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Current Sociology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.739
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 48  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0011-3921 - ISSN (Online) 1461-7064
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Reconstructing biographical knowledge: Biographical policy evaluation
           toward a structural understanding of transnational migration

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      Authors: Ursula Apitzsch, Lena Inowlocki
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In our article, we address how migrants in transnational spaces are affected by policies of citizenship, language policies, labor market, and education and training policies, among others. The analysis of autobiographical narrative interviews can provide methodical access to latently effective structures of transnational spaces. Transnational spaces can be conceptualized as opaque structures of multiply interconnected state, legal, and cultural transitions toward which individuals orient themselves biographically and in which they are simultaneously intertwined as collectives of experience. Transnational biographical knowledge is not only a result of subjective agency, but at the same time produces the structure of migration biographies, which are experienced and repeatedly reconstructed by migrating subjects. Through biographical policy evaluation we analyze policies and their simultaneous and sometimes paradoxical effects that force family members to find solutions for shaping their life practice. Thus, members of a family of several generations might be affected differently by policies due to their incomplete rights and family status, age, and gender. In reconstructing biographical evaluations, typical effects of the underlying policies can be discerned and critically assessed.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T10:49:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221132515
       
  • Social-constructivist and figurational biographical research

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      Authors: Artur Bogner, Gabriele Rosenthal
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we consider how biographical research can avoid common pitfalls such as viewing social phenomena as ahistorical, focusing on single individuals (as if they exist in isolation), neglecting power inequalities and power balances, or ignoring collective discourses and their impact on the groupings or individuals concerned. When conducting biographical research, we are constantly at risk of falling into these traps, despite all our good intentions. To meet this challenge, we suggest an approach that combines social-constructivist biographical research with the principles of figurational sociology. This makes it possible to investigate the mutual constitution of individuals and societies, interdependencies between different groupings or we-groups (and different kinds of we-groups), and the changing power inequalities or power balances between and inside them, within different figurations in varying historical, ‘social’, and geographical contexts. To illustrate this methodological approach, we present examples from our joint field research on local post-war and peace processes, carried out in two adjacent regions of northern Uganda. This research focuses on the situation following the return to civilian life of former rebel fighters from different sociopolitical, ethnopolitical, or regional settings or groupings, and from different rebel groups.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T06:48:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221132511
       
  • Together or apart' Doing biographical research and oral history in an
           interdisciplinary context

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      Authors: Jakub Gałęźiowski, Kaja Kaźmierska
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article compares research and analytical approaches with biographical materials in the fields of biographical research in sociology and oral history practised by a historian. The reflection is based on the experience of long-term cooperation between biographical sociologists and oral historians in the Polish research context. These contacts have created a space for the fruitful exchange of experiences in the field as well as for strengthening the researchers’ distinctiveness and disciplinary identity. It also makes it possible to identify various concerns, both mutual and individual, for each research field. The main objective of this article is to share perspectives, highlight the similarities and differences between the two disciplines, and to show concerns related to the practice of oral history and biographical research, especially those close to the boundaries between the two approaches when they use the same tool, that is, the autobiographical narrative interview. The first section of the article focuses on the specifics of each approach. It then describes the different results of the common research practice and their consequences in relation to anonymising, archiving and reanalysing the data. Ethical issues are embedded into the whole course of our argument.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T11:21:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221132752
       
  • On the emergence and changing positions of old-established groupings in
           migration contexts: A process perspective on group formation in Jordan

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      Authors: Johannes Becker, Hendrik Hinrichsen, Arne Worm
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      While being ‘old-established’ is usually seen as a product of the social negotiation of migration, there is little empirical research on how this category evolves and changes over time. To unravel this process, we focus in this article on the group formation processes which contribute to the making and unmaking of being ‘old-established’ as a pattern of interpretation, a we-image and a potential power chance in various figurations. A combination of figurational and biographical approaches with an extended chronological horizon provides a theoretical and methodological framework to focus on when, and in what circumstances, residents distinguish between ‘old-established’ and ‘newcomers’ in their we- and they-images. Attention is paid to the socio-historical transformations which increase or reduce material and immaterial power chances (such as ownership of land, length of association and internal cohesion) within dynamic processes of group formation in migration societies. A multigenerational case study of an extended family in Jordan shows the complex processuality of how long-time residents become ‘old-established’ as a group, which expands their power chances, and under what circumstances this status can become eroded.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T10:37:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221132514
       
  • Exploring biographies in a rapidly changing labor world

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      Authors: Giorgos Tsiolis, Irini Siouti
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The field of work and employment is among the most rapidly changing fields in current societies. The sociology of work attempts to map these changes, developing concepts that seek to grasp the transformations of labor. Currently, the discussion revolves around two main topics: (a) the ‘normality of non-normality’ expands on the flexible, insecure, and precarious forms of employment, while (b) the ‘subjectivation of work’ has been introduced in order to reflect the newly observed trend in which entrepreneurial strategies and rationales colonize the whole spectrum of an employee’s personal life and the self. It is a paradox, however, that while all these transformations in the labor world are taking place, interest in biographical research on the field has declined. This article aims to show the ways in which biographical narrative research has studied the changes that have taken place in the world of labor and to highlight new research possibilities. We especially wish to highlight ways in which reconstructive biographical research can contribute to the corpus of knowledge generated on this topic. We argue that, through biographical case reconstruction, paths by which transformations of the labor world become biographically significant for individuals and their social life worlds can be grasped in a dialectical manner. Employing systematic reconstruction of the ways in which social actors construct their work experiences biographically can serve a twofold purpose. First, it reveals how social rules, dominant discourses, and social conditions form new workers’ subjectivities, and second, it identifies biographical sources of resistance on the part of the actors.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T08:49:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221132520
       
  • Social media as a means of visual biographical performance and
           biographical work

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      Authors: Roswitha Breckner, Elisabeth Mayer
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      With the rise of social media, forms of communication emerge that are increasingly defined by the use of images. From the perspective of biographical research and visual sociology, the article addresses the question in how far biographical work becomes visible while visual biographies are formed in digitalized visual communication. It proposes a way how these processes can be studied with interpretive biographical and visual methodologies. Based on empirical material from Austria, we show how biographical performances in social media differ, in form and content, from conventional verbal-narratives, and how they simultaneously relate to each other. We present a case study that shows in depth how images on Facebook and Instagram become biographically relevant and what kind of biographical work takes place there. The methodological procedure consists of an innovative triangulation that combines visual analyses, biographical-narrative interviews and media interviews. The aim of this article is to give insights into the biographical significance and biographical work of visual biographies in social media, and to propose by triangulation of different data analysis a way of exploring the intertwining of narrative and visual biographies.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T08:45:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221132518
       
  • Invisible privilege in Asia: Introduction to special section

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      Authors: Laavanya Kathiravelu, Saroja Dorairajoo
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This introduction to the special section ‘Invisible Privilege in Asia’ suggests a framework within which studies of privilege in Asia can be situated. Animated by a global politics of Blackness and social movements that have renewed the focus on racialised inequality and hierarchy, we use this moment to urge an interrogation of the conceptual productivity of the notion of privilege. This project is particularly significant within a region that is often seen only as empirical site and not as a space for theory-building in the social sciences.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T08:04:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221132311
       
