A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  First | 1 2 3        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 401 - 382 of 382 Journals sorted alphabetically
Tla-Melaua : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Trajecta : Religion, Culture and Society in the Low Countries     Open Access  
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Transposition : Musique et sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Travail et Emploi     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
TRIM. Tordesillas : Revista de investigación multidisciplinar     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Valuation Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vlast' (The Authority)     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Future Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  

  First | 1 2 3        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Socio-Ecological Practice Research
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2524-5279 - ISSN (Online) 2524-5287
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Interviews with researchers and practitioners who collaborate with
           Indigenous groups in the United States: Are climate change adaptation
           frameworks helpful'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Indigenous groups in the United States are the highest at-risk group for climate change impacts due to a history of ongoing colonial disenfranchisement, displacement to high-risk locations, and a loss of traditional subsistence practices. In the last 14 years, four frameworks have emerged for guiding climate-based collaborations with Indigenous groups: The Guiding Principles on Climigration, Justice Forward, Human Rights, and WAMPUM, two of which were Indigenous-authored. However, no known studies have examined whether or how these frameworks are used in practice. This paper explores how researchers, practitioners, and Indigenous groups in the US are attempting to navigate complex, often unaligned, social forces integral to climate change adaptation through the application of collaborative frameworks. Using qualitative inductive analysis of interview data, themes emerge demonstrating the current approaches used in tribal engagement by NGOs, government agencies, and academic institutions. The results suggest principles for just collaboration: relationship building, Indigenous representation on projects, respecting tribal leadership, and providing tangible community benefits.
      PubDate: 2024-06-25
       
  • Gaining insights into environmental impacts of India’s financial markets
           and institutions with the ARDL approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This research delves into the intricate interplay between the advancement of financial development and carbon emissions, focusing on the role of green growth in India. Through rigorous analysis, the study observes that the variables under scrutiny exhibit a mixed order of integration, as confirmed by the unit root tests. Further, employing the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) model, the present study examines the role of various facets of adopting financial development (financial institutions and financial markets) on carbon emissions in India. Moreover, employing the ARDL bounding F-test, the study reveals a long-run equilibrium relationship in the model. Further, the investigations reveal that the short- and long-run elasticities of financial development on carbon emissions provide mixed results. The finding shows that financial institutions have a positive and statistically significant impact on carbon emissions, which suggests that an increase in financial institutions leads to a rise in carbon emissions in India both in the short and long run. However, the financial market has a negative impact on carbon emissions in India. The study findings hold great importance for policymakers as they provide valuable insights into the intricate impact of financial development on environmental pollution in India. This paves the way for implementing specific policies to enhance financial development and reduce carbon emissions in India.
      PubDate: 2024-06-21
       
  • Ensuring sustainable livelihoods and inclusive growth of Indian
           smallholder farmers through organic farming: a systematic literature
           review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract In the contemporary era, chemical-based farming provides maximum production for short-term fulfillment of human needs but imposes serious negative implications on the environment, ecology, livelihoods, and growth of smallholder farmers. To reduce environmental degradation, soil erosion, and agroecological biodiversity loss, organic farming practices have emerged as a slogan in India to ensure the inclusive growth and sustainable livelihoods of smallholder farmers. However, there is a dearth of systematic reviews that seek to answer how smallholder and marginal farmers in India foster inclusive growth and sustainable livelihoods by practicing organic farming. Thus, we undertake this study to delve into the impact of organic farming on fostering sustainable livelihoods and inclusive growth for these farmers. To facilitate the study objective, we performed a systematic literature review by using the “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis” protocol of the past decade. The findings of our study reveal that organic farming ensures sustainable livelihoods and inclusive growth for Indian smallholders. Reduced input costs increase their profit margin, and premium prices for their organic products enhance their inclusive growth and economic well-being. However, owing to its major constraints, such as lack of domestic market facilities, high labour inputs, and lower yields farmers may or may not realize profit through this farming while cultivating for commercial purposes. The findings and the major gaps identified in this review will certainly provide a way forward for effective policy formulations and an avenue for future research.
      PubDate: 2024-06-18
       
  • An open letter to the United Nations and the SEPR community about pursuing
           SDGs in the age of democratic backsliding

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2024-06-12
       
  • Assessing ecosystem services in wetlands through importance–performance
           analysis: evidence from lower Gangetic plain region, India

