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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 375)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 301)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 269)
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Qualitative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Judgment and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Sociolinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 20)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Studies in Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Research in Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Classical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Political Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Sociology: Revue Internationale de Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Japanese Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
New Zealand Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Mathematical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Italian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Public and Professional Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue de la régulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue Internationale De Securite Sociale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Landscapes of Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Liinc em Revista     Open Access  
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Socio-logos     Open Access  

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Ethnicities
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.928
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 23  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1468-7968 - ISSN (Online) 1741-2706
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Books received

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 191 - 191
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Volume 24, Issue 1, Page 191-191, February 2024.

      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T03:29:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968241229864
      Issue No: Vol. 24, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Doing style for Saraswati Puja: Girlhood, Class, and Community Identity
           among Muslim girls in Assam

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nirmali Goswami, Navarupa Bhuyan
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Saraswati Puja, a celebration of the Hindu goddess of learning, is organised by youth clubs and educational institutions in eastern India. We draw on debates on girlhood, codes of respectable femininity in a neoliberal world, and how these play out for Muslim girls in the school context. These ideas frame our analysis of the dressing up practice among Muslim girls in a government school. We argue that the middle-class and ethnicised ideals of girlhood are amplified and reconfigured by the popular discourses on Saraswati Puja and add to the tensions over the appropriate code of dressing within the context of Puja at school. While the reality of girls’ lives is being shaped in novel ways, the Muslim girls engagement with the ideals of ‘respectable femininity’ through varied modes of ‘doing style’ put them under contrary pressures in public places like school. In such a scenario, their accounts of dressing up and participating in this event serve as a vantage point to understand how girlhood is being construed and experienced from varied positions of class, caste, age, and community. These accounts highlight Muslim girls’ engagement with the codes of femininity in the majoritarian cultural universe of a school.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T09:46:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968241229749
       
  • The discourse of the Anthropocene and posthumanism: Indigenous peoples and
           local communities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sender Dovchin, Ulemj Dovchin, Graeme Gower
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLCs) are characterised by their special relationships with their traditional lands and the natural world, which are essential to their physical and cultural survival, identity, knowledge, and spirituality. They are custodians of the land; however, often made invisible and voiceless in the face of irreversible destruction caused by human-induced planetary change. This Special Issue (SI) is inspired by the stories, worldviews, knowledge systems, and lived experiences of IPLCs worldwide. Based on the compounded impacts of global climate change and other human-induced crises on their ancestral lands, contributors to this SI recognise that the world has entered the Anthropocene – the epoch of human-induced planetary change. While human activities are considered geologically recent, they have profoundly impacted the planet. The contributors challenge the discourse of the Anthropocene, not only because it takes humanity as the prime reference point in understanding the world but also because of its reproduction of the onto-epistemological foundations of Eurocentric philosophy, which underpins colonialism and racial capitalism. This SI opens up space for historically marginalised IPLCs’ cosmologies, which embody their holistic, spiritually and physically interconnected, interdependent, and reciprocal relationships with land, the natural world, and non-human beings. It expands and pluralises the discourse of the Anthropocene through the concept of posthumanism to recognise alternative knowledge systems that decentre humanity’s dominant position in understanding the world. IPLCs’ onto-epistemologies align with posthuman or more-than-human ways of knowing, being, and doing, which embody their reciprocal relationships with land, non-human beings, and the natural world that are all deemed as living entities with agency. IPLCs’ voices urge us to relearn our ancestral ways of recognizing and interacting with the world and reconnect to our holistic relationships with the planet Earth and its beings to ensure the continuity of nature and culture.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-12-21T11:04:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231219778
       
  • The discourse of the Anthropocene and posthumanism: Mining-induced loss of
           traditional land and the Mongolian nomadic herders

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ulemj Dovchin, Sender Dovchin
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      For over five millennia, Mongolia has been home to a remarkably resilient, land-connected, pastoral nomadic way of life and cultural heritage. Traditional local communities of Mongolian nomadic herders are custodians of the land. Since Mongolia’s transition to a democracy and neoliberal capitalist economy in the 1990s, an unprecedented mining boom has set in as large deposits of mineral resources were discovered. The mining boom and climate change impacts have put mounting pressure on herders’ ability to access their traditional land. Drawing on ethnographic research through storywork with Mongolian nomadic herders (malchid) in their traditional land (nutag) in the Gobi Desert region in Mongolia, this study aims to expand the discourse of the Anthropocene by engaging with the concept of posthumanism. We unpack the predominant discourse among Mongolian nomadic herders – loss of traditional land – induced by mining. In the Anthropocene – the epoch of human-induced planetary change – herders have become victims of both human-induced global environmental and climate change and the neoliberal capitalist extractive economy. Driven by mining-induced forced displacement from their traditional land and the natural resources on which they depend, herders are marginalised, resulting in the loss of their livelihood and severing of their special relationship and spiritual connection with their traditional land. We conclude that Mongolian nomadic herders’ voices urge us that it is crucial to expand and pluralise the discourse of the Anthropocene by relearning our ancestral ways of knowing, being and doing, and reconnecting to our holistic, spiritually and physically entwined, reciprocal and symbiotic relationship with land, non-human beings and the natural world that are all regarded as living and sentient entities with identity, agency and intentionality. Mongolian nomadic herders’ ancestral cosmology and onto-epistemology turn us to posthuman or more-than-human ways of understanding and interacting with the world, which decentre human exceptionalism and dominant position in the Anthropocene.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-12-20T08:41:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231219777
       
  • The ghosts of “internal colonisation”: Anthropogenic impacts of
           Russian imperial ambitions in Ukraine

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      Authors: Tetiana Bogachenko, Olga Oleinikova
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      The Anthropocene denotes an era of accelerated human impact on the environment. Although discourses of the Anthropocene are often criticized for representing colonial and specifically capitalist interests of economic growth, this paper examines, in the case of Ukraine, how these discourses can be applied to uncover and address social (post)colonial impacts of non-capitalist regimes (those also not classified as “Global North”). In particular, the analysis focuses on the aftermath of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear plant accident on local communities in Ukraine. As academics of Ukrainian background, authors share their first-hand experiences of such impact on their lives and wellbeing of their families, communities, and land. The narrative research framework is used to engage with the modern Ukrainian community and discuss the implications of geopolitical and cultural proximity of the coloniser, with a particular focus on displacement and forced migration. This is especially relevant as it is reflected in the current refugee crisis and tactics of nuclear terrorism used by the Russian government in the war against Ukraine. This paper is a valuable resource for promoting and giving a voice to the Ukrainian people and potentially other peoples in post-Soviet space to unveil their colonial legacy and utilise the discourses of the Anthropocene to aid more effective decolonisation processes in the future of the region.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-12-08T11:02:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231219774
       
  • Anthropogenic impacts of mining on indigenous peoples in Western
           Australia: Divergent values

