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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
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Journal of Sociology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.597
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 51  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1440-7833 - ISSN (Online) 1741-2978
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Understanding Covid-19 emergency social security measures as a from of
           basic income: Lessons from Australia

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      Authors: Elise Klein, Kay Cook, Susan Maury, Kelly Bowey
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the changes in social security measures introduced by the Australian government during the first wave of Covid-19 lockdowns in 2020. These measures were basic income-like in that they became both more unconditional and adequate for a reasonable standard of living. This was achieved through a significant supplementary payment, suspension of mutual obligation requirements, and the relaxation of eligibility criteria on a range of unemployment-related payments. Through drawing on the results of an online survey, we examine the impacts of these measures and find that they significantly helped to alleviate poverty and improve wellbeing. These gains were not insignificant for the individuals involved, and offer empirical insights into studies of basic income. While seeing the Australian government embrace more generous and basic income-like measures, we also note that during Covid-19 gendered and class inequalities increased. This reminds us that basic income is never a silver bullet and, alongside implementing basic income payments, there also needs to be a concerted effort to restructure economic relations more generally.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T04:26:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221106242
       
  • Characterising Australians who have high levels of anger towards Islam and
           Muslims

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      Authors: Shannon Walding, Jacqui Ewart
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article reveals the characteristics and demographics of non-Muslim Australians who express levels of anger towards Muslims and Islam. Using data from a 2018 national social survey of a random, stratified sample of Australians, we identify key demographic characteristics amongst those expressing above-average degrees of anger towards Muslims and the religion of Islam, separately. We identify the proportion of different typologies of people who hold anger towards Islam and Muslims. We aim to establish which combinations of demographic and personal characteristics are most strongly associated with the expression of anger so that policy and interventions targeted at reducing this emotion might be effectively directed. We draw on the literature about Muslimophobia and Islamophobia, along with key studies that have examined attitudes towards Islam and Muslims in Australia and elsewhere. Our findings are relevant to organisations and government bodies in Australia, with implications for policy and social cohesion programs.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T07:10:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221101411
       
  • Pox populi: Anti-vaxx, anti-politics

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      Authors: Francis Russell
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the political meaning of the interconnected anti-vaccine and anti-lockdown protest movements that have emerged in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. A range of academics and commentators have argued that such protests should be understood in terms of a dangerous resurgence of far-right populism, one that is fuelled by misinformation and extremist ideologies. This article tests such a framing by engaging with recent scholarship on the ‘anti-political’ – the theorisation of the growing inability for political action to occur other than in opposition to the political system itself. Against the conventional reading of the protests as fundamentally political, this article looks at recent anthropological work on ‘conspirituality’ in order to investigate how the aesthetic and performative dimensions of such protests may be key to understanding contemporary anti-vaccine thought and action.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T08:21:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221101660
       
  • ‘Hey lovely! Don’t miss this opportunity!’ Digital temporalities of
           wellness culture, email marketing, and the promise of abundance

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      Authors: Natalie Ann Hendry
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      For the wellness industry, email communication, albeit mundane, remains an essential practice even as wellness entrepreneurs embrace newer digital technologies. Drawing on ongoing insights from a larger Australian digital ethnographic project, I explore how these ‘wellness emails’ – electronic mail communication (outside of social media) that typically circulate wellness-related content through automated email list subscriptions – promise an always-ready, abundant space for transforming bodies and optimising health. These emails teach alternative bodily temporalities, distinct from the inhospitable biomedical time of mainstream healthcare, yet also employ time-critical marketing tactics and stories to drive attention, where recipients are encouraged both to not miss out on opportunities but also to respect their own ‘divine timing’. Such temporal flexibility of wellness culture, and its promise of abundance, contributes to its global expansion, where email offers personal and marketised engagement and, critically, a potential escape from social media censorship and public health scrutiny.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T03:23:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221101397
       
  • Engineering masculinity: A multimodal critical discourse analysis of trans
           masculine embodiment in magazines for trans men