  • Millennial femininity and the harmonious state of mind

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      Authors: Amalia Sa’ar, Dalit Simchai
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The article depicts feminine subjectivity among women of the millennial generation. Content analysis of an open question relating to the answers of 623 Israeli participants reveals perceptions of femininity as at once gender conscious and non-political. Respondents express a strong sense of entitlement to gender equality yet retain an essentialized perception of gender differences. They are aware of the contradictory demands directed at women, but avoid problematizing them, instead priding themselves on their capacity to encompass both feminine and masculine traits without losing femininity. We identify in the women’s framing a strong commitment to a harmonious worldview and a non-political outlook and trace it to the influences of the global, late-modern generational preoccupation with personal transformation, self-governmentality, and positive thinking.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-27T12:03:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221132315
       
  • Locating invisible privilege in Asia: Conceptual travel and contextual
           significance

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      Authors: Laavanya Kathiravelu, Saroja Dorairajoo
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article that forms part of a Special Section on ‘Invisible Privilege in Asia’ is committed to expanding the theoretical debates in race and ethnic studies, which has been previously critiqued as a field that has focused more on the gathering of empirical observations than the development of theory. This critique is even more pronounced within the realm of studying race and ethnicity in Asia, where research is often siloed within the contexts of national boundaries and area studies. While national, sub-regional and other specificities exist, here we provide a framework that identifies particular practices and structural processes that are best understood as indicative of a form of invisible, or latent ‘privilege’. In paying attention to the geographical and historical specificities of how privilege functions, this article seeks not to uncritically impose a definition, but understand how and when ‘privilege’ provides a useful analytical framework in the absence of, or in collusion with, other explanatory mechanisms. In doing so, this introduction speaks back to the Western-centric conceptual landscape that sociology as a discipline tends to draw from.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-25T09:29:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221132317
       
  • ‘Put me on to a male agent’: Emotional labor and performing
           gender in call centers

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      Authors: Ayşegül Akdemir
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to shed light on the gender dynamics in the context of performing emotional labor in Turkish call centers. Based on qualitative interviews, this study aimed to illuminate how gender is done and undone, providing a perspective on the relationship between gender and emotional labor in call centers, a highly gendered and interactional line of work. Gender relations are complex and gender performativity in call center work allows us to observe different ways in which employees do and undo gender. This study reveals that female employees are more inclined to undo gender and display competence as a work strategy to elevate their position, whereas male employees struggle between job demands and adhering to masculine norms.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T07:11:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221129318
       
  • The network society in the ‘new normal times’: Crisis digitalization
           and adaption of cultural organizations in the COVID-19

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      Authors: Konstantin Galkin, Oksana Parfenova
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      For the recent 3 years, there has been a growing research interest in adaptation to the new normality and crisis digitalization during pandemic. However, there are a little empirical researches in cultural organizations. This study is in line with some sorts of approaches of network society and autonomy. The aim of the research is to study how cultural institutions integrate into the network society through one of the critical elements in creating a network society – digitalization during COVID-19 pandemic. The study was conducted using a mixed methodology in 2021 in St. Petersburg. Three blocks of empirical data were collected and analyzed based on theaters, museums, libraries, and creative spaces: 67 questionnaires; 12 expert interviews; webometrics of social networks of 108 organizations. The key difficulties were the weakness of the technical base and the lack of competencies and specialists to produce content and attract an audience online. The key findings are three strategies of adaptation to the conditions of the new normality: deepening digitalization; hybrid and strategy of autonomy from digitalization. The strategy of deepening digitalization is typical mainly for libraries that are active online even before the pandemic. They found themselves in the most advantageous position by building and expanding the previously developed digital activity. The hybrid strategy was mainly characteristic of museums, which intensified the digitization of collections and introduced new formats, including broadcasts from previously closed repositories. The strategy of autonomy from digitalization is more inherent in theaters, for which the transition to online turned out to be the most difficult and in many cases impossible. Crisis digitalization has exposed the structural difficulties associated with (non-)willingness to transform the former autonomy into the new requirements of the network society.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T07:06:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221129317
       
  • ‘I do not trust any of them anymore’: Institutional distrust and
           corrective practices in pro-asylum activism in Finland

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      Authors: Päivi Pirkkalainen, Lena Näre, Eveliina Lyytinen
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Although there is extensive research on how institutional trust and distrust play out in the forms political participation takes, the existing research lacks thorough analysis on what trust and distrust actually consist of, that is, how individuals evaluate institutions as trustworthy or not and what consequences this evaluation has for individuals and their relation to the state more broadly. Drawing on qualitative research on Finnish citizens who engage in pro-asylum activism, we examine how institutional distrusting evolves as a reflexive process. By analysing citizens’ trust judgements on institutional practices and actions that follow, we argue that distrust in institutions enhances activists’ attempts to engage in corrective practices, in other words taking over the functions of institutions when noticing mistakes or unfairness in institutional practices. Corrective practices reinforce activists’ distrust in the asylum-related institutions and make them question the ‘myth’ of Finland as an equal and inclusive country. Engaging in corrective practices is emotionally and economically taxing. Despite negative consequences of institutional distrust, activists continue their work indicating that they continue to trust the democratic system in Finland and its capability to absorb their claims in the long run. Institutional distrust and generalised trust can then coexist.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T06:57:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221129313
       
  • Environmental anomie and the disruption of physical norms during disaster

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      Authors: Adrienne R Brown
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Large-scale disasters cause a wide variety of disruptions across impacted communities. Existing research has broadly addressed the ways in which both social norms and physical features constrain and dictate everyday life. During disasters, vast disruptions occur to both social and physical norms, which can have negative impacts on people’s sensemaking processes. This study uses transcripts from 24 semi-structured interviews conducted with people from Paradise several months after they survived the Camp Fire – at the time, California’s most destructive wildfire. Drawing on Durkheim’s classical theory of anomie along with extensive work done by environmental sociologists about the importance of place, I introduce the concept of environmental anomie. This recognizes the ways in which sudden changes to the physical landscape can upend the established order and can undermine people’s ability to comprehend, relate to, and function within their environment. Expectations from the physical environment are a taken-for-granted authority that guide and constrain the routines of daily living and enable people to locate themselves spatially and temporally. The Camp Fire challenged this authority in a way that mirrors Durkheim’s socially conceived idea of normlessness.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-10T01:04:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221129316
       
  • Complicating ideas of the political: Examining subaltern performativity as
           gendered resistance

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      Authors: Umer Jan, Sheeba Malik
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article attempts to wrest away the notion of popular political resistance and performativity from the realm of visibility in the ‘public’ sphere/space and place them within the unperformed acts that remain optically invisible. Taking the example of India-controlled Kashmir, where public spaces remain militarized and performative assemblies criminalized, the article focuses on how popular resistance to Indian rule is regularly embodied within what we call subaltern performativity. Furthermore, the gendered nature of this subaltern performativity is also underlined through ethnographic fieldwork.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-10T01:00:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221129314
       
  • ‘Very unsure of what’s to come’: Salon worker experiences of
           COVID-19 in Australia during 2020

