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Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.949
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 27  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0022-1465 - ISSN (Online) 2150-6000
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Does Children’s Education Improve Parental Health and Longevity'
           Causal Evidence from Great Britain

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      Authors: Cecilia Potente, Patrick Präg, Christiaan W. S. Monden
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Parents with better-educated children are healthier and live longer, but whether there is a causal effect of children’s education on their parents’ health and longevity is unclear. First, we demonstrate an association between adults’ offspring education and parental mortality in the 1958 British birth cohort study, which remains substantial—about two additional years of life—even when comparing parents with similar socioeconomic status. Second, we use the 1972 educational reform in England and Wales, which increased the minimum school leaving age from 15 to 16 years, to identify the presence of a causal effect of children’s education on parental health and longevity using census-linked data from the Office for National Statistics Longitudinal Study. Results reveal that children’s education has no causal effects on a wide range of parental mortality and health outcomes. We interpret these findings discussing the role of universal health care and education for socioeconomic inequality in Great Britain.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T09:49:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221143089
       
  • Ongoing Remote Work, Returning to Working at Work, or in between during
           COVID-19: What Promotes Subjective Well-being'

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      Authors: Wen Fan, Phyllis Moen
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic precipitated a massive turn to remote work, followed by subsequent shifts for many into hybrid or fully returning to the office. To understand the patterned dynamics of subjective well-being associated with shifting places of work, we conducted a nationally representative panel survey (October 2020 and April 2021) of U.S. employees who worked remotely at some point since the pandemic (N = 1,817). Cluster analysis identified four patterned constellations of well-being based on burnout, work–life conflict, and job and life satisfaction. A total return to office is generally more stressful, leading to significantly lower probabilities of being in the optimal low stress/high satisfaction constellation by Wave 2, especially for men and women without care obligations. Remote and hybrid arrangements have salutary effects; moving to hybrid is especially positive for minority men and less educated men, although it disadvantages White women’s well-being.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T07:29:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221150283
       
  • Health, Suicidal Thoughts, and the Life Course: How Worsening Health
           Emerges as a Determinant of Suicide Ideation in Early Adulthood

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      Authors: Carlyn Graham, Andrew Fenelon
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Poor physical health places adults at greater risk for suicide ideation. However, the linkage between health and suicidal thoughts may emerge and become established during early adulthood, concomitant with other social processes underlying suicidality. Using nationally representative survey data from Waves III through V of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (n = 8,331), we examine the emergence of health as a predictor of suicide ideation across the early adult life course (ages 18–43). We find that worsening health does not significantly predict suicide ideation until young adults approach the transition into midlife. Our findings suggest this may be due to the increasing severity of health problems, reduced social network engagement, and disruption of social responsibilities later in early adulthood. Our findings underscore the need for social science research to examine the relationship between mental and physical health from a life course perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T08:08:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221143768
       
  • Editorial Acknowledgment of Reviewers

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      Pages: 629 - 631
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Volume 63, Issue 4, Page 629-631, December 2022.

      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-11-29T09:56:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221134674
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Fatherhood, Behavioral Health, and Criminal Legal System Contact over the
           Life Course

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      Authors: Tasseli McKay, Eman Tadros
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Life course theories suggest that fathers’ lifetime criminal legal system contact could contribute to poor parent–child outcomes via deterioration in couple relationship quality and fathers’ behavioral health. Using paired, longitudinal data from the Multi-site Family Study (N = 1,112 couples), the current study examines the influence of three dimensions of fathers’ life course legal system contact on individual and parent–child outcomes. In fitted models, accumulated system contact in adulthood predicts fathers’ later depressive symptoms and drug misuse, which in turn predict diminished father–child relationship quality (as reported by both co-parents). Fathers who were older at the time of their first arrest had poorer relationships with their children’s mothers and, in turn, poorer behavioral health and parent–child outcomes. Conditions of confinement during fathers’ most recent prison stay do not significantly predict later parent–child outcomes, net of the influence of age at first arrest and accumulated criminal legal system contact in adulthood.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-12-21T09:12:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221139246
       
  • Whose Good Death' Valuation and Standardization as Mechanisms of
           Inequality in Hospitals

