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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 342)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 284)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 234)
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Qualitative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Judgment and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Sociolinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Studies in Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Research in Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Classical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Political Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Review of Sociology: Revue Internationale de Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Japanese Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Italian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Mathematical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Public and Professional Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue de la régulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Landscapes of Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue Internationale De Securite Sociale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Liinc em Revista     Open Access  
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Socio-logos     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
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Journal of Sociology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.597
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 52  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1440-7833 - ISSN (Online) 1741-2978
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • A matter of time' Institutional timescapes and gendered inequalities
           in the transition from education to employment in Australia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lyn Craig, Signe Ravn, Brendan Churchill, Maria Rebecca Valenzuela
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores why women miss out in the transition from the educational system to the labour market. Using nationally representative longitudinal data (2001–18) from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, we compare how long after graduation it takes men and women with tertiary qualifications (n = 2030) to achieve key labour market milestones: (1) getting a full-time job; (2) getting a permanent contract; (3) earning an average wage; (4) finding a job that matches their skill level. We find significant gender differences in reaching these milestones, confirming that time is a critical dimension for understanding gendered inequalities in the returns to education. We attribute findings to incompatible ‘timescapes’ across the institutions of education, family and employment. The more flexible timescape of education allows women to succeed, but the inflexible timescape of employment (particularly when combined with family responsibilities) impedes them from turning educational achievement into labour market progress.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T06:08:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221135220
       
  • Changing masculinities' Using caring masculinity to analyse social
           media responses to the decline of men in Australian primary school
           teaching

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicholas Samuel Hookway, Vaughan Cruickshank
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Commentators have predicted that Australian male primary school teachers will be extinct within 50 years. Drawing upon sociological ideas about the emergence of ‘caring masculinities’, this article qualitatively examines popular Australian understandings about male primary school teachers, their importance, why they are declining and whether, and how, this gender imbalance can be addressed. The study analyses data from 541 comments posted in response to nine online media pieces on male primary school teachers in Australia. The article shows that commenters believe men teaching young children experience stigmatised masculine identities but misplace the cause of this as the result of women and anti-feminist ‘anti-male bias’ rather than the constraining impact of hegemonic masculinity. The article suggests that until more caring and progressive forms of masculinity are culturally and economically valued in Australia we will see little change in the numbers of men entering primary school teaching.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-15T07:12:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221136018
       
  • Can a basic income help address homelessness' A Titmussian perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrew Clarke
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Homelessness is a worsening problem across the developed world and existing policy responses are failing to have an impact. This article considers whether a basic income (BI) can play a role in radically overhauling prevailing homelessness policy and interventions. Drawing on Richard Titmuss’ classical arguments about the value of universalist welfare, I argue that a BI can play a role, but only as part of a suite of universalist measures that includes large-scale social housing investment and rent controls. I highlight how a BI can help address the ‘income side’ of the housing affordability problem driving homelessness, but must be coupled with other measures that address housing cost and supply. I also consider how a BI can reduce stigma arising from targeted homelessness measures. I conclude by arguing that addressing homelessness requires us to transform the logic of welfare provision and that a BI can help do this.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-15T01:53:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221135986
       
  • Book Review: Charity and Poverty in Advanced Welfare States by Cameron
           Parsell, Andrew Clarke and Francisco Perales

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katherine Curchin
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T07:13:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221137904
       
  • Information, influence, ritual, participation: Defining digital sexual
           health

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kath Albury, Natalie Hendry
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article draws on Epstein's theorisations of the ‘ideal’ of sexual health and wellbeing to argue that young people's access to digital sexual health content should not be understood primarily as a process of ‘information seeking’. Where digital practices are too narrowly viewed through a lens of information seeking and transmission, there may be an excessive focus on whether sexual health content is ‘factual’ – overlooking the question of whether it is meaningful in specific cultural contexts. We link contemporary digital sexual health cultures to the complex – and politicised – histories of popular mediated sexual health communication that underpin them. Exploring alternative theoretical frames – including pornographic vernaculars, influencer pedagogies, media as ritual, and situated peripheral learning in digital communities – we conclude that redefining and refocusing dominant understandings of ‘good’ sexual health content may generate new and productive strategies for engaging with marginal and disaffected digital sexual cultures.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T07:12:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221136579
       