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      Authors: Hannah McCann
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      During Australia’s first nationwide lockdown due to COVID-19 in 2020, hairdressers and barbers were allowed to remain operating while beauty salons and similar businesses were ordered to shut. This article offers some preliminary insights into the impact of the pandemic on salon workers during the period, in particular the additional emotional labour required. Drawing on a survey of salon workers based in Australia (n = 92), this article considers the emotional labour involved in salon work in tandem with the impact of COVID-19 disruptions on this workforce. Results of the survey reveal the variety of emotional disclosures that salon workers generally encounter from clients and how these disclosures continued during the period, as well as the emotions experienced by workers themselves. Survey results suggest that many salon workers, who were themselves experiencing heightened levels of physical, emotional and financial vulnerability, were expected to continue their emotional roles for clients during a period of high anxiety and stress. This work suggests that future decision making ought to consider the impact on, and how best to support, all workforces who remain in operation during lockdowns, particularly emotional labourers, and not just those typically imagined as ‘essential’.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-10-09T05:13:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221129315
       
  • Controlling precarious work through documents: The carteira de trabalho on
           the sugarcane plantations of Northeast Brazil

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      Authors: Allan Souza Queiroz
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the Brazilian carteira de trabalho (work card) and its usage on the sugarcane plantations of Alagoas, Northeast Brazil. It draws on photography and interviews with rural workers to analyse how documents have been used to manage and reproduce precarious work. On the plantations, work cards function as a managerial tool allowing workforce surveillance and control. Moreover, sugar mills can control rural workers’ mobility and shape the agricultural reserve army by retaining these documents, thereby immobilising wage workers. While the work card symbolises occupational citizenship and materialises the labour legislation, in practice, it becomes a disciplinary instrument supporting the agribusiness’ strategies of identification, control, and deployment of precariously employed and exploited labour on the plantations. Finally, the article contributes with an innovative historical–biographical approach to the study of institutional mechanisms used to produce and reproduce precarious work in Brazil’s sugarcane plantations.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-20T05:51:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221114924
       
  • Sentencing social psychology: Scientific deviance and the diffusion of
           statistical rules

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      Authors: Julien Larregue
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates the inquiries and sanctions that followed accusations of fraud directed toward Dutch social psychologist Diederik Stapel in the early 2010s. Relying on the public reports published by the investigative committees, as well as on interviews conducted with committee members and Stapel’s former students and collaborators, we propose to analyze how this case facilitated the diffusion, in social psychology, of statistical rules that were hitherto unenforced in this field. The Stapel case thus illustrates the regulative role played by statistics in the contemporary scientific field while also demonstrating the appeal of legal modes of dealing with misconduct when it comes to the treatment of scientific deviance. More generally, this article shows how the study of scientific deviance can serve to bring to light symbolic hierarchies that are habitually kept tacit, thus serving as a magnifying glass for the scientific field’s inner processes.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T10:21:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221117604
       
  • Youth and the consumption of credit

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      Authors: David Farrugia, Julia Cook, Kate Senior, Steven Threadgold, Julia Coffey, Kate Davies, Adriana Haro, Barrie Shannon
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores young people’s consumption of credit and the role of credit and debt in the distinction between youth and adulthood. The article engages with recent shifts in the nature of credit that have turned credit into an object of consumption in itself, as well as broader arguments about the financialisation of daily life, in order to understand the temporalities and moral distinctions enacted in different forms of credit and debt among youth. While it is well recognised that financialised capitalism operates and creates value from differences including gender, racialisation and class, the formation of youth subjectivities through credit and debt technologies remains unexplored in the literature despite an emerging crisis of consumer credit among young people. With this in mind, this article draws on a qualitative study of youth, credit and debt, to show that young people experience debt within contradictory temporalities and calculative logics, including the long-term ‘investments’ required to become an adult, and the logic of consumption attached to consumer credit which positions credit as a failure of self-responsible adulthood because it places future creditworthiness in jeopardy. In this way, the article suggests a future research agenda on the way that biographical distinctions are enacted through credit and debt, and how notions of youth and adulthood contribute to the qualification and consumption of credit.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T09:45:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221114925
       
  • Weaponized volunteering: Where and whither

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      Authors: Jon Van Til
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Writing on weaponized volunteering in these perilous times, one risks the perils Auden described of ‘lecturing on navigation as the ship goes down’. Aging and unarmed, this scholar proceeds to respond to the invitation of providing concluding remarks to the monograph issue. I address four aspects of weaponized volunteering, as introduced in the five articles presented in this issue: (1) the significance of the content of this phenomenon; (2) the scope and quality of initial presentations; (3) the refinement of criteria for the subject; and (4) the range of responses that are likely to greet initial efforts to develop this field. Researchers in this field, if they are to succeed, will need to be exceptionally introspective, reflective, and self-critical. It will not be difficult for their critics to attack them as apologists for one or another side in the conflicts they study, or even as advocates for violence or terrorism. Studies in this field will themselves require study, relating, for example, the depiction of groups targeted for study to the intellectual backgrounds and political orientations of the researchers themselves. And the field itself will expand in both time and space: the long history of weaponized volunteering will be discovered and explored as it unfolds in the many corners of the earth; alternative futures and their implications for social peace and justice will require charting. In short, this may become a lively and important field, one which opens a wide range of new issues and concerns to the researcher aiming to understand the broadened nature of voluntary and purposive social action.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T11:01:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221113130
       
  • Publisher’s Note

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      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T12:07:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221116259
       
  • Afro-Belgian activist resistances to research procedures: Reflections on
           epistemic extractivism and decolonial interventions in sociological
           research

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      Authors: Sarah Demart
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines Afro-Belgian resistance to sociological research procedures and in particular, the way in which demands for compensation and citation policies have recently emerged as a sine qua non activist condition for participation in academic devices. Grounded on a long-term ethnography conducted within Afro-Belgian anti-racist circles (2011–2019), the article argues that activist resistances, whether or not they give rise to political claims, have something to do with the colonial engagement of sociology and more generally of science. Building on postcolonial/black/feminist studies and decolonial indigenous research, the article explores to what extent, academic politics of citation and compensation of anti-racist activists could then be considered as decolonial interventions. Against the background of research involving groups whose activism is intrinsically linked to a political and epistemic domination, the paradigm of ‘protection’ of the ‘researched’ (through procedures of anonymization) is not only insufficient but problematic. Decolonial intervention should not only be addressed under the lens of knowledge co-production (participative/decolonial/anti-racist research) but also in terms of co-ownership policies of data/knowledges.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T10:46:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221105914
       
  • Digital home-lessness: Exploring the links between public Internet access,
           technological capital, and social inequality

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      Authors: Matt Comi, Sarah Smith, Walter A Goettlich, Perry Alexander, Drew Davidson, William G Staples
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Millions of individuals in the United States without a computer or broadband at their residence must rely on public libraries for their Internet access. Drawing on a rich data set of interviews and participant observation at three public libraries, we explore how individuals navigate these complex settings and how they profoundly shape their digital lives and experiences, one we characterize as digital home-lessness. In this article, we identify three themes that characterize the relationship between library computer use and digital home-lessness: lifeline encompasses the diverse set of activities that require computer and broadband access; negotiating access focuses on usability, privacy, and security disadvantages among these users; and risky business concentrates on the multiplicities of insecure Internet and computing practices exacerbated by low technological capital. Our findings push forward literature on the digital divide by illuminating how the experience of digital home-lessness limits social inclusion and reproduces socioeconomic inequality.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T10:42:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221111819
       
