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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 376)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 301)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 270)
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Qualitative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Judgment and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Sociolinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 20)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Studies in Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Research in Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Classical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Political Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Sociology: Revue Internationale de Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Japanese Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
New Zealand Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Mathematical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Italian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Public and Professional Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue de la régulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue Internationale De Securite Sociale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Landscapes of Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Liinc em Revista     Open Access  
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Socio-logos     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.848
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0265-4075 - ISSN (Online) 1460-3608
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Technically in love: Individual differences relating to sexual and
           platonic relationships with robots

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Connor E. Leshner, Jessica R. Johnson
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Incremental advancements in technology present researchers with opportunities to examine and predict human behavior before the integration of technology into daily life. Previous studies have identified trends in both the design and reception of current social robotic technologies, including gender biases and social “othering”, which may affect how humans interact with more advanced robotic technologies in the future. The aim of the current study was to explore whether preconceived beliefs about gender inequality, interest in casual sex, and social hierarchies would relate individuals’ interest in engaging in platonic friendships (“robofriendship”) or sexual relationships (“robosexuality”) with hypothetical human-like robots. Two-hundred and twelve participants completed an online survey measuring gender, ambivalent sexism, social dominance orientation, and sociosexual orientation in relation to individuals’ interest in both robofriendship and robosexuality. It was found that hostile sexism positively predicted interest in robosexuality, particularly for men (β = .16, b = .27, 95% CI [.03, .30], t(209) = 2.364, p = .019). Conversely, hostile sexism negatively predicted robofriendship, and significant interactions effects were found in that at lower levels of SDO, women maintained greater interest in robofriendship than men (β = .26, b = .54, 95% CI [.09, .99], t(208) = −2.235, p = .02). The current study provides preliminary evidence to suggest that preconceived beliefs about social hierarchy and gender inequality may impact romantic and platonic interactions between humans and robots. Limitations and future directions are also discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T03:23:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241234377
       
  • A model of personal relationships and cyberbullying perpetration among
           adolescents: A person*environment model

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer L. Doty, Christopher P. Barlett, Joy Gabrielli, Jacqlyn L. Yourell, Yi-Wen Su, Tracy E. Waasdorp
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Although cyberbullying is relational by nature, prior models focused on individual explanations for cyberbullying rather than integrating contextual processes. We present the Relational Model of Cyberbullying Motivation and Regulation (RMC). This model applies the concepts of proximal processes (e.g., interactions with parents, teachers, peers) from ecological systems theory and the concepts of psychological resources (e.g., autonomy, competency, and relatedness) from self determination theory to explain youth motivation and self-regulation of cyberbullying. First, we review theoretical foundations for the theories involved and outline postulates for youths’ proximal influences, motivations for, and regulation against cyberbullying perpetration. Then, we present a pathway by which the most proximal social influences on youth impact the development of psychological resources, which then may impact cyberbullying. We also present pathways by which autonomy, competence, and relatedness have an indirect impact on cyberbullying via motivation and self-regulation. The RMC informs intervention efforts by identifying proximal contexts and leverage points to disrupt processes that lead to competence and/or autonomy to cyberbully others.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T07:36:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241227394
       
  • Adolescents’ experiences of discrimination, disclosure of
           discrimination, and well-being

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Aryn M. Dotterer, Melissa Ferguson, Shawn D. Whiteman
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Discrimination because of one’s stigmatized identities and personal characteristics can thwart healthy adolescent development. Little is known about the role of disclosure, including whether adolescents talk about their discrimination experiences with close relational partners (i.e., parents, siblings, friends) and whether disclosure mitigates the negative effects of discrimination. Addressing this gap, this study investigated links between adolescents’ perceptions of discrimination in multiple settings (from teachers at school, from peers at school, and online) and indicators of adolescent well-being (i.e., depressive symptoms, positive identity/values, school trouble, and school bonding), and tested whether disclosure of discrimination experiences moderated these associations. Survey data from 395 parent-adolescent dyads (33% African American/Black, Hispanic/Latinx, and White, respectively) were analyzed using mixed model ANOVAs and multiple regression. Perceived discrimination was generally associated with less positive identity/values, more trouble at school and less school bonding; however, disclosure of discrimination mitigated some of these deleterious links. Adolescents’ close relationships that promote disclosure therefore represent an important context that can provide protective benefits and ensure youth garner the resources and support they need for optimal development.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T04:33:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241233486
       
  • Connecting through touch: Attitudes toward touch in pregnancy are
           associated with couples’ sexual and affectionate behaviors across the
           transition to parenthood

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Inês M. Tavares, Yvonne N. Brandelli, Samantha J. Dawson, Emily Impett, Anik Debrot, Natalie O. Rosen
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Touch is a universal nonverbal action often used by romantic partners to demonstrate affection and care for each other. Attitudes toward touch might be particularly relevant across periods of relational strain—such as the transition to parenthood—when couples face many novel stressors and shifting priorities which can interfere with their sexual and affectionate experiences. New parent couples (N = 203) completed self-report measures online across six time-points (two prenatal). We tested whether couples’ attitudes toward touch (touch aversion, touch for affection, touch for emotion regulation) at baseline (20 weeks mid-pregnancy) predicted their frequency of sexual and affectionate behaviors from mid-pregnancy through 12-month postpartum. Both partners’ more positive attitudes toward touch (i.e., for affection and emotion regulation) and lower aversive attitudes toward touch, as measured in mid-pregnancy, predicted couples’ higher frequency and variety of sexual and affectionate behaviors at 3-month postpartum. Touch attitudes generally did not predict the degree of change in the frequency or variety of sexual or affectionate behaviors, with one exception: non-birthing parents’ more positive attitudes toward touch for emotion regulation in mid-pregnancy predicted a slower decline in couples’ affectionate behaviors across pregnancy. Findings underscore a link between new parents’ attitudes toward touch and their subsequent sexual and affectionate behaviors, particularly in the early postpartum period. New parents need to navigate novel sexual changes and a nonverbal strategy such as touch might be useful to promote intimacy and care.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T04:16:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241232704
       
  • Need for closure is linked with traumatic bonding among victims of
           intimate partner violence (A mediatory approach)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Uwemedimo S. Isaiah, James E. Effiong, Innih Udokang, Samson Ogwuche, Emekubong N. Udoukok, Steven Kator Iorfa
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an increasingly prevalent problem in most parts of the world, including Nigeria. Very little is known about why persons who experience IPV sometimes decide to remain in the abusive relationships. In this study, we investigate whether the need for closure (NFC) may play significant roles in the association of IPV and the decision to stay in abusive relationships (traumatic bonding). Specifically, we tested if NFC would mediate the relationship between IPV and traumatic bonding (TB) among victims of IPV in Nigeria. Participants were 345 women, purposively selected from female clients who visited the Sexual Assault Referral Centre (SART) in Awka, Anambra State (n = 145) and the Lagos State Domestic and Sexual Violence Response Team, Lagos (n = 200). Their age ranged from 18–61 years (M = 35.79; SD = 8.6 years). They responded to the Composite Abuse Scale, the Need for Closure Scale, and the Stockholm Syndrome Scale. Results of data analysis using the Hayes regression-based PROCESS macro showed that IPV was not significantly associated with traumatic bonding while NFC was positively associated with increased traumatic bonding. Estimates of indirect effects indicated that NFC mediated the relationship of IPV and TB serving as a pathway through which IPV was linked to dimensions of TB. This shows that NFC may engender tendencies that increase the likelihood of traumatic bonding. The implications of these findings were discussed across policy, research and psychotherapeutic practice.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T05:46:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241234074
       
  • Parent empathy and adolescent disclosure in the context of type 1 diabetes
           management

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alexandra Main, Deborah J. Wiebe, Maritza Miramontes, Janice Disla, Erica Hanes, Nedim Cakan, Jennifer K. Raymond
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescent disclosure to parents is a key aspect of positive parent-adolescent relationships and youth adjustment. We leveraged a study of diverse families with an adolescent with type 1 diabetes to examine how observed parental empathy during parent-adolescent conflict discussions about diabetes management was associated with observed adolescent disclosure and adolescent self-reported disclosure to parents. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes and the parent most involved in their diabetes care (N = 67 dyads) participated in the study. Parent empathy, adolescent disclosure, and parent positive affect during parent-adolescent conversations were rated by trained coders. Parents reported on their own empathy and adolescents reported on their own disclosure, parental knowledge of their diabetes management, and parental acceptance. Results indicated that observed parental empathy was associated with both observed and self-reported disclosure. This association remained after covarying other parent-adolescent relationship and parent dispositional, demographic, and diabetes variables. This study holds implications for promoting greater parental communication of empathy to encourage adolescent disclosure in the context of chronic illness management.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-06T10:46:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241231613
       
  • Childhood maltreatment and the quality of marital relationships: Examining
           mediating pathways and gender differences

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shireen Sokar
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Childhood maltreatment (CM) is considered a traumatic experience with long-term adverse effects on the quality of adult intimate relationships. Research on the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon among Arab societies is scarce. Objective: This study investigated the impact of childhood physical abuse (PA) and emotional abuse (EA) on the quality of marital relationships. Additionally, it examined the mediating roles of two dimensions of insecure adult attachment (i.e., avoidant and anxious) to a romantic partner and psychological distress within gender-specific models. Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a representative sample of 604 married Arab adults (M age = 33.5, SD = 6.52; 50.1% women) in Israel using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Childhood PA was significantly related to low levels of relationship quality among men and women. For men, childhood PA was positively related to psychological distress and both patterns of romantic attachment styles, which in turn were negatively associated with relationship quality. For women, childhood PA was positively associated with psychological distress and avoidant attachment, correlating with low levels of relationship quality. Conclusion: A retrospective assessment of childhood PA is associated with decreased levels of marital relationship quality for men and women. This association is mediated by psychological distress and romantic attachment styles. Implications: Implementing interventions focused on improving mental health and promoting a secure romantic attachment style can enhance the quality of marital relationships for adults with CM experiences.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-06T01:37:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241232168
       
  • Social support and perceived partner responsiveness have complex
           associations with salivary cortisol in married couples

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hayley C. Fivecoat, Richard E. Mattson, Nicole Cameron, Matthew D. Johnson
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Spousal support may help ameliorate the health consequences of stressful situations by downregulating cortisol. To examine how cortisol levels change in conjunction with spousal social support during discussions of a stressful situation, 191 married couples engaged in two 10-minute interactions addressing a personal (i.e., non-marital) problem. We coded for positive and negative social support provision and receipt, assessed the perception of received support, and collected salivary cortisol samples. We found that wives’ display of more negative behaviors while receiving support was associated with an increase in wives’ cortisol levels via an indirect (mediated) effect of perceived partner responsiveness. Overall, results suggest a link between support behaviors, changes in cortisol and perceived partner responsiveness, with more consistent links between support behaviors and responsiveness ratings relative to other paths, and cortisol effects found more often in wives than husbands. Exploratory analyses also suggest that cortisol levels coming into an interaction may impact elements of support interactions. The implications of the role of cortisol and partner responsiveness to the provision of spousal support are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T09:18:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241229755
       
