A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Classical Sociology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.22
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1468-795X - ISSN (Online) 1741-2897
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Reframing the classics'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zophia Edwards
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      A number of recent works in sociology call for the decolonization of the discipline. Colonialism and Modern Social Theory adds a critical intervention to this recent body of work by deconstructing the theories that have been canonized in North American and European social theory, and meticulously laying out the systematic erasure of colonialism and imperialism from their concepts and analytical categories. This review focuses on the introductory chapter and overall scope of the book, and draws attention to several potential areas for fruitful future engagement that this text inspires.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T10:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221111766
       
  • “Rethinking Tocqueville: White democracy or American
           democracy'”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennie C Ikuta
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This piece makes two points about “Tocqueville: From America to Algeria.” First, while Bhambra and Holmwood rightly criticize the editorial practice of omitting the “Three Races” chapter from Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, this critique does not go far enough. Even in its unabridged form, Democracy in America is structured to include an extension discussion on race and colonialism while also obscuring its significance. Second, the authors’ critique of Tocqueville’s inability to imagine how Black Americans as free and equal could be included into a system of racialized possession as equals is misplaced.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-27T12:15:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221105967
       
  • Weber: Religion, nation and empire

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sara R Farris
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Colonialism figures in the work of Max Weber in multiple forms. While in his professorial address he supported internal colonialism as the antidote against the threat represented by the immigration of foreigners, in the writings on world religions colonialism appears as displacement, amnesia and Freudian slip. Colonial subjects in particular are portrayed as personalities unable to develop the mentality that would help them to free themselves from what Weber regarded as the chains of a communitarian, gregarious and subaltern life. In the end, I argue that Weber’s work contributed, albeit contradictorily and not always explicitly, to spread an idea of colonial violence as a force of progress and a racist idea of colonial others as backward.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T07:01:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221107226
       
  • Within, beyond or against the canon: What does it mean to decolonize
           social and political theory'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jeanette Ehrmann
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Increasing calls to decolonize the university brought forward by student-led movements have raised the question regarding how to reassess the canon of European social and political thought. This article offers a critical but appreciative reading of Gurminder Bhambra’s and John Holmwood’s Colonialism and Modern Social Theory, based on the first chapter titled “Hobbes to Hegel: Europe and Its Others.” It discusses the strategies of intervention into the canon proposed by the authors and argues for complementary strategies of transformation if decolonizing the canon means to move beyond the myths, metaphors, fictions, and false universals of modern European thought.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T06:57:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221106631
       
  • Tearing asunder the pretty fancies of capitalism: Reflections on Marx and
           empire

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrew Smith
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This chapter argues for a recognition of the nuanced complexity of Marx’s account of empire. In particular, I argue, that account came to be characterised by: (i) a recognition of the historical centrality of anticolonial resistance; (ii) a provincialisation of his own assessment of capitalism’s development in Western Europe; (iii) an understanding of imperialism as a historically regressive force. In seeking to understand the history of European imperialism as a constitutive feature of the modern world we need recourse to a theory of capitalism. In that respect, as generations of writers from the colonised world have demonstrated, Marx’s analysis remains powerfully salient.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T06:53:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221105723
       
  • Book Review: Charles Crothers, Reintroducing Robert K. Merton

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bryan Turner
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T06:51:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221105711
       
  • W.E.B. Du Bois and modern social theory

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nasar Meer
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      How might we move the current discussion of W.E.B Du Bois from a concern with omission to re-construction within modern social theory' Bhambra and Holmwood offer a novel means to do this through revisiting three texts: The Philadelphia Negro (1899), Souls of Black Folk (1903) and Black Reconstruction (1935). The following account explores the benefits of this approach, what it highlights for students and teachers, and discusses where other emphases might also lead a contemporary understanding of Du Bois.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T06:49:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221105594
       
