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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
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International Journal of Community Well-Being
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  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2524-5295 - ISSN (Online) 2524-5309
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Bridging and Bonding: A Case for Prioritizing Social and Organizational
           Connectedness in Non-Profit Literacy Programming

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study contributes to the existing literature by highlighting the ways in which non-profit community literacy organizations can benefit individuals and communities in ways that transcend their stated missions. We employed a qualitative research design whereby data were collected via in-depth individual interviews and focus groups with program users (n = 72), staff (n = 11), and program leads (n = 8). Findings revealed that, in addition to supporting traditionally defined notions of literacy, programs presented participants with opportunities to cultivate bridging and bonding social capital. By way of the conditions created and programmatic measures employed within programs, bridging social capital often strengthened into deeper bonding ties between and amongst service users and, in many cases, staff and volunteers. Administrators and staff described efforts to create program cultures conducive to the development of social capital. The research illuminates how non-profit community entities can empower individual service users and their communities beyond their stated missions by fostering social and organizational connectedness, promoting communal cohesion and social trust, and cultivating typically unacknowledged talents, strengths and assets within marginalized communities.
      PubDate: 2022-11-22
       
  • Doomed to Consume' Non-satiation as a Flaw in the Current Economic
           Paradigm and What Communities Can Do About It

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      Abstract: Abstract The axiom of insatiability within economic theory states that needs, wants and desires can never be satisfied. This axiom drives the utility function upon which most economic policy is based. Non-satiation is not a natural human condition but rather a theoretical and cultural construction. Non-satiation is a myth that has been taken as truth in traditional economic theory. In this paper, we deconstruct the myth of non-satiation and relate its impact on the goals of human well-being and sustainable development. This paper is written for community organisers and change agents with the goal of helping them to understand a foundational premise driving the current economic paradigm and what they can do about it. In this paper, we explain some basic economic theory in simple terms for the reader who is not a trained economist so that they may gain an understanding of the underpinnings of economic theory that drives current economic policies and practices, and inspiration for changing the dominant economic paradigm.
      PubDate: 2022-10-27
       
  • Application of the PERMA Model of Well-being in Undergraduate Students

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      Abstract: Abstract The PERMA model was introduced by Seligman in 2011 to increase and measure well-being. This model defines well-being in terms of Positive Emotion, Engagement, Relationships, Meaning, and Accomplishment (PERMA). Mental health concerns are common in undergraduate students and may prevent them from obtaining optimal well-being. The purpose of this study was to test whether all five PERMA elements of well-being could be constructed from items within the 2018 Purdue University Student Experience at a Research University (SERU) survey. Using confirmatory factor analysis, all five PERMA constructs were supported and demonstrated good model fit statistics. A second order PERMA well-being construct was built and demonstrated adequate model fit with RMSEA = 0.04. All five constructs were significant at p < .001. Accomplishment had the highest factor loading (0.76) and Meaning had the lowest factor loading (0.25). Results for this study support use of well-being theory in the context of undergraduate students and provides enhanced understanding of well-being characteristics in this population.
      PubDate: 2022-10-26
       
  • Editors’ Introduction

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      PubDate: 2022-10-14
       
  • Experienced-Based Food Insecurity and Subjective Happiness: A Case Study
           of Socioeconomically Disadvantaged People in Three Urban Areas of
           Indonesia

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      Abstract: Abstract Experienced-based food insecurity is one of the critical aspects to judge people's well-being. However, its association with subjective happiness has remained unclear. This study aimed to investigate the relation and contribution of household food insecurity status on subjective happiness. A paper-based survey was conducted in a total of 150 socioeconomically disadvantaged households in three megacities in Indonesia (Jakarta, Bandung, and Surabaya). The main scales adapted were the Experience-Based Food Security Scale (EBFSS) and the Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS). In this study, logistic regression models were employed. Experiencing food insecurity explained participants' lower levels of subjective happiness. The results indicate that the subjective well-being of socioeconomically disadvantaged people can also be improved through food security-oriented strategies.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
       