  • Accounts of interpersonal touch in female victims of intimate partner
           violence: A qualitative study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anik Debrot, Shékina Rochat, María del Río Carral, Prisca Gerber, Oriane Sarrasin, Fabrice Brodard
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Crucial for human development and functioning, affectionate touch predicts well-being. However, most research on affectionate touch in romantic relationship is conducted with samples in high quality relationships and relies on quantitative methods. We thus know little to nothing about how touch is experienced in low-quality relationships, namely those characterized by intimate partner violence (IPV). To fill this gap, victims of physical and/or sexual IPV who had received psychological support at one association supporting victims of IPV were invited to participate in the present study. The thematic analysis conducted upon the qualitative data revealed five main themes: (1) the definition of identity by touch, (2) the presence of “undesired” touch, (3) the absence of “desired” touch, (4) the memories and flashbacks triggered by touch, and (5) the self-reconstruction allowed by touch. Analyses are discussed in terms of their link with previous research on affectionate touch and on interpersonal violence. The results suggest that this constitute a meaningful topic of investigation to be further analyzed, as well as a possible therapeutic channel.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T04:41:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241231302
       
  • Characteristics of parent-child separation related to bullying involvement
           among left-behind children in China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jiayao Xu, Shi Guo, Jingjing Lu, Guanlan Zhao, Hailati Akezhuoli, Menmen Wang, Feng Wang, Xudong Zhou
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Parent-child separation due to internal migration is prevalent in China. However, few studies have focused on the associations between different characteristics of parent-child separation and children’s involvement in bullying. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 2,355 fifth-to eighth-grade students in China, using self-reported questionnaires to investigate the associations between children’s bullying involvement (i.e., bullies, victims, bully-victims) and different characteristics of parent-child separation resulting from parental migration. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to explore these associations. Among all respondents, 17.3% reported being victims of bullying, 3.8% reported being bullies, and 2.7% reported being bully-victims. Compared to children with no left-behind experiences, those with current left-behind experiences were more likely to be victims and bully-victims. Children left behind by parent(s) at the age of three years or younger were more likely to be victims (aOR = 1.66, 95% CI [1.22, 2.25], p = .001), bullies (aOR = 1.88, 95% CI [1.02, 3.52]), and bully-victims (aOR = 2.17, 95% CI [1.04, 4.71]). Children left behind for seven years or longer were more likely to be victims (aOR = 1.49, 95% CI [1.12, 2.00], p = .007), bullies (aOR = 2.03, 95% CI [1.15, 3.69]), and bully-victims (aOR = 2.13, 95% CI [1.06, 4.50]). The identified characteristics of parent-child separation associated with bullying involvement hold implications for parental decisions regarding internal migration, interventions, and policymaking for preventing bullying among left-behind children.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-02-02T08:23:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241230115
       
  • Bidirectional longitudinal relationships between parents’ positive
           co-parenting, marital satisfaction, and parental involvement

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      Authors: Ye Zhang, Ruibo Xie, Ru Yan, Die Wang, Wan Ding, Binghai Sun
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Numerous studies have shown that co-parenting plays an important role in marital and parent-child interactions. However, little is known about the bidirectional associations between positive co-parenting and marital and parent-child factors, as well as the dynamic underlying mechanisms. This study used cross-lagged panel model (CLPM) to explore the bidirectional longitudinal relationship between positive co-parenting, marital satisfaction, and parental involvement among Chinese parents from a positive family multiple systems perspective. A sample of 668 father-mother dyads (father’s Mage = 36.47, SDage = 5.34; mother’s Mage = 35.45, SDage = 5.07) completed a series of questionnaires at three time points (approximately spaced 1 year between each time point). The results showed that positive co-parenting positively predicted marital satisfaction and parental involvement and that marital satisfaction positively influenced parents’ positive co-parenting, whereas the effect of parental involvement on positive co-parenting was significant among fathers. Additionally, fathers’ marital satisfaction can affect their involvement, but this effect is negligible among mothers. Finally, parental marital satisfaction mediated the relationship between positive co-parenting and the next stage of positive co-parenting. This study provided new ideas and interventions to strengthen family cohesion and harmony.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T09:42:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241231010
       
  • Exploring social networks in foster caring: The mockingbird family in
           Australia

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      Authors: Michelle Jones, Emi Patmisari, Helen McLaren, Simone Mather, Chris Skinner
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      In their care of children and young people, foster carers report experiencing social isolation and a lack of support. This study examines the social network experiences of Australian foster carers who are members of Mockingbird Family. While well established in the United States and United Kingdom, Mockingbird Family was introduced to Australia offering a new approach to address the unique challenges of foster caring for vulnerable children and young people. The model geographically networks 6–10 foster care households in a ‘constellation’ with a central ‘hub home provider’ tasked with providing information, support, and respite care. This study employed a cross-sectional explanatory sequential mixed methods approach to investigate social connections and supports in the first four Australian Mockingbird Family constellations. A social network tool was used to survey participants (n = 27) and two focus groups (n = 20) to gather their experiences. Analysis found the highest mean social network connections with people from within their own Mockingbird Family constellations. Three measures of centrality were used indegree, betweenness and closeness, to report the connections and role of members within each constellation. Comparing constellations at different stages of maturity, the hub home provider was consistently ranked with high betweenness centrality as the bridge. In the longer-running constellations, the hub home provider was ranked with high indegree centrality or the primary source of advice or expert support. This indicated micro-network evolution that may potentially result in reduced reliance on statutory and other formal system supports over time. Changes to micro-dynamics in social support within constellations were explained qualitatively through three themes: leadership and expertise, information diffusion and communication, and trust and familiarity. Mockingbird Family was found to provide social connections and support networks amongst foster carers, indicating the model’s capacity to strengthen supports to carers thereby strengthening the immediate environment of children and young people in care.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T05:36:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241230455
       
  • The great reconnection: Examining motives for relational reconnection and
           investigating social penetration as a predictor of well-being

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      Authors: Nicholas Brody, Kate Blackburn, Leah LeFebvre
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      This study employs multiple methods to examine why individuals engage in relational reconnection and how self-disclosure during the re-initiation process relates to well-being during a time of acute stress. We apply Social Penetration Theory to examine individuals’ motivation to reconnect with dormant contacts, which channels they selected, the extent to which partners engaged in various levels of self-disclosure during relational reconnection, and how self-disclosure related to psychosocial and relational outcomes. Participants (N = 254) were recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk to answer a series of open- and closed-ended questions relating to the most important person they reconnected with during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. Qualitative thematic analysis identified ten themes driving individuals to reconnect, including relational dormancy, health checks, and reminiscing. Quantitative results showed that depth and breadth of self-disclosure in reconnected relationships were each negatively related to depression and loneliness. Breadth and depth of self-disclosure were also each positively associated with anticipation of future interaction. The ability to re-engage with former social connections showed clear associations with people’s psychological and emotional well-being during the pandemic, and the findings demonstrate the central role of continued self-disclosure during relational reconnection.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T07:09:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231222945
       
  • Daily and longitudinal associations between relationship catastrophizing
           and sexual well-being in the postpartum period

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      Authors: Grace A. Wang, Samantha J. Dawson, Jackie S. Huberman, Natalie O. Rosen
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      New parent couples report heightened relationship conflicts and challenges; how romantic partners regulate their emotions in response can have key implications for their sexual relationship. One way people might respond to these emotional challenges is through relationship catastrophizing, which refers to magnifying negative cognitions, ruminating on relationship problems, and adopting a helpless orientation toward coping with these problems. Relationship catastrophizing may orient new parents’ attention toward challenges in their relationship, such as sexual difficulties, with negative implications for sexual well-being. The current study examined how relationship catastrophizing relates to one’s own and a partner’s sexual well-being. Birthing parents and their partners completed a novel measure of relationship catastrophizing and measures of sexual well-being at 3 and 9 months postpartum (n = 184 couples) and brief versions of these measures for 21 days between 3 and 4 months postpartum (n = 229 couples). On days when birthing parents employed greater relationship catastrophizing, they also reported greater sexual distress and both partners reported lower sexual satisfaction and desire. Partners’ daily relationship catastrophizing was associated with their own lower sexual satisfaction and desire, and both partners’ greater sexual distress. Longitudinal analyses, however, provided minimal evidence that the costs of relationship catastrophizing persist over time when accounting for other stressors (e.g., depressive symptoms, stress, fatigue) characteristic of the postpartum period. Findings support the potential for relationship catastrophizing as a novel target for psychoeducation and interventions aimed at promoting the day-to-day sexual well-being of new parents.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T11:41:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231224327
       
  • Multiracial identity and social support: Navigating the monoracial
           paradigm of race

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      Authors: Megan E. Cardwell
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Following a racialized encounter, especially one that is racist or discriminatory, individuals often turn to those in their racial ingroup for social support. However, ingroup racial membership lines may be blurred for those with one Black parent and one White parent. The purpose of this study is to examine Black-White multiracial individuals’ experiences navigating the monoracial paradigm of race when seeking racialized support. Guided by Critical Multiracial Theory, I take a self-reflexive Interpretative Phenomenology Approach to explore the racialized support-seeking experiences of 15 Black-White biracial adults in the U.S. Results reveal a unique support seeking process that is influenced by the monoracial paradigm of race. Implications and opportunities for future research are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T07:16:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241228790
       
  • Phone presence and relationship quality: Examining the role of emotion
           accuracy and bias

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      Authors: Jennifer L. Heyman, Lauren J. Human
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Does phone presence during romantic couple conversations influence the accuracy and bias of emotion perceptions' This two-part study examined whether phone presence – experimentally-manipulated in the lab (Part 1: N = 383) and assessed naturalistically in daily diaries (Part 2: N = 342) – relates to emotion perceptions, and, in turn, relationship quality. In Part 1, participants randomly assigned to have their phone present (vs. absent) with their romantic partner exhibited more positive emotion perceptions, indirectly contributing to greater relationship quality. In Part 2, on days when participants reported having their phone present with their romantic partner, they exhibited greater assumed similarity, indirectly contributing to greater relationship quality. Overall, phone presence when with a romantic partner may be beneficial, as it could contribute to more biased partner impressions and, in turn, greater relationship quality.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T07:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241227591
       
  • Attachment to parental figures in emerging adults from Brazil, India, and
           Nigeria: Associations with anxiety and depressive symptoms

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      Authors: Alannah Shelby Rivers, Payne Winston-Lindeboom, Guy Weissinger, Nicole K. Watkins, Linda Ruan-Iu
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Attachment theory suggests that experiences with parents and other caregivers are relevant for psychological functioning into adulthood, especially in relation to anxiety and depressive symptoms. However, this work has largely focused on Western countries and has often neglected relationships with paternal figures. The goal of the current study was to test four competing models of parental figure attachment (monotropy, only one attachment relates to symptoms; hierarchical, one attachment is more strongly related to symptoms; independence, both attachments are uniquely important in different ways; and integration, both attachments are uniquely important and interactive) in emerging adults from three countries with different cultures and family structures. We recruited 324 Brazilian, 309 Indian, and 319 Nigerian emerging adults using the online survey platform BeSample. Participants reported attachment to parental figures (maternal and/or paternal), anxiety symptoms, and depressive symptoms. Response surface analyses were tested in each country separately. In general, the results supported an integration model with significant interactions between parental figures. However, the direction of this interaction, as well as the presence of non-linear effects, differed by country. Our results suggest caregiver attachment remains relevant for individuals during the transition to young adulthood but with cultural variations.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T05:59:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241230453
       