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      Authors: Randos Jackalas Korobacz, Peta S Cook
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Masculinity studies has been slow to explore trans men's lives including how trans masculine embodiments are represented in the media. In this article, we examine how the masculinities of trans men are represented in the context of sport through two issues of two print magazines specifically targeting trans men audiences: The Jock Issue of Original Plumbing and The Sport Issue of FTM Magazine. Through combining body-reflexive practices and gender as a social structure in our trans gaze framework, our multimodal critical discourse analysis reveals that trans masculinity is presented as hegemonic, diverse, reflexive and subordinated within the micro, meso and macro levels of social life. As trans people continue to experience social marginalisation that adversely impacts on their health and wellbeing, how they are represented within the media – particularly by those media specifically targeted towards them – is important to examine and recognise.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T06:29:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221099982
       
  • Pride, belonging and community: What does this mean if you are Aboriginal
           and LGBT+ and living in Western Australia'

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      Authors: Braden Hill, Jennifer Dodd, Bep Uink, Dameyon Bonson, Sian Bennett
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The lived experience of being LGBT+ and an Aboriginal person was a major focus of the mixed methods Breaking the Silence research project led by Aboriginal LGBT+ researchers. Aboriginal LGBT+ participants were invited to respond to a survey that canvassed how they were included and accepted within their own families, on social media, dating apps and the wider community. The analysis and discussion of the findings from the survey examine the issues of discrimination, racism, homophobia and what belonging to a community means for intersectional identities. The findings show that while participants do experience microaggressions and queer-phobia, they also describe agency and positive experiences. The question is how these instances of resistance and disruption can be enabled to proliferate and (if appropriate) be supported collectively, to enable Aboriginal LGBT+ individuals to experience a sense of pride and belonging to communities at times and in spaces of their own choosing.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T07:55:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221093402
       
  • Exploring alcohol cultures and homosocial relationships in women's amateur
           AFL teams

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      Authors: Lily Curtis, Steven Roberts
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Young women's risky drinking cultures are pertinent to the world of amateur Australian Football League, yet they have received limited research attention. Drawing on surveys, focus groups, and semi-structured ‘scroll-back’ interviews, this study provides an in-depth investigation of negotiations of gender and risky drinking in such cultures. A range of intersecting socio-cultural themes were identified, summarised into four overarching elements: drinking as central to initial homosociality; awareness of appropriateness; divergences between women's and men's cultural priorities and alcohol behaviours; and young women's unique cultural prioritisation of collectivity and mutuality. The findings further sociological knowledge on risky drinking and gender.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:53:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221093398
       
  • VOIP technology in grassroots politics: Transforming political culture and
           practice'

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      Authors: Rosemary Hancock
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates how the adoption and use of digital technologies shape political culture and practice in grassroots political groups, particularly focusing on how VOIP technologies enable and/or constrain groups to work across physical space and form political relationships among participants. While this article is grounded in a case study of one broad-based coalition in Sydney, Australia, the findings expand our understanding of how digital technology shapes political culture and practice in grassroots spaces by (a) analysing an organisation both before and after the adoption of VOIP technology and (b) focusing on a case study where the organisation attempted to maintain rather than transform their political culture and practice with the adoption of new digital organising methods. The article argues that the instrumental benefits of digital technologies come at a cost: VOIP technologies may constrain the formation of deep relationships and flatten distinctive political practices within grassroots political organisations.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T02:29:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221086331
       
  • Book Review: Owning the street: The everyday life of property by Amelia
           Thorpe

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      Authors: Natalie Osborne
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T02:28:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221086330
       
  • Younger generations’ expectations regarding artificial intelligence in
           the job market: Mapping accounts about the future relationship of
           automation and work