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Toni Dobinson, Graeme Gower, Tania Fahey-Palma
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      The Anthropocene epoch is known as the time when the actions of humans began to impact the planet in unprecedented ways. There is consensus that the “golden spike” coincided with the advent of colonialism and especially settler colonialism. Indigenous Peoples have been impacted by what has been called contemporary colonialism or new colonialism. This has had implications, not only for their local environment, but also for their cultures, languages, health, economies, and political self-determination. Our study is framed by theories of contemporary and new colonialism as well as cultural colonialism and how this is manifested in the discourses of mining companies as they trivialise or ignore community and fuse Indigenous futures with extractive industries, also failing to recognise the non-human rights of the land and post-humanist/new materialist perspectives. The auto-ethnographic yarn (knowledge sharing) told in this article is the voice of an Indigenous Aboriginal Yawuru man living in Western Australia. Through thematic analysis of his, and other Aboriginal people’s yarns, we reveal Indigenous values and beliefs of permanence, community care, and the ensoulment of nature. Thematic analysis of the scripted narratives of the value statements of two mining companies operating in Western Australia uncovers a notion of community care discordant with that of Aboriginal people as well as a focus on courage and curiosity. The occlusion of any traditional, bottom-up understandings of human/non-human relationships in the values statements of the mining companies contrast with the way that Indigenous People’s narratives point towards ecological, social and economic sustainability in an Anthropocene dystopian future.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T10:25:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231219582
       
  • Sustainable mindsets: Combining traditional indigenous knowledge with
           non-aboriginal understanding to address environmental risks

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rhonda Oliver, Rachel Sheffield, Ronita Bradshaw, Jacqui Hunter, Sarah Nowers, Briana Taylor-Ellison
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are the traditional owners of Australia. It has been predicted that they have been the custodians of these lands for at least 60,000 years. Their traditional lands are inextricably linked to their languages, cultural practices and spiritual being. As the custodians they have used their traditional Indigenous knowledge to care for the land – its plants, animals and waterways, protecting unique ecosystems and maintaining sustainability. In fact, their traditional understanding reflects what has been described in the literature as a sustainable mindset. We come together as non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal educators to explore how environmental threats within the epoc of Anthropocene may be addressed using such a sustainable mindset – one reflecting both indigeneity and posthumanism perspectives. We describe three case studies showing how the use of traditional knowledge held by local Indigenous communities (IPLCs) can be used with non-Indigenous knowledge to address human induced planetary changes to protect important animal species and the land on which they live. We draw on written and oral reports from our Indigenous co-authors and data obtained informally from them by way of ‘yarning’. We describe how in the north-west of Western Australia areas of significant ecological and cultural value are being negatively affected by human-induced change threatening different animal species and ecosystems. We outline the effects of light pollution in Port Hedland and how this is disrupting the life cycle of the flatback sea turtle - culturally significant sea animals. As a point of comparison, we next describe how green back turtle and Dugong populations are being protected and sustained on the Dampier Peninsula using traditional knowledge more recently supplemented through the work of the Bardi Jawi Rangers. Finally, we examine how the Fitzroy River catchment area is increasingly under threat from water extraction and mining, but how a sustainable mindset can be used to obviate these environmental risks.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T07:40:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231219284
       
  • Governance of religious diversity in Central Europe: A religious
           nationalism inspired illiberal turn in Hungary and Slovakia'

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      Authors: Dániel Vékony, Egdūnas Račius
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Central European countries with a historically dominant Roman Catholic heritage belong to a particular cluster in respect to the governance of religion. This paper focuses on Hungary and Slovakia and addresses the effect of religious nationalism on the regimes of governance of religion in the two countries. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, there was a brief period of neutral stance towards religion, which was characterized by liberal values. With the introduction of the bilateral Concordat agreements with the Holy See, both countries started to treat traditional Christian Churches preferentially. By the 2010s legislation in both countries created restrictive entry barriers for “new” religions. This created two or multi-tiered systems for “old” and “new” religions, in which the former enjoyed closer relationship with the state. As a result, the separation of church and state has become blurred. Preferentially treated churches reappeared in the public space as providers of certain educational and social services. Preferentially treated churches and the state developed asymmetrically interdependent relationships, the state having the upper hand. Meanwhile, increasingly populist and nationalist parties instrumentalized religion by involving Christianity in their nationalistic political discourse. This helped create a normative space, in which the state is able to give further preferential treatment to certain religious groups over others. The emphasis on Christian national identity underpinned these governments’ narratives that conflates migration with security and Islam, which pushed those religious groups on the margins, which do not fit in the religious nationalist narrative of the increasingly right- and populism-leaning governing elite.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-12-01T06:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231209517
       
  • Colonial governmentality and Bangladeshis in the anthropocene: Loss of
           language, land, knowledge, and identity of the Chakma in the ecology of
           the Chittagong Hill tracts in Bangladesh

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      Authors: Urmee Chakma, Shaila Sultana
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      “Can they do whatever they please. . . Turn settlements into barren land. Dense forests into deserts. Mornings into evenings. Turn fertile into barren. Why shall I not resist!. …. I become my whole self. . . Why shall I not resist”!. This is a section from a poem - ‘Joli No Udhim Kittei’ a Chakma poem written in Bengali script as ‘Rukhe Darabo Na Keno'’ (‘Why shall I not resist!’) by the author \Kabita Chakma in 1992, translated into English. It epitomizes the ongoing violation of human rights that Chakmas (members of one of the Indigenous communities in Bangladesh) experience in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) where the highest number of Indigenous people in Bangladesh live. In this paper, the first author, a member of the Chakma community and a Lecturer at an Australian university is in conversation with the second author, a Professor at a university in a Bangladeshi university. With reference to Phillipson’s linguicism, and Foucault's notion of governmentality in the era of the Anthropocene, in their conversation, they reflect on the Anthropocene – the forced migration, displacement of Indigenous communities in Bangladesh from their traditional land, extinction of Indigenous languages, disengagement with Indigenous and local languages, and consequently, and the destruction of biodiversity of Chittagong Hill Tracts.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T12:22:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231219521
       
