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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
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International Political Sociology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.465
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 43  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1749-5679 - ISSN (Online) 1749-5687
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [423 journals]
  • Connected Memories: The International Politics of Partition, from Poland
           to India

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      Abstract: AbstractThis article theorizes connected memory, or in other words how people remember each other's memories, through the connected histories of territorial partition in different contexts. It claims that social memories can travel beyond their original context, pushing beyond efforts to understand supranational “mnemonic communities,” or to understand cosmopolitan memory as a thin memory community encompassing all humanity. It builds on the idea of “connected histories,” arguing that existing approaches to social memory in world politics either neglect connections across national and regional boundaries or scale up the national model to the global level. The article uses the history of territorial partitions as an illustration of three types of connected memory: sympathetic, vicarious, and modular. Partition has often been studied in comparative or aggregative ways, ruling out the possibility that partitions affect each other. But from the partitions of Poland to the breakup of the Ottoman Empire, to Ireland, Palestine, and India, partitions have often been events remembered beyond the national context and in the plural. Such memories have, in turn, altered the imaginable possibilities of the future, for example, by providing precedents for or warnings about future partitions.
      PubDate: Mon, 17 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ips/olac016
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • It Just Feels Right. Visuality and Emotion Norms in Right-Wing Populist
           Storytelling

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      Abstract: AbstractThis paper contributes to debates on the growing appeal of right-wing populism by combining a focus on visuality, narratives, and emotions. We argue that right-wing populists’ claims extend to establishing alternative emotion norms that collectivize feelings and their expression, and are conveyed in visual narratives. The emotional range covered by these norms transcends emotions usually associated with right-wing populism such as fear or humiliation. By employing seemingly inoffensive modes of presentation, emotional responses including indignation, compassion, and schadenfreude can be used as narrative bait for hitherto uninterested audiences. Following from that, emotion norms, such as exclusive forms of sympathy and humor, can be established. We illustrate our argument in three short case studies from Austria, France, and Italy. The conceptual and methodological insights are particularly relevant for those interested in the power of emotions, different modes of visual storytelling in world politics, and the performative effects of right-wing populist practices and narratives in politics.
      PubDate: Mon, 17 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ips/olac017
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Correction to: Perceiving and Controlling Maritime Flows. Technology,
           Kinopolitics, and the Governmentalization of Vision

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      PubDate: Wed, 12 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ips/olac019
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Walking the International

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      Abstract: AbstractWalking is a nearly universal activity, even given the many contrivances invented to avoid it, yet it is widely absent from the sedentarist disciplines of politics and international relations. This absence is perhaps not surprising, given that so much political thought and practice are deeply tethered to the inventions of the boot and the chair that remove walking from our view, as Tim Ingold has observed. Yet, given the significance of events such as forced death marches as parts of war and genocide; formative collective walks such as Gandhi's march to the sea, the Long March in China, or the Selma to Montgomery marches; or the everyday politics of walking in global cities, such absence might be mistaken. This article suggests instead that walking be understood as integral to the operation of internationality. In particular, it argues that walking is part of a mobile field of power and agency that generates, stabilizes, and unsettles internationality in equal parts. The article diagrams some key conceptual nodes of walking and political power, and then traces their operation in the case of the Long Walk of the Navajo.
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ips/olac018
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 4 (2022)
       
 
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