  • Teaching gender in and through uncertainty

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Frances Egan
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Where higher education classrooms can be sites of both cultural contestation and epistemic violence, this article examines the critical and ethical value of building uncertainty into our teaching of gender. The reflective piece draws on my own experience in a new subject at Monash University, and situates this one very small site of knowledge production within the wider processes that shape the (neoliberal) Australian university, and the discipline of sociology. I elaborate a theoretical framework for embracing epistemic uncertainty that is informed by feminist pedagogies and begins with a feminist provocation, and present my practical strategies for organizing knowledge within this framework, as well as the strategies of the students themselves. An analysis of the students’ project work (collaborative virtual exhibitions) reveals their capacity to navigate uncertainty through an interpersonal and contextualized approach to knowledge, and produce new learning spaces which unsettle harmful truths and make material new realities.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-08T01:44:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221135939
       
  • OBGYNs of TikTok and the role of misinformation in diffractive knowledge
           production

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Clare Southerton, Marianne Clark
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Health misinformation on social media has largely been examined from a harms-focused perspective, with scholars seeking to identify what impacts misinformation has on public health and a popular focus on removing it from platforms. The act of debunking is one response wherein misinformation is corrected with knowledge from scientific sources. To date, little research exists examining how experts and the public engage with misinformation beyond a focus on harm. Using Karen Barad's concept of diffraction, we examine the iterative relationships between misinformation, obstetrician-gynaecologists (OBGYNs) and the educational content they generate on the short-form video platform TikTok. Though misinformation and debunking content have been seen as oppositional, they are brought into productive dialogue with one another using diffractive techniques and platform affordances. We conclude that through the educational content created by the OBGYNs of TikTok, misinformation becomes diffractively integrated into debunking content and is generative of new knowledge, rather than cleansed away.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-08T01:44:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221135209
       
  • Re-politicising the future of work: Automation anxieties, universal basic
           income, and the end of techno-optimism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lauren Kelly
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      ‘Rise of the Robots’, the ‘Second Machine Age’ and ‘This Time it's Different’ are some of the sweeping headlines that frame contemporary popular narratives of the future of work. It is often claimed that technological change is an accelerating force causing significant disruption to employment, necessitating a universal basic income (UBI) as human labour becomes increasingly redundant. This article interrogates these assumptions and considers how the techno-optimism that fuelled contemporary visions of workplace automation has declined in recent years. Empirical studies of automated workplaces, in particular the warehouse, have challenged simplistic binaries of job destruction or creation. I consider how automation and UBI are not value-neutral tools, but sites of socio-political contest that can challenge or consolidate workplace imperatives of control. In the context of ever-widening power asymmetries between workers and employers, this terrain is particularly fraught.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-10T05:38:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221128999
       
  • Gender, doctorate holders, career path, and work–life balance within
           and outside of academia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrea Hjálmsdóttir, Guðbjörg Linda Rafnsdóttir
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Research on satisfaction with work–life balance among doctorate holders is scarce when considering those working outside academia. In this article, we present research on work–life balance among female and male doctorate holders working within and outside academia, and examine how satisfied are they with their work–life balance, and the role of gender and career path in that satisfaction. We study the role of time and flexibility, and whether differences are found in career path among doctorate holders working within and outside academia. The findings, based on open-ended interviews with 32 doctorate holders in Iceland, indicate that the doctorate holders find it difficult to balance their work and family life and feel they are always in a rush. Nevertheless, the academics expressed more complex feelings about their daily lives than those outside academia, especially the women, as their flexible working arrangements allowed them to be always working meant they were always working.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-03T07:07:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221128842
       
  • Public health pedagogy and digital misinformation: Health professional
           influencers and the politics of expertise

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jay Daniel Thompson
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article asks: ‘To what extent can health professional influencers function as health pedagogues, educating their audiences and protecting public health in an era of digital misinformation'’ The article teases out that question by applying Content Analysis and Framing Analysis to a selection of TikTok and Instagram posts by Dr Michael Mrozinski, a Scottish general practitioner who is based in Australia. The posts seek to debunk online misinformation and provide facts regarding COVID-19. Mrozinski's social media content exemplifies what the article terms ‘public health pedagogy’ (PHP) – pedagogy that is informed by public health principles and that is undertaken outside traditional educational institutions. The article also asks: ‘How exactly does Mrozinski respond to misinformation actors and to what extent does this diminish the effectiveness of his PHP'’ The article investigates whether Mrozinski's hostility towards these actors actually invokes stereotypes of medical experts as elitist and uncaring. Those stereotypes are commonly expounded by misinformation and conspiracy actors.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-09-29T06:07:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221128592
       