  • A Policy Review of the SEED (Stockton Economic Empowerment Demonstration)
           Project: Is the Devil in the Details'

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      Abstract: Abstract This review examines the Stockton Economic Empowerment Demonstration (SEED) project, a guaranteed income (GI) project that was undertaken in Stockton, California from 2019- 2021. SEED is a collaborative initiative by the Mayor’s Office of Stockton, the Reinvent Stockton Foundation (RSF), and the Economic Security Project (ESF). The purpose of the SEED project was to ascertain the effects of guaranteed income on the well-being of the project recipients, with a focus on the effects of a UBI on participants’ financial and psychological health. This review will study the potential benefits and challenges involved in implementing such a project, from political, social and economic perspectives. The review will also examine a UBI project’s long- and short-term viability, and its impact on a city, and the project’s beneficiaries. The review will aim to provide a balanced understanding of guaranteed income projects, and the means by which they affect recipients as well as other stakeholders, and the possibilities of implementing guaranteed income on a larger scale.
      PubDate: 2022-09-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s42413-021-00145-3
       
  • Neighbourhood Conditions and Quality of Life Among Local and Immigrant
           Population in Norway

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper explores the relationship between the quality of life and neighbourhood characteristics among immigrant and local population in Storhaug (Stavanger) and Grünerløkka (Oslo), two Norwegian neighbourhoods. The neighbourhood conditions have been analysed and inhabitants have been interviewed to collect objective and subjective data. Several dimensions have been considered, e.g., physical, environmental, mobility and psychological, with different indicators defining them. Objective data related to the physical layout, green spaces, transport system or environmental aspects are studied and complemented with the subjective information such as the satisfaction of the participants with these aspects. The data collection thus includes geographic, personal and qualitative data, and is analysed with the help of geographic and statistical analysis. Differences between the population groups and between the case study neighbourhoods are determined, being possible to conclude that specific neighbourhood conditions influence participants’ quality of life in these Norwegian minor settings. The local participants in this study are the ones taking more advantage of the physical, environmental and mobility dimensions at their residential area and reporting higher perceived quality of life. The results presented can provide relevant information for the effective and efficient planning and development of residential environments.
      PubDate: 2022-09-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s42413-022-00183-5
       
  • Review of the Book Humanitarian Work, Social Change, and Human Behavior.
           Compassion for Change By Cornelia Walther (2020)

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      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • The Participatory Neighborhood Observation Grid: Multiple Case Study of
           Public Housing Tenants Evaluating their Residential Environment

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      Abstract: Abstract The residential environment, including its factual and perceived characteristics, plays an important role in influencing the health and the well-being of residents. Although objective assessment of residential environment has been operationalized through a wide range of tools, few instruments including residents’ perception of this environment have been developed. As part of a larger participatory action research, called Flash on my neighborhood! a total of 62 tenant-researchers living in public housing evaluated their residential environment using the Participatory Neighborhood Observation Grid. Results from this multiple case study show that the novel tool presents 1) tenant-researchers’ self-reported appreciation; 2) the capacity to capture the relevant local knowledge; and 3) complementary quantitative and qualitative data for tailored action planning. The Participatory Neighborhood Observation Grid possesses valuable properties aimed at mitigating certain limitations of the available environment observation tools and is suited for both community development research and practice.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Tethering Natural Capital and Cultural Capital for a More Sustainable
           Post-COVID-19 World

