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Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.949
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 27  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0022-1465 - ISSN (Online) 2150-6000
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Policy Brief

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      Authors: Katharine McCabe
      Pages: 161 - 161
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Volume 63, Issue 2, Page 161-161, June 2022.

      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T06:49:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221097453
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Multiple Family Member Deaths and Cardiometabolic Health among Black and
           White Older Adults

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      Authors: Rachel Donnelly, Hyungmin Cha, Debra Umberson
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Although the bereavement literature is voluminous, we know very little about how exposure to multiple family member deaths across the life course shapes health trajectories as people age and whether unequal exposure to bereavement contributes to racial inequities in cardiometabolic health. We use longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study (1992–2016) to consider how multiple family member deaths before midlife shape trajectories of cardiometabolic health after age 50 for Black and white adults (n = 22,974). Results show that multiple family member deaths prior to age 50 are associated with more cardiometabolic conditions at age 50 and a faster increase in conditions with advancing age. Moreover, Black adults are significantly disadvantaged by a greater risk of bereavement and more cardiometabolic conditions regardless of bereavement status. The life course trauma of exposure to multiple family member deaths uniquely contributes to the cardiometabolic risk of Black Americans.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-08-06T05:00:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221114485
       
  • Gender and Social Isolation across the Life Course

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      Authors: Debra Umberson, Zhiyong Lin, Hyungmin Cha
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Social isolation has robust adverse effects on health, well-being, dementia risk, and longevity. Although most studies suggest similar effects of isolation on the health of men and women, there has been much less attention to gendered patterns of social isolation over the life course—despite decades of research suggesting gender differences in social ties. We build on theoretical frames of constrained choice and gender-as-relational to argue that gender differences in isolation are apparent but depend on timing in the life course and marital/partnership history. Results indicate that boys/men are more isolated than girls/women through most of the life course, and this gender difference is much greater for the never married and those with disrupted relationship histories. Strikingly, levels of social isolation steadily increase from adolescence through later life for both men and women.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T10:39:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221109634
       
  • Income Inequality and Population Health: Examining the Role of Social
           Policy

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      Authors: Michael J. McFarland, Terrence D. Hill, Jennifer Karas Montez
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Studies of the relationship between income inequality and life expectancy often speculate about the role of policy, but direct empirical research is limited. Drawing on the neo-materialist perspective, we examine whether the longitudinal association between income inequality and life expectancy is mediated and moderated by policy liberalism in U.S. states (2000–2014). More liberal policy contexts are characterized by greater efforts to regulate the economy, redistribute income, and protect vulnerable groups and lesser efforts to penalize deviant social behavior. We find that state-level income inequality is inversely associated with policy liberalism and life expectancy. The association between income inequality and life expectancy was not mediated by policy liberalism but was moderated by it. The association is attenuated in states with more liberal policy contexts, supporting the neo-materialist perspective. This finding illustrates how states like New York and California (with liberal policy contexts) can exhibit high income inequality and high life expectancy.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-07-16T08:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221109202
       
  • Mental Health before and during the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Role of
           Partnership and Parenthood Status in Growing Disparities between Types of
           Families

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      Authors: Nicole Hiekel, Mine Kühn
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates mental health inequalities by family type and gender during the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany. Using data from the German Family Panel, we compared three dimensions of mental health (i.e., self-reported stress, exhaustion, and loneliness) one year before the pandemic and in spring 2020. First, two-parent families emerged as a vulnerable group, as the levels of stress and exhaustion they reported during the pandemic converged with those experienced by single parents. Second, a gender gap emerged during this global health crisis, with women, and particularly mothers, reporting significantly worse mental health compared to men in the same family type. Our findings underline the substantive value of studying mental health inequality from a multidimensional perspective and over time. Based on these findings, we urge policy makers to consider more seriously the disproportionate burdens that families, and women in particular, have been carrying due to the pandemic both directly and indirectly.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T08:29:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221109195
       