  • A consensus that impedes contestation: Debating migration-related
           diversity in post-terror Norway

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rojan Tordhol Ezzati
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article draws on the post-terror setting of Norway to investigate interactions between consensus, contestation, and conflict in public debates about diversity. A consensus-oriented unity prevailed in immediate responses to the 2011 terror attacks that killed 77 people in Norway. Analysis of 40 semi-structured interviews identifies lingering perceptions that the following conditions limited the space for contestation after the attacks: the intensity of the initial unity expressions; the perpetrator's identity as a Norwegian, self-proclaimed Christian crusader; and broader patterns of limited space for nuanced contestation in diversity debates. Drawing on influential political theories on liberal democratic debate, this is an empirical inquiry into when and how contestation about migration-related diversity is impeded, and with what implications. The Norwegian case illustrates that too much consensus-orientation and inadequate space for nuance can further underline conflict and thereby impede citizens’ engagement with debates about migration-related diversity.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-09-19T04:57:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221125484
       
  • Workplace wellbeing among LGBTQ+ Australians: Exploring diversity within
           diversity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Madeline Donaghy, Francisco Perales
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      A wealth of research documents disparities in workplace outcomes between cisgender heterosexual employees and LGBTQ+ employees. However, few studies have examined how workplace wellbeing may differ among different subgroups within the LGBTQ+ umbrella – that is, the notion of ‘diversity within diversity’. The current study fills this gap in knowledge by theorising and testing differences in workplace wellbeing across nuanced sexual- and gender-identity groups. To accomplish this, we use unique survey data from the 2020 Australian Workplace Equality Index (AWEI) Employee Survey (n = 5270 respondents and 146 organisations) and random-intercept multilevel regression models. Our results reveal significant differences in workplace wellbeing between different diversity groups. For example, LGBTQ+ employees identifying as gay/lesbian and as cisgender men generally report better outcomes than employees identifying with other minority identities. Overall, our findings call for workplace equity policies that target stigma towards plurisexual, gender non-conforming, and smaller and more invisible diversity groups.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T07:02:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221118383
       
  • Work and wellbeing in remote Australia: Moving beyond punitive
           ‘workfare’

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zoe Staines
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Australia's remote-focused ‘workfare’ program (Community Development Program, CDP) has produced overwhelmingly negative impacts, most of which have been borne by its ∼80% Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participants. The Australian government has announced that CDP will end in 2023, though a replacement policy/program is not yet decided. Here, I bring three public proposals for replacement policies (wage subsidy, Job Guarantee, Liveable Income Guarantee) into conversation with one another, and compare these to the possibilities offered by a basic income. Drawing on documentary evidence, I discuss potential advantages and disadvantages of these alternatives, asking whether they might improve wellbeing and alleviate the harms experienced under CDP-style workfare.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-26T06:36:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221114669
       
  • Negotiating Australian academia as a historically white settler colonial
           institution: A comparison between Muslim and non-Muslim students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Randa Abdel-Fattah
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In Australia, there is a dearth of research applying the theoretical lens of critical race theory to explore Muslim university students’ experiences in higher degree education institutions. The prevailing approach has been to focus on institutional barriers and policies. This article deviates from such studies by framing the analysis in terms of a comparison between Muslim and non-Muslim white students in higher degree education institutions in New South Wales (NSW) Australia in order to operationalize whiteness in Australia's settler colonial society as a central category of analysis. The article seeks to explore how Muslim and non-Muslim students experience and respond to the university as a white institution, considering how Muslim students engage in both adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies in response to the university as a white institution, and how white, non-Muslim students experience the normativity, invisibility and hegemony of whiteness in the university.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T01:34:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221110929
       
  • Affective design and memetic qualities: Generating affect and political
           engagement through bushfire TikToks