  • Anishinaabek Giikendaaswin and Dùthchas nan Gàidheal: concepts to
           (re)center place-based knowledges, governance, and land in times of crisis
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Susan Chiblow, Paul J Meighan
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Land is not a commodity, and dominant western society is unsustainable. Examples of unsustainability include severance of peoples from lands and waters; separation of peoples from centers of decision-making; and dispossession of the lands, and traditional territories of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs). IPLCs at the frontlines of the climate crisis are often excluded on vital decisions regarding land management and protection. Taking an emic interpretation by means of lived experiences and auto-ethnographic responses to question prompts, this paper explores the international implications of Anishinaabek Giikendaaswin and Dùthchas nan Gàidheal as concepts that can (re)center IPLC place-based knowledges, sustainable governance, and lands in times of climate crisis. Anishinaabek Giikendaaswin is about the learning from the lands, N’ibi (the waters), and the sky world. It is a lived knowledge that has guided and continues to guide Anishinaabek Peoples. G’giikendaaswinmin informs Anishinaabek interconnectedness and interrelationality to the lands, all beings, and the sky world. Dùthchas is a millenia-old kincentric concept, informing a Gàidheal (Gael) way of life and traditional land governance that predate the formation of the United Kingdom. Dùthchas transmits a sense of belonging to, not possession of the land, and stresses an interconnectedness and ecological balance among all entities. The authors (Anishinaabe and Gàidheal) respond to critical questions, such as How do Giikendaaswin and Dùthchas center knowledges that can ensure collective continuance of life' Through a common theme of interconnectedness and what this means for reconstitutive real-life practice, they demonstrate how Indigenous concepts and science based on the expertise of IPLCs can address continued colonial atrocities and current crises. Giikendaaswin and Dùthchas have international and transnational implications as discourses of resistance not only to the Anthropocene, but also to ongoing processes of dispossession.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-11-27T11:19:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231219022
       
  • Governing religion in Russia and Bulgaria: Between religious diversity and
           religious nationalism

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      Authors: Marat Iliyasov, Victoria Bogdanova, Liliya Yakova
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      After the collapse of Communism, a major overhaul of the systems of religious governance took place in Bulgaria and Russia. Policies of liberalisation were pursued in both states which created conditions for the revival of religion and growth of religious diversity. This research article analyses the state approaches and policy orientations characterising the governance of religious diversity in Russia and Bulgaria in the post-Communist years as well as challenges to the fulfilment of religious freedom and religious equality. Using the lens of religious nationalism, it demonstrates that religious nationalistic tendencies are significant in both states when it comes to the governance of religious diversity. Furthermore, the analysis suggests that such tendencies are inscribed in a contradiction between constitutionally-established principles and nationalism-tainted practices when it comes to the treatment of some minority religions or/and groups.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-11-08T09:19:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231209448
       
  • Rejoinder to article, “Health Inspector Ratings of Asian Restaurants
           during the Early COVID-19 Pandemic,” published by Cherng et al. On Nov.
           29, 2022

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      Authors: Wendy McKelvey, Carolyn Olson, Adria Zern, J. Bryan Jacobson, Corinne Schiff
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-11-07T07:44:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231211944
       
  • Competing external demoi and differential enfranchisement: The case of the
           2022 Hungarian election

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      Authors: Myra A. Waterbury
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      This analysis of the 2022 Hungarian parliamentary election highlights the phenomenon of competing external demoi, a situation that emerges when an incumbent government differentially enfranchises and mobilizes different external national communities for electoral purposes, thus triggering a competing mobilization of external voters by non-incumbent political actors. Hungarian parliamentary elections have increasingly become battlegrounds between the ethnic Hungarians living in countries neighboring Hungary, who have access to non-resident Hungarian citizenship and the right the vote in Hungarian elections by mail; and Hungarian emigrants in Western Europe who must vote in person at home or at embassies. These differences in voting access and the highly partisan mobilization of these two external demoi came to a head during the 2022 parliamentary election. This article seeks to explain the development of two different sets of external enfranchisement policies within a single case, a variation that is undertheorized in the literature, and uncovers the causes and consequences of the unique structure of external partisan polarization that emerged in the 2022 election. It argues that we must look at Hungary’s competitive authoritarian regime type in the context of “divided nationhood” and the relationship between incumbent hegemony and opposition mobilization in different types of external communities to explain this outcome.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-11-04T01:43:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231213080
       
  • Rejoinder-final right of reply to “health inspector ratings of Asian
           restaurants during the early COVID-19 pandemic”

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      Authors: Hua-Yu S Cherng, Martha Moreno, Jia-Lin Liu
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-11-03T01:49:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231211949
       
  • ‘They silenced our voices’; a genealogy of the linguistic
           othering of the Kurds in Iran

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      Authors: Mohammad Bazafkan
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Since the turn of the twentieth century, the Kurds in Iran have faced various forms of linguistic exclusion. As part of a genealogical project, this article aims to track the lineages of this exclusion. The linguistic exclusions are inscribed in a field of discursivity, which, tracking one of its lineages, turns our attention to the orientalist interventions. The article discusses two complementary projects: the authentication of the Persian language and the othering of the Kurdish language. These projects were made possible by the hegemony of territorial and linguistic discourses over orientalist studies in Iran. Orientalists proposed a periodization of Iranian languages, dividing them into old, middle, and modern eras, with Persian represented as the sole language that has ever existed throughout history, based on their decoding of ancient manuscripts. Meanwhile, the Kurdish language was completely marginalized, and Persian was represented as the essence of all Iranian languages and, consequently, as the language of all Iranians. As a result, an ontological and epistemic horizon emerged, on which all subsequent instances of othering of the Kurds became possible. Finally, the article also examines the ways in which the Kurds have resisted the linguistic exclusions.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-11-01T03:18:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231210557
       
  • The (un)importance of ethnicity in adolescents’ boundary making: An
           analysis over a two-school year period in a super-diverse city

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      Authors: Imane Kostet, Gert Verschraegen, Noel Clycq
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on three rounds of in-depth interviews with Antwerp pupils aged 11–14, we examine how adolescents’ moral boundary making shifts (or not) during the course of a two-school year period, as they talk about whom they like to hang out with (or not), the diversity in their surroundings and in their friendship groups, and the (un)importance of ethnicity in their peer relations. The results show that adolescents initially draw three subtypes of moral boundaries (based on being “good-rebellious”, “stingy-generous” or “decent-indecent”) to emphasize so-called differences between the majority and minority groups; these boundaries, however, reportedly do not structure their friendship groups and even become disconnected from ethnicity in the latter research rounds. Moral boundaries that are set not to distinguish between ethnic majority and minority groups, but against the children of recently arrived immigrants (“established-outsider” boundaries), however, are salient in all three research rounds and are reportedly not crossed in our respondents’ friendship group formation.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T09:39:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231211440
       
  • Introduction: All quiet on the Eastern front' Recent dynamics in the
           governance of religion in post-communist Europe

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      Authors: Liliya Yakova, Egdūnas Račius
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Although decades have passed since the constituent republics of what used to be the USSR and the member-states of its satellite Warsaw Pact dropped off the communist rule, in many regards, the countries of Eastern Europe continue to be in transition. One of the areas where this transition is clearly observable in these countries is the governance of religious diversity. In the aftermath of the collapse of communism, most of the states in the region adopted liberal regimes of the governance of religion as well as pro-diversity tendencies, which allowed for the burgeoning and thriving of various religious collectivities. Recently, however, there has been an observable purported turn away from a generally positive attitude in regards to religious diversity in different parts of the region from alleged freedom towards greater control of religious collectivities and their activities. To account for such processes, this special issue takes on the theoretical perspective of religious nationalism to analyse some of the underlying dynamics of such processes. In this the special issue addresses a number of questions, the major of which is: whether religious nationalism influences the governance of religion in post-communist Europe, and if so, how' This introductory piece outlines the research agenda of this special issue and briefly presents the major argument of each case study.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-10-26T09:32:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231209324
       