  • Social support in the urban safety net: Assessing tie activation among
           individuals with complex care needs

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      Authors: Emily A. Ekl, Tessa M. Nápoles, Irene H. Yen, Laura E. Pathak, Jeff Nicklas, Janet K. Shim, Brea L. Perry
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Activating social ties is a critical mechanism for satisfying individuals’ social, emotional, and material needs. Researchers have offered a number of hypotheses around tie activation about when and why particular supporters step in to help, ranging from strategic activation via functional specificity to opportunistic mobilization. To date, few studies have examined multiple tie activation strategies in tandem. This project focuses on people facing complex, compounding health and social problems, who may have to rely on multiple forms of activation to get their support needs met. We draw on a sample of 92 participants who are affiliated with one of two Care Management programs in the Western United States. Using name generators in a survey, we elicit participants’ social networks and find they utilize a number of methods to secure critical support needs, including calling on kin ties to borrow money and help with daily tasks, relying on strong and proximal ties for almost all types of support, and using functional specificity for health support. We then draw on qualitative interviews to gain a deeper understanding of the ways alters provide support and why egos elicit support from some alters and not others. Future research should continue assessing this population’s social networks with the aim of leveraging social support to help manage chronic conditions, provide access to resources, and increase their sense of belonging.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T11:11:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241229748
       
  • Mate preference dissimilarity predicts friendship attraction at
           zero-acquaintance for men, not women

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      Authors: Kelly Campbell, Benjamin R. Meagher, Cari D. Goetz, Nuttacha Vaitayavijit
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      We hypothesized that dissimilar mate preferences would augment friendship attraction in zero-acquaintance interactions whereas similar mate preferences would hinder friendship attraction. Heterosexual participants completed an online survey to assess their mate preferences. They also rated the attractiveness of opposite-sex photos. Next, they attended a 3-hr speed-friending session in which they interacted with same-sex others for 3-min each. After each interaction, they completed a 2-min assessment about the person they just met. Two sessions were held, one for women (N = 20) and one for men (N = 18). The social relations model was used to regress unique feelings of friendship attraction on similarity in terms of mate preferences while controlling for perceiver and target variance. Our hypothesis was supported among men: Interactions in which two people differed in mate preferences were rated more positively than those in which participants had similar mate preferences. These results are consistent with Parental Investment Theory and highlight the importance of mate preferences in friendship attraction among men.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T08:06:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241230457
       
  • Longitudinal associations between childhood maltreatment and sexual
           motivations in couples: The role of basic psychological needs

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      Authors: Judith Kotiuga, Beáta Bőthe, Sophie Bergeron, Alice Girouard, Noémie Bigras, Marie-Pier Vaillancourt-Morel
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Childhood maltreatment (CM) has been consistently associated with negative sexual outcomes in couples. Yet, its link with sexual motivation, which plays a key role in relational and sexual well-being, remains elusive. Based on self-determination theory, sexual motivations encompass intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation (i.e., integrated, identified, introjected, and external), and amotivation. This study examined the dyadic longitudinal associations between CM and these six sexual motivations, while considering the satisfaction of basic psychological needs (i.e., autonomy, competence, and relatedness) as potential mediators. Data from 309 cohabitating couples (50.8% cisgender women, M = 32.64 years, SD = 9.59), collected at three time points over 1 year, were analyzed using actor-partner interdependence mediation models. CM was not significantly related to intrinsic motivation. However, overall, a person’s CM was indirectly associated with their own and their partner’s extrinsic motivation (i.e., integrated, identified, introjected, and external) via their own satisfaction of basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness in the romantic relationship. A person’s CM was also indirectly associated with their own amotivation via their own and their partner’s satisfaction for autonomy and relatedness. Findings suggest that catering to basic psychological needs of couples with a CM history may facilitate healthier sexual dynamics through their associations with sexual motivation.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T05:46:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241230118
       
  • Associated factors of loneliness among primary school students

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      Authors: Wenyue Wang, Jiawen Liang, Dexing Zhang, Zijun Xu, Dicken C. C. Chan, Grace Yaojie Xie, Yang Gao, Lu Niu, Elsa Lau, Samuel Y. S. Wong
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Loneliness is associated with various negative mental and physical health outcomes. Studies on factors associated with loneliness can inform its early screening and prevention. However, little is known about what factors are associated with loneliness among Chinese young children. The present study aimed to identify the various loneliness-associated factors (demographic, personal, school-related, and family-related) among primary school students in Hong Kong. A total of 258 students and their parents from six primary schools in Hong Kong completed an online anonymous survey from June to October 2020. Loneliness (i.e., UCLA Loneliness Scale 3 total score ≥ 3) was reported by 14% of the students. Multivariable mixed effects logistic regression suggested loneliness was positively associated with a lower happiness level at school, poorer independence skills, a lower level of satisfaction with parents, and lower child-rearing expenditure. There was no clustering effect of school on the associations. The current study found important demographic, personal, school-related, and family-related factors of loneliness among school-age children, with caution suggested in their interpretation considering the cross-sectional nature of this study. Future studies with a larger sample, preferably longitudinal ones, are needed to substantiate these associations and uncover their underlying mechanisms.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T11:32:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241228798
       
  • The scale of myths of romantic love: Psychometric properties and gender
           differences in Spanish adolescents

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      Authors: Enrique Bonilla-Algovia, Concepción Carrasco Carpio, Esther Rivas-Rivero, Eva Izquierdo-Sotorrío
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescence is characterized by the emergence of romantic interactions. This study aims to explore the psychometric properties of the Scale of Myths of Romantic Love (SMRL) and the gender differences in Spanish adolescents. The sample was representative and consisted of 1,840 third (52.8%) and fourth (47.2%) year students in compulsory secondary education in Castilla-La Mancha. In line with the original validation, the results of the factor analyses show that the SMRL is a mainly uni-dimensional measure when applied to adolescents. The bi-factor analysis yields satisfactory fit indices (in terms of GFI, AGFI, CFI, RMSEA, SRMR; Medrano & Muñoz-Navarro, 2017) and indicates that the general factor is more solid than the specific factors (in terms of ECV, ωh and Hh). Correlations with the Myths Scale toward Love and the Gender Equality Attitudes Scale provide evidence in favor of convergent and discriminant validity. Boys scored significantly higher than girls on the SMRL. In conclusion, this is a suitable instrument to scientifically address romantic myths at the adolescent stage, but also to complement and guide educational interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-20T12:59:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241228767
       
  • Actions for solutions: Financial behaviors, power (im)balance, and
           economic abuse among Chinese young adults in non-marital cohabitation

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      Authors: Xiaomin Li, Muhammad Aamir Khan, Jing Jian Xiao, Dexia Kong
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Young adults are at high risk of experiencing economic abuse—a form of intimate partner violence (IPV)—and Chinese young adults in non-marital cohabitation are especially vulnerable. To reduce economic abuse, an important question to answer is: What factors are associated with economic abuse' After controlling for constructs (e.g., demographic information and other types of IPV) that were linked to economic abuse, we investigated how financial behaviors (i.e., individuals’ money management capability) were associated with power (im)balance (i.e., whether individuals shared equal influence with the romantic partner) and, in turn, economic abuse among non-marital cohabitating Chinese young adults. We also investigated whether associations among financial behaviors, power (im)balance, and economic abuse varied across young adults’ gender and SES. We used a Qualtrics survey to collect data from 445 non-marital cohabitating Chinese young adults (53.3% male vs. 46.7% female; 22.7% lower socioeconomic status [SES] vs. 77.3% higher-SES). A structural equation model was conducted to test the associations of research interests. We found that money management capability (e.g., spending within budget and tracking expenses) is associated with balanced power—the individual sharing equal influence with the partner in the decision-making process—and, in turn, less experience of being economically abused. These associations were statistically equivalent across gender and SES. Collectively, our findings suggested that promoting money management capability be a timely and new avenue for reducing economic abuse among Chinese young adults in non-marital cohabitation, possibly because this population faces common and severe economic abuse but generally lacks the opportunity to learn money management.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T06:24:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241227125
       
  • Aging second-generation Holocaust survivors and well-being: The mediating
           role of relational attitudes

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      Authors: Rami Tolmacz, Daniela Aisenberg-Shafran, Sapir Ofek, Lilac Lev-Ari
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      For many years, clinical case studies that have focused on the intergenerational effects of Holocaust trauma have indicated that second-generation Holocaust survivors (SGHSs) often face relational challenges in their intimate relationships. The relational attitudes of SGHSs during childhood, as well as during adulthood, have been studied. However, only in recent years has this cohort entered the “aging adult” group. In this study, we hypothesized that well-being among Israeli aging SGHSs would be associated with parentification and with specific relational attitudes toward their adult offspring. We examined whether parentification, sense of relational entitlement, pathological concern, and authenticity in relationships mediated the association between family background and well-being. A total of 329 participants (60% SGHSs; 19% men) completed questionnaires tapping retrospective accounts of parentification during childhood, inflated and restricted senses of entitlement, pathological concern, relational authenticity, and subjective well-being. Aging SGHSs reported higher levels of parentification, inflated sense of entitlement toward offspring, pathological concern, lower levels of authenticity, and subjective well-being. The association between family background and subjective well-being was mediated by parentification, inflated sense of relational entitlement, pathological concern, and authenticity. Findings suggest that especially for aging SGHSs, childhood parentification takes a heavy toll on their sense of well-being via the hindering of a balanced sense of relational entitlement and concern and the authentic expression of self.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T03:58:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241226486
       
  • How individuals perceive their partner’s relationship behaviors when
           worrying about finances

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      Authors: Johanna Peetz, Odin Fisher-Skau, Samantha Joel
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      What role do financial worries play in close relationship functioning' In this research, we examine how financial worry – negative thoughts and feelings about finances – is associated with perceived relationship behaviors. Participants recalled how their partner acted during a recent disagreement (Study 1, N = 97 couples) or recalled the frequency of positive and negative behaviors enacted by their partner during the previous week (Study 2, N = 99 couples). Feeling more worried about finances was associated with recalling less supportive behavior from one’s partner at the disagreement (Study 1) and with perceiving more negative behaviors from one’s partner in the last week (Study 2). Truth and Bias Model analyses suggest that part of this link may be attributed to biased perceptions, as the link between financial worry and perceiving more negative behaviors persisted even after controlling for participants’ own reported behaviors (i.e., accounting for similarity) and for their partner’s own reported behaviors (i.e., accounting for accurate perceptions). In sum, financial worry is linked to how partners notice and interpret a loved one’s actions within their relationship.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T06:37:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241227454
       
  • Comprehensive scoping review of research on intercultural love and
           romantic relationships

