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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 382)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 303)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 271)
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 192)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 77)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 57)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Qualitative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Judgment and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Sociolinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Studies in Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Research in Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Classical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Political Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Sociology: Revue Internationale de Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Japanese Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
New Zealand Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Mathematical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Italian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Public and Professional Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue de la régulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue Internationale De Securite Sociale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Landscapes of Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Liinc em Revista     Open Access  
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Socio-logos     Open Access  

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Current Sociology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.739
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 51  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0011-3921 - ISSN (Online) 1461-7064
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Becoming a young radical right activist: Biographical pathways of the
           members of radical right organisations in Poland and Germany

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Janina Myrczik, Justyna Kajta, Arthur Buckenleib, Mateusz Karolak, Marius Liedtke, Adam Mrozowicki, Vera Trappmann
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      With the increasing popularity of the radical right, much research has tried to explain the motives of voters. Less attention has been paid to the motives of people to become radical right activists – specifically young people, a group with a high tendency to join right-wing parties. Within the context of the internationalisation of the radical right, this article draws on 28 narrative interviews conducted between 2019 and 2021 with young radical right activists in Poland and Germany, two countries with considerably different political and discursive opportunity structures. We propose to recognise a new motive for becoming involved in political activism: career-oriented individual self-realisation in Germany, as opposed to fulfilling a duty to the nation in Poland. While we identify two different types of radical activism within the different contexts – the (nationalist) anti-establishment populist career type in Germany and the (nationalist) anti-political intellectualism/elitism type in Poland – they both point to the normalisation of the radical right in the two countries.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T05:05:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921241239644
       
  • Counter-professionalisation in collective childcare: The case of
           communities of care in Barcelona

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lara Maestripieri, Raquel Gallego
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Post-industrial transformations have significantly reshaped how young children are cared for outside the family home. Among other factors, the labour market participation of young mothers and a concomitant wish for intensive mothering have led to more diversified childcare solutions for the under-threes. Collective childcare projects (CCPs) promote approaches that are based on a home-like care environment and are run by educators and parents who have usually not trained in formal institutions but who become professionals in informal communities. Applying a discursive approach, this article asks: what characterises professionalism in CCPs' What type of professionalisation is being pursued' We analyse the case of Barcelona, using 45 interviews with association representatives, policymakers, campaigners, educators and parents. Our findings show the important role played by communities of care in defining professionalism and in consolidating a counter-professionalisation ethos, while evidencing their reluctance to pursue formal professionalisation.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-03-26T11:16:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921241239642
       
  • The stealth rise of control: Forgotten trust in contemporary
           professionalism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sanjeev Bhupla, Adam Barnard, Richard Howarth
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Professionalism has long been a term understood to distinguish social strata, commonly highlighting those trusted to employ expert knowledge for the benefit of society. Professionalism however is evolving; this position article contributes to the subject in drawing together different threads of literature beyond empirical studies to extend the discussion on professionalism, shedding a light on an area of interest. Specifically, it is argued that professionalism is threatened by the shift of the loci of control from the traditional, occupational professional positions to what is now contemporary professionalism. To facilitate such a transition, trust, a long-time fundamental component of traditional professionalism, is being readily and overtly substituted by control, wielded in and by modern organisations for the primary benefit of that organisation. The first part of the article explicates an understanding of professionalism and trust. The following section then introduces the relationship between both traditional and contemporary professionalism with trust. The third part moves to discuss the rise of differing types of control, arguing that trust has been forced to take a minor role in contemporary notions of professionalism in organisational practice, leading to the term being utilised to induce the required behaviours within those organisations. The article concludes with direction on both potential implications and applications of the theoretical points raised through the discussion.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-03-18T04:54:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921241239643
       
  • Women’s lives and temporalities of fertility treatment

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      Authors: Nicola Payne, Suzan Lewis, Ann Nilsen
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores women’s temporal experiences of using Assisted Reproductive Technology. The demand for such treatment has increased since the first in vitro fertilisation birth. Assisted Reproductive Technology involves invasive procedures in women’s bodies, uncertain outcomes and temporal challenges. A sample of 11 professional women was drawn from a larger sample recruited for interviews from online infertility forums. Analysis was carried out using a biographical life course approach to draw out the temporal elements of experiences. Four themes were identified: biographical timing and temporalities of fertility treatment; biographical timing and a/synchronicity with friends; temporalities of everyday life when using Assisted Reproductive Technology; and ‘public issue’ or ‘private trouble’ in relation to silences around Assisted Reproductive Technology. Undergoing Assisted Reproductive Technology treatment sets these women apart from friends who conceive without treatment, and they faced challenges for the rhythms of everyday life during this period. Using Assisted Reproductive Technology highlighted public taboos about women’s bodies. Thus for many, this critical phase had to be kept secret. Understanding women’s temporal experiences of using Assisted Reproductive Technology and the challenges involved are important for developing context sensitive theories and concepts that can contribute to deeper insight into the intersecting temporalities of reproductive processes in general and using Assisted Reproductive Technology in particular.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-03-16T06:42:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921241238433
       
  • Who recounts the Stalinist past' Mnemonic roles, acts of remembering and
           life-scripts in Russian families

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      Authors: Gavin Slade, Zhaniya Turlubekova, Laura Piacentini
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article asks why some memories of the Stalinist Gulag are shared while others are not. Considering remembering as a social act, we argue that who engages in acts of remembering, to whom, when and how helps explain what is remembered. The article draws on family memories shared by participants of 16 focus groups in four research sites in Russia. We find that mnemonic actors – most often grandmothers – remember victimhood in veiled ways, structured by life-scripts that focus on the positive: they couch the bad in the good of the Soviet past, particularly focusing on evasive action and near misses which highlight the stoicism and cunning of family members who narrowly avoided repression. We suppose these narratives emerge in families and are shared within the focus groups due to perceived social appropriateness. The study adds to the literature on entangled memory and argues for the use of focus groups as a method for exploring the social patterning of remembering.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-03-15T04:59:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921241238431
       
  • Navigating intimacy and queer entrepreneurship: Relational work in
           Taiwanese lesbian couples’ business endeavors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hong-zen Wang
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This study addresses the significant gap in the entrepreneurship literature concerning the experiences of sexual minority groups, particularly Taiwanese lesbian entrepreneurs. The prevailing focus on heterosexual men has overshadowed the distinct motivations and dynamics in queer entrepreneurship. Drawing on Zelizer’s concept of relational work and incorporating feminist perspectives, this investigation explores how Taiwanese lesbian couples engage in entrepreneurial pursuits in unique local gender culture. Taiwan’s gender cultural context, mainly shaped by Confucianism and Taoism, contributes to the relative acceptance of lesbian relationships and marriages, reducing social criticism. By skillfully utilizing the cultural repertoire of filial piety, lesbian entrepreneurs strengthen their bonds with parents, facilitating both their business endeavors and intimate relationships. In addition, lesbian entrepreneurship is often overlooked and subsumed under gay entrepreneurship, leading to the assumption of ‘gay ordinariness’. The study highlights a significant difference between Taiwanese lesbian entrepreneurs and gay counterparts; the former perform intimate relational work and prioritize emotional ties in entrepreneurial pursuits, while the latter emphasize rational economic outlook. The findings underscore that entrepreneurial motivations are multifaceted, encompassing liberation, empowerment, family bonding, and self-identity construction. Taiwanese lesbian entrepreneurs exemplify the importance of intimate relational work, challenging the dominant masculine economic orientation in entrepreneurship. This research contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of queer entrepreneurship and calls for greater recognition of diverse motivations and dynamics in entrepreneurial pursuits.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-03-14T05:37:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921241238432
       
  • Political polarization and intimate distance: Negotiating family conflicts
           during a high-risk protest movement

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ruby YS Lai
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Political polarization not only threatens democracy, but also disrupts family lives, causing clashes between family members with discordant political orientations. This article examines how individuals negotiate family conflicts during political divides, by focusing on the Anti-Extradition Bill Movement in Hong Kong. Based on data drawn from interviews conducted with 37 self-identified protest participants, I develop the concept of intimate distance in order to capture the way in which the participants negotiated political disagreements with their immediate family. Individuals make peace with their families during a high-risk movement, not merely by restoring closeness, but also by adjusting the intimate distance with their family members in three interconnected aspects: everyday family life, cognitive and emotional aspects. Individuals employ a repertoire of practices, together with emotion work and boundary work, to alleviate confrontations, rebuild consensus, and contain political risks. This study contributes to a more nuanced conceptualization of intimacy and family conflict resolution, and unravels the impact of family interactions on the intensification or alleviation of ideological and affective polarization in relation to the interpersonal and societal level.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T08:34:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921241232409
       