  • Re-imagining what counts as femicide

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      Authors: Elizabeth A. Cook, Sandra Walklate, Kate Fitz-Gibbon
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This Special Subsection on Re-imagining what counts as femicide brings together five original articles which, from different perspectives, seek to push, challenge, and redefine what counts as femicide. The contributions offered here excavate the conceptual issues of what, who, and where femicide ‘counts’. In order to do so, the articles engage with epistemological and methodological questions regarding how different bodies of evidence on femicide are formed and which take priority, the ethical implications of including or excluding deaths from counts of femicide, and prospects for legal intervention, specifically in Latin America, in contributing to who and what is counted as femicide. Together, these articles seek to challenge how existing concepts of femicide and approaches to counting have focused policy and practice attention on some women’s lives whilst neglecting to count (and thereby acknowledge) others.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T07:23:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221106502
       
  • The surviving power of Brahmin privilege

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      Authors: Amritorupa Sen
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The caste system in India traditionally confers immense prestige to upper caste Brahmins and severely curtails the backward castes. In spite of institutional efforts to diminish caste-based discrimination, several contemporary studies underscore the invisible ways in which caste operates. The central question that this article asks is, ‘How do Brahmins maintain and assert their privilege today'’. Focusing on the Brahmin residents of Deulpota (village in West Bengal) and rural Brahmin migrants in Kolkata (city), I trace their social networks to learn about how Brahmins subtly maintain their status and privilege in day-to-day life. I argue that Brahmins form and maintain social networks in ways which innocuously preserve their privileges through social capital accessed from diverse asymmetrical relations. These privileges and advantages are sustained through Brahmins’ networks of the instrumental kind. Wealthy Brahmins forge these relations to preserve their social position, their family lineage and to control the subordinates while the struggling resource-poor Brahmins use their caste position to cope with impediments of their class status. As such, this study shows how being Brahmin allows for easier access to important instrumental relations (which are not merely caste-based) and resources embedded in them.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T07:21:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221105915
       
  • Cosmopolitan social infrastructure and immigrant cross-ethnic friendship

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      Authors: Sean Lauer
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      How do newcomers make cross-ethnic connections and friendships' This article investigates the role of associations as a location for making cross-ethnic friendships. Cosmopolitan social infrastructure includes public spaces, commercial establishments, and community organizations that attract a diversity of people into interaction. I look specifically at the importance of participation in cosmopolitan associations for cross-ethnic friendship. I approach these questions with an analysis of a nationally representative sample of Canadians collected as part of the Ethnic Diversity Survey. I find that participation in cosmopolitan associations is associated with having cross-ethnic friendship groups. To address the robustness of these findings, I use techniques from both longitudinal and treatment effects analysis. The findings suggest that cosmopolitan social infrastructure contributes to participants’ having cross-ethnic friendship groups.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T07:15:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221102983
       
  • Settler colonialism and the archives of apprehension

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      Authors: Areej Sabbagh-Khoury
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The ‘archival turn’ has prompted historical scholarship to reevaluate the positivist sourcing of knowledge, especially in contentious contexts. The archive’s configuration, and attendant mechanisms of classification, apprehension, and attribution indicate colonial governance just as much as inscribed histories and discourses. Scholarship on the Zionist movement in early-20th century Palestine has been slow to adopt the analytical shift from archive as source to archive as subject. This article examines archiving, forms of classification, and the organization of settler colonial history in the context of the Zionist movement’s leftist pole. Cases from the author’s fieldwork are used to introduce the term archives of apprehension: how the informational practices and anxiety over territorial reversibility that settler colonial archives are built upon in fact preserve the collective indigenous presence that colonization tries to marginalize. The article concludes by considering how historical sociology can better instrumentalize such archives to learn about the emergence and endurance of entangled settler/native socialites.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T05:34:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221100580
       
  • Importation for comparison as apparatus: Israeli prime ministers and their
           political strategies of memorialization

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      Authors: Tracy Adams
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Politically grappling with history is a constructive act, one that relies on context, structure, and agency, and is also directed at the forging of cultural coherence. In light of the growing transnationalization of commemoration practices, political actors not only rely on national past but also appeal to historical foreign events in political domestic speech. This research focuses on Israel as a case study for theoretical expansion of the political encounter with history and the experience of alterity. Qualitative analysis of Israeli political rhetoric since the 2000s demonstrates how Israeli prime ministers primarily rely on domestic collective memories; when used, events of others are intended to create a sense of shared experience through comparison. ‘Importation for comparison’ is thus the apparatus reflecting how Israeli prime ministers comply with current needs put forth by internal and external challenges in a globalized world. Contributing to the ongoing discussion regarding the nature of identity, this research underlines how referencing to events from abroad is one of the prominent ways in which national self is evaluated, discussed, and negotiated, thus providing a better understanding of how Israeli society imagines itself in relation to others.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T11:20:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221102984
       
  • The German social space and its homologies: National variation on a basic
           structure

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      Authors: Will Atkinson, Andreas Schmitz
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article constructs a comprehensive new model of the contemporary class structure of Germany. More specifically, inspired by Pierre Bourdieu’s geometric conception of class relations and drawing on original survey data, it adopts multiple correspondence analysis paired with cluster analysis to chart the German ‘social space’, that is, the relational configuration of key forms of capital. It then explores correspondences with occupational groups, ethnic groups, other demographic features, lifestyle practices and tastes. The results disclose specific structuring effects of German peculiarities on the distribution of social power, including East–West reunification and the long-running guestworker programme. More fundamentally, though, in its basic structure, the space resembles that mapped by Bourdieu in France and those documented by others elsewhere, suggesting common principles of social and symbolic differentiation among Western capitalist societies.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T11:17:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221100582
       
  • Friends against capitalism: Constructive resistance and friendship
           compliance in worker cooperatives

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      Authors: Kristin Wiksell, Andreas Henriksson
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The article examines how members of worker cooperatives articulated friendship as resistance against capitalist work relations. This elucidates relatively unexplored links between research on workplace friendships and resistance studies. Based on interviews with members from small Swedish worker co-ops, the analysis shows that the co-ops hinged their friendships on authenticity, but also valued friendship explicitly for its economic and political benefits. Yet, this ideal of authentic and equal friendships sat side by side with narratives of what the article calls ‘friendship compliance’. This concept denotes how friendships may instil loyalty, reduce dissent and promote self-sacrifice. It is argued that while such compliance can be at odds with cooperative ideals, its expression in the worker co-ops studied here did not coincide with how the same mechanism has been described as operating in capitalist work organisations.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T09:53:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221100583
       
  • Disabled youth participation within activism and social movement bases: An
           empirical investigation of the UK Disabled People’s Movement