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      Authors: Ekaterina Yurtaeva, Divine Charura
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the growing evidence that the modern world is more diverse and so is the nature of relationships that present in therapy, there remains paucity of empirical evidence on how cultural differences impact those in intercultural romantic ties. We conducted this comprehensive scoping review with the aim to outline the size and scope of existing research in the field of intercultural love and romantic relationships. We utilised a five-stage scoping review protocol provided by the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) manual for synthesis of evidence for a scoping review to ensure the rigour, transparency, and replicability of our findings. We reviewed peer-reviewed articles across nine electronic databases as well as “snowballing” the literature from the reference lists. A total of 46 studies were included in this review. We found that the majority of studies approached intercultural relationships from the deficit perspective, focusing on the domains of cultural difference that bring challenges to the relationship. These included culture-rooted differences in parenting standards and gender role expectations, among others. Often, cultural differences were found to bring power impedance into the relationship. Open communication and flexibility were found as important coping strategies. Differences in native language posed challenges to emotional communication between partners. These findings demonstrate that intercultural relationships face an additional layer of challenges and complexities that have to be recognised in therapy. We propose four domains of transmodality relational competencies on the basis of our findings to inform culturally sensitive therapeutic practice.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T02:16:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075241228791
       
  • Ready for the next step: Novel commitment amplification in romantic
           relationships

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      Authors: Morgan A. Cope, Mora A. Reinka, Brent A. Mattingly
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Ample research examines the importance of one’s commitment level to their romantic relationship; however, individuals’ desire for progressive levels of commitment has received less attention in the literature. In the current studies, we introduce the novel concept of commitment amplification (i.e., the desire to become more committed in one’s romantic relationship) by developing and validating a new scale (the Commitment Amplification Scale). Additionally, we investigate the conceptual uniqueness of commitment amplification and examine associations with relationship-oriented thoughts (Study 1 and 2) and behaviors (Study 3). Results support the establishment of commitment amplification as a distinct and predictive construct. Furthermore, commitment amplification predicts relationship constructs above and beyond existing measures of commitment and commitment readiness.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T07:15:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231224801
       
  • Is social support beneficial after a breakup' A moderation model of social
           support, depression, emotional volatility and gender for college students
           during COVID-19

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      Authors: Qianyi Wang, Kenneth G. Rice, Fernán G. Arana, Hannah Wetstone, Benson Bunker
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      The current study focused on those who had recently experienced a relationship breakup, which add extra stressors to college students who have already suffered from negative influences of COVID-19. Social support could act as a coping resource to alleviate the negative consequences of breakup and COVID-19 on mental health. Although social support has long been found to have a protective role on mental health, several studies indicated that social support could have differential effects, and even harmful effects on people with high negative emotionality. To understand the roles social support play, we used a longitudinal design to study potential moderators (negative emotionality [or neuroticism] and gender) in the relationship between social support and depression. For students who experienced a relational disruption, our research questions were (1) what are the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between social support and depression before and during COVID-19, and (2) are these relationships moderated by negative emotionality and gender' Participants 361 students (Mage = 23.3, 64% female) from Argentina and the USA who had experienced recent relationship breakups. Participants completed pre-pandemic questionnaires, and were followed up on depression level six months later, after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Results indicated that social support and negative emotionality were significantly related to concurrent depression. Pre-pandemic social support showed a weak correlation with depression levels during COVID-19. Negative emotionality and gender were not significant moderators in both the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations. Results supported the concurrent effects of social support on depression and indicated the potential value of targeting social support during COVID-19. The study also offered several directions for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T06:59:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231226377
       
  • Longitudinal associations among adult attachment orientations, emotion
           regulation tendencies, and transdiagnostic anxiety and depression symptoms
           in young adults

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      Authors: Allison V. Metts, Richard E. Zinbarg, Robin Nusslock, Benjamin A. Tabak, Michelle G. Craske
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Adult attachment orientations can influence emotion regulation. Such influence on the tendency to employ two strategies, cognitive reappraisal (which aims to modify emotional experiences) and expressive suppression (which inhibits emotional expression) and later symptoms is understudied. This longitudinal study evaluated indirect associations between adult attachment orientations—with a focus on the dimension of security—and transdiagnostic anxiety and depression symptoms (General Distress; GD) through reappraisal and suppression. Correlational analyses examined cross-sectional associations among constructs across four timepoints. A cross-lagged panel model was fit to examine prospective hypotheses using 30-month longitudinal data from young adults (N = 270 at baseline). Correlational evidence provided support for expected cross-sectional associations. In prospective analyses, there was a significant unique effect of attachment-related avoidance on expressive suppression such that higher attachment-related avoidance predicted higher use of subsequent expressive suppression. There were significant unique effects of emotion regulation on symptoms such that higher reappraisal predicted lower subsequent GD and higher suppression predicted higher subsequent GD. There was no evidence for significant direct or indirect effects of attachment orientations on GD. Results suggest that adult attachment orientation may inform how one expresses emotions in the future, and how one regulates emotions may inform subsequent shared symptoms of depression and anxiety. There was no evidence that attachment orientations informed future transdiagnostic symptoms of depression and anxiety.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-06T12:22:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231225254
       
  • Measurement invariance of the short form compassionate love scale for a
           romantic partner and sexuality

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      Authors: Joana Neto, Félix Neto
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Compassionate love (CL), a particular kind of love, is centred on enlarging beneficence to another. A short form to assess CL for a romantic partner (CLS-P-SF) was recently developed. The CLS-P-SF is a one-dimensional measure. In this study, we examined CLS-P-SF’s measurement invariance (MI) across gender and age, and the relationship of the CL with sexuality measures. There were 1184 Portuguese participants, 48% women and 52% men, aged between 18 to 79 (M = 37.36; SD = 16.89). Confirmatory factor analyses evidenced that the one latent dimension of the CLS-P-SF confirmed an acceptable fit to the data. MI, and internal consistency were adequate. This invariance permitted to perform meaningful latent average comparisons. The effect of gender and age were not significant. CLS-P-SF was positively associated with sexual desire, love is most important, sex demonstrates love, love comes before sex and satisfaction with sex life, and negatively associated with sex is declining and sociosexuality. Findings are discussed in their relationship with existent literature. The CLS-P-SF’s brevity makes it a promising tool for researchers and practitioners.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T08:43:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231226379
       
  • Dyadic links between adverse childhood experiences, mindfulness, and
           relationship quality in a diverse sample of couples

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      Authors: Erin Cooper, Francesca Adler-Baeder, Julianne McGill
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Emerging research finds negative implications of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) for individual relational outcomes. The current study advanced these explorations by utilizing a risk and resilience approach, as well as a family systems framework that considers couple dynamics. We tested the concurrent dyadic links among (ACEs), mindfulness, and relationship quality in a racially and economically diverse sample of different-gender couples (N = 801). Results from actor-partner interdependence models indicate men’s and women’s ACEs were associated with their own lower relationship functioning as expected. Further, men’s ACEs were associated with women’s lower relationship functioning. Importantly, men’s and women’s mindfulness level were each uniquely and positively associated with their own and their partner’s relationship functioning. Comparatively, the links between mindfulness and one’s own and their partner’s relationship functioning were stronger than the links between ACEs and relationship quality. Suggestions for research and practice are provided.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T07:49:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231226378
       
  • Negative speaks louder than positive: Negative implicit partner
           evaluations forecast destructive daily interactions and relationship
           decline

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      Authors: Ezgi Sakman, Vivian Zayas
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Romantic relationships are affectively complex. Any given interaction consists of both rewarding and aversive features. Recent work has shown that implicit partner evaluations (IPEs)—evaluations spontaneously triggered when one thinks about one’s partner—are also affectively complex. Does such complexity in IPEs help individuals navigate rewarding and aversive aspects inherent in interactions' The present work examined the proposition that negative IPEs uniquely forecast aversive daily relationship behaviors, whereas positive IPEs uniquely forecast rewarding daily relationship behaviors. Individuals self-identified as in a heterosexual romantic relationship completed measures to assess their implicit and explicit partner evaluations at two time points, spanning a three-month period, as well as a daily diary component. Time-1 negative IPEs forecasted perceiving and enacting negative behaviors during a 14-day daily diary, which, in turn, predicted deterioration in explicit partner and relationship evaluations 3-months later. The predictive ability of negative IPEs remained even after statistically controlling for positive IPEs and explicit evaluations. Positive IPEs were weak and inconsistent predictors of outcomes. The findings shine a spotlight on the differential functions of positive and negative IPEs, the importance of assessing negative IPEs independently from positive IPEs, and the role of negative IPEs in predicting destructive relationship experiences.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-12-30T09:24:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231224803
       
  • Elder abuse: The roles of communication neglect, caregiver expressed
           anger, and a positive pre-morbid relational history

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      Authors: Mei-Chen Lin
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      This study tested whether communication neglect (CN) mediated the relationship between caregivers’ reports of care receivers’ cognitive status and/or problem behavior and thoughts about potential harmful behaviors (PHB) toward their care receiver. It also examined if caregivers’ expressed anger and a positive pre-morbid relational history moderated the prediction of CN on PHB. Family caregivers (N = 339) in the U.S. completed the survey via Qualtrics. Results suggested that CN is a meaningful mediator explaining how PHB might occur. Caregiver expressed anger moderated the prediction of CN on PHB/physical abuse. Lastly, caregivers’ perceptions of a positive pre-morbid relational history were a potential protective factor against PHB. When caregiver expressed anger was moderate or high, the prediction of CN on PHB/physical abuse was positive, but its strength was reduced as pre-morbid relational history became stronger.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T12:00:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231225255
       
  • Romance matters: The role of dating in adolescents’ friendship
           beginnings and endings

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      Authors: Haoyang Zhang, Diane Felmlee
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      We examined the influence of romantic relationships on the formation and dissolution of adolescent friendships with a longitudinal network sample (N = 133) from age 14 to 15. Using a dynamic, network statistical model (i.e., STERGM), we found that engagement in a romantic relationship shaped friendship homophily over time, with daters becoming friends with other daters, and singles forming friendships with other singles. Partnered adolescents were not more likely than those who were unattached to dissolve their friendships; however, they were significantly less prone to form new friendships over time. Results broaden our understanding of the role of romantic relationships in youth friendships by showing that romantic involvement deters friendship initiation, but when friendships do form, they tend to be among those who are similarly dating. Our study highlights the significance of adopting a dynamic, social network perspective to examine both the formation and breakup of friendship transitions during this pivotal stage of life.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-12-23T10:07:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231222446
       
  • Identity veiling: Theorizing identity gap negotiation post-intimate
           partner violence

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      Authors: Aimee Jeanne Burns, Charnell Peters
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Within the United States, 1 in 4 women and 1 in 10 men experience intimate partner violence (IPV): psychological aggression, sexual violence, physical violence, and/or stalking from an intimate partner. Although some studies highlight the complexity of post-IPV recovery, the role of communication in post-IPV recovery remains underexplored. This study employs Communication Theory of Identity (CTI) to analyze in-depth interviews with post-IPV adults. Analysis reveals how individuals negotiate post-IPV identity gaps between the personal-personal and personal-relational layers of identity. The forwarded concept of identity veiling explicates how IPV tactics cause the relational layer of identity to eclipse the personal layer in IPV relationships. Therefore, post-IPV recovery involves unveiling the personal layer of identity—communicatively (re)constructing self-image beyond the IPV relationship and the identity gaps it engendered. This study conceptualizes the role of violent communication in the construction of identity gaps and identity gap negotiation.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T04:41:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231221079
       