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      Authors: Lilla Vicsek, Tamás Bokor, Gyöngyvér Pataki
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      There is a deficiency of in-depth explorations of young people’s visions of automation and work, and how these relate to popular projections found in the future-of-work debate. This article investigates such expectations, drawing on 62 interviews with Hungarian university students undertaking non-technical majors. Key characteristics of the interviewees’ accounts included their malleable and changing nature. Although respondents were aware of the widespread messages of experts about the revolutionary nature of likely changes, they expressed scepticism about the extent of change both regarding the macro level and in relation to their own lives. Interestingly, developments in artificial intelligence were not a factor in these young adults’ visions of their careers. The mechanisms and lines of reasoning underlying their expectations – such as a version of optimism bias – are discussed. The study highlights the importance of doing qualitative research on a topic which is dominated by quantitative research.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T06:54:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221089365
       
  • Stuck between the Global North and South: Middling migrants in Australia
           and Singapore

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      Authors: Sylvia Ang
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The literature on ‘middling transnationals’ is growing, although studies on Asian middling migrants are still relatively lacking. Current understandings of middling migrants are also frequently fixed on migrants’ mid-level skills and their middle-class status. Drawing on interviews with Nepali migrants living in Melbourne, Australia and mainland Chinese migrants living in Singapore respectively, this article considers how their middling visa status and imaginaries interact with anxious desires. The article argues, first, that migrants from the Global South experience heightened anxious desires due to imaginaries oscillating between the Global North and South. Second, and relatedly, the article argues that migration regimes keep migrants compliant through managing their anxious desires. By detailing the experiences of different groups of Asian migrants in separate migration regimes, the article aims to highlight the heterogeneous experiences among migrants originating from the Global South, and the techniques used by different states to produce temporary and compliant migrants.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:33:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221088040
       
  • ‘When you delete Tinder it’s a sign of commitment’: leaving dating
           apps and the reproduction of romantic, monogamous relationship practices

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      Authors: Tiina Vares
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years there has been increasing academic attention to forms and practices of disconnection to social networking sites. However, there has been limited attention to non-use/departures, particularly with dating apps. In this article I draw on 27 interviews with previous and current users of dating apps to explore their practices of leaving/deleting their dating apps. For the majority of participants, leaving a dating app was due to ‘success’ in finding a relationship. For others, it was the ‘failure’ to find a relationship. I suggest that this highlights not only the centrality of finding/not finding a relationship to dating app use and departure, but also a particular construction of relationships: romantic, sexually exclusive/monogamous and life-long. This was the case for the majority of participants who identified as heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual and queer and indicates the reproduction and valuing of a particular relationship form and practice for diverse users.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:32:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221082700
       
  • International students on the edge: The precarious impacts of financial
           stress

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      Authors: Shaun Wilson, Catherine Hastings, Alan Morris, Gaby Ramia, Emma Mitchell
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      International students are an important global cohort of ‘noncitizens’ whose experiences are central concerns for urban sociologists and migration scholars. Drawing on survey fieldwork conducted among international students in the private rental sector in Sydney and Melbourne during 2019, this article provides new knowledge about the hardships experienced by international students who report financial stress. Using a modified scale developed by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, we highlight the accelerating role of high levels of financial stress in producing disruptive events such as housing evictions and fears of homelessness, as well as reliance on inadequate housing like ‘hot-bedding’. Financial stress is significantly more likely for students from low-GNI (gross national income) countries and higher stress reduces wellbeing. Access to paid employment, however, does not ‘protect’ against higher financial stress. We conclude that higher education policymakers need tools and policies to prevent disruptive life events among international students related to financial stress, particularly those associated with housing.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T11:32:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221084756
       
  • Book Review: The Private Rental Sector in Australia: Living with
           Uncertainty by Alan Morris, Kath Hulse and Hal Pawson

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      Authors: Charles Crothers
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T05:51:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221082693
       
  • LGBTQ+ non-discrimination and religious freedom in the context of
           government-funded faith-based education, social welfare, health care, and
           aged care

