     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Educational Media International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Educational Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Educational Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Educational Practice and Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Educational Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Educational Reflective Practices     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Educational Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 130)
Educational Research for Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Educational Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127)
Educational Researcher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Educational Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Educational Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Educational Studies : A Journal of the American Educational Studies Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Educational Technology Research and Development     Partially Free   (Followers: 45)
Educationis     Open Access  
Educator     Open Access  
Educazione sentimentale     Full-text available via subscription  
Edufisika : Jurnal Pendidikan Fisika     Open Access  
Edukacyjna Analiza Transakcyjna     Open Access  
Edukasi     Open Access  
Edukasi : Jurnal Pendidikan Islam     Open Access  
Edukasi Journal     Open Access  
EduLite : Journal of English Education, Literature and Culture     Open Access  
Edumatica : Jurnal Pendidikan Matematika     Open Access  
EduMatSains     Open Access  
Edunomic Jurnal Pendidikan Ekonomi     Open Access  
edureligia : Pendidikan Agama Islam i     Open Access  
EduSol     Open Access  
Edutech     Open Access  
Eesti Haridusteaduste Ajakiri. Estonian Journal of Education     Open Access  
Effective Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
EĞİTİM VE BİLİM     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ejovoc (Electronic Journal of Vocational Colleges)     Open Access  
eJRIEPS : Ejournal de la recherche sur l'intervention en éducation physique et sport     Open Access  
Eklektika : Jurnal Pemikiran dan Penelitian Administrasi Pendidikan     Open Access  
El Guiniguada. Revista de investigaciones y experiencias en Ciencias de la Educación     Open Access  
El-Hikmah     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Electronic Journal of Education Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology / Revista Electrónica de Investigación Psicoeducativa y Psicopedagógica     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Elementary School Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Elementary School Journal PGSD FIP UNIMED     Open Access  
ELT Forum : Journal of English Language Teaching     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
ELT Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ELT Worldwide     Open Access  
ELT-Lectura     Open Access  
Eltin Journal : Journal of English Language Teaching in Indonesia     Open Access  
Em Teia : Revista de Educação Matemática e Tecnológica Iberoamericana     Open Access  
Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
En Blanco y Negro     Open Access  
En Líneas Generales     Open Access  
Encounters in Theory and History of Education     Open Access  
Encuentro Educacional     Open Access  
Encuentros     Open Access  
Encuentros : Revista de Ciencias Humanas, Teoría Social y Pensamiento Crítico     Open Access  
Encuentros Multidisciplinares     Open Access  
Engaged Scholar Journal : Community-Engaged Research, Teaching, and Learning     Open Access  
English Education Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
English for Specific Purposes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
English Franca : Academic Journal of English Language and Education     Open Access  
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
English Language Teaching     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
English Teaching & Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Englisia Journal     Open Access  
Enlace Universitario     Open Access  
Enletawa Journal     Open Access  
Enrollment Management Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ensaio Avaliação e Políticas Públicas em Educação     Open Access  
Ensaio Pesquisa em Educação em Ciências     Open Access  
Ensayos : Revista de la Facultad de Educación de Albacete     Open Access  
Ensayos Pedagógicos     Open Access  
Enseñanza de las Ciencias : Revista de Investigación y Experiencias Didácticas     Open Access  
Enseñanza de las Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Ensino em Perspectivas     Open Access  
Entramados : educación y sociedad     Open Access  
Entrelinhas     Open Access  
Entrepreneurship Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy (EE&P)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Environmental Education Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Equine Veterinary Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Equity & Excellence in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Erciyes Journal of Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Erwachsenenbildung     Full-text available via subscription  
Escuela Abierta     Partially Free  
Espacio, Tiempo y Educación     Open Access  
Espacios en Blanco : Revista de educación     Open Access  
Estudios Pedagogicos (Valdivia)     Open Access  
Estudios sobre Educación     Open Access  
Estudos Históricos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ETD - Educação Temática Digital     Open Access  
Eternal (English, Teaching, Learning & Research Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ethics and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Ethiopian Journal of Education and Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Éthique en éducation et en formation : Les Dossiers du GREE     Open Access  
Ethnography and Education: New for 2006     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Euclid     Open Access  
European Early Childhood Education Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
European Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
European Educational Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
European Journal of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
European Journal of Engineering Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning - EURODL     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
European Journal of Psychology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Special Needs Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
European Journal of Teacher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
European Physical Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Evaluation & Research in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Evolution : Education and Outreach     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Exceptionality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Extensão em Ação     Open Access  
Extensio : Revista Eletrônica de Extensão     Open Access  
Facets     Open Access  
FAISCA. Revista de Altas Capacidades     Open Access  
Fawawi : English Education Journal     Open Access  
FEM : Revista de la Fundación Educación Médica     Open Access  
Feminist Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Filosofia e Educação     Open Access  
Filozofia Publiczna i Edukacja Demokratyczna     Open Access  
Fırat Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi     Open Access  
FIRE : Forum of International Research in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
First Opinions-Second Reactions (FOSR)     Open Access  
Florea : Jurnal Biologi dan Pembelajarannya     Open Access  
Florida Journal of Educational Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Focus on Exceptional Children     Open Access  
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Fokus Konseling     Open Access  
Form@re - Open Journal per la formazione in rete     Open Access  
Formação Docente : Associação Nacional de Pós-Graduação e Pesquisa em Educação     Open Access  
Foro de Educación     Open Access  
Foro de Profesores de E/LE     Open Access  
FORUM     Open Access  
Forum Oświatowe     Open Access  
Frontiers in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Frontline Learning Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frühe Bildung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Educational Administration Quarterly
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.144
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 19  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0013-161X - ISSN (Online) 1552-3519
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Organizing Schools for Collaborative Learning: School Leadership and
           Teachers’ Engagement in Collaboration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Susan Kemper Patrick
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Collaborative workgroups can be particularly fruitful sites for teachers to learn and improve. Prior research has illustrated how teachers' engagement in collaboration differs across school contexts. However, this research offers little guidance for leaders hoping to encourage collaborative learning among teachers in their school. Research Methods: Using survey and administrative data from teachers across Tennessee, this study examines the extent to which teachers in a large statewide sample (N = 9889) report engaging in collaborative learning opportunities and how these opportunities are distributed across and within schools. Using a series of multilevel models, I examine whether organizational conditions of schools influenced by school leaders are associated with the teacher-reported frequency and helpfulness of collaborative learning opportunities. Findings: I find significant variation in frequency across context (e.g., school level, geographic context, district size) and find that collaborative planning time consistently predicts how often teachers collaborate. Once accounting for frequency, teachers rate their collaboration as more helpful in schools with higher ratings of the professional climate/leadership and lower ratings of administrative oversight over collaboration. These relationships vary somewhat across contexts, with stronger negative relationships between oversight and helpfulness in schools with weak professional climates and large schools. Implications: Leaders should consider how to structure their schedules to allow for regular collaboration during the school day but should be cautious in mandating how teachers spend large portions of this collaborative time without shared decision-making with teachers.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T06:53:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X221107628
       