  • Contestations over risk expertise, definitions and insecurities: The case
           of European football

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jan Andre Lee Ludvigsen
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article advances sociological debates which, since the 1990s, have proliferated over the nature of ‘risk’ and ‘insecurity’ in modern societies. Central here is Ulrich Beck’s work, dealing with questions regarding which expert systems and institutions possess the ability to define what constitutes a risk or not. For Beck, hegemonic relations of definitions are central in the identification and construction of risk. However, risks are contested by wider publics, sub-political groups and movements. Notwithstanding, existing literature predominantly explores these contestations through techno-scientific contexts. Through a case-study of European men’s football (1985–2023), this article extends Beck’s work into the field of sport, by examining how supporter movements have contested expert claims on risk, insecurity and its management in leisure and sporting cultures. The article argues that reflexive cultures of contestation have matured and enabled a small section of ‘recognized’ supporters to become ‘counter-experts’, thereby blurring the expert/public distinction within Beck’s theories. It thus contributes to sociological debates on risk and citizen-expert contestations in contemporary social contexts.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T04:36:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921241232413
       
  • The effects of economic globalization on fertility in developing
           countries, 1990–2018

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Steven A. Mejia
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Social scientists have long queried the socio-structural determinants of fertility rates. Drawing on the insights of dependency theory, this research investigates the impact of trade openness, exports to high-income countries, foreign direct investment, and debt dependence on fertility rates in developing countries. Results from generalized least squares (GLS) random effects (RE) panel regression models suggest that trade openness has a null effect, while exports to high-income countries is positively associated with fertility. Foreign direct investment is inversely associated with fertility, while debt dependence is positively associated with fertility. This study calls attention to the global–economic processes shaping national-level demographic outcomes.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T05:44:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231223184
       
  • Promoting mindfulness in education: Scientisation, psychology and
           epistemic capital

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Peter J Hemming, Alp Arat
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Mindfulness is increasingly found in many educational settings in the United Kingdom, but existing research has focused primarily on clinical efficacy or implementation issues, rather than sociological interests. This article draws on data from the ‘Mapping Mindfulness in the UK’ study to help explain the successful growth of mindfulness in education, by exploring the discursive strategies through which practitioners construct, promote and solicit support for the practice among policymakers and educational leaders. The analysis highlights the significance of certain authorities or epistemic capitals, and logics of ‘scientisation’, for positioning mindfulness as a credible and legitimate practice for educational contexts, yet also reveals competing discourses and alternative conceptualisations. In doing so, it extends theories of ‘scientisation’ by explicating the role of ‘harder’ and ‘softer’ forms of psychology within these processes. The research makes original contributions to sociological understandings of mindfulness and education, while offering new insights on broader theories concerning science and society.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T11:40:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231223180
       
  • Conflicting demands and emotional labour: Balancing and swapping at the
           front line of the welfare state

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mathias Herup Nielsen
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article combines insights from the sociology of emotional labour with works on conflicting demands facing employees to analyse how frontline staff conduct emotional labour in contexts marked by multifaceted demands facing them. It demonstrates the usefulness of this combination through an analysis of group interviews with frontline staff within Danish job centres, who are currently explicitly instructed to display sincere belief in the job prospects of clients, while also representing a disciplining activation system marked by conditionality. The article contributes to existing literature through an elaboration of two concepts – ‘balancing’ and ‘swapping’ – describing forms of emotional labour conducted by frontline staff in a work setting characterized by conflicting demands. The former is about striking a balance between the wants of the client and the wants of the system while sustaining clients’ feelings of motivation. The latter is about enabling oneself to encounter clients in ways which are personalized and informal, within the contours of a system marked by bureaucratic logics and language.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T09:30:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231224760
       
  • Giving and receiving: Gendered service work in academia

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      Authors: Margaretha Järvinen, Nanna Mik-Meyer
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Deploying the perspective of ‘relational work’, this article investigates the mechanisms behind the gender-unequal distribution of academic service. The concept of relational work is used to analyse how men and women in academia balance collective against individual interests when agreeing or disagreeing on service tasks. Four types of relational work are identified: compliance, evasiveness, barter and investment, with compliance being more common among women, evasiveness and barter being more common among men and investment being tied to temporality in a gendered pattern. The article shows that men are more successful in pursuing individual interests against service demands and how this depends on their relational work as well as organisational role expectations, reducing women’s prospects of ‘saying no’. The study is based on qualitative interviews with 163 associate and full professors in the social sciences and CV data on their service contributions.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T09:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231224754
       
  • Dissenting and innovating: Freelancers’ emerging forms of organising
           in the Netherlands

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      Authors: Valeria Piro, Annalisa Murgia
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates precarious workers’ organising by considering the case of freelancers, a category between the self-employed – usually represented by employer organisations – and employees – whose interests are traditionally defended by trade unions. Drawing on a 6-month ethnography conducted in the Netherlands within two freelancer associations, our study shows their capacity to exercise collective forms of ‘critical agency’ – on the one hand, by questioning their established practices and seeking to innovate their repertoire, and on the other, by staging protest actions, despite the long Dutch tradition of consensus-based social dialogue. The aim of the article is twofold. First, it contributes to the debate on precarious workers’ organising by considering freelancers as agentic subjects, whose collective identity and organising practices shape and are shaped not only by the socio-institutional context, but also by the type of relationships they create and in which they are embedded. Second, by focusing on collective everyday practices as fields of production of the new, it illustrates diverse forms of critical agency exercised by freelancers, thus offering an empirical contribution to the understanding of critical agency in its making.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T09:18:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231223176
       
  • Scapegoating queers: Pink-blocking as state strategy

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      Authors: Meredith L Weiss
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Malaysia’s ‘democratic transition’ in May 2018, when a challenger coalition ousted the long-dominant incumbent coalition, raised hopes of a new political climate, more respectful of civil liberties. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Malaysians shared that sentiment; a growing number had even protested openly for political liberalization as part of an umbrella movement for electoral reform. Within months of the election, several higher profile incidents peppered a series of attacks on queer spaces and both state-sponsored and private harassment of LGBT Malaysians – even as Malaysia ticked upwards in global metrics of ‘democracy’. Attention to LGBT peoples and issues remain at an all-time high in Malaysia, driven far less by queer activism than anti-LGBT agitation, in line with a government-led, base-ingratiating ‘pink-blocking’ agenda, rooted in both ‘Asian values’ and religious discourse. Here as elsewhere, queer identities and acts offer a handy diversion and scapegoat – and in Muslim-majority, increasingly Islamist Malaysia, anti-queer policies and policing affirm commitment to the presumed moral high ground of Malay-Muslim rights: pink-blocking offers a way to build coveted electoral support. In contrast, we may find recourse to ‘pink-washing’ strategies in countries lacking a similarly socially conservative, substantial base and/or competitive elections, and/or where currying favour with the west is a higher imperative.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T05:30:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231217498
       
  • Southern theory, knowledge production and Russia’s war in Ukraine: An
           interview with Raewyn Connell

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      Authors: Ivan Kislenko, Raewyn Connell
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This is an interview with Raewyn Connell held through email in April 2023 and has been later updated in October 2023. It consists of the following three sections: ‘Southern Theory and Its Enemies’; ‘Russia’s war in Ukraine and the Global Field of Knowledge Production’; ‘The position of Russia in the North-South dichotomy’. It includes a variety of ideas, that is, southern theory, subaltern empire, Global East, post-socialist coloniality, sanctions, appropriation of anticolonial narratives by Putin, North and South in sociology, and so on. The main aim of the interview is to demonstrate how the ideas of Raewyn Connell relate to a current configuration of knowledge production in sociology, especially in the state of war and its possible influence on international sociology.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-12-16T12:03:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231218736
       
  • Do countries’ freedom status and gender equality level inform gender
           differences in bribery' Evidence from a multi-country level analysis

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      Authors: Eugene Emeka Dim, Joseph Yaw Asomah, Yiyan Li
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Given the continuing debate on whether women are less corrupt than men, this study investigates the socio-political context in which men and women give bribes based on the seventh round of the Afrobarometer multi-country data set. We also seek to understand how a country’s freedom status and gender equality level inform the extent to which women and men are likely to be involved in corruption. In doing so, the study focuses on the influence of gender status, the number of female legislators, gender equality, and political freedom on bribe-giving among men and women. Research results indicate that (1) women in Africa are less likely to pay bribes than men, controlling both macro-level and micro-level factors, (2) women are less likely than men to give bribes in countries with high gender equality, and (3) the tendency for women to give bribes is the lowest in politically free countries. However, the inclination of women’s bribery reached the highest level among countries with partial political freedom. This study extends the theoretical and empirical understanding of the context within which women are more or less likely to give bribes, especially in the global South.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T05:27:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231217499
       