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The wetland ecosystem plays a crucial role in both ecological potentiality and human wellbeing by providing essential ecosystem services. To truly understand the socio-economic complexities of local communities within wetland landscapes, it is essential to delve into the realm of their satisfaction availing these services. In this context, the perceptions of the local people regarding the importance and performance of ecosystem services become pivotal determinants for effective ecosystem service management. Therefore, the current study aims to identify and assess ecosystem services in six wetlands located in the Murshidabad district, which is part of the lower Gangetic plain region in India. This will be achieved by employing the Rapid Assessment of Wetland Ecosystem Services and Importance-Performance Analysis methods. This study involves comprehensive surveys, semi-structured interviews, and participatory exercises conducted with a total of 205 households in six wetlands surrounding villages from 2021 to 2023. The importance and performance of ecosystem services are categorized into four quadrants: Quadrant I (high perceived importance and performance), Quadrant II (low perceived importance and high perceived performance), Quadrant III (low perceived importance and performance), and Quadrant IV (high perceived importance and low perceived performance).The results indicate that Balagachi Damus and Bangsabati Beel exhibit more than 80% of ecosystem services in Quadrant I, signifying both high perceived importance and performance. In contrast, Chaltiya Beel, Ahiran Lake, and Bishnupur are three wetlands where over 24% of the ecosystem services fall into Quadrant IV, indicating high importance but low perceived performance. Notably, Chaltiya Beel is the sole wetland with nearly 18% of ecosystem services falling into Quadrant III. The study further establishes four prioritization levels (high, medium, low, and very low) for ecosystem services. Waste disposal, Jute retting, water supply (drinking and bathing), and maintenance of hydrological regimes emerge as highly prioritized, while microclimate regulation, carbon sequestration, and nutrient cycling are deemed low priority. The validation of the results emphasizes that Bishnupur and Chaltiya Beel, lacking riverine connections suffer from significant water pollution and act as a barrier to the flow of ecosystem services. It also reveals that where as the average improvement index is low for Balagachi Damus (0.15), it is high for Ahiran Lake (0.66). Consequently, wetland priority based on the average improvement index is ranked as follows: Ahiran (very high), Chhatiani Beel, Bishnupur Beel, Bangsabati Beel, Chaltiya Beel, and Balagachi Damus (very low). These findings serve as valuable guidance for policymakers for prioritizing the protection of wetlands and wetland-based ecosystem services.
      PubDate: 2024-06-08
       
  • Integrating Fail-Safe and Safe-to-Fail practices in resilience planning

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Resilience planning has gained significant attention from scholars and practitioners. However, most resilience planning based on either engineering resilience or ecological resilience concepts have shown deficiency in the face of the uncertainty of disturbances. One major reason is that those resilience planning practices follow the Fail-Safe view which assumes the purpose of action is to protect existing functions and the consequence of planning is predictable. We argue that Fail-Safe resilience needs to be complemented with Safe-to-Fail-based resilience thinking, which requires accepting that changes are an intrinsic system property, and the future is uncertain. Disasters are signals of deficiencies in the existing system, therefore, we ought to implement Safe-to-Fail resilience planning in two areas. First, we need to build evolutionary resilience capacity to treat uncertainties as opportunities to improve system adaptability and transformation capabilities. Second, we need to pay attention to the broad consequences of planned actions because they can induce disturbance to the socio-ecological system we live in.
      PubDate: 2024-06-07
       
  • Transdisciplinary approaches assessing unmanaged urban green spaces reveal
           benefits for biodiversity and people

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Rapid urbanization is projected for African cities at the cost of urban green space, which could jeopardize biodiversity and human benefits. Studies focusing specifically on human–green space relationships in the Global South are lacking, and the validity of extrapolating results from studies in the Global North remains questionable and cannot provide local context-specific design solutions. This study combines methods and perspectives from ecology and human geography with landscape design to better understand the benefits for biodiversity and people derived from unmanaged green spaces in the City of Tshwane, South Africa. Based on empirical data from two unmanaged green space areas in disadvantaged communities, we identify benefits for biodiversity and people and define guidelines for inclusive trans-disciplinary interventions. We combine information from a vegetation survey, a community survey of 200 respondents and a rapid assessment of multifunctional benefit provision to formulate in holistic landscape design proposals. We show that the sites have biodiversity value and provide habitat for > 169 different plant species, including protected species, and smaller wildlife. Residents use the spaces for utility, passive and active leisure, and > 76% of residents benefit from the use of these spaces. However, the integrity and provision of benefits from green spaces are threatened by pollution, safety concerns, biological invasions, and land conversion. Context-specific designs could be developed by merging methods across disciplines and involving local stakeholders to integrate the multifunctionality of socioecological benefits into landscape interventions. Collaboration across ecology, human geography and landscape design generates multifunctional perspectives of unmanaged green spaces that consider benefits for biodiversity and disadvantaged communities.
      PubDate: 2024-06-05
       
