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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
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Journal of Social Inclusion Studies
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2394-4811 - ISSN (Online) 2516-6123
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Conceptualising Marginalisation: Agency, Assertion, and Personhood

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      Authors: Dhananjaya Y. Chandrachud
      Pages: 7 - 22
      Abstract: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies, Volume 8, Issue 1, Page 7-22, June 2022.
      The Indian Institute of Dalit Studies (IIDS) has been regularly organising Ambedkar Memorial Lecture since 2004. The 13th Ambedkar Memorial Lecture, organised on December 6, 2021, was delivered by Dr Justice Dhananjaya Y. Chandrachud (Judge, Supreme Court of India) on the topic “Conceptualising Marginalisation: Agency, Assertion, and Personhood”. The speech given by Justice Chandrachud is being published in form of this article.
      Citation: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T11:57:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23944811221104289
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Repression of Uyghur Muslims and the Freedom of Religious Beliefs in China

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      Authors: Amit Anand
      First page: 23
      Abstract: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies, Ahead of Print.
      China has been accused by the international community for placing tight constraints on the religious freedom of Uyghurs in the northwest Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region (XUAR). It has been widely reported that China has placed in detention over a million Uyghur Muslims in order to ‘re-educate’ them to adapt to ‘Chinese culture’. It has been alleged that China is using a system of surveillance, control, and suppression of religious activity aimed particularly at Uyghurs accusing them of actively involving in separatist activity with foreign funding in order to destabilise the region. Note that, China has also brought in polices on regulation of religious affairs that makes it difficult for a religious body or a church, mosque to exist in China without prior State approval. The policy also gives unfettered power of oversight to the government over minority religious institutions and their day to day management.In light of the above, this article examines the issue of right to freedom of religion or belief in the backdrop of China’s treatment of Uyghur Muslims in the Xinjiang region. Further, this article also comments upon China’s current domestic policy regulating religion and its commitment at the international level to protect and promote freedom of religion or belief of all its citizens.
      Citation: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T10:49:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23944811221085680
       
  • Understanding the Construction of Otherness in Harijan Community in
           Bangladesh

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      Authors: Goutam Kumar Dutta, Md. Musfikur Rahman, Syaket Shakil, Dipika Shankar Bhattacharyya, Md. Mostafizur Rahman
      First page: 37
      Abstract: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Otherness sees the world as divided into mutually excluding opposites. It is built through subjective perceptions and cultural practices in society on which, human beings are remade and separated from each other always based on their own experiences. This was a cross-sectional study, applied a qualitative approach to explore how cultural otherness was produced and practiced within the Harijan community. The studied population live in a separate geographical location due to their traditional occupation. Their accommodation and occupation made them others in the society. They have limited access to public places, shops and restaurants, barbershops, playgrounds, movie theatres, burial grounds, social gatherings, temples, music concerts and cultural events. This subordinated social position has also made them others within their sociocultural context. The identity of the Harijan as ‘others’ has been categorised and identified through the existing sociocultural context they live in. This identity is being perpetuated from one generation to another.
      Citation: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T07:01:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23944811221096951
       
  • Employability and ‘Marginal Efficiency’ of Labour in
           Post-COVID Economy

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      Authors: S. Mohammed Irshad, Vimal Raj
      First page: 51
      Abstract: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19-induced lockdown resulted into a differential impact and the most vulnerable among them are the labour. State is ineffective in preventing income and livelihood loss of the workers. Higher supply and lower wages resulted in a huge reserve labour force in developed and developing countries. The employer in a post-COVID economy is going to be highly selective and labour market also would be selective to labour. The labour is going to be free to move, however, the freedom of labour to move does not ensure better employability. This article explains about employability in the post-COVID economy.
      Citation: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:48:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23944811221097051
       
  • Resistance in Popular Visuals and Iconography: A Study of Dalit–Bahujan
           Calendar Art in North India