  • Triage in Times of COVID-19: A Moral Dilemma

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      Authors: Andreas Tutić, Ivar Krumpal, Friederike Haiser
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      We present evidence from choice experiments on hypothetical triage decisions in a pandemic. Respondents have to decide who out of two patients gets ventilation. Patients are described in terms of attributes such as short-term survival chance, long-term life expectancy, and their current ventilation status. Attributes are derived from the ethical discourse among experts regarding triage guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic and differ in the extent to which they are salient from a utilitarian or deontological perspective. Empirically, we find that although nonexperts agree with experts in prioritizing utilitarian attributes in triage decisions, nonexperts also consider the adherence to the norm of wearing face masks as particularly relevant. Furthermore, our study supports Greene and colleagues’ dual-process model of moral judgment; we find that utilitarian attributes are more decisive for respondents with a greater inclination toward utilitarianism and for respondents with a greater tendency toward reflection.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T09:58:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221080958
       
  • Sexual Fluidity and Psychological Distress: What Happens When Young
           Women’s Sexual Identities Change'

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      Authors: Alice Campbell, Francisco Perales, Tonda L. Hughes, Bethany G. Everett, Janeen Baxter
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The sexual identities of young women today are less binary and more fluid than ever before. Several theoretical perspectives imply that this fluidity could be accompanied by distress. To examine this, we analyzed four waves of data from Australian women born 1989 to 1995 (n = 11,527). We found no evidence of a universal association between sexual identity change and psychological distress. Instead, psychological distress was elevated when women changed their identity away from the heterosexual norm and lowered when they changed their identity toward it. Social stress partly attenuated these associations. In addition, women unsure of their identity at multiple assessment points reported significantly greater psychological distress in the final assessment than women who were never unsure. Our findings suggest that greater support should be offered to women who are questioning their sexual identity or developing a minority identity.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T01:23:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221086335
       
  • Postmortem Diagnostic Overshadowing: Reporting Cerebral Palsy on Death
           Certificates

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      Authors: Scott D. Landes, J. Dalton Stevens, Margaret A. Turk
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Postmortem diagnostic overshadowing—defined as inaccurately reporting a disability as the underlying cause of death—occurs for over half of adults with cerebral palsy. This practice obscures cause of death trends, reducing the effectiveness of efforts to reduce premature mortality among this marginalized health population. Using data from the National Vital Statistics System 2005 to 2017 U.S. Multiple Cause of Death files (N = 29,996), we identify factors (sociodemographic characteristics, aspects of the context and processing of death, and comorbidities) associated with the inaccurate reporting of cerebral palsy as the underlying cause of death. Results suggest that inaccurate reporting is associated with heightened contexts of clinical uncertainty, the false equivalence of disability and health, and potential racial-ethnic bias. Ending postmortem diagnostic overshadowing will require training on disability and health for those certifying death certificates and efforts to redress ableist death certification policies.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T10:13:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221078313
       
  • The Long Arm of Prospective Childhood Income for Mature Adult Health in
           the United States

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      Authors: David Brady, Christian Guerra, Ulrich Kohler, Bruce Link
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Pioneering scholarship links retrospective childhood conditions to mature adult health. We distinctively provide critical evidence with prospective state-of-the-art measures of parent income observed multiple times during childhood in the 1970s to 1990s. Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, we analyze six health outcomes (self-rated health, heart attack, stroke, life-threatening chronic conditions, non-life-threatening chronic conditions, and psychological distress) among 40- to 65-year-olds. Parent relative income rank has statistically and substantively significant relationships with five of six outcomes. The relationships with heart attack, stroke, and life-threatening chronic conditions are particularly strong. Parent income rank performs slightly better than alternative prospective and retrospective measures. At the same time, we provide novel validation on which retrospective measures (i.e., father’s education) perform almost as well as prospective measures. Furthermore, we inform several perennial debates about how relative versus absolute income and other measures of socioeconomic status and social class influence health.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T06:45:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221081094
       
  • Public Stigma and Personal Networks: Confronting the Limitations of
           Unidimensional Measures of Social Contact

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      Authors: Brea L. Perry, Elizabeth Felix, Megan Bolton, Erin L. Pullen, Bernice A. Pescosolido
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      One of the most promising directions for reducing mental illness stigma lies in Allport’s contact theory, which suggests that intergroup interactions reduce stigma. Here, we argue that stigmatizing attitudes are driven by the nature, magnitude, and valence of community-based ties to people with mental illness (PMI), not simply their presence. Using the 2018 General Social Survey (N = 1,113), we compare network-based measures of contact to traditional survey indicators. We find that knowing someone with mental illness, or even number of people known, explains little about desire for social distance, perceptions of dangerousness, or endorsement of treatment coercion. However, having stronger relationships with more PMI, having more friends and family (but not more peripheral ties) with mental illness, and knowing people in treatment are associated with less stigma endorsement. In contrast, we find that exposure to PMI who are perceived as dangerous is associated with greater levels of stigma.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T08:50:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465211072311
       