  • Examining the Foundations of Culturally and Linguistically Sustaining
           School Leadership: Towards a Democratic Project of Schooling in Dual
           Language Bilingual Education

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sandra Leu Bonanno
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Building upon the positive findings from culturally sustaining pedagogical studies, this paper explores how culturally sustaining approaches might operate on an organizational level. Examined in the context of dual language bilingual education (DLBE), this paper proposes a conceptually and empirically-guided culturally and linguistically sustaining school leadership approach (CLSL) as one option for researchers and practitioners to reimagine schools to be more affirming and sustaining for Students of Color (SOC). Research Methods: This project employed a constant comparative analysis across case studies to describe and compare culturally and linguistically sustaining mindsets and practices of DLBE principals in the state of Utah ( Miles et al., 2014). Data collection involved participant methods and data analysis was completed through cycles of inductive and deductive qualitative coding. Findings and Implications: The study unveiled four leadership dimensions – cultivating critical consciousness for self and community, fostering a culturally and linguistically sustaining school climate, supporting culturally sustaining pedagogies, and enacting democratic structures—that operated in tandem to configure a culturally and linguistically sustaining school leadership. The themes bridge existing literature to define culturally sustaining tenets represented in the leadership role by describing ways principals reimagined schools to benefit SOC rather than solely responding to students’ identities and maintaining assimilative student outcomes.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T06:21:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X221106972
       