  • Are public sector organizations still relevant for poverty reduction'
           Frontline workers’ personal resources and the centrality of trust

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      Authors: Einat Lavee
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This study draws on 214 in-depth interviews with frontline Israeli workers providing services in the public sector to investigate whether organizational embeddedness helps individuals living in poverty accumulate resources from public organizations in times of reduced government support. Findings show that public sector workers provide clients with informal, personal resources that allow better coping with poverty. Beyond local, short-term assistance, these personal resources are provided in the hopes of strengthening trust among low-income populations, thereby achieving long-term improved well-being and social inclusion. Findings expose new dimensions in the relations between organizations and their low-income clients, as well as the importance of organizational embeddedness in coping with poverty.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T11:15:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231206492
       
  • Protective abandonment: Risk, data, and surveillance of nuclear workers
           post Fukushima

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      Authors: Midori Ogasawara
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      During the coronavirus disease-19 pandemic, Fukushima marked the 10th anniversary of its nuclear disaster of 2011. And although pandemic scientists around the world used technological surveillance to predict risks, the experiences from the Fukushima health crisis call into question such technological solutionism. The Japanese government and electronic companies had placed nuclear workers under intensive health surveillance for decades, but the health data rarely helped workers to protect themselves. Rather, the government has often used the data to decline workers’ claims for medical compensation. I call this contradictory consequence of data Protective Abandonment, the systematic disposal of people through the promise of protection. Data are collected through surveillance, for the purpose of risk management, but the information ends up protecting only the existing political economic systems. Crucially, data collection disguises protection and hides the unequal distribution of care. I argue that protective abandonment may become a common experience in today’s data-driven societies.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-11-18T11:12:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231211583
       
  • Looking at human-centered artificial intelligence as a problem and
           prospect for sociology: An analytic review

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      Authors: Andrey V Rezaev, Natalia D Tregubova
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Significant advances have been achieved within the past decade in the progress of theoretical and empirical studies of Artificial Intelligence. This article is an attempt, through a review of existing literature on Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, to raise new questions and provide additional scientific data that will stimulate the potential and foster the forces of sociology and Artificial Intelligence studies to draw closer together. The point of departure for the article is the appearance of Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence in scholarly assembly. The authors then explore routines of the term Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence and the dilemmas of Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. In what follows, they review how Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence appears in sociological and social sciences production. The authors turn to the closing remarks and finalize formulating three rules of what not to do when studying Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence from a sociological perspective.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-11-18T07:16:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231211580
       
  • Examining distrust of science and scientists: A study on ideology and
           scientific literacy in the European Union

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      Authors: Dragoș M Obreja, Răzvan Rughiniș, Daniel Rosner
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      There is considerable evidence that, in the United States, public distrust in science is amplified by a conservative ideology and by lower levels of scientific literacy. By emphasizing the discussion on reflexive modernity and (de)politicization of science and politics, we use the Eurobarometer 95.2 to explore these relationships in present-day European Union. We document a significant relationship between conservatively oriented opinions and lower scores on the scientific literacy scale and EU respondents’ levels of distrust in science. We notice that conservative attitudes – measured by dummy statements such as focus on morality instead of innovation, and national isolation due to fear of international crime instead of international co-operation – cause higher distrust in science and scientists. Unlike several studies carried out in the United States, we observe that in the European Union countries, trust in private companies to tackle with scientific issues such as climate change does not predict much when it comes to trust in science and scientists. The obtained results highlight the conceptual confluence between politicization of EU politics and expertization when it comes to policymaking at the EU level, emphasizing the debate regarding the ideological tension that fuels the distrust in science and scientists.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-11-14T09:34:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231211582
       
  • Challenging the protest paradigm and winning legitimacy. Analysis of the
           representation of the social movement against femicide in the mainstream
           media in Mexico

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      Authors: Mariana Aldrete
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Previous studies found a tendency for negative representations of social movements in the media in the so-called ‘protest paradigm’. This work proposes a methodology using the paradigm as a framework and operationalizing its characteristics into neutral variables: emphasis, prominence, legitimacy, and tone. In addition, the political elite-media relationship is included as an analytical dimension to better understand the factors that produce media representations of social movements. The empirical focus is the representation of the movement against femicide in three Mexican national news outlets with different political leanings, from 2014 to 2017, gathering N = 865 news articles. The articles were coded using the qualitative content analysis technique. Each variable was coded to measure the representation of the movement and the authorities. The results show that the detriment to one actor’s legitimacy can benefit the other’s representation, suggesting an interdependent system formed by the political elite, the media, and the social movements.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-11-14T09:29:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231211578
       
  • Reframing the social acceptance of mining projects: The contribution of
           social impact assessment in the Brazilian Amazon

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      Authors: Jacques Demajorovic, Viviane Pisano, Adriano Augusto França Pimenta
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The popularisation of the Social Licence to Operate in measuring the acceptance of mining projects has stimulated the development of critical studies that question how the practical use of this management model has favoured the reduction of risks for the business without generating gains for the community. We propose in this article that the integration of Social Impact Assessment in Social Licence to Operate contributes to deepening the understanding of the social acceptance of mineral projects, especially in contexts of vulnerability. The objective of this research is to discuss the social acceptance of mining projects integrating the results of Social Licence to Operate and Social Impact Assessment approaches applied in a mineral project in the Brazilian Amazon. The methodological procedures of this research included document analysis, survey application, and interviews. The results show that Social Impact Assessment, by enabling the understanding of the local context and social impacts, serves as a complementary instrument to Social Licence to Operate measurement models. By giving voice to the local community, the use of Social Impact Assessment shows means that could effectively contribute to local development, based on actions involving the company and local government in order to act in the most sensitive areas that impact the community, such as its economic, social, environmental, and cultural challenges.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T12:12:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231203173
       
  • Femtech apps and quantification of the reproductive body in India: Issues
           and concerns

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      Authors: Paro Mishra, Ravinder Kaur, Shambhawi Vikram, Prashastika Sharma
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines datafication of the reproductive body in India through use of femtech mobile phone applications (henceforth, apps). Femtech apps quantify reproductive processes such as periods, conception, pregnancy and hormonal health and promise their users greater ‘self-awareness’ and ‘control’ through ‘self-management’. Most studies on femtech refer to users in the Global North, while there are few studies on femtech adoption in the developing countries. This article, based on qualitative and quantitative data, and informed by a feminist technoscience framework, illustrates how femtech’s promise of empowerment through datafication of reproduction is fraught with contradictions and tensions, and has exclusionary and risky consequences for Indian users. It examines the gendered technological landscape’s bearing on concrete practices of design and innovation, and shows how femtech reinforces gendered social hierarchies rather than dismantling them and liberating users. Under datafication, health standards become extremely narrowly defined, marginalising those whose reproductive health trajectories may not conform to normative standards. Femtech’s proliferation in India has also failed to recognise the structural inequalities and socio-economic disadvantages that characterise healthcare access. Finally, the legal grey areas and ill-defined data privacy policies in India allow for easy commercialisation of users’ bodies and personal data possible. This further undermines the liberational rhetoric of femtech, as data privacy breaches are embodied forms of violence with consequences for users’ bodily autonomy and dignity. Femtech’s pursuit of maximising commercial gain is thus at odds with the feminist technoscience project of minimising women’s exploitation and oppression.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-11-03T11:53:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231206491
       
  • Sustainability and the politics of the body in alternative food
           consumption: An embodied materialist perspective

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      Authors: Alice Dal Gobbo
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Health is a key dimension of contemporary food consumption. This preoccupation is beginning to overlap with ecological concerns, as healthy diets are said to largely correspond with sustainable diets. Nevertheless, this link remains rather vague and under-researched in practice. This article adopts an ‘embodied materialist’ perspective to inquire into how the health–sustainability nexus is articulated in the everyday labour of people engaging in alternative food consumption. The interviews, carried out in Milan (Italy), suggest that focusing on health might not always be straightforwardly effective for the promotion of deep and systemic changes. The analysis finds three ways in which the health–sustainability nexus is articulated in daily life. If framed within the dominant articulation of labour and value, health is an individualistic preoccupation with limited potential for socio-ecological transformation. When food labour is guided by the very different logic of care, which emphasises relationality, fragility and the search for a shared wellbeing, more ecological practices emerge, but with some ambivalent implications especially with regards to social justice. Collective engagement in alternative food networks politicises the body more deeply, making it a concrete site of struggle against unsustainable food regimes.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-11-03T11:51:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231206493
       