  • Racial-Ethnic Residential Clustering and Early COVID-19 Vaccine
           Allocations in Five Urban Texas Counties

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      Authors: Kathryn Freeman Anderson, Darra Ray-Warren
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has indicated that racial-ethnic minority communities lack a wide variety of health-related organizations. We examine how this relates to the early COVID-19 vaccine rollout. In a series of spatial error and linear growth models, we analyze how racial-ethnic residential segregation is associated with the distribution of vaccine sites and vaccine doses across ZIP codes in the five largest urban counties in Texas. We find that Black and Latino clustered ZIP codes are less likely to have vaccine distribution sites and that this disparity is partially explained by the lack of hospitals and physicians’ offices in these areas. Moreover, Black clustering is also negatively related to the number of allocated vaccine doses, and again, this is largely explained by the unequal distribution of health care resources. These results suggest that extant disparities in service provision are key to understanding racial-ethnic inequality in an acute crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T05:22:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221074915
       
  • The Roles of Adolescent Occupational Expectations and Preparation in Adult
           Suicide and Drug Poisoning Deaths within a Shifting Labor Market

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      Authors: Jamie M. Carroll, Alicia Duncombe, Anna S. Mueller, Chandra Muller
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Research suggests that economic declines contribute to mortality risks from suicide and drug poisoning, but how the economy impacts individuals’ risks of these deaths has been challenging to specify. Building on recent theoretical advances, we investigate how adolescent occupational expectations and preparation contribute to suicide and drug poisoning deaths in a shifting economy. We use High School and Beyond data linked to adult mortality records for men that were exposed to a decline in labor market share and wages in predominantly blue-collar occupations during early adulthood. We find that adolescent men who expected these occupations had increased risks of suicide and drug poisoning death as adults net of educational and occupational attainment in early adulthood. Family background and occupational preparation are risk factors for death by drug poisoning but not suicide. Our findings improve our understanding of how labor market uncertainty shapes individuals’ vulnerability to suicide and drug poisoning death.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T04:55:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465211073117
       
  • Causal Relationships between Personal Networks and Health: A Comparison of
           Three Modeling Strategies

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      Authors: Emily H. Ruppel, Stephanie Child, Claude S. Fischer, Marian Botchway
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Prior research documents associations between personal network characteristics and health, but establishing causation has been a long-standing research priority. To evaluate approaches to causal inference in egocentric network data, this article uses three waves from the University of California Berkeley Social Networks Study (N = 1,159) to investigate connections between nine network variables and two global health outcomes. We compare three modeling strategies: cross-sectional ordinary least squares regression, regression with lagged dependent variables (LDVs), and hybrid fixed and random effects models. Results suggest that cross-sectional and LDV models may overestimate the causal effects of networks on health because hybrid models show that network–health associations operate primarily between individuals, as opposed to network changes causing within-individual changes in health. These findings demonstrate uses of panel data that may advance scholarship on networks and health and suggest that causal effects of network support on health may be more limited than previously thought.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T04:51:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465211072310
       
  • Resentment Is Like Drinking Poison' The Heterogeneous Health Effects
           of Affective Polarization

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      Authors: Micah H. Nelson
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Affective polarization—the tendency for individuals to exhibit animosity toward those on the opposite side of the partisan divide—has increased in the United States in recent years. This article presents evidence that this trend may have consequences for Americans’ health. Structural equation model analyses of nationally representative survey data from Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel (n = 4,685) showed heterogeneous relationships between affectively polarized attitudes and self-rated health. On one hand, such attitudes were directly negatively associated with health such that the polarized political environment was proposed to operate as a sociopolitical stressor. Simultaneously, affective polarization was positively associated with political participation, which in turn was positively associated with health, although the direct negative effect was substantially larger than the indirect positive one. These results suggest that today’s increasingly hostile and pervasive form of partisanship may undermine Americans’ health even as it induces greater political engagement.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T05:24:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221075311
       
  • Explaining the Occupational Structure of Depressive Symptoms: Precarious
           Work and Social Marginality across European Countries