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      Authors: Miro Griffiths
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Understanding disabled youth activism is key for improving young disabled people’s participation in politics and social change. Young disabled people require opportunities to situate historical and biographical experiences within broader socio-economic contexts. This will lead to a politicised consciousness surrounding disability, emancipation and social justice. This article presents empirical data from the first study on young disabled people’s contemporary position within the UK Disabled People’s Movement. It critically assesses three areas pertinent to youth activism: activist membership, social movement organisation and future considerations for activism. This allows for an exploration of how young disabled activists navigate collective action, influence activist claims and demands and understand the issues for sustaining a disabled people’s social movement. The article illustrates young disabled activists’ desire to disrupt their current position within the UK Disabled People’s Movement and bring into focus a future where young disabled people’s contributions to activism and social movements are accessible, valued and influential. The article argues that a failure to support young disabled people’s participation within social movements will have an adverse impact on their political identities.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T09:50:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221100579
       
  • Who counts' The invisibility of mothers as victims of femicide

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      Authors: Rachel Condry, Caroline Miles
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the important and persistent phenomenon of women killed by their sons. We argue that parricide (the killing of parents) is a gendered form of violence, given that women are disproportionately represented as victims compared to other forms of violence (aside from domestic homicide by current or ex partners) and that son-mother killings are a form of femicide that is often hidden. Not only do they fall under literal definitions of femicide in that they involve women being killed by men, but they also, we contend, fall under motivation-driven definitions as the killing of women by men because they are women and an institutional state failure to protect them as women. Drawing upon analysis of Homicide Index data and 57 case studies of parricide in the United Kingdom, we show that in many cases women are killed by their adult-aged mentally ill sons, within a broader context of ‘parental proximity’, maternal caregiving and intersectional invisibility, which ultimately renders them vulnerable to fatal violence.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T09:48:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221097153
       
  • What is just and unjust in education' Role of inter-ethnic tensions in
           defining justice in education through the prism of media debates

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      Authors: Dorota Lepianka
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      By exploring carefully selected education-related debates that have taken place in and through news media in five European countries, the current study investigates the role of inter-ethnic tensions in organizing public imaging of justice in educational matters. It focuses in particular on analysing in what ways and on what levels of moral reasoning justice-related tensions in the realm of education are permeated with inter-ethnic conflict. The results show that among the various justice-related controversies in educational matters, tensions around the imagined ‘who’ of (in)justice, the alleged winners and losers of educational policies, and the perceived victims and victimizers are absolutely crucial, determining the preferred definition of (in)justice as well as the choice of principles that should govern the realization of justice. Current analysis also shows how claiming victimhood by members of majorities pairs with ‘shifting blame’ and turning minorities into the agents of majoritarian suffering.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T09:44:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221093093
       
  • Empathy in research process: Study of women in sex work in India

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      Authors: Mangala Subramaniam
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The reflexive approach to explaining the process of data collection entails recognizing the delicate balance between being ethical and having empathy for participants, particularly vulnerable populations, whose life experiences may differ from those of the researcher. Conveying and displaying empathy is emotion work that can be a strain on the researcher because of the tenuous connection between relating to the narrative of the participant and maintaining confidentiality and remaining ethical. Drawing from research on women sex workers in India, I examine the research process, particularly empathy as emotion work that is involved in the interview conversations. Contributing to the area of qualitative research methods, I discuss the implications of the researcher’s emotion work noting that it may ease and diminish the differential power between the researcher and the researched, but it is not eliminated.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T10:45:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221097154
       
  • ‘Weaponized volunteering’ and re-considering the
           volunteering-weaponization divide

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      Authors: Itamar Y Shachar, Nir Gazit, Erella Grassiani
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This introductory chapter to the monograph issue Weaponized Volunteering explicates and situates the theoretical and conceptual problems the collection addresses. It defines the concept of ‘weaponized volunteering’ and analyzes its importance for understanding the relations between contemporary trends of moralization and militarization or securitization. It does so by providing a brief genealogy of the concept of ‘volunteering’ and the rising public interest in it since the 1990s, with the upsurge of neoliberal transformations and a post-political public sphere. The introduction then continues to review changing ideas in the literature concerning civil–military relationships and also concerning the entanglement of what is considered civil and what falls under non-military ‘security’ domains. It then connects both themes to explain the value of the concept of ‘weaponized volunteering’. Finally, the introduction explores how the various articles in this monograph issue contribute to understanding how moralization and militarization, civic volunteerism, and securitization are increasingly entangled, and reinforce each other.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T10:40:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221095964
       
  • Spectacularising narratives on femicide in South Africa: A decolonial
           feminist analysis

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      Authors: Floretta A Boonzaier
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      How are we to think about femicide in South Africa – a country with one of the highest rates of gendered violence, globally' The rate of women murdered in South Africa is around five times the global average and at least half of women who are murdered die at the hands of an intimate partner. Every so often, a South African woman’s murder is propelled into national (and sometimes international) media discourse. How these crimes are reported are important for shaping public consciousness about crimes against women, gendered violence and the sexist, misogynistic and patriarchal contexts that produce it. This paper reports on an analysis of instances of femicide that have been reported in South African national media over the past five years. It offers a decolonial feminist reading of the reporting, showing how it is characterised by an overarching narrative that spectacularizes the violence, drawing on long-standing, racialised, colonial tropes about black bodies and identities. The implications of this discourse on femicide are considered for how it contributes to the shaping of collective consciousness and public discourse around how to understand femicide, specifically its victims and its perpetrators.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-28T08:25:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221097157
       
  • Family formation trajectories and migration in the United States by the
           end of the 20th century

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      Authors: Andrés F Castro Torres
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Studies often explain differences in family behaviors by migration status by testing four hypotheses: socialization, selection, disruption, and assimilation/adaptation. These hypotheses were initially formulated as competing explanations, but some scholars have argued that they are complementary. Currently, however, this complementary relationship is not well understood. In this article, I draw on intersectionality theory to challenge this hypothesis-based narrative of the relationship between migration and family formation and dissolution trajectories. I use retrospective information on marriages, union dissolutions, and births of men and women from five waves of the National Survey of Family Growth (1995–2015) to construct a six-category typology of family trajectories. This typology divides men and women into groups with similar family formation and dissolution trajectories. I correlate this typology with information on each respondent’s race/ethnicity, educational attainment, place of birth, and age at migration. The exploratory analysis of these correlations underlines the need for approaches that move beyond testing the above-mentioned hypotheses toward nuanced descriptions of the multiple ways in which family formation and migration paths are intertwined, and how these relationships are influenced by gender and social class inequalities.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T04:48:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221097155
       
  • ‘I can do things that others can’t’: Civic policing as weaponized
           volunteering in eThekwini, South Africa

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      Authors: Tessa Diphoorn, SJ Cooper-Knock
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we analyse civic policing in post-apartheid South Africa as a form of ‘weaponized volunteering’. We use ‘weaponized volunteerism’ as a conceptual lens to refer to practices that rest on the potentiality and/or willingness to use physical violence or to harness the physical violence of others under the guise of ‘volunteer work’. By drawing from ethnographic fieldwork conducted by both authors in eThekwini, South Africa, we show that by framing civic policing as weaponized volunteerism, we are able to analyse the violence at the core of policing and underline the varied ways that violence work is harnessed and expanded through civic policing, in the interest of civic and state actors. This, in turn, allows us to explore the continuum between state and civic violence, which is often directed towards similar groups and individuals.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-14T10:39:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221086823
       