  • Replacing diesel with biogas in decentralized electricity generation
           systems: a feasibility assessment from workers’ perspective with a
           modified Human Development Index (HDI) approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Despite Brazil's high electricity universalization rates, around 1 million Amazon inhabitants need access to this service. An environmentally sustainable way of solving the problem is using biogas from agricultural residues as fuel for electricity cogeneration. This study explores the social effects of this solution, aiming to support more sustainable development for the Brazilian Amazon based on the conscious use of resources and the active involvement of the local population. We compare the social performance of diesel electricity generation (the current scenario) with that of biogas-operated systems for three locations in the Amazon: Aveiro, Porto de Moz, and Prainha. To this end, the following steps were carried out: (i) characterize the analysis scenarios, (ii) determine the personnel associated with each project, (iii) estimate normalized social performance indices considering aspects such as health, education, and income, for the calculation of the Workers' Human Development Index (W-HDI) in different situations, and (iv) analyze the results and formulate a recommendation. The disparities between W-HDI values for the renewable and non-renewable scenarios were less than 10%, even though a slightly better effect concerning diesel systems was observed for Aveiro and Prainha. Conversely, a local biogas energy generation system can generate up to 6 times more wages and 5.5 times more jobs, exhibiting a great potential to reduce social inequalities in these traditionally poor regions. The W-HDI proved a valuable metric for measuring social impacts for a sector devoid of data like the one analyzed herein.
      PubDate: 2024-06-03
       
  • Nature’s values in marine resource governance: an ethnographic case
           study of rockweed in Norway

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This article addresses the shortcomings in the governance of the Norwegian macroscopic brown algae Ascophyllum nodosum (rockweed) that appeared when approaching rockweed as a socio-ecologic object in the Vega archipelago on the Norwegian Helgeland coast. A common seaweed along the Norwegian coast, rockweed constitutes an important species in Norway’s ‘blue forests’. Historically, rockweed harvesting was an important source of income for the local coastal population in Norway. Although not comparable to the newer and expanding kelp industry, rockweed harvesting is still profitable along the coast. Despite revived attention from the seaweed industry, state management of rockweed in 2024 is conspicuously absent. Combined with the lack of scientific knowledge of the consequences of rockweed harvesting on the local coastal ecosystems, the responsibility for ensuring sustainable harvesting of rockweed lies with the industry itself. On Vega, however, where rockweed is a highly valued and contested coastal species with a high economic, ecologic, and cultural significance, rockweed harvesting was a conflicted issue. In approaching rockweed as a socio-ecologic object from ‘below’, the article identifies hegemonic structures and discourses in Norwegian marine governance, suggesting how a narrow definition of ‘value’ comes to matter—not only for rockweed—but for sustainable governance of all marine and coastal ecosystems. This article is also an important contribution to the burgeoning interdisciplinary research on nature’s values, power, and knowledge in environmental management.
      PubDate: 2024-05-24
       
  • Bridging Cree knowledge and Western science to understand the decline in
           hunting success of migratory Canada geese

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Canada goose (Branta canadensis) is one of the main waterfowl species harvested by Cree hunters in James Bay, Canada. Land users who hunt geese along coastal Eeyou Istchee (Eastern James Bay, Quebec) report that they are now much less successful in harvesting sub-arctic breeding geese (B. c. interior) than in the 1980s, especially during the fall hunting season. We followed a mixed-methods triangulation design in which we simultaneously gathered Indigenous and scientific knowledge. For the Indigenous knowledge, we conducted semi-structured interviews with Cree land users who shared their knowledge about how the goose populations that stage in Eeyou Istchee have changed within living memory. They attributed their reduced hunting success to fewer migrating geese and modification of their behavior. They also identified many environmental changes, especially the decline of eelgrass (Zostera marina), that may have affected the number, distribution, and migration patterns of Canada geese along the coastal Eeyou Istchee in the past 50 years. We complemented this information using waterfowl study techniques including aerial surveys, band recovery analyses, and GPS tracking of individually marked geese. Habitat changes both at the local scale in Eeyou Istchee and in other parts of the staging and wintering ranges of Canada geese, natural and human disturbances along the coast, and a gradual increase in molt migrant temperate breeding Canada geese (B. c. maxima) likely resulted in changes in habitat use and migration patterns of sub-arctic breeding Canada geese along the James Bay east coast. By bridging Cree knowledge and Western science, we identified the various factors that affect the harvest success of Eeyou Istchee goose hunters. Such an approach should be encouraged when Indigenous peoples rely upon migratory bird or mammal species that spend only a portion of their annual cycle within the hunting territories of land users.
      PubDate: 2024-05-03
       