  • Parental Internet practices in the family system: Restrictive mediation,
           problematic Internet use, and adolescents’ age-related variations in
           perceptions of parent-child relationship quality

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      Authors: Alanna Peebles, Y. Anthony Chen
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      The current study draws from family systems theory to investigate the relationships between parents’ Internet practices, adolescent age (as a proxy for child development), and adolescents’ perceptions of parent-adolescent relationship quality. Secondary data analysis of 4,592 U.S. parent-adolescent dyads from a nationally representative cross-sectional survey revealed that when parents reported having more problematic Internet use, adolescents (ages 12–17) reported having worse relationships with their parents. Stricter rules regarding Internet usage were associated with lower parent-adolescent relationship quality. This negative relationship was more pronounced for adolescents 14.55 years old and older. Unexpectedly, having stricter rules about Internet content was related to better parent-adolescent relationship quality; this association was weaker for older adolescents. The findings provide insight into the differences between restrictive Internet mediation practices about time and content, the importance of examining parents’ problematic Internet use, and the need for considering children’s development when examining the role of media in the family system.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T04:09:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231221581
       
  • Mother-father and parent-grandmother coparenting conflict and caregiver
           involvement in adolescent parent families

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      Authors: Priscilla L Zambrano, Norma J Perez-Brena, Jeneé C Duncan, Nicholas J Bishop, Michelle L Toews, Melissa A Barnett
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Family systems theory recognizes the complex interconnected subsystems within families, yet little is known about how multigenerational coparenting affects coparenting and caregiving outcomes within adolescent parent families. The current study estimated auto-regressive cross-lag models to evaluate the interrelation between mother-father and parent-grandparent coparenting subsystems and caregiver involvement using reports of coparenting conflict and caregiver involvement from 280 adolescent parents (Mage = 17.02, SD = 1.42; 83.6% Latine; 69.6% women) at two time-points, collected nine-months apart. Results showed stability in coparenting conflict and caregiver involvement among mother-father and parent-grandparent dyads and one intergenerational cross-lag effect. Grandmother involvement at time 1 (T1) was negatively linked to parent-grandparent coparenting conflict at time 2 (T2). Gender differences also emerged, such that (1) father’s report of mother involvement at T1 was positively associated with mother-father coparenting conflict at T2; (2) father’s report of mother involvement at T1 was negatively associated with father’s report of grandmother involvement at T2; and (3) father’s report of parent-grandparent coparenting conflict at T1 was negatively associated with father’s report of mother involvement at T2. Findings underscore connections between intergenerational coparenting subsystems and suggest gender differences in sensitivity, malleability, and the influence of the coparenting dyad on coparenting conflict and caregiver involvement. Further research on adolescent coparenting and caregiving dynamics across coparenting subsystems is needed to strengthen interventions aimed at serving young mothers and fathers.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-12-13T06:39:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231221832
       
  • Couple similarity in empathic accuracy and relationship well-being

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      Authors: Liesbet Berlamont, Eva Ceulemans, Chiara Carlier, Lesley Verhofstadt, William Ickes, Céline Hinnekens, Laura Sels
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Are intimate partners similar in how accurately they infer each other’s feelings and thoughts, and if so, does this similarity predict their relationship well-being' To answer this question, we analyzed data from two laboratory-based studies (n = 155 and n = 172 couples) in which couples participated in a conflict interaction task and afterwards reported on their own feelings and thoughts and inferred those of their partner. Relationship well-being was measured on both a global (i.e., relationship satisfaction) and a situational level (i.e., post-interaction closeness and satisfaction with the outcome of the interaction). We found that intimate partners were more similar in their empathic accuracy than randomly-paired individuals. This similarity predicted the extent to which partners reported that the conflict interaction had led to a positive outcome for their relationship, but was not associated with partners’ global relationship satisfaction or their post-interaction closeness.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-12-07T04:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231206412
       
  • A dyadic assessment of the association between sexual communication and
           daily sexual satisfaction

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      Authors: Emily S. Bibby, Joanne Davila
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Although sexual communication’s association with sexual and relational functioning and satisfaction have been well established, to date only a small number of studies have used dyadic data, and all have used single time-point self-report measures of sexual outcomes. This study examined the unique association between sexual communication quality and daily levels of sexual satisfaction in couples. Participants included 81 couples comprised of mostly mixed-sex dyads of a diverse range of ages and relationship lengths. Using dyadic cross-sectional data on sexual communication quality in couples as well as 21-day daily diary data assessments of sexual satisfaction on days individuals reported having sex, our analyses revealed significant within-partner and cross-partner associations between individual’s perceived sexual communication quality in their relationship and average daily sexual satisfaction. Greater perceived sexual communication quality was also associated with less variability in individuals’ daily reports of sexual satisfaction on days they had sex. Additional models were run adding relationship satisfaction as a covariate and controlling for relationship length. Lastly, similarity in reports of sexual communication between partners did not moderate the association between sexual communication quality and average daily sexual satisfaction. Our findings suggest that greater quality sexual communication may be uniquely associated with better and more consistent daily sexual satisfaction in relationships. This research expands our current understanding of sexual communication’s impact in relationships day to day.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-12-06T03:29:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231220041
       
  • Relationship quality, COVID stress, and mental health in sexual and gender
           minority young adults

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      Authors: Sabrina J. Bothwell, Margaret Lawlace, Michael E. Newcomb, Sarah W. Whitton
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Sexual and gender minority (SGM) individuals, particularly those assigned female at birth (AFAB), have shown poor mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. This issue highlights the importance of identifying factors that may promote SGM-AFAB mental health during the pandemic and protect SGM-AFAB individuals against the negative psychological effects of COVID-related stress. Grounded in previous research and theory suggesting that high quality romantic relationships have promotive (i.e., main) and protective (i.e., stress-buffering) effects on partner’s mental health, we explored associations between relationship quality, COVID-related stress, and mental health among SGM-AFAB individuals. Specifically, we tested whether (1) higher relationship quality, as a promotive factor, was directly associated with fewer mental health problems (depressive and anxiety symptoms, problematic alcohol and cannabis use), and (2) relationship quality, as a protective factor, had a stress-buffering effect, reducing the negative effect of COVID stress on mental health within SGM-AFAB young people. Between May 2020-July 2021, 227 SGM-AFAB individuals (ages 19–35; M = 23.5) in current romantic relationships completed measures of pandemic-related stress, relationship quality, depressive and anxious symptoms, and problematic alcohol and cannabis use. As hypothesized, relationship quality was negatively associated with anxious and depressive symptoms and problematic cannabis use. Relationship quality attenuated the positive association between COVID stress and depression, but not the other mental health outcomes. Findings suggest that high-quality romantic relationships may promote mental health and have a stress-buffering effect for depressive symptoms among SGM-AFAB individuals during major society-wide stressors.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T12:09:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231217390
       
  • Examining the role of speaker familiarity and statement practice on
           deception detection

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      Authors: Daniella K. Cash, Kayla D. Spenard, Tiffany D. Russell
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Detecting deception is a ubiquitous, but difficult component of daily interactions. While prior work has shown that people are poor lie detectors, research has also shown that increased familiarity with the statement sender impacts accuracy. The current study examined how increased familiarity with a statement sender, as well as the type of statement provided, influenced detection accuracy. Participants judged truthful and deceptive statements from different speakers that varied in how familiar they were to the participant (pre-experimental familiarity, experimental familiarity, no familiarity). The statements that were evaluated varied in veracity, statement type (descriptions or denials), and whether the statements had been practiced. Participants believed they were more accurate in their veracity assessments for the pre-experimentally familiar speakers compared to the other speaker types. While participants were more accurate for pre-experimentally familiar speakers compared to strangers, there was no difference in accuracy between judgments for the pre- and experimentally familiar speakers. Participants were also more likely to believe statements that had been practiced, regardless of the statements’ actual veracity or their degree of familiarity with the speaker.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T09:01:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231220843
       
  • Young adults’ experiences of ageism in the United Kingdom: Forms,
           sources, and associations with intergenerational attitudes

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      Authors: Craig Fowler, Jessica Gasiorek
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Although previous research suggests that a large proportion of young adults experience ageism, information is scarce regarding exactly how often they encounter different forms of age-based discrimination. To address this lacuna, we recruited young adults from the U.K. to complete four weekly surveys in which they reported the number of days during the preceding week on which they experienced various forms of ageism. More than three-quarters of our respondents experienced some form of ageism at least once during the reporting period, and more than one-quarter of respondents experienced ageism (on average) at least once per week during the reporting period. The most oft-encountered forms of ageism encountered by young adults involved being shown a lack of respect/being patronized and having other people make assumptions about their cognitive or social characteristics. Most commonly, the perpetrators of ageism were middle-aged and later middle-aged persons (rather than older people) encountered in the course of employment. The number of days on which young adults experienced ageism was inversely correlated with the degree to which they believed middle-aged and later-middle aged adults held positive stereotypes of young adults, and positively predicted the desire to avoid interaction with middle-aged, late middle-aged, and older adults.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T11:45:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231214005
       
  • Advancing understanding of overparenting and child adjustment: Mechanisms,
           methodology, context, and development

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      Authors: Sarah J Schoppe-Sullivan, Ming Cui, Julianna R Calabrese
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-11-21T09:54:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231213397
       
  • Latinas’ internalization of U.S. beauty ideals as a moderator of the
           relations between appearance-related messages from family members and
           Latinas’ depressive symptoms

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      Authors: Avelina Rivero, Sarah E. Killoren, Nicole Campione-Barr
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Depression is a prevalent concern in Latinas; thus, it is critical that we examine the associations between negative eating and weight messages from mothers, fathers, and sisters, and depressive symptoms in Latinas. We utilized a sample of 195 Latina/Hispanic young women (Mage = 23.25 years; range = 18–25; SD = 1.93; 67.4% Mexican-origin) to explore the moderating role of Latinas' internalization of U.S. beauty ideals on the associations between negative eating and weight messages from mothers, fathers, and sisters, and Latinas' depressive symptoms. We conducted three hierarchical regression analyses and found that negative messages from each family member (i.e., mothers, fathers, and sisters) and Latinas' internalization of U.S. beauty ideals were significantly and positively associated with Latinas' depressive symptoms. Further, we found that under both high and low internalization of U.S. beauty ideals, there was a positive association between negative messages from sisters and depressive symptoms. However, this association was stronger for those with high internalization of U.S. beauty ideals. Findings from this study further solidify the importance of family members' negative eating and weight messages for Latinas' well-being. Additionally, our study demonstrates that internalizing U.S. beauty ideals is associated with Latinas’ mental health.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-11-20T10:45:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231215827
       
  • The youth-caregiver relationship quality in residential youth care:
           Professionals’ perceptions and experiences