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      Authors: Douglas Ezzy, Lori Beaman, Angela Dwyer, Bronwyn Fielder, Angus McLeay, Simon Rice, Louise Richardson-Self
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Anti-discrimination laws around the world have explicitly protected LGBTQ+ people from discrimination with various levels of exceptions for religion. Some conservative religious organisations in Australia are advocating to be allowed to discriminate against LGBTQ+ people in certain organisations they manage. The political debate in Australia has focused on religiously affiliated organisations that provide services in education, social welfare, health care, and aged care. We argue that religious exceptions allowing discrimination should be narrow because they cause considerable harm, reinforce, disadvantage and because LGBTQ+ people are deserving of respect and rights. We draw on a national representative survey to demonstrate that the views of some conservative religious lobby groups do not represent the views of the majority of religious people in Australia or the views of the majority of Christian people.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T09:37:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211072566
       
  • Migrant children in a Chilean school:: Habitus, discourses and otherness

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      Authors: Andrea Cortés Saavedra
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on data from ethnographic fieldwork in a diverse school located in the north of Chile, this article explores the ways of narrating and producing otherness, through the analysis of school staff discourses. The article identifies and describes how the discourses on migrant children are produced in a school context, and the sources and references used by teachers. Utilising a focused ethnographic method and based on a critical realist and Bourdieusian approach, this article argues that there are surrounding discourses and pre-existing sets of social relations (state–school relations, socio-spatial relations, intergenerational relations), which are reflexively integrated into the habitus of teachers and the institutional habitus of the school, in order to understand the conviviality with migrant children and to produce social differences.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-25T05:04:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211071144
       
  • The role of an equity policy in the reproduction of social inequalities:
           High School Ranking and university admissions in Chile

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      Authors: Ximena Catalán, Maria Veronica Santelices, Catherine Horn
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The High School (HS) Ranking is an equity policy aimed at increasing the enrolment of students from underprivileged contexts in selective higher education institutions in Chile. However, HS Ranking is considered as an admission criterion for all applicants, regardless of their contextual characteristics. In this study, we delve into how students from different high school settings interpret and deploy actions to increase their HS Ranking score. Through a Structural Equation Model with validated survey data (9 schools, N = 1.831), our results show that the role of the schools’ context in the deployment of academic strategies to increase HS Ranking score is significant, even after controlling for academic individual motivation. In a scenario of a highly segregated secondary system these results are relevant for the discussion of the role of HS Ranking – an equity-oriented admission policy – in maintaining the higher education inequalities.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T12:56:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211072592
       
  • Modifying my self: A qualitative study exploring agency, structure and
           identity for women seeking publicly funded plastic surgery in Australia

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      Authors: Kristen Foley, Nicola Dean, Connie Musolino, Randall Long, Paul Ward
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Our sociological knowledge base about plastic surgery has been predominantly constructed in free market contexts, leaving uncertainties as to how sociological theory around agency, identity, and structure apply in the context of publicly funded plastic surgeries. We draw on narratives of Australian women while waiting for abdominoplasty in the public system and recounting their post-surgical realities to understand the relational, dependent and interdependent agency–structure networks in which women's bodies, affects, lives and eligibility requirements are enmeshed. We found women adopted a ‘deserving’ identity to help them claim and enact agency as they felt and navigated the layered structures that govern publicly funded abdominoplasty in Australia, and theorise how this might influence unfolding patterns of social life. We explicate the importance of locating women's lived experiences of medical (dys)function vis-à-vis the sociocultural histories of medicine, health, gender and citizenship that give rise to publicly funded healthcare.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T04:20:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211068538
       
  • Book Review: Regional cultures, economies, and creativity: Innovating
           through place in Australia and beyond by A. Van Luyn and E. de la Fuente

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      Authors: Michelle Duffy
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T04:20:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211070017
       