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      Abstract: Abstract The world faced stark challenges during the global pandemic caused by COVID-19. Large forces such as climate change, cultural ethnocentrism and racism, and increasing wealth inequality continue to ripple through communities harming community well-being. While the global pandemic caused by COVID-19 exacerbated these forces, lessons across the globe have been captured that inform the field of community well-being long-after the end of the pandemic. While many scholars have looked to political capital, financial capital, and social capital to tackle these challenges, natural capital and cultural capital have extreme relevance. However, scholarship tends to overlook the inextricable and important links between natural capital and cultural capital in community development and well-being work. These capital forms also inform contemporary understandings of sustainability and environmental justice, especially in the fields of community development and well-being. This perspective article showcases the deep connections between natural capital and social capital through literature review and community cases across the globe. Questions are posed for future research and practice tethering together cultural capital and natural capital when looking to bolster community well-being.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Wellbeing and Social Network Characteristics in Rural Communities:
           Findings from a Cohort in Social Housing in Cornwall, United Kingdom

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      Abstract: Abstract The mental wellbeing of those living in resource poor and rural localities is a public health priority. Despite evidence of a link between social networks and mental wellbeing, little is known about this relationship in the context of rural and resource poor environments. The current study uses novel social network methodology to investigate the extent to which social network size and composition is related to mental wellbeing in a social housing community in rural England. Data come from 88 individuals living in social housing in Cornwall. These participants are part of a larger study of 329 social housing households surveyed in 2017 and 2018. Mental wellbeing was measured by the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (SWEMWBS). A series of multivariable linear regression models were used to test associations between social network characteristics and mental wellbeing. Social network size was significantly associated with the SWEMWBS (b = 0.39, p < 0.01), such that individuals with larger networks reported better mental wellbeing, but after controlling for community social cohesion, this effect dissipated. Neither gender composition or talking with network members about health and wellbeing were significantly associated with the SWEMWBS. Findings suggest that both the quantity of social connections and perceptions of community cohesion are moderately associated with mental wellbeing in rural and resource poor localities. As such, efforts to improve mental wellbeing would benefit from targeting multiple aspects of social relationships, rather than focusing solely on increasing the size of individuals’ social networks.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Social and Structural Determinants of Self-Rated Health in Gentrifying
           Neighborhoods in Austin Texas: A Cross-Sectional Quantitative Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Association between neighborhood change and health exists in the literature with mixed evidence. This study examined the association between perceived gentrification and self-rated health—physical, mental, and general—in some selected neighborhoods experiencing gentrification in Austin, Texas. In this cross-sectional study, three hundred and forty (N = 340) current residents in East and Southeast Austin participated in a Neighborhood and Health Survey in summer 2020. We used a combination of quantitative techniques, including descriptive statistics, t-test, Pearson’s Chi-square, analysis of variance, and logistic regression to describe and assess various relationships between variables. Results show that perceived gentrification among community members reduced the report of high self-rated mental health but increased the report for self-rated physical health and general health. In addition, older residents in these gentrifying neighborhoods rated their mental health higher than middle-aged residents. However, access to socioeconomic resources served as a cushion to the impact of gentrification on self-rated health in the multivariate analysis. Thus, this study provides evidence that reinforces the importance of health impact assessment of urban renewal policy and its implication on the minorities’ well-being, particularly longtime residents.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • A Conceptual Framework to Visualise Liveability

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      Abstract: Abstract The paper presents an alternative conceptual framework to theorise urban liveability. It reviews two urban liveability measurement methodologies to identify the existing understanding of liveability in practice and literature. The paper highlights the lacunas of theorising liveability through the utility-based approaches and proposes a framework to establish liveability through a non-utilitarian approach. It adopts the central argument of the capability approach to insinuate liveability through human well-being, functioning, capability, and freedom. In present literature Amartya Sen, Martha Nussbaum, Sabina Alkire have discussed the capability approach extensively. It also discusses the ethical arguments of John Rawls and the egalitarian considerations of Ronald Dworkin to establish the uniqueness of the capability approach and to theorise liveability. The paper contributes toward a structured and systematic review of the existing methods to theorise and measure liveability and presents a comprehensive conceptual alternative framework to measure liveability.
      PubDate: 2022-08-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s42413-022-00178-2
       
  • Examining the Impact of COVID-19 on Upper Manhattan Community-Based
           Organizations: A Qualitative Analysis of Employee Focus Groups