  • Racial residential patterns in Singapore: What happens after the
           implementation of racial quotas in public housing'

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      Authors: Yvonne Yap
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The Ethnic Integration Policy in Singapore functions to socially engineer ethnic desegregation in public housing. Aside from investigating whether the Ethnic Integration Policy has truly achieved its stated goal, urban researchers have also devoted much attention to investigating the Ethnic Integration Policy’s secondary effects, such as how it has facilitated the creation of divergent resale housing markets for different ethnic groups. Most of these studies focus on the Ethnic Integration Policy’s effects at a household level. Little attention, however, has been paid to the straightforward question of how and to what extent the Ethnic Integration Policy contributes to geographic stratification in Singapore. Anecdotally, Singaporeans find it easy to name which neighbourhoods contain clusters of rich or poor households or which neighbourhoods are popular ethnic enclaves, but researchers have yet to develop a formal model of how the Ethnic Integration Policy and social-economic inequality interact. Using a mix of planning area and survey data, this article examines the spatial relationships between the Ethnic Integration Policy and ethnic and socio-economic clusters in Singapore. This article finds that contrary to past literature that have mostly attributed racial clustering as occurring among racial minorities, racial clustering occurs mostly among the Chinese when nation-level residential change is considered.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T05:38:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221093096
       
  • ‘Why give birth to many children when you cannot take care of
           them'’ Determinants of family size among dual-earner couples in
           Ghana

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      Authors: Sylvia Esther Gyan, Albert Kpoor
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The family size in Ghana is increasingly changing from large to small family sizes due to modernization. As societies become modernized, couples begin to limit their family size despite the high value society places on children in marriage and the family. In this study, we explore the factors influencing reproductive behaviour among Ghanaian dual-earner couples by highlighting the subjective views on factors that influence the number of children they have or hope to have as a couple. A qualitative approach was used to collect and analyse data. Data were gathered through in-depth interviews with 47 dual-earner couples from rural and urban communities selected from five regions in Ghana. Twenty key informant interviews were held with community leaders to provide the social context of the study areas. The data were analysed thematically. The study observed that there were no differences in the factors influencing family size in rural and urban communities in Ghana. Also, the findings are consistent with previous studies that identified factors such as the cost of raising children and women’s participation in the labour force although the meanings and interpretations that couples attribute to these factors have changed slightly. Couples’ family size was influenced by the need to ensure a comfortable life for their children. Access to modern contraceptives and infertility also came up as influencing family size. Overall, the changing family size among dual earner couples can be attributed to a combination of factors that are interrelated and interdependent.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:11:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221093097
       
  • Supporting oneself: The tensions of navigating a prolonged crisis among
           Spanish youth

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      Authors: Antonio Álvarez-Benavides, Matthew L Turnbough
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Spanish youth’s process of transition to adult life illustrates the complex effects of a prolonged economic crisis that emerged in 2008 and exacerbated an already precarious labour market. In this article, we approach this panorama of social change from the perspective of the young individuals who find themselves immersed in this passage from one crisis to another – from a global economic crisis to COVID-19 – and between two symbolic realities, one marked by individualism and the other by individualisation. Based on a discourse analysis of 20 in-depth interviews and three focus groups with young adults, conducted between 2018 and 2019 for a publicly funded RDI project, we analyse how the process of individualisation tied to a self-sufficient model of human agency may contribute to an increased reliance on individual solutions to social problems. Furthermore, we underline how these individualised pathways involve a dependency on multiple supports which are characterised by a series of tensions. Consequently, we seek to elucidate the manner in which vulnerable young workers navigate, both interpretively and practically, the trials of social life as well as the expectations associated with individualism/individualisation within a context of crisis and uncertainty.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T07:09:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221093094
       
  • Criminalization of femicide in Latin America: Challenges of legal
           conceptualization

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      Authors: Wania Pasinato, Thiago Pierobom de Ávila
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The concept of femicide was created within the feminist theoretical field of studies influencing Law reform in Latin America. Eighteen countries throughout the region have criminalized femicide based on different legal provisions, in intimate and nonintimate relations. This article aims to provide a comparison of legal definitions of femicide as adopted in Latin American legal frameworks and to analyze the challenges of using law to give a name to the gender-based killings of women. The transition of the concept to law may partially impact its potential since other forms of gender-based violence may be hidden in a general clause of ‘gender prejudice’. It may also lead to restricted recognition in the legal system since traditionally this system operates in a conservative way wherein individual criminal liability has limitations in addressing institutional discrimination. Despite regional challenges, criminalization has contributed to raising social awareness on gendered killings. It has induced improvements in statistics and pushed for more attention on prevention policies and support for survivors and relatives. Nevertheless, current conservative movements tend to stress only the punitive approach and entail backlash on gender equality policies. This comparative study aims to contribute to a better understanding of the concept in the region.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T11:56:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221090252
       
  • Do we need a posthumanist sociology' Notes from the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Mickey Vallee
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article asks whether we need a posthumanist sociology, arguing that such a perspective can export a good deal of useful methodological and theoretical insight into the sociological toolbox. A posthumanist sociology is not a flattened ontology, in which we find agency in all things living and non-living. A posthumanist sociology asks instead what we do with the fundamental question of becoming both more and less human, following a surge of interest in decentring human exceptionalism. Moreover, a posthumanist sociology returns to the question of what it means to be an intersectional being, to proliferate the involvement of entities at the intersections of histories and social structures. Thus, it is a perspective that emerges from within the conditions of related crises, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This pandemic has highlighted the need to decentre human exceptionalism, raising a challenge for sociologists to return to the premises of what it means to be a social being. In some sense, management of the pandemic already assumes a decentring. This article builds an argument by first reviewing what broadly constitutes a ‘posthumanist’ sociological perspective, then moves on to a case study of the interrelated human and non-human actors that constituted the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak. The case study usefully marks the intersection between human and non-human bodies as nodes in the interpretive production chain of this global event – one that acknowledges human extensions and connections to multispecies and ecological systems. Such interlinkages become foundational to interrogating what it means to become human in a posthuman world. The article ends on this posthuman question: under the posthuman condition, if we do not discern a difference between the human and other-than-human entities, how will this homogenization affect the human collective ability to enact and maintain cross-species and cross-entity protections'
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T07:07:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221090253
       
  • Weaponizing people in environmental conflicts: Capturing ‘hearts’,
           ‘minds’, and manufacturing ‘volunteers’ for extractive development
           

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      Authors: Alexander Dunlap
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Local support is instrumental to natural resource extraction. Examining militarization beyond the battlefield, this article discusses the organization of volunteers in three controversial resource extraction projects. Drawing on the political ecology of counter-insurgency and 4 years of research that examined wind energy development in Mexico, coal mining in Germany, and copper mining in Peru, this article examines the weaponization of volunteers in environmental conflicts. It is argued that political acquiescence to natural resource extraction is manufactured by various means of coercion and reward, meanwhile volunteerism – or the appearance thereof – seeks to manipulate people’s ambitions and desires. The manufacturing of volunteerism expresses a ‘local’ counterinsurgency approach, designed to counter-resistance groups by articulating a form of counter-organizing to defend extractive development projects (and transnational capital). The fact remains, however, that these groups often qualify for welfare programs, are paid, or are recipients of ‘donations’ to ensure a supportive presence in the target areas. Volunteerism, in the conventional sense, is ‘hybridized’ with paid work posturing as unpaid to organize legitimacy. Discussing counter-organizations and their relationship to armed and unarmed volunteerism, the article details how communities are divided to support natural resource extraction in times of widespread ecological and climate crises.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T07:04:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221086828
       