  • From project-based to community-based social impact assessment: New social
           impact assessment pathways to build community resilience and enhance
           disaster risk reduction and climate action

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      Authors: Angelo Jonas Imperiale, Frank Vanclay
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Social impact assessment can greatly contribute to sustainable regional and urban planning. However, social impact assessment is used primarily in the context of pre-determined projects, while social impact assessment’s role in informing regional and urban plans before projects are even conceived is under-estimated. Moreover, a narrow understanding of the social impacts of projects leads social impact assessment practitioners to consider such impacts as being the outcomes only of the technical characteristics and risks of projects and their implementation, rather than also of broader social, cultural and political-institutional processes. In this article, we reflect on these gaps in social impact assessment. We expand the conceptualization of the social impacts of projects to better consider how social impacts are also influenced by the social dimensions of risk and resilience, and by the knowledge processes and governance strategies that inform and regulate projects. We conceptualize these processes and strategies and design new conceptual models to derive the social impacts of projects. Finally, we reflect on the strategic role social impact assessment can have in enabling social learning and sustainability transformation in localities (i.e. community resilience) and across multiple governance levels (i.e. social resilience). With this article, we contribute to building a key role for social impact assessment in disaster risk reduction, climate action and sustainable development.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T07:20:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231203168
       
  • Social media and social impact assessment: Evolving methods in a shifting
           context

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      Authors: Kate Sherren, Yan Chen, Mehrnoosh Mohammadi, Qiqi Zhao, Keshava Pallavi Gone, HM Tuihedur Rahman, Michael Smit
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Among many by-products of Web 2.0 come the wide range of potential image and text datasets within social media and content sharing platforms that speak of how people live, what they do, and what they care about. These datasets are imperfect and biased in many ways, but those flaws make them complementary to data derived from conventional social science methods and thus potentially useful for triangulation in complex decision-making contexts. Yet the online environment is highly mutable, and so the datasets are less reliable than censuses or other standard data types leveraged in social impact assessment. Over the past decade, we have innovated numerous methods for deploying Instagram datasets in investigating management or development alternatives. This article synthesizes work from three Canadian decision contexts – hydroelectric dam construction or removal; dyke realignment or wetland restoration; and integrating renewable energy into vineyard landscapes – to illustrate some of the methods we have applied to social impact assessment questions using Instagram that may be transferrable to other social media platforms and contexts: thematic (manual coding, machine vision, natural language processing/sentiment analysis, statistical analysis), spatial (hotspot mapping, cultural ecosystem modeling), and visual (word clouds, saliency mapping, collage). We conclude with a set of cautions and next steps for the domain.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T06:53:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231203179
       
  • Reconnecting to the social: Ontological foundations for a repurposed and
           rescaled SIA

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      Authors: Richard Howitt, Dyanna Jolly
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Social Impact Assessment’s incorporation into neoliberal management systems did not enhance their capacity to actually respond to social impacts. Efforts to integrate ‘social’ and ‘environmental’ assessments largely assumed that Social Impact Assessment rightfully belonged to key practitioners (professionals, academics, and corporate and government decision-makers). This article advocates rethinking ontological foundations for a different sort of Social Impact Assessment. It starts from an understanding that the social domain is always and inescapably connected across scales from the microbial, through the global to the cosmological. Building from experience working with Indigenous peoples, it recognizes that although ontological separation of social, environmental and other categories of impact assessment may well facilitate project approval, it also renders industrial systems deaf and blind to many of the most pressing risks facing coupled human and natural systems at multiple scales.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-10-24T10:49:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231203172
       
  • Streamlining social impact assessment and disaster risk assessment for the
           21st century – Perspectives from South Africa

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      Authors: Leandri Kruger, Luke Sandham, Dewald van Niekerk
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite considerable improvements in social impact assessment practice, the shortfalls and neglected status of social impact assessment persist. Integrated impact assessments have been suggested to address some of these shortcomings. Due to its transdisciplinary nature, disaster risk assessment has been identified as an emerging area that could assist social impact assessment in managing social changes and risks and improving community resilience. Emerging research from South Africa and abroad have shown that social impact assessment–disaster risk assessment integration offers opportunities for streamlining and improved practice across four areas, that is, theoretical discourses, legislative and statutory provisions, practitioner perspectives and combined methodologies. The resulting streamlined social impact assessment and disaster risk assessment will be more suitable for 21st-century challenges, allowing for enriched social impact assessment practice, contributions to social sustainability and strengthening of the social resilience of at-risk communities. From observations of the South African context, we suggest that streamlined social impact assessment and disaster risk assessment will optimally address the challenges of developing sustainably and enhancing the resilience of at-risk societies in the 21st century in South Africa, the global south and also the rest of the world.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-10-24T08:58:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231203175
       
  • Generative processes of social vulnerability to flood risk: A proposal for
           the strategic management of social impacts

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      Authors: Pablo Aznar-Crespo, Antonio Aledo, Guadalupe Ortiz, Arturo Vallejos-Romero
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The mainstream approach of social vulnerability to flood risk faces some challenges regarding its ability to address the complexity of its causal processes. The objective of this study was to analyse the causal processes of social vulnerability to flood impacts from a relational perspective. To this end, a social network analysis was performed that identified the conditions and causes of social vulnerability and systematically articulated the relationships between them. This analysis was tested on the specific case of flood risk on the coast of the province of Alicante (SE Spain). To ascertain the conditions and causes of social vulnerability to flood risk, a multidisciplinary group of local experts was consulted, and the resulting data processed in a relational way using Atlas.ti and Gephi softwares. The result was a social vulnerability network comprising 84 nodes and 189 edges distributed into four dimensions: the adaptive capacity of tourists, socio-economic structure, land use planning and risk management. The information was ranked for betweenness centrality, revealing the components with highest causal power of social vulnerability to social impacts in flooding events: low flood risk awareness, economic growth based on real estate boom, property speculation and lack of political interest in flood risk management. This proposal places emphasis on the driving forces of social vulnerability and not exclusively on the specific adaptive conditions of the population, which allows a strategic identification and management of generative forces that ultimately induce the social impacts of floods.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-10-24T07:49:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231203174
       
  • Unpacking the global climate politics-to-local nexus: Renewables,
           community struggles, and social impacts

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      Authors: Nain Martínez
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Accelerating renewable energy deployment is imperative to address the climate crisis, yet projects commonly face community resistance and local cancellation. Accordingly, interest has risen in social impact assessments (SIAs) to evaluate social viability and strengthen management. However, mainstream approaches overlook upstream political economy dynamics that shape projects and drive opposition. Analyzing renewable developments in Mexico reveals how international negotiations and national policies produce rushed, large-scale projects in marginalized territories, igniting rural social struggles. While SIA practices can be enhanced, upstream policies constrain their scope to reshape misaligned projects and performance to address complex sociocultural contexts. This prompts questioning why vulnerable regions bear concentrated impacts and the need to explore alternative development pathways, despite SIAs implementation.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-10-13T12:13:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231203177
       
  • Exploring equity in social impact assessment

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      Authors: Richard ED Parsons, Lara K Mottee
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Social impact assessment as a concept and practice is generally framed as a process for delivering socially equitable outcomes, and in particular, a vehicle for improving the lives of society’s most vulnerable and marginalised people. For example, the International Association for Impact Assessment 2015 guidance document makes the normative statement that projects should benefit local communities and be a ‘force for positive social change and beneficial social development’. Yet most guidance provides little prescription for what this looks like in practice. More recently, the New South Wales 2021 guideline includes distributive equity as a principle for social impact assessment, but its application is yet to be tested. This article discusses key dimensions of equity concepts, drawing on international social impact assessment guidance documents, academic literature on equity, fairness and justice, and case studies in Australia. We elaborate process/procedural/participative and outcome/distributive dimensions of equity. We further argue that, to reflect the International Association for Impact Assessment position, social impact assessment needs to defend its normative purpose of advancing equity, rather than simply ‘considering’ equity impacts.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-10-03T07:13:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231203170
       
  • Creativity and the collective Renaissance: A hermeneutic-imaginary
           approach (for monograph: ‘patterns of social creativity and cultural
           change’)

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      Authors: José Angel Bergua 
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article builds on a powerful statement by Hans Joas regarding creativity, with which he claims ‘the self escapes its bounds and loses itself in pursuit of the forces of sociality that make it up’. To develop this argument, we propose a hermeneutic approach that centres on myths and rituals that narrate how subjective and collective orders are dissolved within the indeterminate (apeiron). Although this question has been further explored within theoretical frameworks that discuss the death drive, the body without organs, the inoperative community and so on, these approaches do not refer to the subsequent rebirths, which the logos seems incapable of tackling but which traditional wisdom manages to address. The lesson that this ancient wisdom can pass on to sociology is that the communitas can act as the apeiron of the social from which the self and society itself escape their bounds to be reborn.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T07:14:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231190722
       