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      Abstract: Abstract Community-based organizations (CBOs) play a key role in assisting local communities, especially those in under-resourced areas, through their deep knowledge of the community’s needs and available resources. We examined perceptions of COVID-19’s impact on health-related services in CBOs located in Upper Manhattan, New York City (serving East Harlem, Central Harlem, Morningside Heights and Hamilton Heights, and Washington Heights and Inwood). Three focus groups were conducted on Zoom in November 2020; focus groups were composed of participants employed at CBOs in this catchment area. Deidentified interview transcripts were evaluated using an iterative process of thematic content analysis. We identified five major themes related to the impact of COVID-19 on community needs: 1) increased mistrust and decreased service utilization, 2) breakdowns in communication, 3) shift in need, 4) increased risk factors for negative health outcomes among staff and community, and 5) decreased funding and an uncertain future. Because of the pandemic, CBOs have pivoted to cater to the immediate and changing needs of the community and, in doing so, revised their menu of services as well as their service delivery model. In trying to maintain connectivity with and the trust of community members, participants had to construct novel strategies and develop new outreach strategies; participants also recognized the role strain of trying to balance community needs with home responsibilities. Given these findings, concern arises around the long-term health and well-being of community members and participants. The government must provide the necessary resources to ensure the viability of CBOs and create a stronger infrastructure for future emergencies.
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s42413-022-00180-8
       
  • Analyzing the Causal Model between Place Attachment and Social
           Participation in Residences through the Mediation of Social Cohesion

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study takes advantage of data gathered from residents of Qeytarieh Tehran to explore the relationship between place attachment (PA) and social participation (SP) in neighborhoods through the mediating role of social cohesion (SC). To do so, a survey was conducted on 402 respondents from the Qeytarieh neighborhood, and the collected data were analyzed using a causal model. The results of this study indicate a strong direct relationship between place attachment and social participation. The study further finds a significant indirect relationship between place attachment and social participation. Social cohesion mediates and catalyzes the impact of the indirect relationship between place attachment and social participation. Furthermore, the model displays a high level of goodness of fit to the study data. The study concludes with implications for academics and practitioners.
      PubDate: 2022-08-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s42413-022-00179-1
       
  • Income and Health Perceptions in an Economically Disadvantaged Community:
           A Qualitative Case Study from Central Florida

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      Abstract: Abstract The link between income and adverse health outcomes continues to be problematic among racially and economically segregated urban communities. Although the consequences of living in areas of concentrated disadvantage have been delineated, there is a dearth of knowledge on how citizens from such areas perceive the effects of neighborhood characteristics on their individual and community health. This qualitative study explored how minority residents ( N = 23) viewed the intersectionality of income and health within their urban neighborhoods of economic distress. Focus groups were conducted using semi-structured interviews to better understand health concerns, needs, and barriers for individuals and their community. The main finding highlighted how residents desired to be healthy, but economic barriers prevented them from maintaining a healthy lifestyle and diet. While residing in a concentrated disadvantaged community, lack of income and power contributed to stress and fear that forced residents to prioritize survival over their wellbeing. Implications for improving individual and community health include operating within a systems framework to affect collective efficacy and empowerment among residents of low-income neighborhoods.
      PubDate: 2022-08-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s42413-022-00177-3
       
  • Well-Being on Prince Edward Island, Canada: a Statistical Case-Study of
           Well-Being Related Community Factors