  • Humans in Hierarchies: Intergroup Relations in Education Reform

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Renée Rinehart Kathawalla, Jal Mehta
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Existing research on loosely coupled educational systems has largely ignored the social and affective dimensions of such systems. Drawing on literature from organizational behavior, this study examines how “human” factors, including role identity dynamics, power dynamics, and stereotyping, shape the implementation of state-led education reforms. Research Method/Approach: This study draws on interviews and focus groups with 77 actors from different organizational levels in two states and uses a grounded theory analytical approach. Findings: Our findings indicate that stereotyping is ubiquitous across contexts, that the way actors stereotype and perceive each other depends on their positions in the system, and that stereotypes of higher ups often persist even as higher ups are aware of them and try unsuccessfully to mitigate them. We theorize about the reasons for these outcomes and their consequences for efforts at systemic change. Implications for Research and Practice: This study underscores the importance of social and emotional factors in education reform efforts, which have been under-theorized to this point. It demonstrates that reforms could be more successful when higher ups and lower downs have more frequent and meaningful interactions, which facilitate opportunities to break down social and emotional barriers to successful implementation.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T07:48:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X221098072
       
  • Public School District Characteristics and the Formation of Longitudinal
           Interdistrict Collaboration Networks

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      Authors: Victor G. Hugg, Michael D. Siciliano, Alan J. Daly
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: School leaders rely on a number of collaborative policy tools to address fiscal and governance issues. While prior research has examined the dynamics and implications of research-practice and public-private partnerships, this study addresses a third form of collaboration: interdistrict cooperative agreements. Method: We develop a unique data set to study the formation of interdistrict agreements formed among 333 public school districts in the state of Iowa from 2008 through 2017. Aimed at reducing costs and improving student outcomes, these agreements collectively reflect an intergovernmental network that develops through predominantly bilateral agreements. We examine the factors and mechanisms that can facilitate and hinder interdistrict collaboration through a stochastic actor-oriented model for analyzing panels of network observations. Findings: We find both transitivity and popularity to be positively associated with the inclination to form cooperative relationships. Further, school districts are more likely to collaborate with districts that have a: (1) greater number of enrolled students; (2) smaller percentage of students that receive free or reduced-price lunch; (3) higher student-to-teacher ratio; and (4) lower average teacher salary. Propinquity and homophily effects are present as well: between any two given school districts, the likelihood of collaboration improves as geographical distance and the absolute difference in district-level measures decreases. Implications: Understanding the antecedents of education network formation enables examinations of how network characteristics can reduce the cost of providing education or improve student outcomes.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T04:20:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X221081855
       
  • Is Role Change Enough' District Organizational Supports for Principal
           Supervision

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      Authors: Laura K. Rogers
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Background and Purpose: District school improvement efforts have increasingly focused on improving the quality of support principals receive from the central office. This study uses the theoretical lens of recoupling to examines efforts by one urban district in the midst of change to revise the role of principal supervisors. Analysis focuses on how district organizational structures and systems supported (or did not support) principal supervisors' work in the new role. Research Methods: This qualitative study draws upon semi-structured interview data from 31 principals, principal supervisors, and central office leaders. Data were analyzed using an iterative, multi-round coding process that identified emergent themes. Findings: District central office structures, systems, and roles shape principal supervisors' ability to effectively develop principal leadership. System-wide changes to support principal supervisors' new work appeared to be at odds with existing district context and structure, limiting their effectiveness. Additionally, three organizational barriers emerged that limited principal supervisors' ability to meet the new role expectations: misaligned central office expectations, overlapping responsibilities between supervisors and other central office administrators, and an incoherent district definition of instructional leadership. Implications: Findings provide guidance for districts seeking to build central office capacity for school support by highlighting the importance of implementing district-level structural supports and other system considerations in addition to changing administrator roles.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T12:14:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X221081828
       
  • Negotiating Incomplete Autonomy: Portraits from Three School Principals

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      Authors: Taeyeon Kim, Jennie Weiner
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study builds on research scrutinizing school autonomy in policy and school governance by shifting the focus from a formal structural view of autonomy to examining how principals negotiate autonomy in their daily work. Drawing on multiple dimensions of autonomy and street-level bureaucracy, this study examined how principals, as both professionals and bureaucrats, work to expand and strategize their autonomy in practice. Research Methods/Approach: We used portraiture to document and interpret the experience and perspectives of three principals at urban, suburban, and rural PK-12 traditional public schools in the Midwest of US during the 2018–2019 school year. Findings: Principals faced a “bounded” or “partial” autonomy in which they had to constantly negotiate their individual autonomy (e.g., how they spent their time on any given day) with institutional autonomy (e.g., the demands of the role via external expectations). The findings show the ways participants utilized institutional autonomy to support individual autonomy and dealt with the boundaries of their autonomy. While these strategies gave them a bit more “control” over decision-making, they also often resulted in overwork and/or conflict with district priorities. Implications for Research and Practice: Detailed portraits offer key insights for rethinking school autonomy with multiple dimensions intersected in leadership practice. Findings yield knowledge regarding how to best support districts and school leaders in creating greater alignment between institutional and individual demands, thus increasing the likelihood that autonomy, as an improvement strategy, can be effective.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T03:26:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X221080374
       