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      Authors: Katrina E. Hauschildt
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Although most clinicians have come to perceive invasive life-sustaining treatments as overly aggressive at the end of life, some of the public and greater proportions of some socially disadvantaged groups have not. Drawing on 1,500+ hours of observation in four intensive care units and 69 interviews with physicians and patients’ family members, I find inequality occurs through two mechanisms complementary to the cultural health capital and fundamental causes explanations prevalent in existing health disparities literature: in valuation, as the attitudes and values of the socially disadvantaged are challenged and ignored, and in standardization, as the outcomes preferred by less advantaged groups are defined as inappropriate and made harder to obtain by the informal and formal practices and policies of racialized organizations. I argue inequality is produced in part because wealthier and White elites shape institutional preferences and practices and, therefore, institutions and clinical standards to reflect their cultural tastes.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T06:33:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221143088
       
  • The Biomedical Subjectification of Women of Advanced Maternal Age:
           Reproductive Risk, Privilege, and the Illusion of Control

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      Authors: Emily S. Mann, Dana Berkowitz
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The United States is experiencing a demographic transition toward older motherhood. Biomedicine classifies pregnancies among all women of advanced maternal age (AMA) as high-risk; paradoxically, women having first births at AMA are typically economically and racially privileged, which can reduce the risk of risks. This article examines the implications of the biomedicalization of AMA for first-time mothers, age 35 and older, using qualitative interviews. We find participants had substantial cultural health capital, which informed their critiques of AMA and the medical model of birth. When they found themselves subjected to biomedical protocols and concerned about reproductive risk as their pregnancies progressed, their subsequent biomedical subjectification compelled most to accept biomedical interventions. Consequently, some participants had traumatic birth experiences. Our findings illustrate that while first-time mothers of AMA anticipated that they would have more control over the birth process because of their advantages, ultimately, most did not.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T09:56:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221136252
       
  • Race, Toxic Exposures, and Environmental Health: The Contestation of Lupus
           among Farmworkers

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      Authors: Alison E. Adams, Anne Saville, Thomas E. Shriver
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Extant research has established that low-wage workers of color are at higher risk for occupational exposures. While the medical sociology literature regarding contested illness provides insights into the dynamics surrounding workplace exposures, some environmental illnesses such as lupus have gotten scant analytical attention. This is a significant gap because women of color, who are more likely to hold these high-risk jobs, are disproportionately affected by the disease. We examine a case of pesticide exposure among Black women farmworkers in Florida. We investigate how race and occupation intersect to shape lived experiences with toxics and what role race plays in the process of contesting exposures and illness. Our data include in-depth interviews (N = 36), media coverage, and archival materials. Our findings indicate that race-related factors played an important part in shaping the farmworkers’ experiences with exposures, illness, and interaction with elite actors.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T09:50:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221132787
       
  • Romantic Unions and Mental Health: The Role of Relationship Churning

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      Authors: Sarah Halpern-Meekin, Kristin Turney
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The stress process perspective suggests that romantic relationship transitions can be stressors that impair mental health. Research on romantic relationships and mental health has ignored one common stressor, on-again/off-again relationships, or churning. Using five waves of data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3,176), we examine associations between relationship churning and mothers’ mental health. We find that mothers experiencing relationship churning have worse mental health than mothers in stably together relationships, net of characteristics associated with selection into relationship instability; these associations persist over four years. Mothers experiencing relationship churning have similar mental health as their counterparts who experience union dissolution (with or without repartnering). Current relationship status and quality explain some of the differences between churning and stably together mothers. Findings emphasize attending to multiple types of family stressors—even stressors and instability in ongoing relationships—and the micro-level ecological factors that shape mental health.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-10-19T07:07:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221126091
       
  • “Si Mis Papas Estuvieran Aquí”: Unaccompanied Youth Workers’
           Emergent Frame of Reference and Health in the United States

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      Authors: Stephanie L. Canizales
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Relying on in-depth interviews and ethnographic data in Los Angeles, California, this study examines the health experiences of unaccompanied, undocumented Latin American-origin immigrant youth as they come of age as low-wage workers. Findings demonstrate that unaccompanied, undocumented youth undergo cumulative physical and mental health disadvantages in the United States’s secondary labor market and during critical developmental life stages while lacking the parental monitoring and guidance to navigate them. Developing comparisons between their past and present living conditions and between themselves and other youth in Los Angeles—what I refer to as an emergent frame of reference—youth workers come to perceive family disruptions, and especially separation from their parents, as the most salient factor affecting their health. While some youth ultimately resign themselves to short-term attempts to assuage illness, injury, or distress through activities like substance abuse, others pursue community connections and support groups that can sustain them long term.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-09-10T06:12:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221122831
       