  • Assessing public perceptions of the cultural ecosystem services waterfront
           spaces provide along the Huangpu River in Shanghai, China, in support of
           urban waterfront planning and design

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Urban waterfront green space is a critical component of urban ecosystems and can provide various types of cultural ecosystem services (CESs). In this study, the CESs of six waterfront green spaces with different planned functions in different areas along the Huangpu River were assessed, and a framework of CES types applicable to the assessment of waterfront green spaces was proposed. Based on an investigation of the basic indicators of different waterfront green spaces and the differences in planning in the regions where they are located, we explored the factors affecting the public's perception of CESs. We found that a waterfront green space with a clear theme and amusement facilities with special features improved public perceptions of CESs. Improved water accessibility and many winding walkways can increase the diversity of outdoor activities. The discrepancy between public perceptions of CESs and the CESs that city managers hope waterfront green spaces to provide in urban planning may be due to a lack of a detailed introduction to facilities for public within green spaces. We suggest promoting the public perception of CESs provided by waterfront green spaces through improved water accessibility and enhanced descriptions of their facilities. The results and suggestions generated from this study offer insights into the future planning and design of urban waterfront green spaces.
      PubDate: 2024-04-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-024-00181-1
       
  • Examining (in)justice, environmental activism and indigenous knowledge
           systems in the Indian film Kantara (Mystical Forest)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The acquisition of knowledge encompasses various dimensions that should be consolidated to facilitate a comprehensive and holistic advancement of its trajectory. In this context, the article explores the film Kantara: A Legend (Shetty in Kantara: a legend [film], Hombale Films, 2022), a Kannada-language production from India and its significance in highlighting the importance of indigenous knowledge systems, local customs, demigods and the sacredness attributed to the forest. The article explicates the marginalization of these knowledge systems and the community’s vulnerability to epistemic and environmental injustices. Additionally, the article highlights the importance of the sacredness of their land and the community’s engagement in activism. The study concludes by examining how a film such as Kantara serves as a means to disseminate the notion of environmental activism to a wide audience.
      PubDate: 2024-04-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-024-00180-2
       
  • Shifting the language of ‘invasion’ ecology: two-eyed seeing as a
           framework for discourse regarding introduced species

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Discourse used in the field of invasion ecology has significant impacts on society's perception, yet communication related to “invasives” is rife with problematic, exclusionary language. We provide potential solutions, including a repositioned perspective that may facilitate better relationships with the natural world by applying the two-eyed seeing framework. Our discussion calls for a paradigm shift for deeper understandings of human and more-than-human relationships. Ultimately, we advocate for respectful, considerate, and intentional language and stewardship.
      PubDate: 2024-03-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-024-00179-9
       
  • A bibliometric assessment of the science and practice of blue–green
           space (BGS): hot spots, lacunae, and opportunities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Blue–green space (BGS) is an important component of the Earth's environment, and BGS research and practice have become an increasingly important part of climate change adaptation and mitigation. In this review article, we conducted a bibliometric assessment on the science and practice of BGS worldwide. Our results showed that (1) the number of BGS studies has been growing rapidly since 2017, and the intensity of international collaboration has increased markedly; (2) BGS research hot spots were ignited by and focused on environment problems and evolved over time. Examples include, but are not limited to, boosting the composite functions and synergistic effects of BGS in climate change adaptation and mitigation (particularly stormwater management and thermal environment regulation), enhancing ecosystem services (biodiversity and carbon), and promoting human health (physical and mental); (3) the collaborative planning and system construction of BGS will be a major development trend in the future; and (4) research on synergistic mechanisms, collaborative planning, and BGS spatial pattern optimization has largely been theoretical, and there is a shortage of empirical quantitative research and there are few real-world examples of BGS in socio-ecological practice. These set the stage for further advancement of BGS science and practice.
      PubDate: 2024-02-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-024-00178-w
       