  • Black Women Principals in American Secondary Schools: Quantitative
           Evidence of the Link Between Their Leadership and Student Achievement

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      Authors: Sung Tae Jang, Nicola A. Alexander
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This study aims to provide quantitative knowledge concerning the leadership of Black women principals in American secondary schools. We examined (1) the demographic composition of the schools in which Black women principals serve, (2) these principals’ instructional leadership behaviors, (3) the collective responsibility among teachers in those schools, and (4) the association between their interacting identities and the math achievement scores of the 9th graders at the schools they led. Research Design and Methods: We used a critical quantitative intersectionality framework along with the base-year data from the High School Longitudinal Studies 2009 provided by the National Center for Education Statistics. Multiple regression analysis and linear mixed-effect modeling were used to examine how the convergence of principals’ race or ethnicity and gender is associated with the variables of interest. Findings: The results showed that on average, Black principals served schools with relatively higher percentages of students who were eligible for free or reduced-cost lunch and relatively higher percentages of students of color. We found that Black women principals were associated with a higher level of teachers’ collective responsibility as perceived by teachers and higher math achievement scores among students. There was a positive association between the principals’ instructional leadership behaviors perceived by teachers and female principals. Implications for Research and Practice: The importance of understanding the multiplicative influences of race or ethnicity and gender in research and principal preparation programs are discussed. We suggest that policymakers prepare intersectionality-informed policy interventions that specifically support leadership by Black women principals.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T08:52:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211068415
       
  • The Deep Roots of Inequity: Coloniality, Racial Capitalism, Educational
           Leadership, and Reform

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      Authors: James Wright
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This article is a critical analysis of educational leadership and administration’s historically privileged Eurocentric epistemologies, research methodologies, and intellectual norms, shaping the field through conceptions of coloniality. The purpose of this article is toward decolonizing educational leadership. Problem: Dominant, Eurocentric knowledge systems are epistemically imposing. Racialized and ethnic critiques of Eurocentric epistemologies and educational leadership norms are relatively new in dominant knowledge production institutions such as University Council of Educational Administration and peer-review journals such as Education Administration Quarterly. Questions: Why are BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) epistemologies a critical issue in educational leadership, research, practice, and leadership preparation' In what ways have educational leadership research, practice, and training represented BIPOC epistemologies' Conceptual Framework: This article refines and advances theories of coloniality by a concept that I coined Coloniality Racial-Capitalism and Modernity. Coloniality, the darker side of modernity, is highlighted in educational leadership practices and reform for perpetuating epistemicide in the service of racial capitalism. Contributions to the Field: This article reconnects the struggles of Blackamericans to a global struggle, such as the progenitors in the Blackamerican struggle understood. Furthermore, placing coloniality in conversation with other critical work in educational leadership around coloniality’s articulations of racism and inequity is useful for BIPOC and their allies in fights for educational justice for BIPOC children.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-01-17T10:48:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211029483
       
  • Computer Science Trends and Trade-offs in California High Schools

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      Authors: Paul Bruno, Colleen M. Lewis
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: We aim to better understand the curricular, staffing, and achievement trade-offs entailed by expansions of high-school computer science (CS) for students, schools, and school leaders. Methods: We use descriptive, correlational, and quasi-experimental methods to analyze statewide longitudinal course-, school-, and staff-level data from California, where CS course taking has expanded rapidly. Findings: We find that these rapid CS course expansions have not come at the expense of CS teachers’ observable qualifications (namely certification, education, or experience). Within-school course taking patterns over time suggest that CS enrollment growth has come at the expense of social studies, English/language arts (ELA), and arts courses, as well as from other miscellaneous electives. However, we find no evidence that increased enrollment of students in CS courses at a school has a significant effect on students’ math or ELA test scores. Implications: Flexible authorization requirements for CS teachers appear to have allowed school leaders to staff new CS courses with teachers whose observable qualifications are strong, though we do not observe teachers’ CS teaching skill. Increasing CS participation is unlikely to noticeably improve school-level student test scores, but administrators also do not need to be overly concerned that test scores will suffer. However, school leaders and policymakers should think carefully about what courses new CS courses will replace and whether such replacements are worthwhile.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2021-12-03T10:37:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211054801
       