  • ‘Being old’ and ‘feeling old’ in contemporary Italy: Active ageing
           and COVID-19

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      Authors: Valeria Cappellato, Eugenia Mercuri
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Over the last 20 years, ageing has been studied through the lens of an active ageing perspective, which considers older adults as responsible for their own conditions. However, the COVID-19 health emergency has highlighted its limits. Drawing on a sample of semi-structured interviews – collected before and during the pandemic – with people aged 65 years and above who are self-sufficient and live in Turin, Italy, this article explores the representations and perceptions of ageing, to highlight the possible effects of the COVID-19 emergency. The results show that representations of ageing revolve around two fundamental viewpoints: one considers older adults as a cost for the community because of their unproductiveness; the other overlaps the loss of self-sufficiency with a definition of ‘real’ old age. Furthermore, the interviews introduce a distinction between those who – considered productive despite their age – were called to provide a service to the community during the lockdown, and those who were judged vulnerable because of their age. Such ambiguous messages have raised new questions about an active and successful ageing imperative.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T06:43:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231201626
       
  • What is left unsaid: Omissions in biographical narratives

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      Authors: Sónia Bernardo Correia, Ana Caetano
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      When we ask people to tell us the story of their lives, it is not the full extent of their biographies that we have access to, but only a partial version of it. Biographical narratives are permeated by processes of selection that imply highlighting some things while omitting others. Most of the time, what is left unsaid cannot be fully acknowledged, precisely because it is not explicitly verbalised. In the scope of the research project Biographical echoes, we were able to identify significant events and relationships in a person’s life that were not disclosed in autobiographical accounts but were unveiled in hetero-biographical ones by close people who were interviewed about that person’s life. The triangulation of data allowed us to access elements of a biography that would otherwise have remained unseen. By taking omissions as units of analysis, we characterised their main features and identified three distinct profiles of omissions using a Multiple Correspondence Analysis: relational, light and taboo. We argue that the act of omitting something is a meaningful social action with implications at both the biographical and analytical levels.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T06:40:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231200253
       
  • The necessary confluence of sociology and social impact assessment in the
           era of global change

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      Authors: Guadalupe Ortiz, Antonio Aledo
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the intrinsic and natural connection between sociology and social impact assessment, the latter often does not hold a prominent place in the academic theory and practice of sociology. This monograph aims to justify and reclaim the rightful position of social impact assessment within the sociological discipline, through the contributions of some of the most renowned international experts in this field. This introductory article reflects on the necessary mutual contribution between sociology and social impact assessment, which, through their epistemological, methodological and axiological dialogues, establish an applied working space aimed at providing solutions for real-world problems. Sociology and social impact assessment must join forces to become agents not only of knowledge production but also of improvement of the living conditions of those in situations of social vulnerability, being this an urgent task in the face of contemporary global changes and growing inequalities.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-09-28T04:56:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231203182
       
  • After 50 years of social impact assessment, is it still fit for
           purpose'

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      Authors: Frank Vanclay
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Social impact assessment is a field of applied social research that is now over 50 years old. With its ongoing evolution in practice and thinking, social impact assessment is a valued part of project development and will continue to be so. Over time, there has been a shift in understanding, from social impact assessment being a regulatory tool to now being the process of managing social issues throughout the life of a project. The range of issues considered has become much wider, now also including human rights. More than a tool or approach, social impact assessment is a discourse, a body of scholars and practitioners, a paradigm, and a philosophy about development and the rights of affected communities. The proper consideration of social impacts is now expected by all project stakeholders and is a requirement of international standards and project financing. There is now recognition of the need for projects to gain and maintain social acceptance, or a social license to operate and grow. Key current issues include: human rights; doing good rather than just doing no harm; benefit-sharing arrangements; Indigenous-led social impact assessment and community-based social impact assessment; and gender, LGBTQI+, two-spirit people, and intersectionality. Social impact assessment is increasingly being used to assist communities in negotiating Impact and Benefit Agreements (or Community Development Agreements).
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-09-28T04:54:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231203189
       
  • Diasporic multiculturalism

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      Authors: Daniel Fittante
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Noting an overreliance on North American and European-based understandings of race and ethnicity, many sociologists have called for research in new spaces. But the same conceptual and regional limitations apply to several other studies. One example of this is multiculturalism. Scholars tend to associate multiculturalism with international migration and ethnic pluralism. As such, they typically study multiculturalism in the most ethnically diverse (and often most affluent) countries – that is, in Europe and North America. But international migration does not always result in ethnic pluralism. For example, diasporic return migration often leads to the convergence of internally diverse co-ethnic populations in ethnically homogeneous nation-states. The diasporic ‘returnees’, who were born outside of their perceived homelands, come through targeted migration policies, face various levels of discrimination, and yet contribute significantly to the economic development and cultural diversity of the countries to which they relocate. As such, this article argues that the multiculturalization of monoethnic nationhood is substantially driven by diasporic return migration. In exploring diasporic multiculturalism, the article draws from data collected in Yerevan, Armenia.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-09-09T06:22:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231194090
       
  • A history of whales in contemporary Brazil: A study of media reports on
           deaths of cetaceans

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      Authors: Janaina Zito Losada
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This essay seeks to understand the sensitive responses of contemporary perspectives and experiences in dealing with whales washed up on beaches killed largely by plastic pollution in our seas and oceans. Identified in Brazilian online mass-circulation periodicals and denounced by environmentally engaged art, the interactions between the bodies of whales and culture are interpreted in the light of studies of the history of human–non-human–animal relationships, human sensibilities triggered by this contact, and media reports denouncing the current environmental crisis and raising awareness of the importance of protecting species, in this case cetaceans. Through the Brazilian periodical press, one can see, in the record of whale deaths, the sensitivity toward non-human animals and the concern with the explanations of this phenomenon.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-08-25T11:05:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231190721
       
  • ‘No way. You will not make [insert country here] home’: Anti-asylum
           discursive transfer from Australia to Europe

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      Authors: Madeleine Geibel, Farida Fozdar, Fiona McGaughey
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses the ways Australia’s overseas ‘public information campaign’ on asylum based around the phrase ‘No way. You will not make Australia home’ has been adopted by far-right movements in Europe. Considering examples of anti-asylum online video campaigns and activism in a range of European countries, we note semiotic and discursive similarities with the Australian campaign. We discuss the implications of such discursive transfer from official Australian government policy to far-right campaigns promoting a blatantly racist agenda in Europe. We also consider the broader question of the fundamental challenge to international law inherent in the promulgation of information that denies the right to seek asylum in Refugee Convention signatory states.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-08-25T10:59:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231194093
       
  • The intellectual biography of Syed Farid Alatas: Hegemonic orientations,
           epistemic decolonisation and the School of Autonomous Knowledge

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      Authors: Leon Moosavi, Syed Farid Alatas
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Syed Farid Alatas is a Malaysian sociologist who has been highly influential in discussions about decolonising knowledge. He has also continued the legacy of his esteemed father, Syed Hussein Alatas, by furthering ‘the School of Autonomous Knowledge’ in the Malay Archipelago and beyond. This article presents a wide-ranging, comprehensive and rich dialogue between Farid and Leon Moosavi. In this conversation, pertinent questions are asked: How does Farid’s approach to decolonising knowledge differ from other decolonial scholars' What exactly does Farid mean when he talks of ‘intellectual imperialism’, ‘alternative discourses’ and ‘academic dependency’' This dialogue also explores Farid’s extensive engagement with the Islamic/Muslim sphere, including topics such as: Ibn Khaldun, Muslim revivalism, Muslim sectarianism and the Islamisation of knowledge. The discussion also explores some potential critiques of Farid’s intellectual contributions with challenging questions: Can Farid’s theoretical ideals be applied in ‘the real world’ or are they confined to an audience of intellectual elites' Is Farid anti-Western' Or, actually, does his work inadvertently fall into the trap of Westerncentrism' This article offers a unique insight into the intellectual biography of one of the most notable social theorists of the current era.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-08-24T05:00:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231194094
       
  • Tragedy does not die: Creativity, emotions, and metaphor of revolution in
           the context of Chinese Revolutionary Drama