  • To the avid gardeners of SEPR community knowledge garden

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2024-02-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-024-00176-y
       
  • Correction to: The role of fisheries cooperative societies in addressing
           small-scale fishery predicaments in Northern Sri Lanka

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2024-02-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-024-00177-x
       
  • The role of fisheries cooperative societies in addressing small-scale
           fishery predicaments in Northern Sri Lanka

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The issues related to the small-scale fisheries operating in Northern Sri Lanka are multifaceted. These issues are intensifying with the recent challenges like COVID-19 and the prevailing economic crisis in the country and influenced by pluralistic managerial structures. However, how these fishery resources and related livelihoods are being managed amidst these issues has yet to be explored. Eight fisheries cooperative societies in Northern Sri Lanka were studied using semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions. The aim was to understand their role as co-management entities to address the prevailing issues related to small-scale fisheries. As a result, the following three key themes were extracted—(1) the transboundary poaching by the Indian trawler fleet followed by the impact of the recent economic crisis combined with COVID-19, (2) the mistargeted blue economy ambitions of the Sri Lanka state government, and (3) poor fisheries management practices in Sri Lanka. The efforts by the fisheries cooperative societies to maintain the fishing activities sustainably were highlighted. However, concurrently, limited state efforts in expediting the solutions for chronic issues (e.g. Indian bottom trawling) and acute issues (pandemic and economic crisis) were identified as criticised by the fisheries cooperative societies. The role of institutions (e.g. fisheries cooperative societies, government) is at stake with the increasing vulnerability of the fisherfolks. Finally, recommendations were made to increase the sustainability of these co-management institutions and for transboundary fishery issues.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-023-00174-6
       
  • The emerging identity and reputation of SEPR

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2024-01-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-023-00171-9
       
  • Assessing differential socio-demographic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic
           on urban livelihood capitals in suburban Accra, Ghana

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a debilitating socio-economic impact on livelihoods across the world. Extant studies show that livelihood capitals in developing countries have been hard hit due to their vulnerability and the minimal support system available to help people respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet the extent of the pandemic’s impact on livelihood capitals may not be the same for the various socio-demographic groups. Using quantitative techniques, this study examines the differential impact of the pandemic on the livelihood capitals of different socio-demographic groups in suburban Accra, Ghana. The study found significant differences in the pandemic’s impact on the livelihood capitals for various socio-demographic groups, such as gender, income, household sizes, and age groups. The findings show how framing the pandemic’s impacts through an urban livelihood capital-socio-demographic nexus lens enables a more complex, socially conscious, and locally placed understanding of the health risks. Furthermore, findings provide impetus for disaster interventions to transcend normative policies and practices that oversimplify disaster risks from a single vulnerability context and focus on at-risk groups.
      PubDate: 2024-01-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-023-00173-7
       
  • River and watershed organizations in the U.S. Intermountain West: key
           actors in social-ecological resilience

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract River and watershed organizations are important local and regional actors working toward the resilience of rivers and watersheds. Social ecology and relational frameworks guide our assessment of these organizations and their contributions across the U.S. Intermountain West. From 2020 to 2022, 237 semi-structured interviews were conducted with representatives of river and watershed organizations. These organizations varied in scope, mission, scale, and capacity. Key findings included the following: (1) These organizations are multitasking, often working on more than one project or goal at a time, even with limited resources; (2) These organizations work across geographic, social, and temporal scales; (3) These organizations rely heavily on incorporating diverse knowledges to their work; and (4) These organizations have complex relationships built through partnerships and collaborations that enable them to address issues and conflicts and to carry out their missions. Insights from river and watershed organizations offer evidence for their key role in river and watershed resilience and provide recommendations to others working in this practice arena.
      PubDate: 2023-12-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-023-00172-8
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.200.194.255
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  First | 1 2 3        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 401 - 382 of 382 Journals sorted alphabetically
Tla-Melaua : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Trajecta : Religion, Culture and Society in the Low Countries     Open Access  
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Transposition : Musique et sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Travail et Emploi     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
TRIM. Tordesillas : Revista de investigación multidisciplinar     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Valuation Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vlast' (The Authority)     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Future Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  

  First | 1 2 3        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.200.194.255
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-