  • Armenian-Americans and the semicentennial of the Medz Yeghern: Ethnic
           mobilization in action

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      Authors: Karina Diłanian-Pinkowicz
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      In the wake of the 100th anniversary, this paper examines the shift in Armenian genocide commemorations materializing in the USA for the 50th anniversary of the 1915 genocide. Explored are ritual aspects of the commemorative practices undertaken to pay homage to its victims. Accentuated is the 1965 landmark year during which Armenians from diasporas around the world (including the American at the heart of this analysis) took to the streets, for the first time, to demand Turkey’s recognition of the Medz Yeghern. Through the prism of two newspapers published in English (Hairenik Weekly and The Armenian Mirror-Spectator), the author explores this ethnic mobilization of the Armenian-American community with its public protest against the decades-long injustice and silence. Unveiled are the inner workings of the commemoration planning, as well as the ways by which Armenian-Americans narrated their tragedy to the host community (in which they were already well-settled). The article depicts the preparations for and the semicentennial itself as the moment of formation of an ethnic body politic – one transcending intra-ethnic competition and dispute even as the group remained formally divided.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-10-25T08:29:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231209600
       
  • Religion and nationalism revisited: Insights from southeastern and central
           eastern Europe

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      Authors: Anna Triandafyllidou
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the dynamics behind the rise of religious nationalism in Central Eastern and Southeastern Europe with distinct populist, nativist, and authoritarian overtones. The paper explores the relationship between nationalism and religion today and the broader transformation challenges both within the region and more globally that can shape this relationship. It then looks closer into the historical experiences in the region with regard to the relationship between state and church as well as nationalism and religion, critically analysing how these relations have evolved during nation-state formation in the 19th and early 20th century, under Communism, and in the last three decades. Analysing critically the relevant literature, the paper discusses the entanglements between state and religious institutions as well as between national identity and faith, and how these are mobilised today. The paper argues for the need to consider both internal and external factors in the evolution of the relationship between nationalism and religion in Central Eastern and Southeastern Europe and more broadly.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-10-23T11:21:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231207980
       
  • Religious nationalism and the dynamics of religious diversity governance
           in post-communist Eastern Europe

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      Authors: Ani Sarkissian
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      The analysis of the dynamics of the governance of religious diversity in Southeastern and Central Eastern Europe and Russia provided in country studies in this special issue reveals that the countries of the region share several common tendencies but also exhibit significant divergences. This contribution compares the experiences of post-communist transition in religious diversity governance in the countries covered in the special issue. I assess the degree to which liberal regimes of religious diversity governance have been achieved or abandoned. I explore the explanatory factors behind the diversity of regimes in the region and the internal dynamics that these regimes have undergone throughout the post-communist period. I also compare policy issues related to the governance of religious diversity and the subsequent policy approaches adopted to tackle those challenges. The papers in this collection seek to explain a recent turn away from pro-diversity policy orientations by examining the influence of religious nationalism and the securitization of religion. In the conclusion, I argue for the need to consider additional factors related to post-communist transition in analyzing outcomes related to religious diversity governance.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-10-19T09:05:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231207975
       
  • Governing religious diversity in Western Balkans: The volatility of
           ethno-religious coexistence in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Albania

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      Authors: Eda Gemi, Etleva Babameto
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      The chartography of physical and imaginary borders between different national communities has historically been a challenging political process, especially in the case of the Balkan Peninsula. As regards ethno-nationalism in the Western Balkans, religion is one of the rudimental and constitutive elements of a nation’s identity. Yet, in theory this can only be true for a religiously homogenous nation-state, although this region is far from being home to religious homogeneity. A case in point is Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), where the lack of religious homogeneity can be illustrated through the three different religions that dominate the two political entities in the country. Albania, another country of Western Balkans, is similar to the case of BiH in relation to religious diversity among its population, but different from it in relation to religion not being an identity element upon which its nation is founded. In view of this diversity of mixed religious heritage embedded in the state formation, this article focuses on the nature of the ethno-religious nationalism in BiH and Albania. By employing a comparative case study approach, this article sets the analytical framework for the study of ethno-religious nationalism, while addressing the state approaches, policy orientations and challenges that characterize the governance of religious diversity in these countries in the post-communist era. The concept of religious nationalism - which is operationalized in ethnic terms – is used to shed light on the two states’ nation-building efforts, which have incorporated a marked religious element. The paper concludes with a cross-country analysis on how the volatility of ethno-religious coexistence in BiH and Albania has shaped their present and shall impact their future.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-10-19T09:04:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231208303
       
  • Long-distance nationalism, diaspora mobilisation, and the struggle for
           Biafran self-determination in Nigeria

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      Authors: Stanley Jachike Onyemechalu, Promise Frank Ejiofor
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Existing works on the sources of secessionist agitations in postcolonial Africa tend to be methodologically nationalist but also circumvent the diasporic dimension. Particularly, the resurgent ethnic separatism amongst Igbos in southeastern Nigeria has been predominantly analysed from the theoretical standpoints of relative marginalisation and material deprivation that focus on domestic politics in post-war Nigeria. We broaden this literature by underscoring the diasporic dimension of this secessionist conflict. Drawing on the literature on diaspora nationalism with a focus on the case of the Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB)—a transnational separatist movement—we reveal evidence showing how the Igbo diaspora instigate and exacerbate separatist tensions in the homeland by reviving collective memories of the macabre Nigeria-Biafra war (1967–1970) and reimagining alternative political futures for ethnic Igbos devoid of the state’s grand narratives of nationhood. We contend that the diasporic dimension is profoundly critical to comprehending separatist agitations in southeastern Nigeria with implications for wider postcolonial African contexts.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-10-18T11:28:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231208307
       
  • Religious nationalism and religious governance: Overlaps and divergences.
           The case of Croatia

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      Authors: Zoran Grozdanov, Nebojša Zelič
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we argue that the religious governance in Croatia was shaped by the specific position that was given to the Catholic Church in Croatia as the historical and moral guardian of the Croatian people. We describe how the fusion of religious and national identity occurred and how it was connected to the relationship between the Catholic Church and the political party that governed Croatia in the 1990s, as well as the relationship between the state and minority religious communities. The article also deals with the issue of whether religious nationalism, which is very strong at the levels of society and national self-consciousness, played any role in the governance of religious diversity and how it has influenced social movements that have reconfigured mutual recognition of different religious communities in Croatia.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-10-18T10:48:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231208267
       
  • Consociational politics as a mediating effect in strengthening ethnic
           unity among youth in Malaysian public universities