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      Authors: Zhang Jingting, Jia Chao
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The decline of tragedy is one of the greatest tragedies of modernity. While many scholars exclaim that tragedy has been dead, Raymond Williams points out that it is not an eternal metaphysical event, but is plural and dynamic, a series of experiences, a tradition. Williams’ rethinking of tragedy provides a historical perspective on the cultural meanings. What matters are the traditions, emotions, and experiences of the time in which the tragedy is set, and the superimposed series of accidents and imbalances that create this type of tragic experience. That is, tragedy is not a static narrative of grief, but a textual creativity. This article will examine this argument in the context of Chinese Revolutionary Drama. The White-Haired Girl (Bai Mao Nv) is a famous tragedy born a hundred years ago in China that depicts the tragic fate of the poor. During the Communist Revolution, it was adapted by the propaganda department of the Communist Party as a tragedy of class oppression and extended to the whole country as a symbol of emotional mobilization. After 1978, the tragedy was forgotten as an outdated revolutionary legacy. However, the experience and texts of the The White-Haired Girl are still active in Chinese social networks today. This complex process is not only historical but also emotional. The aims of this article are the following: (1) to reveal the constructive relationship between creativity, revolution, and emotion; (2) to present the process of interconstruction between tragedy as context and tragedy as metaphor for revolution; and (3) to place creativity in the context of specific cultural and historical changes and observe its dynamic significance.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-08-23T09:50:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231190723
       
  • Extended family collaboration in childcare during the coronavirus
           disease-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Yinni Peng
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The coronavirus disease-19 pandemic and the accompanying public health restrictions have posed significant challenges to parents with dependent children. A rich body of literature has examined the problems encountered by parents and their gendered division of labour in childcare during the pandemic. However, little attention has been paid to their interactions and collaborations with extended family for childcare. Drawing on qualitative interviews with 43 urban parents in Shenzhen, China, I examine how parents mobilised childcare support from extended family during the pandemic, focusing on their collaboration with grandparents. Viewing parenting as a series of interactive and relational practices, I analyse how parents made new childcare arrangements and sought support from extended family to cope with work–childcare conflict and their ambivalence towards family collaboration in childcare during the pandemic. My findings highlight the significance of extended family collaboration for parents to overcome childcare challenges and reveal the embeddedness and relationality of parenting during the coronavirus disease-19 pandemic within extended family.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-08-22T09:23:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231194092
       
  • Farewell to genre: Plot, meaning, and eudaemonic paths in social
           narratives

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      Authors: Todd Madigan
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Narratives, it has been argued, serve to represent, explain, transform, and even constitute the social world. However, efforts to apply narrative theory to the social world have become mired in conceptual ambiguity. The culprit of much of this confusion is the notion of genre, which, as a formal property of social narratives, has become hopelessly confused. Instead, when the study of the social world turns to the formal elements of plot structure, I argue that the analysis of how a protagonist’s state of well-being is emplotted is a far more helpful analytic frame. To this end, I delineate a typology of narratives based on what I call their eudaemonic path (the Greek term eudaemonia capturing the concept of ‘well-being’ more fully than the term happiness) and conclude that eudaemonic paths provide explanatory insight regarding the content that is selected for and omitted from particular social narratives. And it is on this more certain foundation – rather than the slippery footing of so-called genre – that the formal elements of narrative can be said to influence social action and cultural change.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-08-18T12:34:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231190720
       
  • Middle-class responses to climate change: An analysis of the ecological
           habitus of tech workers

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      Authors: Robert Dorschel
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The question of how the digital economy responds to ecological issues has gained salience in recent years. So far, though, social scientists have primarily taken interest in the ecological positionings of tech entrepreneurs. Little attention has been paid to the middle-class fraction of ‘tech workers’ who are responsible for programming, designing, and managing the digital technologies that reconfigure socio-material relations. Based on 52 interviews with data scientists and user experience designers, the article analyzes the ecological habitus of this new professional segment. Four central ecological schemas are identified: (1) managing limited resources, (2) critical techno-optimism, (3) academic concern, and (4) lifestyle struggles. Simultaneously, the article discusses how these four schemas relate to the different forms of capital held by tech workers. This mapping of the ecological habitus of tech workers shows how social relationships with nature are underpinned by class positions. The article thus pursues dual aims, contributing to research on green capitalism as well as to debates on how the middle class relates to climate change.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-08-17T09:08:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231194091
       
  • The power of a look: Tracing webs of power in intimate partner violence
           through an everyday act

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      Authors: Ewa Protasiuk, Alicia Chatterjee, Melissa E Dichter
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The relationship between power, control, and violence defines the experience of intimate partner violence, abuse that occurs within the context of a current or former intimate relationship. Coercive control, including using violence and threats of violence to restrict another’s freedom, is an especially dangerous manifestation of intimate partner violence. In this article, we point to an under-explored modality of power and control as well as resistance to intimate partner violence: the act of looking. Our analysis of interviews with 18 intimate partner violence survivors in the United States identified ‘looking’ as an emergent category in their experiences. We read these mentions of ‘looking’ through select insights from symbolic interactionism, post-structuralism, and postcolonial studies. We argue that acts of looking are everyday mechanisms for both the contestation and the maintenance of power and control in survivors’ lives, highlighting dynamics of intimate partner violence that extend beyond physical violence. Paying attention to everyday forms of interaction like looking helps illuminate the webs of power in which survivors’ intimate relationships are situated, including at the social and institutional levels. Tracing the ‘looks’ of survivors also underscores both the social nature of abusive intimate power and the social embeddedness of survivor healing.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-08-14T04:59:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231194095
       
  • Creativity, transcendence, and social constellations

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      Authors: Celso Sánchez-Capdequi, Josetxo Beriain
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      As happens in the very notion of social creativity that presents itself objectified in different figures over time, in the same way the types of transcendence -as condition of posibility of creativity- change over time. We are going to analyze four socio-historical constellations of the creativity-transcendence binomial: The first of them is the one represented by a myth-ritual structure embodied by Homo Sapiens in primitive cultures; the second of them is the one that arises 500 B.C. ago with the “axial revolution” in China, India, Iran, Palestine and Greece supported by new carriers of creative action; the third of them is configured at the beginning of modernity in the 18th century, with the Protestant Reformation and immediately afterwards with the Enlightenment and Romanticism, supported by new carriers of creative action; the fourth constellation of creativity-transcendence emerges today with the convergence of technologies - nanotechnology, biotechnology, Big Data and Artificial Intelligence - where the sense of human nature as a vector within a hybrid cognitive collectivity made up of humans and things is altered.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-08-14T04:52:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231190714
       
  • Everyday utopias and social reproduction

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      Authors: Suvi Salmenniemi, Hanna Ylöstalo
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses reproductive labour in everyday utopias. Everyday utopias refer to spaces and practices that experiment with alternative forms of life and create new social imaginaries. Drawing on ethnographic research in three everyday utopias in Finland, the article argues that labour plays a key role in transformative politics by prefiguring socially and ecologically sustainable forms of life not conducive to capitalist logic. The article brings together feminist social reproduction theory and utopian studies to shed light on different forms of reproductive labour in everyday utopias. It identifies four forms of labour: manual, affective, mnemonic and experimental. In particular, experimental labour foregrounds the importance of everyday utopias as sites of political imagination in which novel forms of life are actively developed and tried out. The article concludes by suggesting that everyday utopias subvert conventional understandings and practices of labour and social reproduction.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-08-11T04:54:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231194087
       
  • From ascetic individualism to the dissolution of the self: A sociological
           approach to the religious symbolism of Chicago and New York skyscrapers

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      Authors: Juan Antonio Roche Cárcel, Angel Enrique Carretero Pasin
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article seeks to determine the link between the symbolic profile of North American skyscrapers and the features of North American culture, emphasizing the parallelism followed in the evolution of both. For this purpose, it resorts to a comprehensive or interpretative sociology combined with an incipient sociology of skyscrapers as a theoretical–methodological basis, complemented in turn with the notions of creativity and symbolism, resources through which the nuclear myths on which North American culture is sustained would become visible. The work reveals how the transformations in the style followed by American skyscrapers maintain a close relationship with the process of collapse of the original values proclaimed by American capitalism. So that the aesthetics characterized by a rationalist abstraction, perfectly fitted in the inaugural ascetic values of this first capitalism, would give way to an aesthetics of evanescent sign where an individuated consideration of the self would be given preeminence. In this sense, the work discovers how the symbology carried on the skyscrapers constitutes a first-level observatory in order to evidence the mutations that took place in the North American religiosity.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-08-10T09:19:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231190718
       