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      Authors: Yanni Brown, Barbara Pini, Adele Pavlidis
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the affective dimensions of social media platform TikTok, and its potential as a novel form of political participation among young people. It draws on data from a sample of 24 TikToks focused on the 2019/20 Australian bushfires, as well as seven interviews with young people who create, view and share TikToks. Building on Ash’s notion of ‘affective design’, the article demonstrates how the memetic qualities of juxtaposition, whimsy and humour are utilised to enable escape and/or connection. As young people grappled with the intensity of emotions from the Australian bushfires, TikTok gave them space for the expression of complex affects through humour, whimsy, and juxtaposition.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T05:54:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221110267
       
  • Understanding Covid-19 emergency social security measures as a from of
           basic income: Lessons from Australia

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      Authors: Elise Klein, Kay Cook, Susan Maury, Kelly Bowey
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the changes in social security measures introduced by the Australian government during the first wave of Covid-19 lockdowns in 2020. These measures were basic income-like in that they became both more unconditional and adequate for a reasonable standard of living. This was achieved through a significant supplementary payment, suspension of mutual obligation requirements, and the relaxation of eligibility criteria on a range of unemployment-related payments. Through drawing on the results of an online survey, we examine the impacts of these measures and find that they significantly helped to alleviate poverty and improve wellbeing. These gains were not insignificant for the individuals involved, and offer empirical insights into studies of basic income. While seeing the Australian government embrace more generous and basic income-like measures, we also note that during Covid-19 gendered and class inequalities increased. This reminds us that basic income is never a silver bullet and, alongside implementing basic income payments, there also needs to be a concerted effort to restructure economic relations more generally.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T04:26:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221106242
       
  • Characterising Australians who have high levels of anger towards Islam and
           Muslims

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      Authors: Shannon Walding, Jacqui Ewart
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article reveals the characteristics and demographics of non-Muslim Australians who express levels of anger towards Muslims and Islam. Using data from a 2018 national social survey of a random, stratified sample of Australians, we identify key demographic characteristics amongst those expressing above-average degrees of anger towards Muslims and the religion of Islam, separately. We identify the proportion of different typologies of people who hold anger towards Islam and Muslims. We aim to establish which combinations of demographic and personal characteristics are most strongly associated with the expression of anger so that policy and interventions targeted at reducing this emotion might be effectively directed. We draw on the literature about Muslimophobia and Islamophobia, along with key studies that have examined attitudes towards Islam and Muslims in Australia and elsewhere. Our findings are relevant to organisations and government bodies in Australia, with implications for policy and social cohesion programs.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T07:10:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221101411
       
  • Pox populi: Anti-vaxx, anti-politics

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      Authors: Francis Russell
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the political meaning of the interconnected anti-vaccine and anti-lockdown protest movements that have emerged in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. A range of academics and commentators have argued that such protests should be understood in terms of a dangerous resurgence of far-right populism, one that is fuelled by misinformation and extremist ideologies. This article tests such a framing by engaging with recent scholarship on the ‘anti-political’ – the theorisation of the growing inability for political action to occur other than in opposition to the political system itself. Against the conventional reading of the protests as fundamentally political, this article looks at recent anthropological work on ‘conspirituality’ in order to investigate how the aesthetic and performative dimensions of such protests may be key to understanding contemporary anti-vaccine thought and action.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T08:21:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221101660
       
  • ‘Hey lovely! Don’t miss this opportunity!’ Digital temporalities of
           wellness culture, email marketing, and the promise of abundance

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      Authors: Natalie Ann Hendry
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      For the wellness industry, email communication, albeit mundane, remains an essential practice even as wellness entrepreneurs embrace newer digital technologies. Drawing on ongoing insights from a larger Australian digital ethnographic project, I explore how these ‘wellness emails’ – electronic mail communication (outside of social media) that typically circulate wellness-related content through automated email list subscriptions – promise an always-ready, abundant space for transforming bodies and optimising health. These emails teach alternative bodily temporalities, distinct from the inhospitable biomedical time of mainstream healthcare, yet also employ time-critical marketing tactics and stories to drive attention, where recipients are encouraged both to not miss out on opportunities but also to respect their own ‘divine timing’. Such temporal flexibility of wellness culture, and its promise of abundance, contributes to its global expansion, where email offers personal and marketised engagement and, critically, a potential escape from social media censorship and public health scrutiny.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T03:23:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221101397
       
  • Engineering masculinity: A multimodal critical discourse analysis of trans
           masculine embodiment in magazines for trans men