  • “If I Ever Leave, I Have a List of People That Are Going With Me:”
           Principals’ Understandings of and Responses to Place Influences on
           Teacher Staffing in West Virginia

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      Authors: Erin McHenry-Sorber, Matthew P. Campbell, Daniella Hall Sutherland
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Schools across the predominately rural state of West Virginia are experiencing widespread teacher shortages, though recruitment and retention difficulties are unevenly distributed across place. Using spatial in/justice as our framework, we explore how principals define place, how place influences principal perceptions of teacher recruitment and retention, and how principals respond to these staffing challenges given their leadership experiences, relationship to school community, and understandings of place affordances and disadvantages. Research Methods/Approach This research utilized interviews with eight principals across six school districts in West Virginia over a four-month time frame. We inductively coded interview transcripts in iterative cycles using our research framework as a guide for emic and etic codes. Findings: We find principals’ understanding of place influences on staffing to be specific to the unique attributes of each community and the placement of their leadership experiences – as community returners, seasoned though not originally from the community, and new-to-place. Their understandings of spatial in/justice as it relates to teacher staffing shape ideas of place affordances and disadvantages and recruitment and retention practices. These findings complexify the teacher staffing picture across geographically diverse rural places and the responses available to leaders given their leadership experience and relationship to place. Implications for Research and Practice The place-specific influences on teacher staffing problematize statewide policy mechanisms for ameliorating teacher shortages. The findings also suggest the need for further in-depth qualitative research within districts and across states, with an emphasis on racially diverse rural places.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2021-11-15T02:49:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211053590
       
  • School Leaders’ Use of Social-Emotional Learning to Disrupt
           Whiteness

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      Authors: Stephanie R. Forman, James Lamar Foster, Jessica G. Rigby
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This article examines how school leaders connect Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) with anti-racist practices. Current literature has yet to explain how leaders support race conscious approaches to SEL that promote marginalized students’ well-being, particularly with White teachers who often resist learning about race and Whiteness. Research Approach: We conducted a qualitative study of three leaders in one district in the Puget Sound region of Washington state. The first data collection and analysis phase drew from interviews, observations, and artifacts from a larger study to identify anti-racist SEL intersections and the leaders associated with these intersections. In the second phase, we conducted additional interviews with three leaders and performed a critical frame analysis to characterize the frames used by leaders to shape what SEL means and who it serves. Findings: We describe three anti-racist SEL intersections in which leaders made explicit connections between SEL and broader anti-racist goals within their work with White teachers. We found that leaders framed SEL strategically to address White teachers’ emotions, and as tools teachers might use to understand and address students’ racialized classroom experiences Implications: Findings provide illustrative examples of leadership that connects anti-racist practice with SEL and explore how leaders’ novel understanding of SEL and anti-racism undergirds this leadership approach.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2021-11-10T12:20:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211053609
       
  • Toward a Just Leadership Learning Ecology: A CHAT-IT Analysis of the
           Highlander Idea

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      Authors: Ethan Chang, Ronald David Glass
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This paper conceptualizes a just leadership learning ecology through an analysis of one nontraditional site of leadership preparation: the Highlander Research and Education Center (originally founded as the Highlander Folk School). Methodology: Drawing on cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) and institutional theory (IT), we examine the core design and pedagogy of Highlander, which co-founder, Myles Horton, referred to as the “Highlander idea.” Findings: We illustrate how a residential learning and living environment, norms of epistemic humility and democratic decision making, and horizontal teaching and learning roles fostered social justice leadership. This just leadership learning ecology reflected institutions present at the time of Highlander's founding, including cultural scripts rooted in prophetic Christianity, class consciousness, and unfolding social movements in Appalachia and the South. Implications: Our analysis of Highlander extends recent efforts to re-envision the how and who of leadership preparation and addresses the observed lack of coherence within this subfield.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2021-11-06T03:04:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211054835
       
  • Coming to Know and Knowing Differently: Implications of Educational
           Leadership