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      Authors: Ross Macmillan, Michael J. Shanahan
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The idea that socioeconomic differences are a “fundamental cause” of health and well-being is the basis for large volumes of research. However, one of the challenges in this area is that of linking socioeconomic positions to etiological mechanisms in theoretically informative ways. The situation is doubly challenging because the expression and meaning of socioeconomic positions and the mechanisms they activate change over time. Focusing on depression and applying mediation analysis to data from a large multinational sample from European countries, we find strong support for a three-stage model where occupational differences are largely mediated by exposure to precarious work, which itself is mediated by social marginality. The model is largely robust across welfare state regimes. Ultimately, the research extends fundamental cause perspectives by highlighting connections between “old” and “new” dimensions of socioeconomic status and the social and social psychological sequelae that connect them to psychological well-being.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-02-09T08:28:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465211072309
       
  • Examining the Association between Racialized Economic Threat and White
           Suicide in the United States, 2000–2016

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      Authors: Simone Rambotti
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Suicide is steadily rising. Many blamed worsening economic conditions for this trend. Sociological theory established clear pathways between joblessness and suicide focused on status threat, shame, and consequent disruption of social relationships. However, recent empirical research provides little support for a link between unemployment and suicide. I attempt to reconcile this contradiction by focusing on white suicide and white employment-to-population ratio. Whiteness is not just a default category but a pervasive ideology that amplifies the effects of status loss. The white employment-to-population ratio represents a form of racialized economic threat and accounts for discouraged workers who have exited the labor force. I use longitudinal hybrid models with U.S. state-level data, 2000 to 2016, and find that decreasing employment is associated with increasing suicide among the white population and white men. I discuss this study’s contributions to the literature on suicide and joblessness and the emerging scholarship on whiteness and health.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-01-16T04:46:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465211069873
       
  • Sandwiched Grandparents and Biological Health Risks in China

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      Authors: Hongwei Xu, Jinyu Liu, Zhenmei Zhang, Lydia Li
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the cross-sectional associations between intergenerational caregiving and health risks among sandwiched Chinese grandparents who provide care to grandchildren, great-grandparents, or both. Drawing on biomarker data from the 2011 wave of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (N range = 2,189–3,035), we measured age-related biological health risks of hypertension, diabetes, inflammation, and allostatic load. We found that health risks did not necessarily increase with the intensity of intergenerational caregiving. Providing care to grandchildren and great-grandparents simultaneously was not as detrimental to health as reported in earlier studies from the United States. Sandwiched grandparents could benefit from providing care to grandchildren or great-grandparents only. These unexpected findings might be related to the cultural mandates of filial piety and family solidarity in China. Grandfathers and grandmothers experienced different associations between varying types of intergenerational caregiving and health risks.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T08:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465211069895
       
  • Dualized Labor Market and Polarized Health: A Longitudinal Perspective on
           the Association between Precarious Employment and Mental and Physical
           Health in Germany

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      Authors: Timo-Kolja Pförtner, Holger Pfaff, Frank J. Elgar
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      This study analyzes the longitudinal association between precarious employment and physical and mental health in a dualized labor market by disaggregating between-employee and within-employee effects and considering mobility in precariousness of employment. Analyses were based on the German Socio-Economic Panel from 2002 to 2018 considering all employees ages 18 to 67 years (n = 38,551). Precariousness of employment was measured as an additive index considering working poverty, nonstandard working time arrangements, perceived job insecurity, and low social rights. Health outcomes were mental and physical health. Random effects models were used and controlled for sociodemographic and socioeconomic variables. Results indicated that the association between precariousness of employment and mental and physical health is mainly based on between-employee differences and that prolonged precariousness of employment or upward or downward mobility are associated with poor health. We found evidence of polarization in health by precariousness of employment within a dualized labor market.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T06:35:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465211066855
       
  • Surveillance, Self-Governance, and Mortality: The Impact of Prescription
           Drug Monitoring Programs on U.S. Overdose Mortality, 2000–2016