  • A sociological genealogy of transcendence

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      Authors: Javier Gil-Gimeno, Maya Aguiluz Ibargüen
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this article is to carry out a sociological genealogy of transcendence – understood as a condition of possibility of creativity – articulated from three milestones in its conceptual evolution: The first focuses on the study of the link between transcendence and religiosity in the scenario of primitive societies. We will stop to study how, as Émile Durkheim shows in The Elementary Forms of Religious Life, in this type of society transcendence acted and was articulated mainly through two types of mechanisms: ritual and collective effervescence. The second milestone is established theoretically on the basis of the analysis of transcendence carried out by Hans Joas, in his work The Power of the Sacred, and by Georg Simmel, in ‘Life as Transcendence’. For the former, transcendence is sacredness that becomes reflexive, while for the latter, transcendence is the essence of social life, and implies an exercise of going beyond oneself. In this second moment in the sociological evolution of transcendence we focus on its reflexive dimension, linked to the fact that, since the emergence of the Axial era (800-200 BC), the subject becomes an object for itself, a problem to which answers must be given, whether in terms of soteriology or truth. The third milestone analyzes what we can call ‘variable geometries of transcendence’, and for its study we take as a reference the typology of transcendences articulated by Alfred Schutz and Thomas Luckmann in their work The Structures of Social Life (vol. 2), which unfolds around three categories: ‘Little Transcendencies’, ‘Medium Transcendencies’ and ‘Great Transcendencies’. In this scenario, the sociological key is provided not so much by the decline of the formulas of religious transcendence, but by the coexistence of different and heterogeneous formulas of transcendence (secular and religious) that struggle to obtain a voice and social recognition in the civil sphere.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-08-03T04:41:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231190724
       
  • If unequal, don’t change it' The inequality-redistribution
           puzzle among political elites

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      Authors: Cristian Márquez Romo, Hugo Marcos-Marne
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite accumulated empirical evidence suggesting that economic inequality influences citizens’ redistributive preferences, evidence of this relationship among political elites remains scarce. This study aims at filling this gap using an elite survey data set of more than 2300 legislators from Latin America, a region with the highest levels of inequality in the world. We first examine the general association between economic inequality and political elites’ redistributive preferences. In a second step, we focus on the conditional effect of self-positioning in the left–right ideological scale. Our findings suggest a modest negative longitudinal association between economic inequality and legislators’ support for redistribution. In line with our expectations, right-wing and market-oriented legislators are less prone to support redistribution when inequality increases. However, we also find this pattern among left-wing and State-oriented members of parliament. Implications and limitations of our results are considered in the discussion section.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-07-17T07:06:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231186447
       
  • Justifying contentious social and political claims using mundane language:
           An analysis of Canadian right-wing extremism

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      Authors: Kayla Preston
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      There has been a lack of research examining how right-wing extremist groups justify their key claims online to reach a broader audience. This question is even more worrisome when considering a Canadian context, given Canada’s state policies on multiculturalism and intolerance of hateful rhetoric. My research draws on the gaps within the literature of right-wing extremism, online spaces, and justification of discourse by conducting a content analysis of 300 Facebook and Twitter posts from the accounts of three Canadian right-wing extremist groups, ID Canada, Soldiers of Odin BC, and Yellow Vests Canada. This article proposes the use of French theorist Boltanski and Thévenot’s sociology of critical capacity common worlds to help explain how right-wing extremist groups make arguments that are quite extreme to a broad audience of people on social media. Such claims include advocating for a homogenized Canadian identity and Canadian values, promoting a belief in social decay, and supporting authoritarianism. However, these claims are not overt; rather right-wing extremist groups discuss apolitical topics to mask controversial views.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-06-26T05:13:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231182183
       
  • LGBT+ ballroom dancers and their shoes: Fashioning the queer self into
           existence

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      Authors: Yen Nee Wong
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the role of dance shoes in LGBT+ ballroom dancers’ identity formation and expression on the dancefloor. Applying Entwistle’s (2015) ‘situated bodily practice’ to an analysis of ethnographic field notes and 35 interviews, I highlight that dancers’ performative constitution of subversive identities through reiterative mobilisation of the traditional symbolic values of dance shoes is influenced by the material. The article makes a key contribution to sociological knowledge on performativity through an introduction of materialities of place, bodies and artefacts into a close reading of reiterative acts. I argue that a closer look into performative acts is necessary for determining whether and how resistance is constituted, recognised and reproduced, taking into account how materialities interweave with discourse in order to give credit to subversive agents emerging in the micro-moments.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-06-26T05:04:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231182182
       
  • Voices of emergency: Imagined climate futures and forms of collective
           action

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      Authors: Anna Clot-Garrell
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Sociological debates on the mobilising force of imagined futures are particularly relevant in our present context of climate emergency, where the claim-making of a ‘threatened future’ has come to the fore in civic mobilisations worldwide. This article addresses these debates by empirically examining how adverse views of the future underpinning present thematisations of climate change as an emergency shape collective action. Based upon qualitative research conducted in Barcelona on new climate movements, I analyse the content and form of two imagined futures (‘catastrophe’ and ‘collapse’) that emerge from the ways in which participants of Extinction Rebellion and Fridays for Future engage with the future and climate. This analysis shows how these imagined futures are reflected in individual imaginations and processed by these movements, infusing different forms of agency and impacting trajectories of action in the present. This empirically grounded focus on imagined climate futures reveals that not only are cognitions of climate risks crucial, but so are the emotions that these produce in configuring collective action. Likewise, this study highlights how even disastrous imagined climate futures include utopian impulses for sustainable futures as both a driver and result of collective action.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-06-26T04:59:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231182179
       
  • Ticket inspectors use emotion displays of sympathy and dominance to manage
           status dynamics in passenger encounters

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      Authors: Camilla Bank Friis
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Research shows that people use emotions to manage service encounters. Little research has examined how rule enforcers manage status with different emotion displays. This article conceptualizes emotion displays as defensive and protective strategies to study how rule enforcers use emotions to control status dynamics in contested encounters. Based on 30 body-worn camera-recorded ticket-fining events and 11 interviews, the analysis shows that inspectors use emotion strategies of displaying dominance and giving and claiming sympathy to manage situations and negotiate status. Feeling rules prescribe inspectors to avoid conflict escalation and personal investment, yet rule enforcement involves interpersonal contests with emotional tension that makes emotional investment difficult to avoid. The findings yield insights into microprocesses of emotion management with an appreciation of the strategic use of emotion displays and their relation to micro-level status dynamics. The article discusses the prospects of studying the microprocesses of negotiating status and its methodological implications.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T09:48:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231176582
       
  • ‘Class and “Race”. . . the two antinomic poles of a permanent
           dialectic’: Racialization, racism and resistance in Japan

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      Authors: Zaheer Baber
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the pervasive social constructivist turn, regardless of some exceptions, discussions of race, racialization and racism continue to focus on the relatively essentialist White/non-White binary. In this article, I move from the White/non-White binary to consider the dynamics and practices of racialization, racism and racial conflicts in Japan where there are no phenotypical distinctions between the dominant and the main racialized minority groups – the Burakumin, the Ainu, the Okinawans, the Zainichi Koreans and the Chinese. The main argument made in this article is that in Japan, class and power inequalities generated by colonialism, the division of labour, adoption and the deployment of the dominant Western 19th-century discourse of ‘scientific racism’ contributed to ‘racial formations’, ‘racial projects’ and the construction of the racialized boundaries that fuelled and continue to compete over material and non-material resources. A historical sociology of the permanent dialectic between class and race in Japan is offered in this article.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-04-28T05:33:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231166146
       
  • Can a colonial flag become a banner for democracy' The Case of the Dragon
           and Lion flag and the 2019 Hong Kong protests

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      Authors: Filipe Carreira da Silva, Julius Maximilian Rogenhofer
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Why did Hong Kong protestors choose a symbol of former oppression – the old colonial flag – as a banner for their fight for democracy, rights and autonomy in 2019' We propose to answer this puzzle by studying the colonial-era flag as a displacement device. The waving of the colonial-era flag is shown to induce non-linear temporal and extraterritorial displacements, as well as contradictory interpretations of Hong Kong’s core values, national sovereignty and cultural identity. The flag’s displacements are amplified against the contested colonial history of the former British enclave. Conceptually, this pragmatic definition of the flag moves beyond approaches that study flags as representations of a structure of symbolic meaning. The flag is neither an unimportant prop nor is it a free-floating signifier; its materiality elicits significant political effects. Methodologically, this translates into an exploration of the flag’s second-order agency. The old colonial-era Hong Kong flag, in combination with discourse and institutional arrangements, is shown to be integral to contentious politics. The flag and its displacements shed new light on a city uneasy with its past, dissatisfied with its present and uncertain about its future.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-04-26T05:25:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231170649
       
  • Police violence, corrupt cops, and the repudiation of stigma among
           underclass residents in Mexico City

