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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
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Ageing & Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.756
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 40  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0144-686X - ISSN (Online) 1469-1779
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [352 journals]
  • ASO volume 42 issue 12 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X22001295
       
  • ASO volume 42 issue 12 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 2
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X22001301
       
  • Referees for volume 42, 2022

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      Pages: 2723 - 2734
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X22001210
       
  • Fractured: Why Our Societies Are Coming Apart and How We Can Put Them Back
           Together Again John Yates, HarperCollins, Manchester, UK, 2021, 352 pp.,
           hbk £20.00, ISBN 13: 9780008463960

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      Authors: Cann; Paul
      Pages: 2968 - 2969
      PubDate: 2022-10-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X22000782
       
  • The city centre as an age-friendly shopping environment: a consumer
           perspective

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      Authors: Kohijoki; Anna-Maija, Koistinen, Katri
      Pages: 2735 - 2756
      Abstract: Urban population ageing has significant implications for city centres catering for an increasing number of older consumers. To guide world cities on taking action in response to population ageing, the World Health Organization (WHO) has addressed the universal features of the age-friendly city. This study applies the WHO guideline to the context of shopping. With an emphasis on older consumers, the perceptions of the city centre as a physical and social shopping environment are studied. Using a qualitative content analysis, older consumers’ perceptions (focus-group participants aged 64–94) are analysed based on the age-friendly city features. The perceptions are compared with those of younger consumers (qualitative-survey respondents aged 21–41). The study confirms the significance of older city shoppers, and suggests their needs and wants should be taken into account in urban development projects. The older consumers differ from younger consumers in their city-shopping behaviour and perceptions in many respects. The age groups highlighted the same themes, but mainly with dissimilar content. This indicates that measures to develop a city centre friendlier to older consumers also benefit their younger counterparts, but for different reasons. It is necessary to understand this disparity to create a city-centre shopping environment that is friendly for different ages. The study offers new perspectives on responding to the challenges that consumer ageing poses to Western cities.
      PubDate: 2021-03-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000295
       
  • Gambling activity in the old-age general population

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      Authors: del Pino-Gutiérrez; Amparo, Granero, Roser, Fernández-Aranda, Fernando, Mena-Moreno, Teresa, Mestre-Bach, Gemma, Gómez-Peña, Mónica, Moragas, Laura, Aymamí, Neus, Giroux, Isabelle, Grall-Bronnec, Marie, Sauvaget, Anne, Codina, Ester, Vintró-Alcaraz, Cristina, Lozano-Madrid, María, Agüera, Zaida, Sánchez-González, Jéssica, Casalé, Gemma, Baenas, Isabel, Sánchez, Isabel, López-González, Hibai, Menchón, José M., Jiménez-Murcia, Susana
      Pages: 2757 - 2783
      Abstract: Old age constitutes a vulnerable stage for developing gambling-related problems. The aims of the study were to identify patterns of gambling habits in elderly participants from the general population, and to assess socio-demographic and clinical variables related to the severity of the gambling behaviours. The sample included N = 361 participants aged in the 50–90 years range. A broad assessment included socio-demographic variables, gambling profile and psychopathological state. The percentage of participants who reported an absence of gambling activities was 35.5 per cent, while 46.0 per cent reported only non-strategic gambling, 2.2 per cent only strategic gambling and 16.3 per cent both non-strategic plus strategic gambling. Gambling form with highest prevalence was lotteries (60.4%), followed by pools (13.9%) and bingo (11.9%). The prevalence of gambling disorder was 1.4 per cent, and 8.0 per cent of participants were at a problematic gambling level. Onset of gambling activities was younger for men, and male participants also reached a higher mean for the bets per gambling-episode and the number of total gambling activities. Risk factors for gambling severity in the sample were not being born in Spain and a higher number of cumulative lifetime life events, and gambling severity was associated with a higher prevalence of tobacco and alcohol abuse and with worse psychopathological state. Results are particularly useful for the development of reliable screening tools and for the design of effective prevention programmes.
      PubDate: 2021-03-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000258
       
  • Art, authenticity and citizenship for people living with dementia in a
           care home

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      Authors: Hughes; Julian C., Baseman, Jordan, Hearne, Catherine, Lie, Mabel Leng Sim, Smith, Dominic, Woods, Simon
      Pages: 2784 - 2804
      Abstract: This paper reports on a study which examined the notions of authenticity and citizenship for people living with cognitive impairment or dementia in a care home in the North-East of England. We demonstrated that both notions were present and were encouraged by engagement with an artist, where this involved audio and visual recordings and the creation of a film. The artist's interactions were observed by a non-participant observer using ethnographic techniques, including interviews with the residents, their families and the staff of the care home. The data were analysed using grounded theory and the constant comparative method of qualitative analysis. Our findings suggest that participatory art might help to maintain and encourage authenticity and citizenship in people living with dementia in a care home. Certainly, authenticity and citizenship are notions worth pursuing in the context of dementia generally, but especially in care homes.
      PubDate: 2021-03-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000271
       