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      Abstract: Abstract This research continues the advances in applied positive psychology by measuring and exploring the factors which contribute to the happiness among people living in Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada. This research provides a province-wide account of subjective well-being (SWB), which is defined as a person’s cognitive and affective evaluation of his or her life, by answering the questions: What is the measurable level of well-being of individuals in PEI' What are the relationships between community factors and components of well-being in PEI' Which quality of life factors most influence individual’s emotions and life satisfaction in PEI' Participation was voluntary, anonymous, and included just over 1% of the adult population of residents (n = 1381). Data was collected online between October and November 2020. Demographic variables were collected and analyzed using variance of mean scores from three self-reported well-being measures, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Positive and Negative Effect Schedule, and the World Health Organization’s (brief) Quality of Life Scale. Regression analysis was used to investigate contributions to well-being. Findings uncovered inequity in well-being among minority populations including, LGBT, gender diverse, Indigenous, disabled, and those living under the poverty line. This study provides a deeper understanding that Islanders view psychological health and healthy environment as important aspects of quality of life influencing their well-being. Results build on existing theories on the influence of income, age, and education have on well-being. Finally, the research provides a starting point and methodology for the continuous measurement and tracking of both the affective and cognitive accounts of well-being on PEI, or in other communities, provinces, or islands. This research provides insight into happiness as an indicator of how our society is performing and adds momentum towards the adoption of sustainable development goals, such as national happiness.
      PubDate: 2022-06-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s42413-022-00169-3
       
  • Halting COVID-19 Requires Collective, Decentralized, and Community-Led
           Responses

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      Abstract: Abstract Many global health organizations are reliant on the funding provided by a few dozen high-income countries, making them fiscally insecure and fragile, especially during times of global crises. The COVID-19 pandemic could be an opportunity to move away from this status quo to a more decentralized, multipolar, and community-led approach. The global health community can take four immediate steps in response to the pandemic to start that paradigm shift now: support more regional and country-specific responses, convince national and regional business houses and philanthropies to make up for response funding shortfalls, leverage public health advocacy to improve investments in public health infrastructure, and put community leaders and members at the frontlines of mitigation efforts.
      PubDate: 2022-06-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s42413-022-00171-9
       
  • Measuring Regional Social Cohesion by Objective Indices: The Case of Korea

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      Abstract: Abstract The study focuses on constructing social cohesion measurement with community-level, objective indicators and appropriate methods. Applying the latent profile analysis with variable selection model to theoretically wide definition of the concept, four clusters in the Korean subnational administrative unit are identified utilizing 14 indicators: “low social cohesion”, “highly excluded with strong social capital”, “mid-level social cohesion”, and “economically strong with weak social capital”, and their geographic distribution is discussed with each group’s characteristics based on the estimated average values. For confirmatory assessment, the grouping is applied to the analysis of suicide rate, which shows that the suicide rate for “low social cohesion” group is significantly higher than “mid-level social cohesion” group. Also, it is shown that relatively weak social capital can be translated into higher suicide rate, which can be seen by higher estimated suicide rate for “economically active with weak social capital” group. This demonstrates regional social cohesion measurement can provide unique information for policy-making.
      PubDate: 2022-06-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s42413-022-00166-6
       
  • Community Food Security: The Multi-Level Association Between Social
           Capital, Economic Capital, and Diet Quality

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      Abstract: Abstract Diet quality varies widely across geographic areas in the United States and is a critical component of community well-being. Community food security (CFS) relates to the availability, stability, and access to food at the community level, and how these issues connect to the community food production system. This study explores the joint relationship between community social capital, economic capital, and individual diet quality. Hierarchical generalized linear mixed model regression using publicly available data from 2005–2009. The sample consisted of 216,381 adult respondents nested within 283 micro/metropolitan counties. After controlling for individual level factors, social network density was significantly associated fruit and vegetable consumption (FVC), but not obesity. However, income inequality was associated with greater rates of FVC and lower likelihood of obesity. County-level poverty rates were not associated with FVC but had a negative relationship with probability of obesity. Household size, a proxy for household social capital, was positively associated with FVC and negatively related to probability of obesity. Findings from this study suggest a strong role for social capital and economic factors in CFS. This study also reinforces the importance of strengthening theoretical explanations of the role social capital at the community and household levels play in CFS to guide practice and evaluation for community well-being initiatives.
      PubDate: 2022-06-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s42413-022-00170-w
       
 
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