  • The Long Arm of Childhood: Does It Vary According to Health Care System
           Quality'

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      Authors: Matthew A. Andersson, Lindsay R. Wilkinson, Markus H. Schafer
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Increasing evidence points to the salience of early life experiences in shaping health inequalities, but scant research has considered the role of institutional resources as buffers in this relationship. Health care systems in particular are an understudied yet important context for the generation of inequalities from childhood into adulthood. This research investigates associations between childhood disadvantage and adult morbidity and examines the role of health care system quality in this relationship. We also consider the role of adult socioeconomic status. We merge individual-level data on major disease (2014 European Social Survey) with nation-level health care indicators. Results across subjective and objective approaches to health care system quality are similar, indicating a reduced association between childhood socioeconomic status and adult disease in countries with higher quality health care. In total, our results reiterate the long-term influence of childhood disadvantage on health while suggesting health care’s specific role as an institutional resource for ameliorating life course health inequalities.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T06:40:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221120099
       
  • Why Your Doctor Didn’t Go to Class: Student Culture, High-Stakes
           Testing, and Novel Coupling Configurations in an Allopathic Medical School
           

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      Authors: Judson G. Everitt, James M. Johnson, William H. Burr
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      A clear pattern has emerged in allopathic medical schools across the United States: Most medical students have stopped going to class. While this trend among students is well known in medical education, few studies to date have examined the underlying sociological mechanisms driving this collective behavior or how these dynamics are related to institutional change in medical education. Drawing on 33 in-depth interviews with medical students in an allopathic medical school, we examine medical student culture and its role in shaping how medical students make sense of the institutionalized licensing requirement of the United States Medical Licensing Exam. We find that medical students learn to rely on digital recordings of their course content and third-party digital resources for Step 1 prep and stop attending their academic courses in person altogether. We argue that medical students create novel coupling configurations between local interaction and institutionalized licensure rules via their student cultures.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-08-29T12:33:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221118584
       
  • Income Inequality and Population Health: Examining the Role of Social
           Policy

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      Authors: Michael J. McFarland, Terrence D. Hill, Jennifer Karas Montez
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Studies of the relationship between income inequality and life expectancy often speculate about the role of policy, but direct empirical research is limited. Drawing on the neo-materialist perspective, we examine whether the longitudinal association between income inequality and life expectancy is mediated and moderated by policy liberalism in U.S. states (2000–2014). More liberal policy contexts are characterized by greater efforts to regulate the economy, redistribute income, and protect vulnerable groups and lesser efforts to penalize deviant social behavior. We find that state-level income inequality is inversely associated with policy liberalism and life expectancy. The association between income inequality and life expectancy was not mediated by policy liberalism but was moderated by it. The association is attenuated in states with more liberal policy contexts, supporting the neo-materialist perspective. This finding illustrates how states like New York and California (with liberal policy contexts) can exhibit high income inequality and high life expectancy.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-07-16T08:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221109202
       
  • The Roles of Adolescent Occupational Expectations and Preparation in Adult
           Suicide and Drug Poisoning Deaths within a Shifting Labor Market

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      Authors: Jamie M. Carroll, Alicia Duncombe, Anna S. Mueller, Chandra Muller
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Research suggests that economic declines contribute to mortality risks from suicide and drug poisoning, but how the economy impacts individuals’ risks of these deaths has been challenging to specify. Building on recent theoretical advances, we investigate how adolescent occupational expectations and preparation contribute to suicide and drug poisoning deaths in a shifting economy. We use High School and Beyond data linked to adult mortality records for men that were exposed to a decline in labor market share and wages in predominantly blue-collar occupations during early adulthood. We find that adolescent men who expected these occupations had increased risks of suicide and drug poisoning death as adults net of educational and occupational attainment in early adulthood. Family background and occupational preparation are risk factors for death by drug poisoning but not suicide. Our findings improve our understanding of how labor market uncertainty shapes individuals’ vulnerability to suicide and drug poisoning death.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T04:55:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465211073117
       
  • Racial/Ethnic Residential Clustering and Early COVID-19 Vaccine
           Allocations in Five Urban Texas Counties

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      Authors: Kathryn Freeman Anderson, Darra Ray-Warren
      First page: 471
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T11:30:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221130917
       
  • Racial-Ethnic Residential Clustering and Early COVID-19 Vaccine
           Allocations in Five Urban Texas Counties