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      Authors: Eunice Magalhães, Margarida Ferreira, Sandra Ornelas, Carla Sofia Silva, Cláudia Camilo, Maria Manuela Calheiros
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to explore the perceptions and experiences of professionals working in residential care (RC) settings (i.e., caregivers and directors) about youth-caregiver relationship quality (YCRQ). Method: A qualitative study was developed in Portugal including 15 caregivers (73.3% women, 23–50 years) and 15 directors (73.3% women, 34–45 years) working in 18 generalist RC units. Data were collected through six focus groups using a semi-structured interview script. Data were analyzed following a content analysis approach using NVIVO 12 software. Results: Our findings revealed that the concept of YCRQ in RC was mainly described in terms of good qualities, and the organizational determinants of YCRQ relationships were most mentioned both by caregivers and directors (i.e., organizational social context, intervention models and strategies). Individual characteristics of youth and staff were less described as determinants of YCRQ. These findings provide important insights for practice. Conclusions: efforts should be made to design interventions in RC that aim to improve its organizational social climate so as to provide caregivers with the necessary support and resources that enable them to enhance positive YCRQ.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-11-16T10:01:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231215824
       
  • The perceived quality of social interactions differs by modality and
           purpose: An event-contingent experience sampling study with older adults

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      Authors: Gizem Hülür, Minxia Luo, Birthe Macdonald, Carlotta E. Grünjes
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Older adults increasingly use digital technologies to communicate with others. The goal of the present study is to understand the role of interaction modality for the perceived quality of social interactions. We use data from 118 participants (age: M = 72 years, SD = 5, range = 65 to 94; 40% women), who reported on their social interactions (quality [valence, social relatedness, calmness, meaningfulness], modality [face-to-face in-person, telephone, text-based digital], and purposes [e.g., small talk, conflict]) over 21 days in an event-contingent experience sampling study that took place between April and November 2019. Text-based communication was rated lower in valence and social relatedness relative to face-to-face communication and telephone calls, and lower in meaningfulness relative to telephone calls. Face-to-face and telephone communication only differed in meaningfulness, with telephone calls being rated higher. Some of the associations between interaction modality and perceived quality were moderated by interaction purpose. For example, conflicts were perceived more negatively as indicated by lower valence, social relatedness, and calmness when they were carried out by text messages (vs. face-to-face or by telephone). Conflicts were rated higher in valence when they took place by telephone versus face-to-face. In summary, our findings suggest that the modality of daily social interactions plays an important role for their quality. We discuss implications of these findings for increasing well-being and social connectedness through technology-mediated communication.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-11-15T11:47:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231215269
       
  • Relational turbulence and couples’ convergence and divergence in weekly
           highs and lows during three months of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown

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      Authors: Shaochun Li, Denise Haunani Solomon, Kellie St.Cyr Brisini
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has found relational benefits of interpersonal emotional convergence. Drawing on relational turbulence theory, we expected that partners’ convergence in emotional high and low points is associated with relational uncertainty, qualities of interdependence, and relational turbulence. These hypotheses were tested using data retrieved from a longitudinal project in which spouses in 64 American married couples independently reported high and low experiences and completed relationship measures every week for ten weeks from June to August of 2020. Results from multilevel models confirmed some of the hypothesized benefits of convergence in highs, but predictions about convergence in lows were largely unsupported. The findings suggest that dyadic emotion is an antecedent of relational turbulence processes and highlight the importance of sharing positive experiences for maintaining relationship health.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-11-14T12:15:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231215270
       
  • No response' Chronemic expectancy violation and relational turbulence in
           technologically-mediated romantic relational conflict

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      Authors: Qing Huang, Shuting Yao
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      An extensive body of literature shows how people deal with conflicts, verbally and nonverbally, in interpersonal interactions. However, the role of technologically-mediated communication (TMC) in romantic relational conflict has received less attention. Through the lenses of Relational Turbulence and Expectancy Violations Theories, this study explored how a chronemic expectancy violation from a romantic partner impacts emotional well-being in a TMC-involved conflict discussion. Two online questionnaires were distributed. First, a pilot study was conducted to understand the basic online communication dynamics between emerging adult romantic partners (e.g., usual response latency) and possible emotions when they experience a chronemic expectancy violation from their partner on TMC. Results show that people are likely to experience negative affect and other specific emotions (e.g., disillusion, loneliness, frustration, hurt, anger) if their partner takes longer than expected to respond. The main study then further explored how individuals’ expectations differ in a hypothetical TMC-involved conflict scenario where they use text-based TMC to discuss a recent romantic conflict with their partners. Participants were instructed to imagine a chronemic expectancy violation whereby their partner does not respond within their expected time period (i.e., conflict expected latency) and report their feelings about it. Results show that people expect their partners to respond more rapidly in the conflict scenario than usual and report negative feelings after the expectancy violations. Conflict-specific (e.g., seriousness), personal (e.g., attachment anxiety and avoidance), and relational (e.g., commitment) variables also influence the intensity of their emotional experiences. This research enhances comprehension of nonverbal cues in text-based TMC and potential emotional repercussions in romantic conflict management.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-11-11T02:56:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231213824
       
  • Age differences in emotional support buffering on the relationship between
           physical disability and psychological distress

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      Authors: Cynthia A. Rohrbeck, Philip W. Wirtz, Jennifer E. Marceron
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Greater levels of physical disability are often accompanied by greater levels of psychological distress. Stress Buffering Theory (Cohen & Wills, 1985; Thoits, 2011) posits that the level of social support buffers this relationship. Life Stage Theory proposes the previously untested hypothesis that the salience of the buffering offered by social support may decrease with age – i.e., that as individuals age, emotional support offers a weaker buffer of the effect of disability on psychological distress (Segrin, 2003). This research tested a unified Stress Buffering/Life Stage model of psychological distress. We hypothesized that the buffering effect of emotional support is greater for younger adults than for older adults. Study data were drawn from 293 adults who self-identified as having a physical disability. Respondents’ age, emotional support, psychological distress, and disability were assessed. A saturated three-way interaction analysis of covariance model was used to evaluate the association of disability and psychological distress, as buffered by emotional support, for older versus younger people. Results were consistent with a unified Stress Buffering Life Stage model. Greater levels of emotional support attenuated the relationship between disability and psychological distress for younger, but not for older, study participants. Self-reported measures and the cross-sectional design precludes making causal inferences. Emotional support may be particularly salient for younger people in buffering the effects of disability on psychological distress.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-11-10T03:20:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231214971
       
  • Women’s experience with religion and spirituality when perceiving their
           husband’s pornography use as problematic: A qualitative study

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      Authors: Heidi F. Hastings, Rebecca Lucero Jones, Catherine Dutton
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Several recent studies concerning men’s pornography use have challenged past research conclusions that male pornography use negatively impacts relational outcomes in heterosexual relationships. While extant literature has explored the intersection of religion and men’s experience with pornography consumption, the impact on religious wives has primarily been understudied. Purpose: The present study examined the impact of a husband’s problematic pornography use on a religious woman’s spirituality and religiosity. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 27 women who self-identified as religious women. Faith traditions of the participants include Catholic, Jewish, Latter-day Saint, Native American Spiritual, non-denominational Christians, Protestant Christians, and Spiritual. The data was analyzed using interpretive phenomenology, a qualitative methodology. Results: Using a feminist hermeneutics theoretical lens to analyze the data in a way that gives preference for the woman’s experience, three primary themes emerged: Wrestle with Religion, Relationships that Facilitate Healing, and Spiritual Growth. Nine subthemes were identified, including Influence of Religious Culture, Unmet Expectations of Religious Leaders, Challenges to Faith, Support from Inside the Religion, Recognizing the Need for Support Outside the Religion, Women Need Women for Healing, Divine Assistance, Relationship with God, and A Journey of Growth and Transformation. Conclusions & Implications: These primary themes and subthemes provide a rich description of the religious context, means to healing, and resilience that characterize religious women’s experiences after discovering a husband’s problematic pornography use. Most importantly, the authors discuss significant implications for religious leaders and clinicians seeking to provide culturally sensitive care to distressed women.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-11-08T09:22:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231213610
       
  • Learning and teaching care within the family: Experiential learning
           reflecting informal teaching

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      Authors: Juliene Madureira Ferreira, Allegra J. Midgette
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      The present study investigated how caregivers in Finland and the US recount learning and teaching care within the family, drawing on a new educational-psychological framework for care. This study applied thematic analysis to seven focus groups in the US and five focus groups in Finland composed of caregivers (N = 45). The results suggest one main theme for learning, Imperfect Mirroring of Past Parenting and Present Parenting Practice, and two themes for teaching: Actions Tell More Than Words (US) and Teaching Them To be Independent and Caring Citizens (Finland). For learning, the findings indicate that childhood experiences are transformed into an informal guide for how care should (or should not) be practiced, highlighting how the lack of systematization in learning care contributes to caregivers’ need for self-teaching and unlearning what they experienced. In addition, caregivers tend to reproduce their learning experiences in teaching to care, and within this process, they focus more on pragmatic aspects of care. The various elements theorized in the Psycho-educational Framework of Care used, including identifying and anticipating others’ needs and deciding on the responsibility of addressing needs, were neglected in caregivers’ reports of teaching care. Implications argue in favor of psycho-educational programs for caregivers that can systematically address two pressing issues in learning-teaching care - the complexity involved in care processes and understanding the intersubjective nature of the construction of caring relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-11-04T12:17:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231211359
       
  • Relational uncertainty and dyadic synchrony within the interaction of
           couples

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      Authors: Lynne M. Knobloch-Fedders, Kelley Quirk, Leanne K. Knobloch
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Relational uncertainty refers to the questions people have about their perceptions of involvement within close relationships. To complement a wealth of research examining the link between relational uncertainty and people’s self-reported communication strategies, we investigate relational uncertainty as a predictor of behavioral sequences within interaction. We draw on both seminal and contemporary theorizing to hypothesize that relational uncertainty impedes dyadic synchrony, or the coordination between partners within interaction. Couples (N = 97) participated in a 5-minute discussion designed to facilitate expressions of intimacy; we coded these interactions using the circumplex-based Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) model. We evaluated whether couples experiencing relational uncertainty exhibit forms of dyadic asynchrony in which self-disclosure and validation are met by a partner’s hostility. Sequential analyses revealed that, after covarying relationship quality, relationship uncertainty was associated with sequences of self-disclosure/hostility among men (H1), and self uncertainty and relationship uncertainty were associated with sequences of validation/hostility among both men and women (H2). Partner uncertainty did not predict dyadic asynchrony in either form. These findings advance scholarship on relational uncertainty by underscoring the importance of sequential exchanges within couple interaction.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-11-01T01:00:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231208035
       