  • Weaponized volunteering in schools: The discourse of volunteering and
           pre-military education in Israeli high schools

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      Authors: Tammy Hoffman
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the interrelations between two educational endeavors in Israeli high schools, which are usually perceived as separated. The first is a pre-military education program that is an inherent part of Israeli schools’ formal and nonformal curriculum. The second is the incorporation of volunteering activity in and for the community as a compulsory prerequisite for the matriculation diploma. An integrative analysis of policy and curricular documents of both programs suggests that a shared common discursive framework characterizes these programs. This discourse glorifies an ideal Israeli citizen who serves his country through both civic volunteering and military service. This dual discourse blurs the boundaries between what is considered civic and what is considered military in the education system. Thus, it calls for a reconsideration of the ways in which civic education may be implemented in the education system together with militaristic ideals.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T07:03:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221086826
       
  • Securitized volunteerism and neo-nationalism in Israel’s rural
           periphery

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      Authors: Nir Gazit, Erella Grassiani
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Contemporary volunteering is often considered a neoliberal phenomenon that has become prevalent in an era of post-national sentiments and individualism. Although it is frequently depicted as non-political, it may serve the promotion of political agendas, such as neo-nationalism, outside the traditional frame of the state and its institutions. This becomes particularly salient when non-governmental organizations practice volunteering in ways that undermine the state’s monopoly in the realms of security and public order. We conceptualize this tendency as securitized volunteering – instances of volunteering work that is promoted by, in this case non-state, organizations who are involved in voluntary security activities that are violent (or potentially violent). Drawing on an ethnographic study of the Israeli organization HaShomer HaChadash (The New Guard), this article demonstrates how agricultural and security volunteering is used to advance a neo-nationalist agenda that circumvents the state, and at the same time maintains an apolitical stance. This is achieved through the implementation of two corresponding forms of securitized volunteering – civilianization of security volunteerism and securitization of civilian volunteerism. Blurring the distinction between both forms enables the organization to attract supporters and volunteers that come from various social sectors and to reinforce its seemingly apolitical position and nationalist agenda.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T07:01:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221086824
       
  • An emerging military-industrial-nonprofit complex' Exploring
           conscripted volunteering in Israel

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      Authors: Itamar Y Shachar
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      ‘Volunteering’ has been emerging in the last decades as an object of intensified political interest and promotion, assembled through a myriad of alignments, composed of state institutions and international bodies, corporations, and third sector actors, operating across local, nationwide, and transnational scales. This article focuses on a particular configuration that I call ‘conscripted volunteering’, in which soldiers engage in activities framed as ‘doing good’ beyond their regular military duties. The article explores how this configuration emerges in Israel through growing efforts to create assemblages of corporate, public, nonprofit, and military actors. These assembling efforts include initiating and maintaining connections, routinizing and sustaining partnerships, and aligning various interests and needs. While some assemblages gradually dissolve, others are successfully sustained and new ones emerge. The overall proliferation of such assemblages in Israel is identified in this article as an emerging ‘military-industrial-nonprofit complex’ that is forged by a consensual neoliberal agenda regarding citizenship and modalities of participation. These insights could be utilized to understand various types of military-humanitarian interventions and to reconceptualize military-society relations more broadly.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T06:59:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221086822
       
  • Ideal types’ strategies related to handling early stages of the COVID-19
           pandemic: A thematic analysis of comments from an international survey

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      Authors: Stinne Glasdam, Sigrid Stjernswärd
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      People (re)act differently when facing the pandemic. Multiple opinions about COVID-19 and related issues prevail, both in personal meetings and in (social) media. This article aims to illuminate different ideal types and handling strategies in early stages of the pandemic. A thematic Braun and Clark, and Weber inspired analysis of qualitative data from an international web-based survey was carried out in two steps. First, five ideal types related to handling the COVID-19 pandemic were constructed: the Stickler for the rules, the Challenger, the Fact hunter, the Idealist, and the Entertainer. Second, the ideal types were represented throughout four themes: Divided opinions on politico-medico restrictions, Multifaceted picture of the pandemic, Social media as a lookout point and source of insight, and The future between hope and fear. The results illustrated the complexity of people’s understanding of, (re)actions to and handling of the pandemic.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T06:01:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221090251
       
  • Re-imagining the measurement of femicide: From ‘thin’ counts to
           ‘thick’ counts

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      Authors: Sandra Walklate, Kate Fitz-Gibbon
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The term femicide, while contested, focuses attention on women killed by men’s violence. This focus has generated work on its nature and extent much of which examines the lethal act and the lethal actor in which the death is counted. These counts are themselves incomplete. Despite their shortcomings, these ‘thin’ counts have contributed to the increasing impetus for a wide range of global and local prevention and response initiatives designed to draw attention to femicide. ‘Thin’ counts, measuring as they do, who does what to whom, while justified and justifiable, are a surface manifestation of the deeper embrace of social ecological theory within this field of work. This theory, originating in the work of Brofenbrenner, has functionalist tendencies which fail to assign explanatory power or salience to any one variable. This approach provides a narrow vision of what counts as femicide: a ‘thin’ count. However, if femicide was viewed through a wide-angled lens and incorporated all those lives curtailed and shortened as a result of living with men’s violence(s), that which Walklate et al. have called ‘slow femicide’, femicide counts might look somewhat different. Here, we explore why these might be called ‘thick’ counts. These counts would focus attention on not only who does what to whom but also on with what implement, in what place and at what point in time. Thus, ‘thick’ counts would broaden our understanding of the nature, extent and impact of femicide.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T11:07:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221082698
       
  • What is femicide' The United Nations and the measurement of progress
           in complex epistemic systems

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      Authors: Sylvia Walby
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Femicide is a key global indicator of progress towards gender equality. The occurrence of some but not all five gender dimensions in the indicators of violence used to measure progress towards United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 5, 11 and 16 are analysed as resulting from the tension between divergent feminist strategies that focus either on women-only or on mainstreaming intersecting inequalities. The tension between universalist and particularist projects underlies the contestations over the construction of these gendered indicators. The analysis develops a conceptualisation of indicators as assets in order to capture the social relations of power involved (rather than as boundary objects), supported by platforms (which can be public as well as corporate) and generated by dynamic epistemic systems (rather than stable epistemological infrastructures).
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T12:30:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221084357
       
  • (Un)making the established-outsiders figuration in anti-racist and migrant
           rights activism