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      Authors: Mike Vuolo, Laura C. Frizzell, Brian C. Kelly
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Policy mechanisms shaping population health take numerous forms, from behavioral prohibitions to mandates for action to surveillance. Rising drug overdoses undermined the state’s ability to promote population-level health. Using the case of prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs), we contend that PDMP implementation highlights state biopower operating via mechanisms of surveillance, whereby prescribers, pharmacists, and patients perceive agency despite choices being constrained. We consider whether such surveillance mechanisms are sufficient or if prescriber/dispenser access or requirements for use are necessary for population health impact. We test whether PDMPs reduced overdose mortality while considering that surveillance may require time to reach effectiveness. PDMPs reduced opioid overdose mortality 2 years postimplementation and sustained effects, with similar effects for prescription opioids, benzodiazepines, and psychostimulants. Access or mandates for action do not reduce mortality beyond surveillance. Overall, PDMP effects on overdose mortality are likely due to self-regulation under surveillance rather than mandated action.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T07:09:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465211067209
       
  • Spotlight on Age: An Overlooked Construct in Medical Sociology

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      Authors: Anne E. Barrett, Cherish Michael
      First page: 177
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Medical sociology gives limited attention to age—a surprising observation given the aging of the population and the fact that age is among the strongest determinants of health. We examine this issue through an analysis of articles published in Journal of Health and Social Behavior (JHSB) and Sociology of Health & Illness (SHI) between 2000 and 2019. One in 10 articles focused on age or aging, with attention increasing over the period. However, the journals differed. More JHSB than SHI articles addressed it, but fewer focused on the latest life stages when frailty often appears. We discuss three dimensions of age that would enrich medical sociology: as a dimension of inequality akin to race and gender with similar health effects, as an institution interacting with the medical one, and as an identity—again, akin to race and gender—through which people process their experiences in ways that affect health.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-03-01T08:38:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221077221
       
  • Analytic Advances in Social Networks and Health in the Twenty-First
           Century

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      Authors: Alexander Chapman, Ashton M. Verdery, James Moody
      First page: 191
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The study of social networks is increasingly central to health research for medical sociologists and scholars in other fields. Here, we review the innovations in theory, substance, data collection, and methodology that have propelled the study of social networks and health from a niche subfield to the center of larger sociological and scientific debates. In particular, we contextualize the broader history of network analysis and its connections to health research, concentrating on work beginning in the late 1990s, much of it in this journal. Using bibliometric and network visualization approaches, we examine the subfield’s evolution over this period in terms of topics, trends, key debates, and core insights. We conclude by reflecting on persistent challenges and areas of innovation shaping the study of social networks and health and its intersection with medical sociology in the coming years.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-04-08T08:53:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465221086532
       
  • Structural Racism and Quantitative Causal Inference: A Life Course
           Mediation Framework for Decomposing Racial Health Disparities

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      Authors: Nick Graetz, Courtney E. Boen, Michael H. Esposito
      First page: 232
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Quantitative studies of racial health disparities often use static measures of self-reported race and conventional regression estimators, which critics argue is inconsistent with social-constructivist theories of race, racialization, and racism. We demonstrate an alternative counterfactual approach to explain how multiple racialized systems dynamically shape health over time, examining racial inequities in cardiometabolic risk in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. This framework accounts for the dynamics of time-varying confounding and mediation that is required in operationalizing a “race” variable as part of a social process (racism) rather than a separable, individual characteristic. We decompose the observed disparity into three types of effects: a controlled direct effect (“unobserved racism”), proportions attributable to interaction (“racial discrimination”), and pure indirect effects (“emergent discrimination”). We discuss the limitations of counterfactual approaches while highlighting how they can be combined with critical theories to quantify how interlocking systems produce racial health inequities.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T11:35:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465211066108
       
  • Crossover Effects of Education on Health within Married Couples

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      Authors: Andrew Halpern-Manners, Elaine M. Hernandez, Tabitha G. Wilbur
      First page: 301
      Abstract: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Although empirical work has shown that personal and spousal education are both related to health, the nature of these associations has been harder to establish. People select into marriages on the basis of observed and hard-to-observe characteristics, complicating the job of the researcher who wishes to make causal inferences. In this article, we implement a within-sibling-pair design that exploits variation within pairs in spousal education to generate estimates of spousal crossover effects. Results—based on a long-term study of siblings and their spouses—suggest that spousal education is positively related to health, but to a greater degree for women than men. Sensitivity analyses show that these patterns are unlikely to derive from measured differences between individuals or unmeasured characteristics that sort them into unions. These results are consistent with network-based theories of social capital, which view education as a resource that can be mobilized by network ties to enhance health.
      Citation: Journal of Health and Social Behavior
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T11:33:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00221465211063879
       
 
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