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      Authors: Kathryn Freeman Anderson, Darra Ray-Warren
      First page: 472
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has indicated that racial-ethnic minority communities lack a wide variety of health-related organizations. We examine how this relates to the early COVID-19 vaccine rollout. In a series of spatial error and linear growth models, we analyze how racial-ethnic residential segregation is associated with the distribution of vaccine sites and vaccine doses across ZIP codes in the five largest urban counties in Texas. We find that Black and Latino clustered ZIP codes are less likely to have vaccine distribution sites and that this disparity is partially explained by the lack of hospitals and physicians’ offices in these areas. Moreover, Black clustering is also negatively related to the number of allocated vaccine doses, and again, this is largely explained by the unequal distribution of health care resources. These results suggest that extant disparities in service provision are key to understanding racial-ethnic inequality in an acute crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T05:22:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221074915
       
  • Clinical Need, Perceived Need, and Treatment Use: Estimating Unmet Need
           for Mental Health Services in the Adult Population

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      Authors: Peggy A. Thoits
      First page: 491
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Estimates of unmet need for mental health services in the adult population are too high because many recover without treatment. Untreated recovery suggests that individuals accurately perceive professional help as unnecessary and do not pursue it. If so, perceived need for treatment should predict service use/nonuse more strongly than the presence or seriousness of disorder. With National Comorbidity Survey-Replication data, respondents who recovered from prior disorder by the current year (N = 1,054) were compared to currently unrecovered respondents with less serious (N = 999) and more serious disorders (N = 294). Perceived need covaried positively with the presence and seriousness of disorder and linked to far higher odds of treatment use than disorder seriousness, supporting perceptual accuracy. Two-thirds of respondents who perceived a treatment need obtained care; only one-third had unmet need. Need perceptions may better estimate a treatment gap and prompt research on individuals’ self-assessments and treatment decision-making.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T05:41:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221114487
       
  • Resentment Is Like Drinking Poison' The Heterogeneous Health Effects
           of Affective Polarization

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      Authors: Micah H. Nelson
      First page: 508
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Affective polarization—the tendency for individuals to exhibit animosity toward those on the opposite side of the partisan divide—has increased in the United States in recent years. This article presents evidence that this trend may have consequences for Americans’ health. Structural equation model analyses of nationally representative survey data from Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel (n = 4,685) showed heterogeneous relationships between affectively polarized attitudes and self-rated health. On one hand, such attitudes were directly negatively associated with health such that the polarized political environment was proposed to operate as a sociopolitical stressor. Simultaneously, affective polarization was positively associated with political participation, which in turn was positively associated with health, although the direct negative effect was substantially larger than the indirect positive one. These results suggest that today’s increasingly hostile and pervasive form of partisanship may undermine Americans’ health even as it induces greater political engagement.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T05:24:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221075311
       
  • Postmortem Diagnostic Overshadowing: Reporting Cerebral Palsy on Death
           Certificates

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      Authors: Scott D. Landes, J. Dalton Stevens, Margaret A. Turk
      First page: 525
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Postmortem diagnostic overshadowing—defined as inaccurately reporting a disability as the underlying cause of death—occurs for over half of adults with cerebral palsy. This practice obscures cause of death trends, reducing the effectiveness of efforts to reduce premature mortality among this marginalized health population. Using data from the National Vital Statistics System 2005 to 2017 U.S. Multiple Cause of Death files (N = 29,996), we identify factors (sociodemographic characteristics, aspects of the context and processing of death, and comorbidities) associated with the inaccurate reporting of cerebral palsy as the underlying cause of death. Results suggest that inaccurate reporting is associated with heightened contexts of clinical uncertainty, the false equivalence of disability and health, and potential racial-ethnic bias. Ending postmortem diagnostic overshadowing will require training on disability and health for those certifying death certificates and efforts to redress ableist death certification policies.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T10:13:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221078313
       
  • The Long Arm of Prospective Childhood Income for Mature Adult Health in
           the United States