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      Authors: Mari Kuukkanen
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The article discusses recent anti-racist and migrant rights activism in Finland with the help of Norbert Elias’ figurational sociology and the concept of the established-outsiders figuration. The mobilisation of ‘outsiders’ (racialised minorities and migrants) has reordered the contemporary field and challenged the ‘established’ majority activists to reflect on their own practices. Through combining figurational and cultural perspectives, I compare the extent to which established liberal and left-libertarian activists, with their distinct ideological positions, have succeeded in transforming the power ratio between themselves and the outsiders. This article advances the use of the established-outsiders conceptualisation in cases where the established support, in principle, the outsiders’ inclusion. This helps to shed light on both the more covert and subtle ways through which the established reproduce their power as well as their agency in dismantling the power disparity.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T10:24:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221082699
       
  • The constitution of political contention: The case of protests and riots
           at the turn of the 19th century

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      Authors: Johan Gøtzsche-Astrup
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      How is political contention constituted as an intelligible political practice, distinct from mere social disorders' This article gets at the question by analysing the relation between protests and riots at the turn of the 19th century in England. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s discussion of visibilities and post-foundational political theory, it contrasts the 1760s Wilkes and Liberty agitations with that of the London Corresponding Society in the 1790s. It articulates two ways of configuring the relation and constituting political contention in the self-governing practices of contentious actors. In the first case, political contention is an exercise of public spirit that may include riots and is opposed to passivity or factional interest. In the second, it is a process of public inquiry premised on a constitutive exclusion of riots. The comparison reveals how the emergence of protest politics also resulted in a new way of delineating and constituting political contention. In this way, it offers a new perspective on the contemporary constitution of political contention.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-23T09:28:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221084359
       
  • Complex innovation, organizations, and fields: Toward the organized
           transformation of today’s innovation societies

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      Authors: Arnold Windeler, Robert Jungmann
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Societies are increasingly using innovation as a point of reference, thereby progressively transforming societies into innovation societies. Today, complex innovations are characteristically produced in fields where organizations play significant roles, as prom inent innovation models indicate. However, there is a lack of a conceptual framework to study the interplay between organizations and innovation fields. From a perspective informed by structuration theory, we provide such a research framework, enabling researchers to analyze how organizations increase their relevance by jointly producing innovations in innovation fields as a significant part of the organized transformation of our contemporary innovation societies.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T10:26:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221078042
       
  • The production of counter-space: Informal labour, social networks and the
           production of urban space in Dhaka

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      Authors: Lutfun Nahar Lata
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Access to public space for earning livelihoods is important for street vendors in global south cities. However, due to continuous population growth and the demand for lands by the real estate development sector, pressure on land is very high in the global south. Consequently, global south cities such as Dhaka provide ‘no place’ for its poor migrant citizens. Yet, the urban poor are able to appropriate public space for livelihoods. Drawing on a case study of Sattola slum in Dhaka, this article investigates how the urban poor access to public space for livelihoods and construct counter-spaces by breaking the planned order of the city. This article argues that the urban poor are able to construct counter-spaces with the tacit support of translocal social networks as well as with the support of a range of state and non-state powerful actors who are compromised by the benefits and profits they extract from vendors. This article draws on qualitative data generated through in-depth interviews with 94 informal workers and 37 key informants. This article contributes to urban sociology literature demonstrating that the urban poor are able to construct counter-spaces drawing on a range of everyday tactics and appropriating public space by quietly breaking the planned order of the city.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T10:24:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221078049
       
  • Analysing homophobia, xenophobia and sexual nationalisms in Africa:
           Comparing quantitative attitudes data to reveal societal differences

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      Authors: Leon Freude, Matthew Waites
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      To problematise Western discourses of a homophobic Africa, there is a need to analyse evidence of homophobia and its interplay with other attitudes, in ways that explore contextual differences. Hence, this article offers an original sociological analysis of quantitative data on homophobia in African states, examining how this inter-relates with xenophobia. Social attitudes data are drawn from the Afrobarometer research project as a unique and important source, and compared in five diverse contexts: Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal and Zambia. Data are examined from Round 6 (2014–2015) and Round 7 (2016–2018). Findings are interpreted in light of specific national literatures on the relations between sexuality, gender and nationalism, as well as wider critical and postcolonial perspectives – especially conceptualisation of sexual nationalisms, and recent literatures on political homophobia. Whereas analyses of homonationalism in Western societies have explored alignments of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex rights affirmation with anti-immigrant attitudes, this study explores such relationships between homophobic and xenophobic attitudes in alternative patterns within specific African contexts. The analysis delivered not only challenges Western discourses of generalised African homophobia (especially discussing the counterexample of Mozambique) but also advances understanding of the complexity of how attitudes inter-relate in different postcolonial states.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T10:19:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221078045
       
  • The anti-vaccination Robinsons – Isolated actors of the mainstream
           vaccination discourse in Poland

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      Authors: Maria Świątkiewicz-Mośny , Aleksandra Wagner, Paulina Polak
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Vaccinations are treated as a tool that can eliminate disease or at least reduce morbidity and mortality. The programmes implemented by the World Health Organization aim to completely eradicate certain infectious diseases. At the same time, the number of people who choose not to vaccinate, or question the effectiveness and necessity of vaccination, is increasing. Called as anti-vaccinationists, they are treated by the dominant discourse as irrational, selfish and irresponsible. In this article, we analyse the media discourse around vaccination, pointing out that the institutionalised message supports the vaccination policy, while displacing and ridiculing actors who are opposed to the current vaccination procedure. Labelled as one type of group and pushed out of the dominant discourse, they organise themselves in their spaces and practise their coping strategies. We call them ‘the Robinsons’ (inspired by Robinson Crusoe) because, locked in their islands, they close themselves off from the current discourse, forming their own knowledge and their own practices. Our aim is to show the discursive mechanisms of pushing out them of the mainland.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T10:41:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221078048
       
  • Education as care labor: Expanding our lens on the work-life balance
           problem

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      Authors: Youyenn Teo
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars have documented the challenges of combining wage work and care responsibilities in various societal contexts. National variations reveal that public policy and care infrastructure have major effects in shaping gendered patterns, class inequalities, as well as overall wellbeing of parents. Childcare centers and schools can enable people with children to pursue jobs and careers. Yet, as I show in this article, education systems’ demands can become a major component of parental care labor. Drawing on interviews with 92 parents in Singapore, I illustrate the ways in which education care labor impedes work-life reconciliation as well as deepens the significance of gender and class.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-05T11:20:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921211072577
       
  • The advent of the citizen expert: Democratising or pushing the boundaries
           of expertise'

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      Authors: Eva Krick, Taina Meriluoto
      First page: 967
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This contribution introduces Current Sociology’s special subsection ‘The advent of the citizen expert: Democratising or pushing the boundaries of expertise'’, which deals with the increasing involvement of ‘ordinary citizens’ as experts into political and social debates. From an integrated perspective that transcends policy fields and societal realms, the special subsection deals with the epistemic and democratic implications of this transformation in civic participation and knowledge validation practice. It pays special attention to the tensions that can be implied by citizen expertise’s ‘double promise’ of tapping into novel channels of participation and idle knowledge resources at the same time. Three promising themes and research avenues are identified that the advent of the citizen expert highlights: The changes in liberal-democratic culture indicated by the emergence of this new actor category, the way societal power relations are impacted by the elevation of citizen expertise and the subsequently shifting boundaries and standards of what can count as knowledge or expertise.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T10:16:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221078043
       
 
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