  • Durkheim and the possible connections between social theory and
           colonialism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matt Dawson
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In this piece I explore how Bhambra and Holmwood’s Colonialism and Modern Social Theory implies three different questions that can be asked concerning the connections between colonialism and social theory. With reference to their discussion of Durkheim, I suggest the answers they offer to these possible questions return us to what Kurasawa termed the ‘constitutive paradox’ of Durkheim’s relation to colonialism, namely a mix of political acceptance while also questioning its ideological legitimacy. While exploring Durkheim’s comments on colonialism, race, the state and his own Jewishness, I emphasise the need for a careful historical sociology which reckons with the different possible connections between social theory and colonialism.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T11:05:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221105713
       
  • Editorial: Writing (and righting) the ‘classics’: A symposium on
           Gurminder K Bhambra and John Holmwood’s Colonialism and Modern Social
           Theory, Polity 2021

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gurminder K Bhambra, John Holmwood
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T10:27:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221105421
       
  • Afterword: Writing (and righting) the ‘classics’, a response

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gurminder K Bhambra, John Holmwood
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T12:58:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221105439
       
  • Habitus and personality in the work of Max Weber

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elisabeth Anderson
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Weber’s critique of modernity centred on how it shaped the habitus – life-conduct and motivations – of the modern individual. I explicate six habitus-types that appear in Weber’s work: the early-modern Puritan Berufsmensch, the modern specialist, the modern industrial worker, the politician, the civil servant and the citizen voter. In doing so, I identify the main characteristics of each type and the causal mechanisms through which Western modernity’s core features – capitalism and bureaucracy – brought them into being. Further, I discuss two habitus-related problems that concerned Weber: the general failure of the modern habitus to achieve ‘personality’; and the mismatch between habitus and occupational role in the Wilhelmine political sphere. I then explain the practical reforms through which Weber hoped to address these problems. Finally, I show how this analysis helps resolve two apparent contradictions which have long perplexed Weber scholars.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T04:55:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221099207
       
  • Benjamin’s Baudelaire: Translation and modern experience

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Esperança Bielsa
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article focusses on Walter Benjamin’s approach to the experience of modernity through his long-term engagement with the poetry of Charles Baudelaire. Benjamin translated Baudelaire and produced a theoretical reflection on translation based on this experience in his essay ‘The Task of the Translator’. Years later, he would place Baudelaire at the centre of his attempt to reconstruct the prehistory of modernity in his great unfinished work The Arcades Project. This article brings to light the relationship between translating and interpreting Baudelaire in Benjamin’s work, attempting to recover a systematicity in his thought that escapes from traditional disciplinary borders. In order to do so, it reads Benjamin’s essay on ‘The Task of the Translator’ in light of major issues that can only be clarified with reference to his later adoption of historical materialism and, conversely, it approaches Benjamin’s interpretation of Baudelaire as the writer of modern life as a revision of philosophical concerns that were first approached in his metaphysics of language and translation. A concluding section explores how such an interpretation relates to a materialist physiognomics which puts language and translation at the heart of a critique of modernity.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T11:42:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221097001
       
  • Max Weber and his conservative critics: Social science and the problem of
           value relativism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Martyn Hammersley
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper some fundamental criticisms of Max Weber’s conception of the vocation of science are addressed. These well-known criticisms focus on his admission that science cannot demonstrate its own value, and his broader claim that there can be no rational basis for committing oneself to one set of ultimate values as against another. Instead, he insisted that the adoption of such values is necessarily a matter of individual decision. Influential critics have argued that this amounts to relativism, or even nihilism: that, if it were true, neither science nor anything else could have genuine value, all value-judgements would be arbitrary or entirely instrumental (e.g. a matter of self-interest). I will outline Weber’s position, and then examine the arguments of some of his critics: focussing particularly on Midgley and Strauss. This provides the basis for a careful reassessment of Weber’s position, and for some suggestions about how he could respond to these critics. It is argued that fundamental values operate in a dialectical relationship with specific evaluations, and that they arise naturally out of more or less universal features of human beings’ life experience. While this does not provide a compelling rational basis for commitment to those values, even less for prioritising one over another, it tells us why we often feel a need to uphold them. Furthermore, despite the fact that it does not guarantee agreement, rational clarification of these values and their implications, as well as appraisal of their relative significance in particular cases, is possible.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T09:58:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221096542
       
  • Adventure in the social world: Georg Simmel’s appeal to a theory of
           creative action