  • Explicating a comprehensive model of post-dissolution distress

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      Authors: René M. Dailey, Lingzi Zhong, Sarah Varga, Zhengyu Zhang, Kyle Kearns
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Building on the extant research, the current work outlines a comprehensive model of post-dissolution distress (CMPDD). The model integrates the previous research and includes both distal (static; e.g., controllability of breakup, relational anxiety) and proximal (dynamic; e.g., desiring reconciliation, coping, quality of alternatives) factors in predicting both initial distress and change in distress over time. Potential mediating mechanisms are also proposed. We conclude with a discussion of several ways the model could be potentially refined with empirical research to generate a more specific and parsimonious theory of PDD. Ultimately, testing and refining the model will provide insights on identifying those who will be more distressed following a breakup and highlight the factors that could be altered (e.g., contact with the partners, coping strategies) to best alleviate distress.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-10-19T12:44:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231207588
       
  • Helicopter Parenting and First-Semester Students’ Adjustment to College:
           A Self-Determination Theory Perspective

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      Authors: Matt Shin, Elissa A. Adame
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we examined the relationship between helicopter parenting and first-semester students’ (N = 211) adjustment to college. It was hypothesized that first-semester students who report higher amounts of helicopter parenting would also report higher levels of basic psychological need frustration and lower levels of educational, relational, and psychological functioning. Results of a structural regression model suggested that helicopter parenting had negative indirect associations with educational, relational, and psychological functioning through competence frustration. Helicopter parenting also had a negative indirect association with psychological functioning through autonomy frustration. No significant indirect associations were found through relatedness frustration. Findings from our study highlight the particular importance of both autonomy and competence needs as potential mechanisms through which helicopter parenting might negatively impact students’ optimal functioning and well-being during their transition to college.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T03:01:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231186443
       
  • Do personal relationships boost academic performance more for women than
           for men'

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      Authors: Sofia Dokuka, Oxana Mikhaylova
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Social integration is known to be positively related to academic performance. It is also well-known to play a different role for (self-identified) men and women. In this paper, we examine the differences seen in the correlations between academic performance and social integration for men and women. Gender was determined on the basis of self-identification. Utilizing the data from the Russian representative panel of late adolescents (N = 4,400), we demonstrate a positive relationship between the core discussion network size as a measure of social integration. Using moderation analysis, we demonstrate that the role of social integration for women is more pronounced than for men. Our findings show the importance of social integration and support for girls and women and suggest possible policy implications.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T04:19:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231205319
       
  • Seeking support via mediated channels: The roles of impression goals,
           stigma, severity, and perceived affordances

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      Authors: Daniel A. Lee, Shannon M. Cruz, Kelly Sweeney, Rachael E. Bishop
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research suggests that impression management goals and face threats can be barriers to seeking support, especially among college students and those facing severe problems that are highly stigmatized. In such cases, technologically-mediated communication channels (TMCCs) may be an important resource because they have unique affordances that can help overcome impression concerns and thereby promote well-being. To examine this possibility, the present study explored how impression goals, problem severity, perceived stigma, and perceived affordances interact to affect comfort with seeking support. Contrary to expectations, results from an online survey of undergraduate students (N = 183) indicated that problem severity was not associated with levels of comfort with seeking support, and the interaction of stigma with impression goals had an unexpected positive effect. Furthermore, TMCCs affording persistence and conversation control facilitated comfort with support seeking as stigma increased. Possible explanations for these findings and implications for scholarship on TMCCs and social support are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-09-20T07:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231197606
       
  • Overparenting in adolescents’ everyday life: Development and validation
           of the momentary overparenting scale

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      Authors: Maartje P.C.M. Luijk, Anne Bülow, Savannah Boele, Amaranta de Haan, Jolene van der Kaap-Deeder, Loes Keijsers
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Background. While there is ample theoretical and empirical interest in overparenting, little is known about how overparenting of adolescents operates in everyday family life. This study describes the development and validation of a novel instrument to assess overparenting with Experience Sampling Methods – The Momentary Overparenting (MOP) scale. Methods. Following 143 (Belgian and Dutch) adolescents for 7 subsequent days, we measured overparenting (i.e., worry, interference, and unnecessary help), autonomy support and psychological control 5 to 6 times per day. Using multilevel structural equation modeling on 1865 parent-adolescent interactions, we investigated the scale’s psychometric properties: within-family and between-family reliability, convergent and divergent validity. Results. Overparenting was characterized by both stable differences between families (46%), as well as dynamic fluctuations within families over time (54% of the variance). The MOP could reliably assess such real-time dynamics in overparenting. Momentary assessments correlated meaningfully with established instruments for overparenting at the between-family level. Within families, adolescents experienced interactions with more overparenting as more psychologically controlling and less autonomy supportive. Between families, overparenting correlated negatively with mothers’ autonomy support and positively with mothers’ psychological control. Conclusion. Worry, interference, and unnecessary help may be important expressions of overparenting in everyday family life – which can now be reliably measured from moment-to-moment as a distinct parenting construct.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T09:22:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231192382
       
  • Adolescent Exposure to Racially and Ethnically Diverse Neighborhoods and
           Schools: Implications for Interracial Dating, Cohabitation, and Marriage
           in Emerging and Young Adulthood

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      Authors: Xing Zhang
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Interracial romantic relationships and unions are a marker of social distance between racial and ethnic groups, but the role of geographic context at schools and neighborhoods during adolescence in shaping interracial romantic relationship formation in the transition to adulthood has been underexplored, which is important for understanding how intergroup contact in the school and neighborhood contexts during adolescence may have subsequent consequences for interracial union formation later in emerging and young adulthood. Methods: Using data from Waves I, III, and IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, this study examines the roles of exposure to racial and ethnic diversity in schools and geographic regions in adolescence in shaping the likelihood of being in an interracial romantic relationship in emerging and young adulthood. Results: Adolescents who lived in a Census tract that had fewer of their own racial and ethnic groups were significantly more likely to be in interracial romantic relationships in emerging and in young adulthood. Adolescents who attended more racially and ethnically diverse high schools were also more likely to be in interracial romantic relationships in emerging adulthood. In young adulthood, Hispanic adolescents who went to primarily White high schools were more likely to be in interracial romantic relationships in emerging adulthood and young adulthood. Conclusions: Exposure to racially and ethnically diverse neighborhoods and schools is associated with an increased likelihood of interracial union formation in emerging and young adulthood.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-08-02T03:49:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231193451
       
  • “We’ll Deal With It as It Comes”: A Qualitative Analysis of Romantic
           Partners’ Dyadic Coping in Cystic Fibrosis

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      Authors: Nancy Lau, Kathleen J Ramos, Moira L Aitken, Christopher H Goss, Krysta S Barton, Erin K Kross, Ruth A Engelberg
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAlthough cystic fibrosis (CF) is a progressive, life-limiting, genetic disease, recent advances have extended survival, allowing persons with CF the time and physical and mental health to form romantic relationships. Previous studies have shown the importance of dyadic coping to positive psychosocial functioning and relationship satisfaction for people with serious chronic illness and their romantic partners, but little work has been done with persons with CF and their partners. The present study examines dyadic coping processes in persons with CF and their romantic partners.Methods16 adults with moderate to severe CF (Mage = 42.3, 43.8% identified as cisgender male, 56.2% identified as cisgender female) and their romantic partners (Mage = 43.8, 56.3% identified as cisgender male, 43.7% identified as cisgender female) participated in individual semi-structured interviews focused on topics related to quality of life, communication, and palliative care. We conducted a directed content analysis utilizing Berg and Upchurch’s (2007) developmental-contextual theoretical model to examine dyadic coping processes in persons with CF and their romantic partners.ResultsConsistent with the developmental-contextual model of dyadic coping, couples described adapting to health and functional declines that occurred over time. Dyads were aligned in their appraisals of illness representation, illness ownership, and perspectives of illness as a shared stressor; they used shared coping mechanisms that included supportive and collaborative actions rather than uninvolved or controlling strategies.ConclusionsWe recommend family-based approaches to medical decision-making and goals of care conversations with persons with CF and their partners, aligning those approaches with supportive and collaborative coping configurations. This may improve psychosocial outcomes for patients and their partners.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-07-21T01:24:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231190617
       
  • Artificial intelligence and perceived effort in relationship maintenance:
           Effects on relationship satisfaction and uncertainty

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      Authors: Bingjie Liu, Jin Kang, Lewen Wei
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Maintaining satisfying close relationships is important for individuals’ well-being. In the digital age, artificial intelligence (AI) has growing applications for relationship maintenance and thus implications for relational well-being. We hypothesize that although using AI to help with relational maintenance may reduce an individual’s effort, their partner may perceive AI-augmented activities negatively. According to the investment model and equity theory, perceptions of diminished effort in a relationship may lead to less satisfaction and greater uncertainty about the partner’s involvement in the relationship. In an online experiment, we presented participants (N = 208) with hypothetical scenarios of relational maintenance initiated by a fictional close friend, with a 3 (agency: self-without-augmentation vs. AI-augmented vs. human-augmented) × 3 (relational task: support-giving vs. advice-giving vs. birthday celebration) between-subjects design. Compared to the self-without-augmentation condition (i.e., the control condition) where the friend completed a relational task with no external aid, using AI assistance led participants to perceive the friend expended less effort, reducing participants’ relationship satisfaction and increasing uncertainty. Getting help from another person was not significantly different from using AI in terms of perceived partner effort, relationship satisfaction, uncertainty, and perceived appropriateness. We discuss the implications of the findings for relational maintenance and technology-mediated communication.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-07-18T06:10:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231189899
       
  • Social media use, perceived social support, and well-being: Evidence from
           two waves of surveys peri- and post-COVID-19 lockdown

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      Authors: Zhiying Yue, Renwen Zhang, Jun Xiao
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Numerous studies have suggested that active social media use can promote well-being by enhancing perceived social support. However, the relationship between social media use and perceived social support remains inconsistent across studies. This study explores possible mechanisms underlying the relationship between active social media use, perceived social support, and well-being during and after a COVID-19 lockdown. Using online surveys with Chinese participants during (N = 1,131) and after (N = 407) the lockdown period, our findings support a sequential mediation model. Specifically, active social media use was positively associated with perceived online network responsiveness, which in turn, predicted augmented perceived social support. Ultimately, increased social support was linked to reduced loneliness and increased life satisfaction. These findings were consistent both during and after the lockdown, indicating that social media has the potential to complement offline social interactions and effectively fulfill individuals’ social needs.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-07-08T10:02:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231188185
       
  • Responding to threatening online alternatives: Perceiving the partner’s
           commitment through their social media behaviors

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      Authors: Alexandra E. Black
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Two studies examined how committed people perceived their partners’ social media behaviors and how the presence of these behaviors impacted feelings of relationship security and satisfaction. Study 1 identified the specific social media behaviors that signal commitment by a romantic partner. Study 2 then manipulated the identified partner social media behaviors to examine if buffering occurred for people with high levels of attachment insecurity. Study 2 found that when a person was led to believe their partner engaged in high commitment online behaviors, they reported greater felt relationship security and relationship satisfaction. Attachment avoidance, but not attachment anxiety, moderated the manipulation’s effect on relationship satisfaction. Perceiving that a partner signals high commitment when the threat of online alternatives is salient may be one specific route to mitigate attachment avoidance’s impact on relationship satisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-06-30T05:14:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231186960
       
  • Erratum to Parental stress mediates the effects of parental risk factors
           on dysfunctional parenting in first-time parents: A dyadic longitudinal
           study

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      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-06-22T12:22:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231184428
       