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      Authors: George J. S. Dei (Nana Adusei Sefa Tweneboah), Asna Adhami
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Our paper will examine the question of counter-hegemonic knowledge production in the Western academy and the responsibilities of the Racialized scholar coming to know and producing knowing to challenge the particularity of Western science knowledge that masquerades as universal knowledge in academia. We engage the topic from a stance examining the coloniality of knowledge in educational leadership by centering Indigenous knowledge systems in the academy as a means to disrupt Euro-colonial hegemonic knowledging. We ask: How do we challenge the “grammar of coloniality” of Western knowledge and affirm the possibilities of a reimagining of “new geographies” and cartographies of knowledge as varied and intersecting ontologies and epistemologies that inform our human condition as “learning experiences, research, and knowledge generation” practices' The paper highlights epistemic possibilities of multicentricity, that is, multiple ways of knowledge as critical to understanding the complete history of ideas and events that have shaped and continue to shape human growth and development. The paper highlights Indigeneity as a salient entry point to producing counter-hegemonic knowing. The paper concludes pointing to implications for educational “re-search” and African educational futurity.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2021-10-20T10:07:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211036079
       
  • Searching for Amistad in Two School Districts: A Case Study of Black
           History Curriculum Implementation in New Jersey

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      Authors: Kevin L. Clay, Nora C. R. Broege
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Over the past 30 years, much debate has been produced about improving the quality and caliber of curriculum taught to public school students. Less prominent in these discussions has been the content of Black history and culturally relevant curriculum. Many states and districts assume they are adequately including these experiences through theme months (i.e., Black History Month) or single school days dedicated to workshops on diversity and equity. Unlike most states, the State of New Jersey has legislated the inclusion of Black history education through the enactment of the Amistad Legislation. In doing so it stands out among its peers, but has this legislation actually enacted curricular change' Research Design: We engage a decoloniality framework in this exploratory case study of two districts, describing how each is interpreting Amistad, the processes they subsequently implement, the curricular results, and if/how these attempts address dominant Eurocentric frames essential to the project of coloniality. Findings: We find that simply following the legislation itself does not result in a great deal of reform. The districts we profile, rather than follow the vague dictum of Amistad, opt to follow the “spirit” of the law. The result is clear curricular reform and district-level changes. Our cases present interesting points of discussion as they are at two distinct points on the spectrum of implementation—one having already established a well-regarded curriculum, the other in the early stages of reform. Despite this, administrators in each express the value of Amistad for their students, faculty, and communities.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2021-08-09T09:58:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211026962
       
  • Somali Immigrant Mothers’ Experiences of School Engagement:
           Implications for School Leaders

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      Authors: Nimo M. Abdi
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: This critical phenomenology study examines the experiences of Somali mothers’ involvement with an urban school in London, United Kingdom. Specifically, the study explores Somali mothers’ experiences and responses in navigating the coloniality of gender discourses imbedded in school structure and culture. The research questions that guided the study concerned the gender-based tools that Somali mothers use to navigate the school structure and culture and how school leaders can recognize and tap into parental knowledge and ways of being to serve these communities. Methods: This study is based on the stories of five Somali immigrant mothers. Data collection included focus groups, field memos, site observations, and school archival data. Data were analyzed through hermeneutic interpretation of whole-part-whole. Findings: Somali mothers use three important elements—identity, resistance, and traditions—to respond to coloniality of gender in school as they negotiate tensions between the Somali conception of motherhood and western notions of gender. The findings emphasize the practices rooted in Indigenous Somali culture and gender roles as assets. Implications: This research argues that the matripotent leadership practices of Somali mothers can inform theory, practice, and policy, as these practices offer a more collective and humanizing approach to leadership centered in ideals connected to a non-Western conception of motherhood, gender, and gender dynamics.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T01:02:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211033555
       
  • How Conceptions of Equity Inform Principal Data Use: A Purposeful
           Examination of Principals From Four School Districts

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      Authors: Rachel Roegman, Ruqayyah Perkins-Williams, Matt Budzyn, Olivia Killian-Tarr, David Allen
      First page: 183
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we examine principals’ data use within four districts are engaged in district-level professional learning around equity. Drawing on Gutierrez's framework for dimensions of equity, we consider how principals engage in data use in light of the dimensions of access, achievement, identity, and power. Findings suggest each district had its own definition of equity and engaged in work at advancing equity based on this unique definition. We conclude with implications for policy, preparation, and practice related to these different understandings of equity.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2021-11-29T04:11:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211056084
       