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Simon Lafontaine
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Reconstructing the logic of everyday action between reproduction and invention of forms is a growing concern in contemporary debates on the praxeological foundation of sociology. This article argues for a renewed understanding of action in its contingency and creativity. Building on current developments on the role of projectivity and imagination in the emergence of the new and unexpected in action, it turns to Simmel’s undervalued essay “The Adventure” to examine a style of conduct characterized by deviation from predicable patterns and background assumptions in everyday life. To understand the emergent properties and intrinsic complexity of creative action, one must consider the philosophical discoveries of Simmel concerning the form of adventure in the subjective flow of time. The adventure is elaborated as an action involving curiosity, unfamiliar detours, and a sense of presentness as striking features that benefit insights from his later work on life’s transcendence.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T06:16:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221092667
       
  • Race and its reformulation in Max Weber: Cultural Germanism as political
           imperialism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jack Barbalet
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Weber rejected the notion of race founded on innate characteristics, and instead developed one based on cultural and political factors. The importance of Weber’s distinctive characterization of race cannot be appreciated when consideration is given only to his treatment of minorities. Examination, however, of Weber’s account of the German people as a Herrenvolk, master race, consolidated by shared cultural values and realized through the expansive practices of a Machtstaat or power-state, indicates a complex ethnonational conceptualization of race. Weber’s approach to race as an ethnonational manifestation is important for understanding his sociology as well as his commitment to German imperialism.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T04:44:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221083684
       
  • Max Weber and Charles Taylor: On normative aspects of a theory of human
           action

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sebastian Raza
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper seeks to make two distinctive sets of contributions through a supplementary reinterpretation of Max Weber in the light of Charles Taylor’s expressivist-hermeneutical theory of human agency. First, it offers a reinterpretation of Weber’s work. Focussing on the concept of stance, the paper highlights that Weber’s theorising on values and their relation to cognition, action and identity is less underpinned by subjectivism, representationalism, emotivism and decisionism than is typically thought. Instead, Weber sets values within a non-naturalist dimension where agents find their bearings and are constituted as such. In this dimension, orientation to meaning takes place; identity, action and thought are constituted; and normative experiences (such as freedom, or responsibility) are made possible. Weber recognised that this non-naturalist dimension has variegated modes, but seemingly studied them in their purest and most logical form (the ‘ideal type’), hence his focus on explicit belief systems and world-images. Second, there is a prospective supplementation of Weber’s theory through Taylor’s notion of expression. For Taylor, we take a stance and orient ourselves expressively through the domain of strongly valued meanings. The notions of strong evaluation and articulation prove central to understanding embodied, symbolic and representational meaning-orientation in the non-naturalist dimensions of values. This supplementary reading places Weber as a central figure in current American, British and French debates about, respectively, the normative nature of human agency; the question of culture, meaning and their different forms and modes of operation; and the question of how to examine identity-formation.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T05:20:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221080770
       
  • Introduction to Max Weber’s article ‘The “Threatening” of the
           Reich Constitution’

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sam Whimster
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In May 1904 Max Weber published a short article in the Frankfurter Zeitung. It has gone unnoticed in the extensive Weber literature and it appears here in English translation for the first time. It is an important statement of Weber’s political views after his withdrawal from his active political engagement in the 1890s. He defends the Reich Constitution from attack and a possible coup d’état. He demands that the German Parliament (Reichstag) stand up to autocratic plans, closely linked to Emperor William II, to suppress democracy and voting rights. A constitutional conflict would require not a great statesman but an ‘unscrupulous idiot or a political adventurer’ who would undermine ‘all our institutions and the security of law for many generations’. The article marks the start (earlier than previously assumed in the literature) of Weber’s consistent championing of Parliament and democratic institutions.
      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T04:12:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X211067453
       
  • Book review: A Joyfully Serious Man. The Life of Robert Bellah

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bryan S. Turner
      First page: 364
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-22T12:29:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X211073300
       
  • Book Review: Spätmoderne in der Krise. Was leistet die
           Gesellschaftstheorie'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alan Scott
      First page: 367
      Abstract: Journal of Classical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Classical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T11:41:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1468795X221080547
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.197.230.180
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-