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      Authors: WN Wan Husin, NI Samsudin, WK Mujani, SJ Zainurin
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      This study analyses the role of consociational politics as a mediating effect in enhancing ethnic unity among youth in Malaysia, with reference to the university students, through educational policy, economic system and religious practice. The research focuses on ethnicity due to its persistent influence on election outcomes over the previous two decades. Besides, a significant number of voters choose to base their political choices on the party that resonate with their ethnic interests. For this study, it involved a survey of 373 students from two Malaysian public universities, namely University of Malaya and the National Defence University of Malaysia. The obtained data are subjected to descriptive analysis as well as structural equation modelling (SEM) analysis. The results indicate that all three domains are significant in strengthening ethnic unity among youth, and this finding has national significance since it demonstrates the efficacy of this strategy in safeguarding Malaysia's diverse population The study's findings demonstrate that the grand coalition, as a fundamental component of consociational politics, possesses the capacity to cultivate a political alliance comprising many ethnic groupings, ultimately earning the confidence of the broader populace, particularly the younger generation. This facilitates the ascendance of a politically diverse party with individuals from various ethnic backgrounds to take over governance of the nation. Hence, the successful promotion of racial peace among the youth in Malaysia can be attributed to the implementation of a consociational strategy within the country.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T04:28:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231204667
       
  • Ethnoracist exclusion and anti-immigrant sentiment in Europe: A hybrid
           model analysis using the European Social Survey, 2002–2016

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      Authors: Aaron Ponce
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      The literature on anti-immigrant sentiment analyzes generalized threat—rooted in a mix of cultural and economic anxieties—but relies on a theoretical foundation based on the study of race. This is puzzling since research on immigration attitudes has developed theoretical and empirical blind spots regarding the relevance of race-ethnicity. This study engages with race theories to show that racialization and symbolic racism constitute a primary axis along which a substantial subset of the European public views immigrants. Using five waves of the European Social Survey (2002–2016) and matched country-level data, the study finds that excluding immigrants based on race-ethnicity distinguishes a sizeable minority in most countries, and is also not isolated to any one region. Further, results provide evidence for the racialization of certain immigrant groups through greater associations between these groups’ presence and anti-immigrant sentiment. Strong and consistent reactions to the Muslim foreign-born population stand out. Finally, ethnoracist exclusionists are the primary agents of such racialization as they exhibit the strongest reactions to racialized groups, having the highest anti-immigrant sentiment. Findings are discussed within the context of assumptions underlying classical threat theories, the cultural, religious, and racialized aspects of anti-Muslim sentiment, and the global and local manifestations of race.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T11:02:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231204038
       
  • Independence or a federation' Perceived discrimination as an antecedent of
           Anglophone Cameroonians’ attitude towards the form of state

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      Authors: Elvis Nshom, Immaculate Mkong, Kwoh Elonge, Isidore Agha
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Since 2016, the Central African country of Cameroon has been experiencing the worst conflict and humanitarian crisis in its history over the systematic marginalization and discrimination of Anglophones and a change in the form of state. This study sets out to explore Anglophone’s perception of discrimination, their attitudes towards the form of state (federation and independence), and the extent to which the perception of discrimination predicts attitudes towards the form of state. In a sample of 314 Anglophones, results showed that attitudes towards the form of state were mixed as there was no significant difference between support for independence and support for a federation. In addition, results indicated that the perception of discrimination among Anglophones was significantly high. Lastly, while controlling for the effect of age, level of education, and economic status, the results showed that the perception of discrimination was significantly related to support for independence but not support for a federation. Implications and avenues for further research are discussed as well.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-09-25T01:51:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231203407
       
  • Immigration, ethnic diversity and public goods provisioning: Evidence from
           rural communities in Uganda

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      Authors: Godfreyb Ssekajja
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      A considerable body of literature suggests that immigration undermines voluntary contributions to public goods because it leads to ethnic diversity, which erodes social trust. This article posits that the effect of immigration outweighs that of ethnic diversity, so that immigration may explain why ethnic diversity is negatively associated with social trust and public goods provisioning. I also highlight a need to emphasize the moderating influence of transaction costs when analyzing provisioning problems associated with immigration and ethnic diversity. To examine my hypotheses, I use a mixed-method research design to study public goods management in randomly selected communities in rural Uganda whose rates of immigration and levels of ethnic diversity vary. I analyze community-level attempts at collective action that involve substantially different costs; that is, contributing to toilet construction and participating in litter pickup programs. The findings suggest that socio-political barriers to collective action for public goods provisioning may have less to do with the stock of demographic diversity than the flow rate of demographic change. The same findings suggest a more micro-level explanation that transcends the erosive effects (of immigration and ethnic diversity) on social trust to emphasize the moderating influence of transaction costs.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-08-18T01:49:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231193549
       
  • (De)Securitising national minorities: The case of Singapore

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      Authors: Julius CS Mok
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Singapore presents a unique case study for multiculturalists in that the state leans heavily in its promotion of racial demarcations whilst simultaneously propagating a narrative of the state “regardless of race, language or religion”. This paper argues that this apparent contradiction is a deliberate calculation to use multiculturalism to desecuritise an otherwise disparate multiracial society. Extending He’s (2018) sequencing of multicultural progress as an a priori development to desecuritisation, this paper moves past traditionally democratic assumptions to demonstrate how the Singaporean state has in effect desecuritised national minorities through semi-to-autocratic management of multiculturalism. Referring to ‘securitised multiculturalism’ that has become increasingly evident since the 2000s, the paper progresses to consider how terrorism has affected Singapore’s multicultural formulation and examines the state’s top-down responses to desecuritise the security element in ‘securitised multiculturalism’ to the extent that such is possible.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-08-17T12:47:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231196657
       
  • Returning empty-handed or going somewhere' Tales from social division
           networks of re-migrants in the polarized post-COVID-19 era: A
           phenomenological study

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      Authors: Hanvedes Daovisan, Sayamol Charoenratana, Motoki Akitsu
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      This study poses the following questions: What are the reasons for cross-border re-migration' How are social division networks formed' We conducted a phenomenological study of social division networks for Laotian re-migrants in polarized post-COVID-19 Thailand. Chain referral sampling was used to recruit participants in 20 online semi-structured interviews, which were conducted from December 2021 to April 2022. Thematic saturation (codebook development, codebook refinement, code saturation, emerging themes, and confirming theory) was used to analyze the interview transcripts. Three themes emerged from the participants’ responses: the reasons for re-migration, the role of network capital, and social divisions of re-migrants in polarized post-COVID-19 Thailand. Our findings provide useful insights into the importance of group connections with strong supply network ties to promote transnational mobility; this facilitates the movement of cross-border re-migrants between home-sending and host-receiving countries.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-08-12T09:51:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231193826
       
  • ‘It feels made up’: Post racialism and colorblind ideology within
           individual constructions of self identity