  • Complex data and simple instructions: Social regulation during the
           Covid-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Sharyn Roach Anleu, George Sarantoulias
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Responses to the Covid-19 pandemic include the generation of new norms and shifting expectations about everyday, ordinary behaviour, management of the self, and social interaction. Central to the amalgam of new norms is the way information and instructions are communicated, often in the form of simple images and icons in posters and signs that are widespread in public settings. This article combines two sociological concerns – social control and visual research – to investigate the ways social interaction is being recalibrated during the pandemic. It focuses on some of the imagery relied on in public information about the coronavirus and investigates the form and content of various signs, instructions, and notices for their normative underpinnings, their advice and directives which attempt to modify and regulate diverse activities.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-13T01:03:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211066926
       
  • Education's economic return in multicultural Australia: Demographic
           analysis

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      Authors: Yaghoob Foroutan
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the impact of education as the most important human capital endowment in the context of migration, religion, gender and ethnic identity from a demographic perspective. It presents research-based evidence to address such key research questions as whether and how significantly women's education provides equal benefit in the labour market for individuals, based on their migration status, religion, and ethnic identity. The field of this study is the multi-ethnic and multicultural context of Australia with a wide range of ethnic and religious groups of migrants from throughout the world. Preliminary results show that labour market achievement is positively and significantly associated with the educational attainment of individuals, irrespective of their migration status, religious affiliation and ethnicity. However, more comprehensive analysis from comparative perspectives reveals that the positive economic return of education is higher for natives (compared with migrants), for ethnic migrants from developed regions of origin (compared with those from less developed regions of origin) and for non-Muslims (compared with Muslims). The article provides two plausible explanations for these patterns. The first refers to the lack of recognition of overseas qualifications and to the devaluation of foreign education that particularly applies to ethnic migrants from less developed regions. The second relates to disadvantage through structural discrimination against migrants, particularly when their cultural and religious identity, such as Islamic names and dress codes, are distinctively displayed. In sum, this analysis presents further research-based evidence to go beyond the human capital theory in order to explain more appropriately the economic return of women's education in the context of religion and migration from a demographic perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T02:46:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211049479
       
  • Transcultural capital and emergent identities among migrant youth

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      Authors: Magdalena Arias Cubas, Taghreed Jamal Al-deen, Fethi Mansouri
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The everyday practices and socio-cultural identities of migrant youth have become a focal point of contemporary sociological research in Western countries of immigration. This article engages with the concept of transcultural capital to frame the possibilities and opportunities embodied in young migrants’ multi-layered identities and cross-cultural competencies in the context of an increasingly interconnected and diverse world. By re-conceptualising diversity and difference as agentic, transformational capitals to be valued, fostered and mobilised, this transcultural approach brings to the fore the multitude of skills, networks and knowledge that migrant youth access and develop through multiple cultural repertoires. Drawing on the narratives of migrant youth in Melbourne (Australia), this article argues that access to different – and not necessarily oppositional – cultural systems opens up a space for understanding the ability of migrant youth to instigate, negotiate and maintain valuable socio-cultural connections in ways that recognise, disrupt and transform social hierarchies.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T03:52:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211066969
       
  • Introduction to the special issue – Imagining rural futures in times of
           uncertainty and possibility: Progressing a transformative research agenda
           for rural sociology

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      Authors: Christina Malatzky, Kiah Smith
      First page: 133
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Historically and now, the rural is frequently relegated to the periphery of broader public and policy debates, and within the discipline of sociology. At this moment in time, where the world needs radical re-imagining for the future, rural perspectives and realities must be visible and addressed. This article introduces a special issue of the Journal of Sociology which seeks to articulate how rural sociology is a crucial field of study for (re)imaging rural futures. In this article, we provide an overview of the research included in the collection, which draws much needed attention to some of the specific contemporary challenges encountered in rural places and some of the possibilities for transforming rural futures, and rural sociology. We argue that rural places are a key site where transformative change can, and does occur, and that rural sociologists are ideally positioned to work with and for rural communities in effecting desired change.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-18T11:54:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211071126
       
 
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