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      Authors: Kalyani Kalyani
      First page: 64
      Abstract: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The Dalit–Bahujan visual representation is uniquely constituted through cultural artefacts, symbols and iconography. The pictorial representations of cultural artefacts are meaningful as they signify and symbolise resistance. The new emerging visuality of the marginalised communities is questioning the dominant regimes of visuality. A calendar as the site of visuality is a signification of resistance to the Brahminical culture by the Dalit–Bahujan community. The Calendar art has engaged with a reiteration of anti-caste social icons that has generated a visual effect on the collective memory of the community. This article has traced the shifts that have happened in calendar art with the rise of anti-caste consciousness in North India. The article has methodologically engaged in observing and doing a content analysis of calendars that are gaining popularity among the Dalit–Bahujan community. The article has also presented an in-depth case study of the Samyak Prakashan calendar in North India. Through the study of the calendar’s iconography and symbols, the article reflects on the cultural practices of the Dalit–Bahujan community. The article also looks into the epistemological and historiographical gaps that are bridged through the reiteration of culturally significant dates in the calendar.
      Citation: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T10:58:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23944811221087489
       
  • Media as an Instrument of Reflection or Distortion of the Real Life
           Problems of Muslim Women in India

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      Authors: Aamina Shabir, Tanveer Ahmad Khan
      First page: 86
      Abstract: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The relationship between women and media in terms of the portrayal of the former in the latter has been a contested one. It has been an area of interest and scrutiny for academicians in general and feminists in particular. However, despite being laden with the xenophobic undercurrent, Muslim women’s depiction has not been addressed with much academic curiosity and seriousness. Muslim women per se represent a category defined by the intersection of gendered and Islamophobic vulnerabilities. The disadvantage of Muslim women has also cropped into media, with representation dominated by voiceless and docile images, primarily seen as a victim of her religion and the men folk. In the Indian scenario, the trend is quite the same with women from this marginalised community seen as victims of Muslim personal law, practices such as Hijab and polygamy, and immediate prey of the conservative and patriarchal Muslim men, which is the popular stereotype surrounding the latter. This depiction at the theoretical level can be understood as a manifestation of Edward Said’s concept of orientalism, which defines the othering of Muslims at various levels, including the institution of media perpetuating the anti-Muslim bias. Within this larger framework of orientalism, othering and intersectionality, this article seeks to the inconsistency in the actual issues faced by women of the community and those defined in the television news media.
      Citation: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-31T05:57:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23944811221096943
       
  • Unequal Distribution of the State Power, Political Leadership and Regional
           Disparities in Odisha

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      Authors: Deepak Kumar Nanda, Bipin Jojo
      First page: 97
      Abstract: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article critically examines the dynamics of state power and political leadership in connection to the regional disparities of Odisha in a historical and present context, using both historical and empirical data. It finds a pattern of highly dominant, discriminatory and exclusionary politics and leadership. That resulted in regular and frequent control of state power by ‘Brahmin–Karan–Khandayat’ of the eastern region in collaboration with the upper-caste feudal and landlord rulers of the western region. Thus it is argued that the eastern regional upper castes dominated state power derived maximum advantage over the western region in the creation, distribution and utilisation of state resources. On the other hand, the western region has remained under the control of upper-caste feudalists and landlords while by sharing the power with their eastern partners for self-gain but did not do much for the progressive transformation in the redistribution of resources.
      Citation: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies
      PubDate: 2022-04-08T10:07:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23944811221086672
       
  • Unread History of an Erstwhile Manual Scavenging Community: From Being an
           Urban to a Marginalized

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      Authors: K. M. Ziyauddin
      First page: 115
      Abstract: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The article is based on an ethnography of community who had been historically manual scavengers in the Bengal Province later even in the state of Bihar and continued until the parliament enacted a law prohibiting this practice. The history of manual scavengers are well written in the context of their rehabilitation and occupational engagements but one community that merely got any attention was Hadi jati (caste), who have been doing the menial job for generations in the Jharkhand region. Off beat, they are referred as Safai Karamchari on the roll of municipal administration for technical purposes but the people living in the town popularly refer them as Hadis. This article is an attempt to bring the historical existence of Hadis in the region who served in the kingdom, royal and feudal families and later, in the independent India, continues in the contemporary urban settlements. An inquiry into the historicity of Hadis brings a sociological insights to a neglected and marginalized section of the urban India and shows the tyranny and continuation of caste-based traditional in a town that could see the earliest public sector steel conglomerate established in 1968. In view of this background, there is a humble attempt to examine the process of marginalization of Hadis in the historical and contemporary social structure.
      Citation: Journal of Social Inclusion Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T07:55:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23944811221094176
       
 
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