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      Authors: Caroline Adolfsson
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to explore the interrelation between post racialism, colorblind ideology, and the perception of Swedishness. Through 40 interviews and surveys conducted in Malmö, Sweden, participants were asked to reflect on race, ethnicity, and Swedishness. Multiple meanings were present in the participants’ responses, half of whom were white and half non-white. For white participants, boundaries around the in-group construction of ‘Swedishness’ were based in whiteness, yet these participants held overwhelmingly negative attitudes towards the use of words race or racialization. On the other hand, non-white participants viewed race and racialization with less negative connotations, yet they also endorsed the need to be white in order to be perceived as being Swedish. The results support the notion that abandonment of the word race does not always equate to an abandonment of whiteness. This article builds upon and expands previous findings in the U.S. context while contributing to an emerging body of literature on race and racialization in Sweden. Additionally, it seeks to challenge dominant narratives and assumptions of 'Swedishness' and its connection to whiteness.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-08-10T07:17:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231191751
       
  • Between redemption and affirmation: German identity in affective
           narratives of the ‘refugee crisis’

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      Authors: Heidi Armbruster
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      The German ‘refugee crisis’ produced formidable levels of civil society assistance, involving citizens and locations with no previous experience in refugee support. Grounded in research with citizen volunteers in a rural region in southern Germany conducted at a time when rightwing populism gained strength, this article explores how volunteers reflect on their relations with refugees while negotiating distinctly German identities. Scholarship on volunteering in refugee settings has looked at the emotional aspect of this work largely for its political import. This article expands attention to emotions in volunteering from a form of political practice on the ground to a practice of narrative reasoning. In a close reading of interview-derived narratives as affective practices the relevance of locality, identity and history for refugee reception comes to the fore. Deploying the notions of ‘redemptive’ and ‘affirmative’ Germanness the article shows how volunteers draw on specific historical trajectories to produce moral arguments about the support and incorporation of strangers. This article argues that volunteers’ affective involvement with history and locality needs unpacking if their relations of solidarity are to be understood.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-08-04T06:28:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231193827
       
  • The representation of Jews in the Finnish press before the second world
           war

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      Authors: Sanna Ryynänen
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the representation of Jews in the Finnish general press before the Second World War. The data comprise of 313 texts gathered from newspapers and magazines that were targeted at general audiences and that appeared between the years 1821–1936. The texts were examined on three levels: First, the upfront topics pertaining to Jews were identified and grouped under 12 themes. Second, the tone of the mentions was evaluated as positive, neutral, or negative. Third, underlying assumptions, opinions and attitudes expressed aside the upfront topics were identified from the texts. Until recent decades, the idea in Finland has been that there was hardly any antisemitism in the country before or during the Second World War. As new research has emerged, this view has repeatedly been challenged. However, research on the general media’s representation of Jews has remained scarce. This article aims at filling this gap. In doing so, it offers a view on how Jews were seen and discussed in the Finnish society at large. So far, the studies on pre-WWII media have concluded that antisemitism was limited to far-right or ultranationalist papers. This article ends up with the opposite conclusion.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-06-24T06:16:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231184632
       
  • Symbolic capital and the inclusion of ethnic minority artists in Dublin
           and Warsaw

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      Authors: Waleed Serhan
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      The dominant literature delineates that European museums tend to ‘resist’ the inclusion of immigrant and ethnic minority artists due to a Eurocentric evaluation of the art within a postcolonial setting. This study builds on this premise, but also emphasizes the significance of ‘symbolic capital’, as conceptualized by Pierre Bourdieu, in processes of inclusion and exclusion. While the evaluation of the art is of vast importance, inclusion and exclusion are also influenced by the relation between the symbolic capital of the museum professionals and the cultural and social capital of ethnic minority artists. Moreover, museum professionals in Dublin and Warsaw find creative ways of both safeguarding their symbolic capital and including ethnic minority artists. The research is based on semi-structured interviews with key museum professionals in several main modern art museums and galleries, and with ethnic minority artists, in the relatively new immigration cities of Dublin and Warsaw, as well as a review of past exhibitions.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-06-05T07:13:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231181132
       
  • Afghan immigrants in Western Australia: Divisions within the community and
           integration within the society

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      Authors: Omid Rezaei, Vicki Banham, Hossein Adibi
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      The integration process for immigrants is a multi-dimensional concept, influenced by a wide range of structural and individual factors, including social connections that immigrants make in the host society. An important part of this social connection can be developed with other co-nation immigrants within the immigrant community. However, this sometimes can be challenging due to the divisions that might exist within communities. Drawing on data with a mixed-method design, this study focuses on the Afghan community in Western Australia to understand, firstly, the relationship between Afghan immigrants’ social connections within their community and successful integration within Australian society, and secondly the causes of divisions and challenges within the community. To do this, the Immigration Policy Lab (IPL) Integration Index was used to measure the level of integration among 115 Afghan participants in the quantitative phase, with 18 interviews and two focus groups conducted in the qualitative phase, to understand Afghan experiences of divisions within their community. Findings show that there is a correlation between Afghans’ social connections within their community and the four dimensions of economic, social, linguistic, and navigational integration. Qualitative findings also showed the details of the challenges that Afghans face within their community due to ethnic/regional divisions as well as the challenges women face in the community.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-05-31T05:50:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231181421
       
  • Negotiating between gender, national and professional identities: The
           work-experience of israeli-palestinian women journalists

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      Authors: Einat Lachover
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      This paper analyzes the work experience of Israeli-Palestinian women journalists who reside and work in Israel for local news organizations or non-Israeli news agencies. It focuses on their experiences related to the intersected axes of their gender, ethnic, and national identities. Through thematic analysis of narrative interviews with 24 Palestinian women journalists, the study reveals that their work experiences vary between exclusion and inclusion among different news organizations. Israeli-Palestinian women journalists face barriers getting jobs at mainstream news agencies because of their accent; and when they apply to local Arab news organizations, they confront recruiting procedures based on a clan system that discriminates against women. However, a few of them report an advantage when trying to enter mainstream news organizations based on their image as an “authentic Arab woman.” Additionally, the study finds that the professional identity of all interviewees is closely connected to their ideological perceptions and political aims.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-05-05T01:17:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231173759
       
  • Greening self-government' incorporation of environmental justifications
           into sub-state nationalist claim making in Spain

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      Authors: Stephanie Kerr
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Regional nationalism in Spain – particularly those movements in Catalonia and the Basque Country – have been characterized at the parliamentary level by political parties from both the traditional left and right of the political spectrum. While calls for greater autonomy and even secession are made from both ends of that spectrum, the framings of their calls for self-government vary in content and scope. Since the turn into the 21st century, sub-state nationalist parties of the left - those more typically associated with a prioritization of environmental concerns - in both regions have taken an increased share of the seats in their respective parliaments. Over the same period, climate change has increasingly moved to the front of the list of the concerns of European citizens. This paper investigates the degree to which key regional nationalists of the left have moved to incorporate environmental and climate change concerns into their claim making, narrative, and framings, highlighting both regional, and governance level comparative dynamics.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-05-04T12:03:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231171168
       