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      Authors: Roger S Guy, Piotr A Chomczyński
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The relationship between police corruption and violence is well established in Latin America. Those with less power in poor communities often adapt their actions to serve their group interests in response to constraints placed on them by law enforcement. Using ethnographic and qualitative methods, we probe the effect of corrupt police behavior on the stigma of arrest and imprisonment by members of impoverished neighborhoods in Mexico City. Using an interpretive approach, we find that widespread corruption and police violence has indirectly mitigated the negative effects of the stigma or arrest and incarceration by what we term the repudiation of stigma. For the subjects in our study, the adjustment to pervasive corruption has led amelioration of the social stigma associated with arrest and incarceration among those with whom they share similar biographies of experience. More generally, repudiation of stigma highlights the ability of the marginalized to deflect the social consequences of being arrested and having a criminal record.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-04-21T09:05:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231166148
       
  • Replace, absorb, serve: Data scientists talk about their aspired
           jurisdiction

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      Authors: Netta Avnoon
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      How do data scientists frame their relations with domain experts' This study focuses on data scientists’ aspired professional jurisdiction and their multiple narratives regarding data science’s relations to other fields of expertise. Based on the analysis of 60 open-ended, in-depth interviews with data scientists, data science professors, and managers in Israel, the findings show that data scientists institutionalize three narratives regarding their relations with domain experts: (a) replace experts, (b) absorb experts’ knowledge, and (c) provide a service to experts. These three narratives construct data scientists’ expertise as universal and omnivorous; namely, they are relevant to many domains and allow data scientists to be flexible in their claim for authority.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-04-19T05:21:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231166147
       
  • Reflections on racialisation’s impact on research: Insights from a study
           of Muslim radicalisation in Norway

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      Authors: Uzair Ahmed
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Sociologists have studied the causes and consequences of collectively blaming and negatively portraying Muslims, but less attention has been paid to how collective blaming and negative descriptions affect researchers’ categorisations of such vilified groups. Drawing on 22 months of fieldwork with Muslim men in Norway, I elucidate how racialisation can influence interactions in field research when studying a controversial subject with a racialised group. I identify three patterns in which racialisation affects field interactions: accepting a racialising view, defending the racialised group and developing a shared story between a researcher and participants. I argue that, in this case, desires to present positive views of Islam and Muslims, attempts to distance oneself from religious extremism and attempts to categorise radicalised Muslims as neither Norwegians nor Muslims illustrate racialisation’s influence. My findings suggest that racialised understandings enter field interactions but remain opaque unless the researcher reflects upon their own and participants’ positionality and membership in a racialised group. I conclude that shared experiences of racialisation between a researcher and the participants deepen the researcher’s understanding while limiting enquiry.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-04-01T09:39:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231162395
       
  • Making military conscription count' Converting competencies between the
           civilian and military spheres in a neoliberal Estonia

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      Authors: Eleri Lillemäe, Kairi Kasearu, Eyal Ben-Ari
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      While past decades Western societies have been shifting from mandatory military service toward all-volunteer forces, a number of them have retained conscription. A growing emphasis on individualization and neoliberalist ideas results in a tension for youths between fulfilling a duty and the need for constant self-development. We argue that a central mechanism for addressing this challenge is convertibility, the ability to use competencies gained in one sphere in another, and thus increasing the individual value of conscription for recruits. By linking convertibility to societal expectations, we demonstrate how societies shape ideas of what is convertible and why, and by relating convertibility to agency and motivation, we extend the concept to the individual level. We argue that as material rewards are limited and conscripts cannot rely on occupational motivations, convertibility has a potential to increase the value of conscription for recruits and enable them to combine institutional motivators with utilitarian motives.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-03-13T12:22:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231159433
       
  • Pandemic racism and sexism in Australia: Responses and reflections among
           Asian women

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      Authors: Sylvia Ang, Jay Song, Qiuping Pan
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Since the COVID-19 pandemic, studies have emerged to address either racism or women’s issues. Studies that address the intersection of pandemic racism and sexism are lacking and the experiences of Asian women have been neglected. Drawing on interviews with 20 Asian women living in Victoria, Australia, this article aims to bridge the gap between studies of pandemic racism and the issues women faced during the pandemic. The article’s intervention is threefold, we ask: first, how have Asian women in Australia experienced racism' Second, how have their experiences of racism intersected with sexism' Third, how do they make sense of their experiences and thoughts about the future' Our analysis argues three points: first, the lack of attention to Asian women’s experiences of racism obscures the fact that Asian women can encounter racism more than their male counterparts. Second, the lack of attention to how sexism intersects with Asian women’s experiences of racism causes them the inability to make sense of their experiences and prevents them from stopping mistreatment. Third, participants’ reflections show that there is potential for women of colour in general to form coalitions based on sharing intersectionality and offer valuable insights for feminist and antiracist studies and initiatives.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-03-11T05:23:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231159432
       
  • Brokering immigrant transnationalism: Remittances, family reunification,
           and private refugee sponsorship in neoliberal Canada

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Emine Fidan Elcioglu, Tahseen Shams
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Using the case study of Canada’s private refugee sponsorship program, we show how neoliberalization heightens the power of non-immigrant civilians to broker immigrants’ transnationalism. Private sponsors respond differently to two common and interrelated forms of refugee transnationalism in which they are structurally empowered to intervene. They encourage family reunification while discouraging remittances, although the former often depends on the fulfillment of the latter. Reflecting on these power imbalances, we classify private refugee sponsorship as part of a North American trend to devolve the management of noncitizens from state actors to ordinary citizens. We conclude by encouraging scholars of transnationalism to look down and investigate how non-immigrant private civilians in receiving countries increasingly shape newcomers’ cross-border linkages. We also urge them to look up and attend to the broader neoliberal context empowering and structuring the behavior of citizen brokers.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-02-22T12:34:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921231155652
       
  • Self-optimisation: Conceptual, discursive and historical perspectives

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      Authors: Daniel Nehring, Anja Röcke
      Abstract: Current Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Self-optimisation has arguably become a central socio-cultural trend in contemporary Western societies. The imperative to optimise our ways of thinking, feeling and interacting with others features prominently in public discourse, and a range of commercial products and services are available to assist us in our quest to become the best version of our selves. However, self-optimisation has so far received scant attention in sociological research. Addressing this knowledge gap, we aim to introduce self-optimisation as a concept for sociological analysis. We first situate self-optimisation in several closely linked strands of academic debate, on transformations of self-identity under conditions of globalisation and neo-liberal capitalism, and on the spread of a therapeutic culture. We then map the socio-cultural antecedents of self-optimisation, survey its rise as a salient public discourse and as a form of everyday practice and consider some political implications. In the conclusion, we set out an agenda for further research on self-optimisation and discuss its conceptual and empirical relevance beyond the Global Northwest.
      Citation: Current Sociology
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T11:43:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00113921221146575
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 382 Journals sorted by number of followers
American Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 382)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 303)
Annual Review of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 271)
Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 192)
Social Forces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 91)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 77)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Anthropological Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Comparative Studies in Society and History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 57)
The British Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Current Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Qualitative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Sociological Methods & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Critical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
International Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
European Journal of Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of European Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Contemporary Sociology : A Journal of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
The Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
AlterNative : An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Sociological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Critical Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Games and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Judgment and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Sociolinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Rural Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Ethnicities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sociology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
African and Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sociological Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
The Sociological Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Cities in the 21st Century     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Family & Community History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Studies in Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Research in Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sociological Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Comparative Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Health Sociology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Philosophy & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sociology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Berliner Journal für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Teaching Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Global Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sociological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sport in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Symbolic Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Chinese Sociology & Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Classical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sociological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Review of Sociology / Revue Canadienne De Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Sociologia Ruralis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Clio. Femmes, Genre, Histoire - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cultures & conflits     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Studies in Latin American Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
East Central Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sociological Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Political Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Sociology / Cahiers canadiens de sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Anthropologie et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Prevention & Intervention Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Sociologie du Travail     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Sociology: Revue Internationale de Sociologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Ateliers d'anthropologie     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sociolinguistic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Race/Ethnicity : Multidisciplinary Global Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Sociological Research Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Japanese Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Critical Realism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Surveillance and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Nordic Journal of Migration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cuban Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
New Zealand Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Mathematical Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Pacific     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Critical Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aztlan : A Journal of Chicano Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Italian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ethnologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Études françaises     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Social Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sociological Spectrum: Mid-South Sociological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Dynamics: A journal of African studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Law and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Good Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sociologie et sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Public and Professional Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue de la régulation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SociologieS - Articles     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Seminar : A Journal of Germanic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Ethnic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Enfances, Familles, Générations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sociology Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
COnTEXTES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue Internationale De Securite Sociale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Política y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Landscapes of Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access  
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern Cultures     Full-text available via subscription  
Liinc em Revista     Open Access  
World Cultures eJournal     Open Access  
Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access  
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Socio-logos     Open Access  

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Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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