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      Authors: Randos Jackalas Korobacz, Peta S Cook
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Masculinity studies has been slow to explore trans men's lives including how trans masculine embodiments are represented in the media. In this article, we examine how the masculinities of trans men are represented in the context of sport through two issues of two print magazines specifically targeting trans men audiences: The Jock Issue of Original Plumbing and The Sport Issue of FTM Magazine. Through combining body-reflexive practices and gender as a social structure in our trans gaze framework, our multimodal critical discourse analysis reveals that trans masculinity is presented as hegemonic, diverse, reflexive and subordinated within the micro, meso and macro levels of social life. As trans people continue to experience social marginalisation that adversely impacts on their health and wellbeing, how they are represented within the media – particularly by those media specifically targeted towards them – is important to examine and recognise.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T06:29:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221099982
       
  • Pride, belonging and community: What does this mean if you are Aboriginal
           and LGBT+ and living in Western Australia'

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      Authors: Braden Hill, Jennifer Dodd, Bep Uink, Dameyon Bonson, Sian Bennett
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The lived experience of being LGBT+ and an Aboriginal person was a major focus of the mixed methods Breaking the Silence research project led by Aboriginal LGBT+ researchers. Aboriginal LGBT+ participants were invited to respond to a survey that canvassed how they were included and accepted within their own families, on social media, dating apps and the wider community. The analysis and discussion of the findings from the survey examine the issues of discrimination, racism, homophobia and what belonging to a community means for intersectional identities. The findings show that while participants do experience microaggressions and queer-phobia, they also describe agency and positive experiences. The question is how these instances of resistance and disruption can be enabled to proliferate and (if appropriate) be supported collectively, to enable Aboriginal LGBT+ individuals to experience a sense of pride and belonging to communities at times and in spaces of their own choosing.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T07:55:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221093402
       
  • Exploring alcohol cultures and homosocial relationships in women's amateur
           AFL teams

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      Authors: Lily Curtis, Steven Roberts
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Young women's risky drinking cultures are pertinent to the world of amateur Australian Football League, yet they have received limited research attention. Drawing on surveys, focus groups, and semi-structured ‘scroll-back’ interviews, this study provides an in-depth investigation of negotiations of gender and risky drinking in such cultures. A range of intersecting socio-cultural themes were identified, summarised into four overarching elements: drinking as central to initial homosociality; awareness of appropriateness; divergences between women's and men's cultural priorities and alcohol behaviours; and young women's unique cultural prioritisation of collectivity and mutuality. The findings further sociological knowledge on risky drinking and gender.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:53:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221093398
       
  • VOIP technology in grassroots politics: Transforming political culture and
           practice'

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      Authors: Rosemary Hancock
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates how the adoption and use of digital technologies shape political culture and practice in grassroots political groups, particularly focusing on how VOIP technologies enable and/or constrain groups to work across physical space and form political relationships among participants. While this article is grounded in a case study of one broad-based coalition in Sydney, Australia, the findings expand our understanding of how digital technology shapes political culture and practice in grassroots spaces by (a) analysing an organisation both before and after the adoption of VOIP technology and (b) focusing on a case study where the organisation attempted to maintain rather than transform their political culture and practice with the adoption of new digital organising methods. The article argues that the instrumental benefits of digital technologies come at a cost: VOIP technologies may constrain the formation of deep relationships and flatten distinctive political practices within grassroots political organisations.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T02:29:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221086331
       
  • Book Review: Owning the street: The everyday life of property by Amelia
           Thorpe

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Natalie Osborne
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T02:28:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221086330
       
  • Younger generations’ expectations regarding artificial intelligence in
           the job market: Mapping accounts about the future relationship of
           automation and work

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      Authors: Lilla Vicsek, Tamás Bokor, Gyöngyvér Pataki
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      There is a deficiency of in-depth explorations of young people’s visions of automation and work, and how these relate to popular projections found in the future-of-work debate. This article investigates such expectations, drawing on 62 interviews with Hungarian university students undertaking non-technical majors. Key characteristics of the interviewees’ accounts included their malleable and changing nature. Although respondents were aware of the widespread messages of experts about the revolutionary nature of likely changes, they expressed scepticism about the extent of change both regarding the macro level and in relation to their own lives. Interestingly, developments in artificial intelligence were not a factor in these young adults’ visions of their careers. The mechanisms and lines of reasoning underlying their expectations – such as a version of optimism bias – are discussed. The study highlights the importance of doing qualitative research on a topic which is dominated by quantitative research.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T06:54:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221089365
       