  • Critical Tiriti Analysis: A prospective policy making tool from Aotearoa
           New Zealand

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      Authors: Heather Came, Dominic O’Sullivan, Jacquie Kidd, Tim McCreanor
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      Restrictions on Indigenous peoples’ contributions to policymaking pervade post-settler societies like Australia, Canada and Aotearoa. Such effects are observed in spite of agreements like Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Aotearoa and the United Nations’ Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Te Tiriti, negotiated between the British Crown and Māori (Indigenous peoples of Aotearoa), may have been entered into honourably by both parties, but the Crown has consistently resisted its implementation. Contemporary colonialism is characterised by the entrenched and on-going displacement of Indigenous people’s authority by settler states, rationalised by race as a determinant of human worth. Impacts include land alienation, unsustainable resource exploitation and marginalising Indigenous voices from opportunities to make policy consistent with Indigenous values and preferred ways of living. Colonialism normalises institutional racism so that public policy outcomes are persistently unjust. This article describes Critical Tiriti Analysis (CTA), an original contribution to transforming colonial policy, which retrospectively evaluates whether any specific policy document is consistent with Te Tiriti. Substantial interest in CTA from policymakers, practitioners, and scholars led to the development of the tool as a prospective guide to making policy that is consistent with authoritative interpretations of Te Tiriti, and therefore, more likely effective in producing public policies which eliminate inequities. CTA was initially focused on health policy and built on a series of questions that arise from our interpretations of the text of Te Tiriti, contemporary Tiriti scholarship and jurisprudence, and our observations of the ways in which the method is being used by ourselves and others. Although deeply grounded in Aotearoa, we argue that CTA may be transferable to other colonial contexts, such as the Australian where treaties between First Nations and the state are being contemplated, and Canada which has passed legislation to implement the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-04-18T10:53:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231171651
       
  • Evoking the resemblance: Descriptive representation of ethnic minorities

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      Authors: Jelena Lončar
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      The constructivist approach to political representation has shown that descriptive representation cannot be reduced to passive presence. Descriptive representatives rather actively contribute to the construction of constituencies’ identities. Nevertheless, the existing empirical literature still dominantly operationalizes descriptive representation as mere presence of group members in the representative institutions. This article adds to the previous efforts of rethinking descriptive representation in the more constructivist terms by defining it as consisting of two necessary elements: 1) construction of a representative through activation of claim-maker’s ethnicity, and 2) portrayals of ethnic constituency. The article argues that descriptive representation is performed through the use of diverse boundary mechanisms. In the process of positioning themselves and portraying their constituency, representatives work with and around ethnic boundaries. Using the case of ethnic minority representation in Serbia, the article demonstrates how resemblance or group membership is not necessarily transparent and self-evident. Instead, representatives first need to activate and deploy ethnic boundaries to be perceived as group’s descriptive representatives. In doing so, they also tell stories about ethnic groups, which are consequential upon the ways group members perceive themselves and relations within and across the boundaries.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-03-22T05:48:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231166514
       
  • Governing diversity in the multilevel European public space

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      Authors: John Erik Fossum, Riva Kastoryano, Tariq Modood, Ricard Zapata-Barrero
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      The issue of working out a viable relationship between accepting and/or living with diversity on the one hand and fostering integration on the other has occupied public debates, political agendas, and social sciences for decades. Our point of departure is that the contemporary European context provides distinct challenges. We need to understand how postmigrant integration is shaped and conditioned by the European public space understood as a geographical space; a composite of legally and institutionally constituted entities; covering nations, regions, and cities mainly within but also beyond the EU; and a site of interaction, and public expression of contestation and cooperation. In so doing, we have to contend with the fact that such important perspectives for handling diversity as multiculturalism, interculturalism, transnationalism and cosmopolitanism occupy distinct roles within the European public space whose governance is multi-levelled yet not reducible to a single tiered system. The European public space is more encompassing than the EU even while that level of governance has some important regulative functions upon member states and to some extent even on non-EU states such as Norway and the UK, especially in what we refer to as the outer circle. While the national level is the most powerful normatively and by most other measures on the inclusion of difference (our inner circle), municipalities also contribute to the constitution of this space. We explore the logics of our four ‘isms’ and of the tiers of governance and their interaction with each other, both the isms in tensions and syntheses with each other and differentially in relation to the levels of governance. This is an exercise that has not been done before. Our purpose is to suggest a new normativity that might feasibly achieve a broader degree of support and success than any of the isms have achieved alone.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-03-15T07:47:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231158381
       
  • ‘Guru Rinpoche is Śivajī’: Ethnicity and ethnic boundary drift in
           Nepal’s ethnic art

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      Authors: Jingwei Li
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      This paper argues that ethnic paintings connotate situational ethnicity, adjusted by social change and ethnic boundaries. Based on anthropological fieldwork focusing on painter and mercantile communities, social-political connotations of ethnic art are discussed by applying an analysis of social semiotics in three discourses, employing the case of post-1990 Nepal. In particular: 1) Modern visual expressions of ethnicity are adopted into anti-hierarchical representations, as people engage in ethnic politics and cultural activities. 2) The two genres of ethnic painting, paubhā, and thangka, which were developed by traditional creators and informed by ethnicity, have experienced and developed a cross-boundary mode of operating in industries in response to social change. 3) In the market and mass media, the narrative of value construction regarding the tradition of ethnic art reveals a sign arena that identifies a drift toward the nation, the state, and civilization, prepensely attempting to mobilize semiotic resources through the lens of politics, the market, and global values.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-03-15T02:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231161455
       
  • Migratory success in the experience of poles from Berlin and London

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      Authors: Agnieszka Szczepaniak-Kroll, Anna Szymoszyn
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates the issue of migration success achieved by Poles settling in Berlin and London between the 1980s and 2018. We focus on the migration wave that took place after Poland’s accession to the European Union in 2004. We show different ways in which migrants understand their new situation in the light of their integration, daily life, and well-being or satisfaction in the context of migration success. We analyse the similarities and differences of approaches to the new life in London and Berlin explicated by Polish migrants. In doing so, we pay attention to several important characteristics and processes related to the integration of Polish migrants into the metropolitan environments of Western Europe.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-03-15T02:28:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231164372
       
  • Economy of marginality and familiarity: Making sense of South Asian
           migrant breakout business in Hong Kong