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      Authors: David Brady, Christian Guerra, Ulrich Kohler, Bruce Link
      First page: 543
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Pioneering scholarship links retrospective childhood conditions to mature adult health. We distinctively provide critical evidence with prospective state-of-the-art measures of parent income observed multiple times during childhood in the 1970s to 1990s. Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, we analyze six health outcomes (self-rated health, heart attack, stroke, life-threatening chronic conditions, non-life-threatening chronic conditions, and psychological distress) among 40- to 65-year-olds. Parent relative income rank has statistically and substantively significant relationships with five of six outcomes. The relationships with heart attack, stroke, and life-threatening chronic conditions are particularly strong. Parent income rank performs slightly better than alternative prospective and retrospective measures. At the same time, we provide novel validation on which retrospective measures (i.e., father’s education) perform almost as well as prospective measures. Furthermore, we inform several perennial debates about how relative versus absolute income and other measures of socioeconomic status and social class influence health.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T06:45:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221081094
       
  • Triage in Times of COVID-19: A Moral Dilemma

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      Authors: Andreas Tutić, Ivar Krumpal, Friederike Haiser
      First page: 560
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      We present evidence from choice experiments on hypothetical triage decisions in a pandemic. Respondents have to decide who out of two patients gets ventilation. Patients are described in terms of attributes such as short-term survival chance, long-term life expectancy, and their current ventilation status. Attributes are derived from the ethical discourse among experts regarding triage guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic and differ in the extent to which they are salient from a utilitarian or deontological perspective. Empirically, we find that although nonexperts agree with experts in prioritizing utilitarian attributes in triage decisions, nonexperts also consider the adherence to the norm of wearing face masks as particularly relevant. Furthermore, our study supports Greene and colleagues’ dual-process model of moral judgment; we find that utilitarian attributes are more decisive for respondents with a greater inclination toward utilitarianism and for respondents with a greater tendency toward reflection.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T09:58:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221080958
       
  • Sexual Fluidity and Psychological Distress: What Happens When Young
           Women’s Sexual Identities Change'

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      Authors: Alice Campbell, Francisco Perales, Tonda L. Hughes, Bethany G. Everett, Janeen Baxter
      First page: 577
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The sexual identities of young women today are less binary and more fluid than ever before. Several theoretical perspectives imply that this fluidity could be accompanied by distress. To examine this, we analyzed four waves of data from Australian women born 1989 to 1995 (n = 11,527). We found no evidence of a universal association between sexual identity change and psychological distress. Instead, psychological distress was elevated when women changed their identity away from the heterosexual norm and lowered when they changed their identity toward it. Social stress partly attenuated these associations. In addition, women unsure of their identity at multiple assessment points reported significantly greater psychological distress in the final assessment than women who were never unsure. Our findings suggest that greater support should be offered to women who are questioning their sexual identity or developing a minority identity.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T01:23:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221086335
       
  • Mental Health before and during the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Role of
           Partnership and Parenthood Status in Growing Disparities between Types of
           Families

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      Authors: Nicole Hiekel, Mine Kühn
      First page: 594
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates mental health inequalities by family type and gender during the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany. Using data from the German Family Panel, we compared three dimensions of mental health (i.e., self-reported stress, exhaustion, and loneliness) one year before the pandemic and in spring 2020. First, two-parent families emerged as a vulnerable group, as the levels of stress and exhaustion they reported during the pandemic converged with those experienced by single parents. Second, a gender gap emerged during this global health crisis, with women, and particularly mothers, reporting significantly worse mental health compared to men in the same family type. Our findings underline the substantive value of studying mental health inequality from a multidimensional perspective and over time. Based on these findings, we urge policy makers to consider more seriously the disproportionate burdens that families, and women in particular, have been carrying due to the pandemic both directly and indirectly.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T08:29:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221109195
       
  • Multiple Family Member Deaths and Cardiometabolic Health among Black and
           White Older Adults

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      Authors: Rachel Donnelly, Hyungmin Cha, Debra Umberson
      First page: 610
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Although the bereavement literature is voluminous, we know very little about how exposure to multiple family member deaths across the life course shapes health trajectories as people age and whether unequal exposure to bereavement contributes to racial inequities in cardiometabolic health. We use longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study (1992–2016) to consider how multiple family member deaths before midlife shape trajectories of cardiometabolic health after age 50 for Black and white adults (n = 22,974). Results show that multiple family member deaths prior to age 50 are associated with more cardiometabolic conditions at age 50 and a faster increase in conditions with advancing age. Moreover, Black adults are significantly disadvantaged by a greater risk of bereavement and more cardiometabolic conditions regardless of bereavement status. The life course trauma of exposure to multiple family member deaths uniquely contributes to the cardiometabolic risk of Black Americans.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-08-06T05:00:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221114485
       
 
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