  • Stuck between the Global North and South: Middling migrants in Australia
           and Singapore

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      Authors: Sylvia Ang
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The literature on ‘middling transnationals’ is growing, although studies on Asian middling migrants are still relatively lacking. Current understandings of middling migrants are also frequently fixed on migrants’ mid-level skills and their middle-class status. Drawing on interviews with Nepali migrants living in Melbourne, Australia and mainland Chinese migrants living in Singapore respectively, this article considers how their middling visa status and imaginaries interact with anxious desires. The article argues, first, that migrants from the Global South experience heightened anxious desires due to imaginaries oscillating between the Global North and South. Second, and relatedly, the article argues that migration regimes keep migrants compliant through managing their anxious desires. By detailing the experiences of different groups of Asian migrants in separate migration regimes, the article aims to highlight the heterogeneous experiences among migrants originating from the Global South, and the techniques used by different states to produce temporary and compliant migrants.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:33:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221088040
       
  • ‘When you delete Tinder it’s a sign of commitment’: leaving dating
           apps and the reproduction of romantic, monogamous relationship practices

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      Authors: Tiina Vares
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years there has been increasing academic attention to forms and practices of disconnection to social networking sites. However, there has been limited attention to non-use/departures, particularly with dating apps. In this article I draw on 27 interviews with previous and current users of dating apps to explore their practices of leaving/deleting their dating apps. For the majority of participants, leaving a dating app was due to ‘success’ in finding a relationship. For others, it was the ‘failure’ to find a relationship. I suggest that this highlights not only the centrality of finding/not finding a relationship to dating app use and departure, but also a particular construction of relationships: romantic, sexually exclusive/monogamous and life-long. This was the case for the majority of participants who identified as heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual and queer and indicates the reproduction and valuing of a particular relationship form and practice for diverse users.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:32:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221082700
       
  • International students on the edge: The precarious impacts of financial
           stress

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      Authors: Shaun Wilson, Catherine Hastings, Alan Morris, Gaby Ramia, Emma Mitchell
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      International students are an important global cohort of ‘noncitizens’ whose experiences are central concerns for urban sociologists and migration scholars. Drawing on survey fieldwork conducted among international students in the private rental sector in Sydney and Melbourne during 2019, this article provides new knowledge about the hardships experienced by international students who report financial stress. Using a modified scale developed by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, we highlight the accelerating role of high levels of financial stress in producing disruptive events such as housing evictions and fears of homelessness, as well as reliance on inadequate housing like ‘hot-bedding’. Financial stress is significantly more likely for students from low-GNI (gross national income) countries and higher stress reduces wellbeing. Access to paid employment, however, does not ‘protect’ against higher financial stress. We conclude that higher education policymakers need tools and policies to prevent disruptive life events among international students related to financial stress, particularly those associated with housing.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T11:32:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221084756
       
  • Book Review: The Private Rental Sector in Australia: Living with
           Uncertainty by Alan Morris, Kath Hulse and Hal Pawson

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      Authors: Charles Crothers
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T05:51:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833221082693
       
  • LGBTQ+ non-discrimination and religious freedom in the context of
           government-funded faith-based education, social welfare, health care, and
           aged care

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      Authors: Douglas Ezzy, Lori Beaman, Angela Dwyer, Bronwyn Fielder, Angus McLeay, Simon Rice, Louise Richardson-Self
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Anti-discrimination laws around the world have explicitly protected LGBTQ+ people from discrimination with various levels of exceptions for religion. Some conservative religious organisations in Australia are advocating to be allowed to discriminate against LGBTQ+ people in certain organisations they manage. The political debate in Australia has focused on religiously affiliated organisations that provide services in education, social welfare, health care, and aged care. We argue that religious exceptions allowing discrimination should be narrow because they cause considerable harm, reinforce, disadvantage and because LGBTQ+ people are deserving of respect and rights. We draw on a national representative survey to demonstrate that the views of some conservative religious lobby groups do not represent the views of the majority of religious people in Australia or the views of the majority of Christian people.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T09:37:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211072566
       
  • Modifying my self: A qualitative study exploring agency, structure and
           identity for women seeking publicly funded plastic surgery in Australia