  • Diversity Ideology and School Leadership: Obscuring Inequities for
           Emergent Bilingual Students in Career and Technical Education

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      Authors: Mark R. Emerick
      First page: 223
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The purpose of this article is to examine the ways in which school leaders in career and technical education (CTE) conceptualized diversity and inclusion for emergent bilingual students (EBs) and how their beliefs about diversity manifested in institutional support (or lack thereof) for EBs. Research Method: This study draws on data collected during a year-and-a-half long qualitative case study at a large, nationally recognized CTE center. The primary sources of data were interviews with administrators, teachers, and students; local artifacts, student records, and state-level enrollment data were also used. Findings: CTE administrators adhered to diversity ideology when discussing issues of diversity and EBs' inclusion at their institution and believed that they cultivated an inclusive educational environment. This ideology resulted in superficial diversity and inclusion initiatives that did not ensure that EBs had equitable access to CTE program nor that teachers had a sufficient system of support to ensure EBs’ academic success, despite the administration's stated commitment to equal opportunity and inclusion. Implications: These findings suggest the need for administrators to critically examine their conceptualization of diversity and equity when considering how to support EBs in CTE programs.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2021-11-06T03:05:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211052510
       
  • Who Leads Turnaround Schools' Characteristics of Principals in
           Tennessee's Achievement School District and Innovation Zones

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      Authors: LaTanya L. Dixon, Lam D. Pham, Gary T. Henry, Sean P. Corcoran, Ron Zimmer
      First page: 258
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: While previous research has examined the impact of school turnaround models, less is known about the principals who lead these turnaround schools. This study examines the personal demographics, experience, educational background, prior school performance, salaries, and turnover of principals who led two turnaround models in Tennessee's lowest performing schools: a state-run Achievement School District (ASD) that has not yielded positive nor negative effects and local Innovation Zones (iZones) that averaged positive effects on student achievement over six years. Methods: We analyze longitudinal, administrative data from the Tennessee Department of Education from 2006–2007 to 2017–2018 to compare pre- and post-reform means and trends in principal characteristics between ASD, iZone, and similarly low-performing comparison schools. Results: ASD schools had higher principal turnover rates and lost principals whose schools performed higher while iZone schools retained more principals and lost principals whose schools performed lower. Moreover, iZone schools employed more experienced principals, more Black principals, and principals with higher graduate degree attainment and paid their principals more than ASD schools. Salary differences between ASD and iZone schools were not explained by principals’ characteristics, such as years of experience. Implications: Our findings reveal differences in leadership characteristics between iZone and ASD schools that were consistent with differences in the effectiveness of the two turnaround approaches.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T02:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211055702
       
  • From Compliance to Improvement: How School Leaders Make Sense of
           Institutional and Technical Demands When Implementing a Continuous
           Improvement Process

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      Authors: Maxwell Yurkofsky
      First page: 300
      Abstract: Educational Administration Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: A recurring frustration in educational research is the tendency for school leaders to implement reforms in ways that prioritize compliance over more substantive improvements to practice. Drawing on new institutional theory and sensemaking theory, this article explores the different ways leaders respond to continuous improvement (CI) reforms and why they frequently privilege external compliance over the perceived needs of their schools. Methods: This study used interviews, observations, and artifacts to analyze how six leaders across two midwestern school districts led the implementation of a CI method. Data analysis involved an iterative process of identifying emergent themes, refining themes based on existing research, and evaluating their usefulness in explaining differences within and across school leaders, in order to understand the different ways leaders responded to CI and what factors caused them to prioritize compliance over substantive improvement. Findings: Findings illuminate six different responses to CI that vary across three dimensions: whether leaders prioritize bridging or buffering, the form or the function of reform, and concerns for external legitimacy or internal improvement. Leaders’ professional identities, their beliefs about the usefulness of CI, and their perception of district regulation contributed to whether they implemented CI in a way that prioritized concerns for legitimacy over improvement. Implications: These findings trace the shallow reach of recent reform efforts to the ways leaders make sense of the complex institutional and technical demands of their role, offer an integrative typology of leaders’ different approaches to implementation, and identify factors that support more productive responses to district reform.
      Citation: Educational Administration Quarterly
      PubDate: 2021-11-20T11:08:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0013161X211053597
       
 
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