  • Leaving early or staying on' Retirement preferences and motives among
           older health-care professionals

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      Authors: Stattin; Mikael, Bengs, Carita
      Pages: 2805 - 2831
      Abstract: There is a need for improved knowledge about how workplace conditions and organisational factors may obstruct or facilitate work in late life. By means of both quantitative and qualitative data, this study aims to explore retirement preferences among employees (aged 55 and older) in a large Swedish health-care organisation and to identify work-related motives influencing their retirement preferences. The quantitative analysis showed large variation in retirement preferences in the organisation. The qualitative results were summarised into two overarching types of motives for late and early retirement preferences, general and group-specific. The general motives were shared by the early and late preference groups, and included recognition, flexibility, health and work motivation. The group-specific motives were exclusively related to either an early or a late retirement preference. Criticism towards the organisation and strenuous working conditions were specific motives for an early retirement preference, while positive accounts of work and a wish to utilise one's own competencies as well as being financially dependent on work was stated as specific motives for wanting to retire late. The results illustrate the need to improve organisational practices and routines, as well as working conditions, in order to make an extended working life accessible for more than already-privileged groups of employees.
      PubDate: 2021-03-18
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X2100026X
       
  • Experiences of loneliness among older people living alone. A qualitative
           study in Quebec (Canada)

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      Authors: Charpentier; Michèle, Kirouac, Laurie
      Pages: 2832 - 2853
      Abstract: In this article, we analyse experiences of loneliness among older people living alone. Current knowledge suggests that loneliness is a significant social issue that can compromise health and wellbeing, and that seniors living alone are at a higher risk of loneliness. Based on a qualitative methodological approach and semi-structured interviews conducted with 43 people aged 65 or over living alone in Montreal (Quebec, Canada), this study sought to understand how they perceive, reflect on and react to loneliness. The results show that these seniors perceive loneliness as a dynamic, and rarely static, experience, which has a very different significance, depending on whether it is chosen or circumstantially imposed. The experience of loneliness recounted by the seniors we met is characterised by its heterogeneity, and involves, to varying degrees, their relationship to themselves (solitude), to others (family (and friends) loneliness and loneliness in love) and/or to the world (existential loneliness and aloneness). Lastly, our analyses highlight how social factors, such as age, gender, marital status, social network and socio-economic conditions, shape the experience of loneliness among seniors. These factors also influence the strategies that seniors develop to prevent or alleviate loneliness, strategies that yield very mixed results.
      PubDate: 2021-03-26
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000349
       
  • Exploring ageing and time as resources in men's mental health experiences

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      Authors: Roger; Kerstin, Herron, Rachel, Ahmadu, Mairo, Allan, Jonathan A., Waddell, Candice M.
      Pages: 2854 - 2868
      Abstract: While research on men's mental health is increasing, it has not typically focused on the intersections between ageing, masculinity and mental health in a rural context. Given the significant increase not only in our global ageing population, but also our growing awareness of mental health problems in the general population, understanding men as they grow older in relation to mental health is a notable gap in research. In this paper, the authors explore the ageing experiences of male participants over 50 with self-identified mental health problems in rural Manitoba. We draw on semi-structured qualitative interviews from a larger project which focused on the diversity of rural men's perceptions, experiences and expressions of mental health and wellness. Specifically, we explore how these men reflect on their mental health and wellness. Participants in the study described their experiences as a cumulative process of making meaning, developing strategies, resources and a more positive sense of self – but sometimes also simply for survival. Men's sense of time over time – looking back and reflecting on the present and the future – appears to be a critical resource and a positive coping strategy for these men associated with ageing. The main themes include sustaining relationships; work, retirement and volunteering; and reflections on physical and emotional health. Our paper concludes with a discussion of the implications for new research on ageing men's mental health in a rural context.
      PubDate: 2021-03-25
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000362
       
  • Worry about debt is related to social loneliness in older adults in the
           Netherlands

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      Authors: Loibl; Cäzilia, Drost, Madeleine A., Huisman, Martijn, Suanet, Bianca, Bruine de Bruin, Wändi, McNair, Simon, Summers, Barbara
      Pages: 2869 - 2891
      Abstract: The amount of financial debt held by older adults has grown substantially over the past two decades in Europe. This study examines the association of objective and subjective debt burden with social and emotional loneliness among 1,606 older adults in the Netherlands. Objective debt burden is based on financial terms, such as debt-to-income ratio; whereas subjective debt burden measures the psychological distress caused by financial debt. Data are from the 2015/2016 wave of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam. First, we use means-comparison tests to examine whether older adults who experience social and emotional loneliness differ from older adults who do not experience loneliness regarding their subjective and objective debt burdens. Subsequently, using linear regression models we address two questions: whether social loneliness and emotional loneliness are associated with objective and subjective debt burden; and whether social participation, social network size, anxiety and depression mediate these relationships. We find that subjective debt burden (i.e. the worry related to debt) is a significant predictor of social loneliness, above and beyond the role of social and psychological measures. Objective debt burden, in contrast, is unrelated to social and emotional loneliness. Social participation, social network size, anxiety and depression do not mediate the debt-burden-to-loneliness relationships. The results point to the importance of subjective debt burden in understanding social loneliness and designing interventions.
      PubDate: 2021-03-19
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000325
       