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      Authors: Kristen Foley, Nicola Dean, Connie Musolino, Randall Long, Paul Ward
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Our sociological knowledge base about plastic surgery has been predominantly constructed in free market contexts, leaving uncertainties as to how sociological theory around agency, identity, and structure apply in the context of publicly funded plastic surgeries. We draw on narratives of Australian women while waiting for abdominoplasty in the public system and recounting their post-surgical realities to understand the relational, dependent and interdependent agency–structure networks in which women's bodies, affects, lives and eligibility requirements are enmeshed. We found women adopted a ‘deserving’ identity to help them claim and enact agency as they felt and navigated the layered structures that govern publicly funded abdominoplasty in Australia, and theorise how this might influence unfolding patterns of social life. We explicate the importance of locating women's lived experiences of medical (dys)function vis-à-vis the sociocultural histories of medicine, health, gender and citizenship that give rise to publicly funded healthcare.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T04:20:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211068538
       
  • Complex data and simple instructions: Social regulation during the
           Covid-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Sharyn Roach Anleu, George Sarantoulias
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Responses to the Covid-19 pandemic include the generation of new norms and shifting expectations about everyday, ordinary behaviour, management of the self, and social interaction. Central to the amalgam of new norms is the way information and instructions are communicated, often in the form of simple images and icons in posters and signs that are widespread in public settings. This article combines two sociological concerns – social control and visual research – to investigate the ways social interaction is being recalibrated during the pandemic. It focuses on some of the imagery relied on in public information about the coronavirus and investigates the form and content of various signs, instructions, and notices for their normative underpinnings, their advice and directives which attempt to modify and regulate diverse activities.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-13T01:03:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211066926
       
  • Education's economic return in multicultural Australia: Demographic
           analysis

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      Authors: Yaghoob Foroutan
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the impact of education as the most important human capital endowment in the context of migration, religion, gender and ethnic identity from a demographic perspective. It presents research-based evidence to address such key research questions as whether and how significantly women's education provides equal benefit in the labour market for individuals, based on their migration status, religion, and ethnic identity. The field of this study is the multi-ethnic and multicultural context of Australia with a wide range of ethnic and religious groups of migrants from throughout the world. Preliminary results show that labour market achievement is positively and significantly associated with the educational attainment of individuals, irrespective of their migration status, religious affiliation and ethnicity. However, more comprehensive analysis from comparative perspectives reveals that the positive economic return of education is higher for natives (compared with migrants), for ethnic migrants from developed regions of origin (compared with those from less developed regions of origin) and for non-Muslims (compared with Muslims). The article provides two plausible explanations for these patterns. The first refers to the lack of recognition of overseas qualifications and to the devaluation of foreign education that particularly applies to ethnic migrants from less developed regions. The second relates to disadvantage through structural discrimination against migrants, particularly when their cultural and religious identity, such as Islamic names and dress codes, are distinctively displayed. In sum, this analysis presents further research-based evidence to go beyond the human capital theory in order to explain more appropriately the economic return of women's education in the context of religion and migration from a demographic perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T02:46:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211049479
       
  • Transcultural capital and emergent identities among migrant youth

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      Authors: Magdalena Arias Cubas, Taghreed Jamal Al-deen, Fethi Mansouri
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The everyday practices and socio-cultural identities of migrant youth have become a focal point of contemporary sociological research in Western countries of immigration. This article engages with the concept of transcultural capital to frame the possibilities and opportunities embodied in young migrants’ multi-layered identities and cross-cultural competencies in the context of an increasingly interconnected and diverse world. By re-conceptualising diversity and difference as agentic, transformational capitals to be valued, fostered and mobilised, this transcultural approach brings to the fore the multitude of skills, networks and knowledge that migrant youth access and develop through multiple cultural repertoires. Drawing on the narratives of migrant youth in Melbourne (Australia), this article argues that access to different – and not necessarily oppositional – cultural systems opens up a space for understanding the ability of migrant youth to instigate, negotiate and maintain valuable socio-cultural connections in ways that recognise, disrupt and transform social hierarchies.
      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T03:52:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211066969
       
  • Book Review: Regional cultures, economies, and creativity: Innovating
           through place in Australia and beyond by A. Van Luyn and E. de la Fuente

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      Authors: Michelle Duffy
      First page: 612
      Abstract: Journal of Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T04:20:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14407833211070017
       
 
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