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      Authors: Kim Kwok, Michael Parzer
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines an emerging phenomenon within the South Asian economy in Hong Kong: Disadvantaged entrepreneurs, mainly from Pakistan, Nepal and India, have adopted breakout strategies to target other disadvantaged migrants, particularly Indonesian and Filipino foreign domestic workers. This challenges the widely shared assumption that breakout strategies of migrant entrepreneurs address primarily the mainstream population. By applying Erving Goffman’s notion of frame, we focus on how these entrepreneurs understand and interpret their (change of) market orientation in the context of a specific entrepreneurial environment, where power asymmetries exist in the economic and political constellation between the ethnic majority and various groups of migrants. Regarding methodology, semi-structured interviews were conducted, and analyses were done based on 15 business units with 19 migrant entrepreneurs targeting other marginalised migrant groups with whom they share stigmatisation by the ethnic majority. The findings reveal that four frames around “marginality” and “familiarity” play a crucial role in shaping South Asian migrant entrepreneurs’ market orientation and strategies: a) shared experiences of discrimination, b) unwanted locality as resources, c) common culture, and d) race-based affinity and sympathy. These results contribute to the debates by adding a rather neglected form of market orientation to the diversification of migrant entrepreneurial strategies in existing literature, supplementing the economic and social explanations by applying a cultural sociological perspective of social inequality, and critically reviewing the assumption that breakout automatically generates economic success and social mobility.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-03-08T02:27:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231162362
       
  • Palestinian and jewish public representatives' attitudes toward violence
           in the Palestinian community in Israel: Conspiracy and cultural violence
           perspectives

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      Authors: Nohad ‘Ali
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      In the last decade, the spread of the violence became one of the most worrying phenomena in the Palestinian Arab community in Israel. This article focuses on the violence where victims and offenders come from Palestinian Arab community in Israel. Its purpose is to review the attitudes of the public figures in the Jewish and the Palestinian Arab communities of the country regarding the violence in the latter community through the lens of the conspiracy and the cultural violence theories. The review shows that some leaders of the Palestinian Arab community tend to refer to the persistence of violence and crime in their community in a cospirative way. Their key claim is that the state authorities intentionally neglect this phenomenon and possibly have some sinister goal behind this way of conduction. In contrast, public representatives of the Jewish community tend to refer to the persistence of violence and crime in Palestinian Arab community in cultural terms. Their key claim is that violence in Palestinian Arab community is deeply rooted in the culture of this community. The review suggests that the attitudes reflect the discourse around the “blaming the victim” concept, whereas representatives of the hegemonic Jewish majority use this tactic in their cultural violence rhetoric, and representatives of the dispossessed Palestinian Arab minority complain against it using the conspiracy beliefs. The review is concluded with broad implications for the Israeli society.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-02-27T05:38:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968231159103
       
  • Experiences of culture and cultural negotiations among Russian-speaking
           migrants: National habitus and cultural continuity dilemmas in
           child-rearing

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      Authors: Raisa Akifeva, Farida Fozdar, Loretta Baldassar
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      How migrants negotiate and adjust to new cultural settings and how they transmit culture to their children are key questions for migration researchers. This paper explores how culture is experienced and negotiated among Russian-speaking migrants, drawing on interviews and observation data collected in Perth, Australia, and Madrid, Spain, together with online forum data and documents. Analysis reveals that long-term socio-historical processes taking place within the post-Soviet space generate certain similarities among its inhabitants. These shared features, which Norbert Elias (1996) called ‘national habitus’, include internalised dispositions and behavioural patterns evident and reproduced in everyday life, such as hygiene and healthcare practices, norms of conduct in public places, and practices and beliefs related to the control of children’s behaviour and discipline. Many migrants come to realise that they are bearers of these similarities only in the process of the migration experience. This process of recognition of their habitus, including realising the cultural nature of certain standards of behaviour perceived as ‘civilised’ and ‘rational’ in the past, and the making of decisions about what is important to keep and what is not, we refer to as ‘cultural continuity dilemmas’. Participants resolve these dilemmas in three main ways: reinforcing their cultural classification systems through condemnation or attempts to correct; adopting the new standards; or adjusting perceptions to find a compromise. In these processes, certain practices and norms may come to be recognised as Soviet in both positive and negative senses, as being acceptable, or outdated remnants of a totalitarian system. Solving such dilemmas creates a unique combination of practices, forming a common cultural hybridity and generating new awareness of cultural and national identities.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-01-11T11:56:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968221149167
       
  • A stranger at home' A multilevel analysis of anti-Muslim sentiment in
           Western European societies

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      Authors: Ana Maria Torres Chedraui, Pui-Hang Wong
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      The capability of accommodation policies to create inclusive and cohesive societies for social integration has recently been called into question. Some people worry that accommodation may upset those who disagree about the policy and create a backlash effect. This study examines these issues using the theory of cognitive dissonance and empirically tests whether individuals’ policy preference influences the impact of accommodation of Islam policies on anti-Muslim sentiments. Using survey data from 15 Western European countries, we find that accommodation of Islam policies produce socialising effects on those whose opinions resonate with the policies. However, we do not find statistical evidence of backlash on those whose opinions dissonate with the policies. The findings suggest that accommodation of Islam policies do not radicalise dissonant opinions and are likely to reduce anti-Muslim sentiments among those whose opinions resonate with the policies.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-01-09T01:33:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968221149030
       
  • Adapting the socio-cultural adaptation scale (SCAS-R) to Arabic: A study
           on the Syrian migrants living in Gaziantep province of Türkiye

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      Authors: Ahmet Keser, Önder Yalçin, Yunus Gökmen
      Abstract: Ethnicities, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to investigate the validity, reliability, and Arabic language equivalence of the Socio-cultural Adaptation Scale (SCAS-R) created by Colleen Ward and Antony Kennedy (1999) and revised by Jessie Wilson (2013). A sample group of 424 Syrian Migrants (18 years and older) living in Gaziantep province of Türkiye from different neighborhoods, economic status, and socio-demographic backgrounds are included in the research, and the scale is examined via commonly used validity and reliability analysis methods. It is obtained that the Cronbach’s Alpha of the items is higher than 0.7 and the corrected item-total correlations are above the threshold value (0.2) in item analysis, nearly 69% of the total variance is explained by 5 factors in Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA), and the Goodness of Fit Indexes (χ2/sd = 1.521, CFI = 0.958, and SRMR = 0.048) are within the good/acceptable range in Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). It has been understood that the SCAS-R is a valid and reliable scale for Arabic culture. The results of this study may provide a valuable tool for policymakers, researchers, and humanitarian workers studying migration issues.
      Citation: Ethnicities
      PubDate: 2023-01-03T05:15:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14687968221149589
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 375)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 301)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 269)
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Qualitative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Judgment and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Sociolinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 20)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Studies in Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Research in Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Classical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Political Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Sociology: Revue Internationale de Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Japanese Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
New Zealand Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Mathematical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Italian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Public and Professional Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue de la régulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue Internationale De Securite Sociale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Landscapes of Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Liinc em Revista     Open Access  
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Socio-logos     Open Access  

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