  • Beyond the shrinking world: dementia, localisation and neighbourhood

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      Authors: Ward; Richard, Rummery, Kirstein, Odzakovic, Elzana, Manji, Kainde, Kullberg, Agneta, Keady, John, Clark, Andrew, Campbell, Sarah
      Pages: 2892 - 2913
      Abstract: ‘Dementia-friendly communities’ herald a shift toward the neighbourhood as a locus for the care and support of people with dementia, sparking growing interest in the geographies of dementia care and raising questions over the shifting spatial and social experience of the condition. Existing research claims that many people with dementia experience a ‘shrinking world’ whereby the boundaries to their social and physical worlds gradually constrict over time, leading to a loss of control and independence. This paper reports a five-year, international study that investigated the neighbourhood experience of people with dementia and those who care for and support them. We interrogate the notion of a shrinking world and in so doing highlight an absence of attention paid to the agency and actions of people with dementia themselves. The paper draws together a socio-relational and embodied-material approach to question the adequacy of the shrinking world concept as an explanatory framework and to challenge reliance within policy and practice upon notions of place as fixed or stable. We argue instead for the importance of foregrounding ‘lived place’ and attending to social practices and the networks in which such practices evolve. Our findings have implications for policy and practice, emphasising the need to bolster the agency of people living with dementia as a route to fostering accessible and inclusive neighbourhoods.
      PubDate: 2021-03-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000350
       
  • Person-centred Australian residential aged care services: how well do
           actions match the claims'

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      Authors: Seah; Sylvia Sing Lynn, Chenoweth, Lynn, Brodaty, Henry
      Pages: 2914 - 2939
      Abstract: Recent inquiries into residential aged care services, including the 2018–2019 Australian Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety, have informed revisions to the 2019 Australian Aged Care Quality Standards. Reforms to the Standards include a greater focus on person-centred services, consumer-directed care and authentic participation in decision-making on service provision by residents and their family members. In respect of person-centred services, the revised Standards reflect the four elements of the ‘Valuing, Individualised Care, Personal Perspective, Social Environment’ (or VIPS) framework for quality aged (social) care services in the United Kingdom. This qualitative study investigated whether the quality of services in a convenience sample of seven Australian aged care homes, which claimed to be person-centred, aligned with the four elements and 24 indicators of the VIPS framework. Data were obtained via semi-structured interviews with a volunteer sample of people associated with these seven aged care homes: 12 residents, 15 family members and 18 staff members in various roles. Data were analysed deductively with a priori reference to the 24 VIPS framework indicators, achieving data saturation for four common themes which indicated more person-centredness and ten common themes indicating less person-centredness. Only two of seven homes adhered to the four elements and 24 indicators of the VIPS framework across most service offerings. The remaining five homes offered some aspects of a person-centred service. The study findings provide insight to the factors which support and hamper the implementation of the VIPS-informed indicators of a person-centred aged care service and, therefore, what is needed to help meet person-centred requirements as outlined in the 2019 Australian Aged Care Quality Standards.
      PubDate: 2021-03-30
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000374
       
  • Can't save or won't save: financial resilience and discretionary
           retirement saving among British adults in their thirties and forties

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      Authors: Suh; Ellie
      Pages: 2940 - 2967
      Abstract: This study examines retirement saving activity outside the state and workplace pension saving schemes among British adults aged between 30 and 49 on the premise that individuals are increasingly encouraged to save for their retirement in the new pension policy structure in Britain. The issue of under-saving among the younger adults has been studied with the focus on internal characteristics, such as undesirable attitudinal or behavioural tendencies (‘won't save’), or on external factors, such as income (‘can't save’). Building on these discussions, this study tests the role of internal characteristics and further examines the interplay between internal and external factors. The decision-making process for retirement saving is mapped based on the Model of Financial Planning with minor modifications. The analysis utilises the fourth wave of the Wealth and Assets Survey (2012/2014), and is conducted in the structural equation modelling framework. Results show that younger adults’ discretionary retirement saving is an outcome of a complex interplay between internal and external factors. Financial resilience, which indicates current financial behaviours and wellbeing, is found to be the strongest predictor for identifying a discretionary retirement saver, but it is closely connected to individuals’ income and home-ownership. The findings also suggest that social and economic arrangements are important to consider as social ageing, individuals’ projection on their lifestages, may be more informative than age per se for understanding younger adults’ retirement saving behaviour. These findings have important implications for the policies that aim to increase retirement saving participation.
      PubDate: 2021-04-23
      DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X21000337
       
 
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