  • Discrepancies in Parent-Adolescent Educational and Career Expectations and
           Overparenting

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      Authors: Peipei Hong, Ming Cui
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Informed by the goodness-of-fit model, goal theories, and literature on support gaps, this study examines the associations between congruence/discrepancies in parent-adolescent expectations of the adolescent’s educational and career goals and adolescents’ perceived overparenting. Data were collected through a survey of 122 parent-adolescent dyads from four high schools in the U.S. Results from second-order polynomial regression with response surface analysis indicated that parental high educational or career goal expectation alone was not necessarily related to adolescents’ perception of overparenting. Rather, adolescents’ perception of overparenting depended on the congruence/discrepancies in parents’ and adolescents’ expectations. Compared to parent-adolescent congruence in high or low expectations, either direction of expectation discrepancies—either parents’ expectation exceeds adolescents’ expectation, or adolescents’ expectation exceeds their parents—was more likely to be associated with adolescents’ perception of overparenting. Parenting intervention and educational programs should acknowledge that discrepancies in parents’ and adolescents’ educational and career goals could potentially contribute to parental overparenting. Fostering communication and negotiation of goal expectations between parents and adolescents may help reduce the practice of overparenting.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-05-24T04:47:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231177865
       
  • Developmental Differences in Reported Overparenting, Autonomy, and Glucose
           Monitoring within a Medical Specialty Camp Context

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      Authors: Ryan J. Gagnon, Barry A. Garst, Leslie E. Heffington
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Developmentally inappropriate and excessive parenting can manifest at higher levels in children with Type 1 diabetes (T1D). A child’s age, level of T1D training, and time since T1D diagnosis have been associated with higher levels of developmentally excessive parenting (i.e., overparenting), lower rates of autonomy granting, and lower rates of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Utilizing a structural equation model, the present study examined these associations with data collected from a medical specialty camp (MSC) serving 262 youth with T1D. Respondents primarily identified as female (59.5%), were an average 13.83 years old, and had attended the MSC for an average of 3.72 years. Respondents had an average of 5.95 years since T1D diagnosis, an average of 2.62 years utilizing a CGM, reported checking their CGM data an average of 12.75 times per day, and an average of 12.02 parent CGM checks per day. As youth age increased, rates of overparenting decreased. Similarly, youth with more MSC experience reported lower rates of overparenting. Contrary to the study hypotheses, overparenting had a positive effect on autonomy granting. Finally, a negative relation was found between years with T1D and average CGM checks, consistent with the broader T1D literature where adherence to diabetes management tends to decline in parallel with youth experience level managing T1D.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-05-06T10:58:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231173459
       
  • Overprotective parenting and social anxiety in adolescents: The role of
           emotion regulation

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      Authors: Louise Mathijs, Bénédicte Mouton, Grégoire Zimmermann, Stijn Van Petegem
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      The present study sought to examine the underlying mechanisms through which overprotective parenting relates to social anxiety symptoms in adolescents. Specifically, we tested whether the adolescents’ emotion regulation strategies of dysregulation, suppression, and integration, played an intervening role in the association between perceived maternal and paternal overprotection and social anxiety symptoms in adolescents. A sample of 278 Swiss adolescents filled out questionnaires assessing perceived overprotective parenting, social anxiety symptoms and emotion regulation. Results indicated that perceived overprotective parenting was significantly associated with adolescents’ social anxiety symptoms. Furthermore, structural equation modeling analyses indicated that emotional dysregulation, in particular, intervenes in the association between both maternal and paternal overprotection and social anxiety. These findings highlight emotion regulation difficulties as a potential mechanism underlying the association between parental overprotection and social anxiety, suggesting that adolescents’ maladaptive emotion regulation strategies as well as overprotecting parenting could be targeted when treating social anxiety symptoms.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-05-05T07:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231173722
       
  • Parent-emerging adult text interactions and emerging adult perceived
           parental support of autonomy

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      Authors: Morgan T. Brown, Michaeline Jensen, Andrea M. Hussong
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Parents play an important role in scaffolding autonomy and independence as their children transition to adulthood. In the digital age, mobile phones allow for increased connection at this important developmental transition, but we know little about the extent to which digital connection may help (i.e., through developmentally appropriate support) or hinder (i.e., through intrusiveness or helicopter parenting) emerging adult (EA) autonomy development. We tested whether digital parent-EA interactions tapping engagement, monitoring, and responsiveness were associated with EA perceptions of parental autonomy support in a sample of 238 college students (Mage = 19.85) who contributed all text messages exchanged with their parents over 2 weeks. Results indicate that many dimensions of parent-EA text message interactions are unrelated to perceived parental autonomy support, but those that did emerge point towards a potentially maladaptive role of overparenting in associations with less perceived parental autonomy support. Results underscore that, for most EAs, parental text messaging is not likely to be perceived as autonomy inhibiting, but that for a small minority of parent-EA dyads, intense levels of digital connection with parents may be associated with perceived autonomy inhibition.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-04-06T07:33:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231167347
       
  • Greater average levels of relatedness need fulfilment across daily and
           monthly life predict lower attachment insecurities across time

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      Authors: Yuthika U. Girme, Nickola C. Overall
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Attachment insecurity is characterized by chronic concerns about whether partners can fulfil core relatedness needs, including feeling loved and cared about. In two longitudinal studies, our aim was to extend current evidence that certain relationship conditions buffer attachment insecurity by (1) focusing on the central ingredient—fulfilment of relatedness needs—that likely account for buffering effects, and (2) illustrate the importance of general experiences of relatedness need fulfilment across couples’ lives. Couple members completed initial assessments of attachment insecurity, reported on the fulfilment of relatedness needs every month for 6 months (Study 1) or daily for 3 weeks (Study 2), and then completed re-assessments of attachment insecurity 6-months (Study 1) or 9-months (Study 2) later. Across both studies, greater fulfilment of relatedness needs across monthly and daily relationship life predicted decreases in attachment anxiety and avoidance. General experiences of relatedness across couples’ lives appear to reflect a relationship environment that fulfils core needs for love, care, and regard that cultivate attachment security.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-04-03T05:44:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231162390
       
  • Understanding the Link Between Anxious Parental Overprotection and
           Academic Confidence in Emerging Adults: Mediation through Interpersonal
           and Intrapersonal Processes

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      Authors: Mary B Eberly Lewis, Justin J Slater, Meredith McGinley, Wendy M Rote
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Some parents may engage in overparenting, often characterized as overprotection, to ensure their college student’s academic success, yet, findings show that such parental efforts undermine performance. In the present study, we propose that there are interpersonal (parental hostility) and intrapersonal factors (depression and self-regulation) that act as mechanisms through which anxious overprotective parenting leads to diminished emerging adult academic confidence. Emerging adults (N = 967; 75.6% women; Mage = 18.71, SD = .94) who were primarily in their first (60.5%) or second (35.7%) year of college completed measures of academic confidence (academic adjustment, academic efficacy, confidence in graduating), reports of mothers’ and fathers’ anxious overprotective parenting, perceptions of maternal and paternal hostility, depression, and self-regulation. Employing a double mediation structural equation model, results revealed that anxious maternal and paternal overprotective parenting operated through perceived parental hostility to intrapersonal processes (depression, self-regulation) in predicting academic confidence. Maternal and paternal hostility, in particular, was paramount as an interpersonal mediator through which overprotective parenting led to emerging adult intrapersonal and academic outcomes. Although cross-sectional, the current findings are suggestive of the developmental cascade model (Masten & Cicchetti, 2010), whereby diminished family dynamics are associated with internalizing symptoms and self-regulatory issues, which, in turn, are linked with lower academic achievement in children.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-03-01T02:50:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231160131
       
  • Lonely Algorithms: A Longitudinal Investigation Into the Bidirectional
           Relationship Between Algorithm Responsiveness and Loneliness

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      Authors: Samuel Hardman Taylor, Mina Choi
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      This research project addresses the role algorithms play in curating meaningful social connections on social media by examining perceived algorithm responsiveness (PAR) and perceived algorithm insensitivity (PAI) within the framework of the bidirectional model of social internet use and loneliness. In study 1, a cross-sectional survey found that PAR and PAI on Instagram are both associated with loneliness, and that the association for PAR depends upon age. In study 2, a 3-wave longitudinal survey replicates these associations. Online relational maintenance behaviors explained the negative relationship between PAR and loneliness but not the positive relationship for PAI and loneliness. Loneliness at wave t-1 predicted perceptions of algorithm responsiveness at wave t but not vice versa. This research contributes to social media uses and effects by theorizing and empirically testing the connection of algorithms with loneliness, finding that perceptions of social media algorithms are associated with perceived social isolation.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-02-25T05:30:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231156623
       
  • Directly-measured smartphone screen time predicts well-being and feelings
           of social connectedness

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      Authors: Christine Anderl, Marlise K. Hofer, Frances S. Chen
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Previous findings on the relationship between smartphone use and well-being have been mixed. This may be partially due to a reliance on cross-sectional study designs and self-reported smartphone usage. In the current study, we collected screen time data by directly tracking participants’ (N = 325, ages 14−80 years, 58% women) smartphone usage over a period of 6 days. We combined this tracking with ecological momentary assessment, asking participants three times per day about their psychological well-being and feelings of social connectedness. Smartphone screen time was determined for the hour directly before each assessment. Results revealed that at times when participants used their smartphone more in the hour before an assessment, they reported lower psychological well-being and lower social connectedness. A bidirectional relationship emerged between smartphone screen time and social connectedness, suggesting a potential “vicious cycle” whereby smartphone usage leads to reduced social connectedness, which promotes more smartphone usage.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-02-23T04:53:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231158300
       
  • Texting or face-to-face for support-seeking in romantic relationships: The
           role of affordances and attachment

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      Authors: Y. Anthony Chen, Runzhi Mary Lu
      Abstract: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Ahead of Print.
      Support-seeking, a critical and strategic function of close relationships, is increasingly practiced via texting. Guided by attachment theory and an affordance-centric approach, this study investigated to what extent individuals in a romantic relationship would use texting and face-to-face for support-seeking, and what stimulates their interest in mediated support-seeking. A survey of college students in exclusive romantic relationships (N = 211) found that several affordances (i.e., accessibility, the availability of social cues, and conversation control) were associated with varying levels of interest in texting or face-to-face for support-seeking. Both accessibility and the availability of social cues were perceived as less important by avoidant individuals, which was related to a lack of interest in texting and face-to-face interactions for support-seeking. Anxious individuals valued the availability of social cues more, which led to a greater interest in face-to-face interactions when seeking assistance. These findings contribute to a better understanding of support-seeking behavior in today’s mediated world.
      Citation: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
      PubDate: 2023-01-20T10:34:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02654075231152910
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 376)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 301)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 270)
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Qualitative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Judgment and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Sociolinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 20)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Studies in Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Research in Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Classical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Political Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Sociology: Revue Internationale de Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Japanese Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
New Zealand Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Mathematical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Italian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Public and Professional Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue de la régulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue Internationale De Securite Sociale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Landscapes of Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Liinc em Revista     Open Access  
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Socio-logos     Open Access  

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