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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 401 - 382 of 382 Journals sorted alphabetically
Tla-Melaua : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Trajecta : Religion, Culture and Society in the Low Countries     Open Access  
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Transposition : Musique et sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Travail et Emploi     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
TRIM. Tordesillas : Revista de investigación multidisciplinar     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Valuation Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vlast' (The Authority)     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Future Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  

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Social Currents
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.968
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2329-4965 - ISSN (Online) 2329-4973
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • An Updated Data Portrait of Heterosexual, Gay/Lesbian, Bisexual, and Other
           Sexual Minorities in the United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lawrence Stacey
      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.
      Sexual minorities are a rapidly growing population, with recent estimates showing a two-fold increase in the percentage of sexual minorities over the past decade. Working with relatively few measures to identify sexual minorities, social scientists have amassed an impressive amount of evidence on inequality by sexuality. Despite this remarkable work, I argue that it is important to take a step back analytically and re-assess sexual minorities from a descriptive standpoint. Using population-level data from the CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, I provide unadjusted estimates of sociodemographic, socioeconomic, and family characteristics by sexual identity. Results reveal that sexual minorities are younger, are more racially diverse, and concentrate in different parts of the country than heterosexuals. Similarly, sexual minorities have remarkably different socioeconomic lives than heterosexuals, who enjoy higher annual household incomes, achieve higher educational attainment, and are more likely to be homeowners. Sexual minorities are also less likely to be married than heterosexuals. I conclude by highlighting that descriptive research can illuminate compositional differences between sexual minorities and heterosexuals; provide rationales for adjusting for certain characteristics that might confound relationships between sexual identity and numerous outcomes; and highlight potential explanatory mechanisms to make better sense of well-established findings regarding sexual minority disadvantage.
      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-06-22T10:52:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241260057
       
  • How Did Telecommuting Fathers Navigate Work and Family Responsibilities
           During the First Year of the COVID-19 Pandemic'

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      Authors: Angela K. Clague
      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.
      The global outbreak of COVID-19 abruptly upended work and family life. Yet, little is known about how fathers combined paid and unpaid labor during this unprecedented historical period. Drawing on 35 semi-structured interviews with fathers who primarily telecommuted from home, I identify four strategies fathers used to combine paid and domestic labor: interim primary caregiving, egalitarian tag-teaming, transitional tag-teaming, and hands-on traditional fathering. Findings suggest that these work-family strategies primarily depended on wives’ physical presence in the home. The fathers who described doing the most domestic labor said their wives worked outside of the home. When wives were physically present in the home, fathers’ domestic behavior varied by the extent to which they endorsed the new fatherhood ideal—defining good fathering as involvement in both paid and domestic labor. Yet, change in fathers’ domestic behavior was limited. None of the fathers I interviewed described doing most of the domestic labor when their wives were physically present at home. Taken together, fathers’ domestic behavior depends on wives’ physical presence in the home and their normative perception of men’s responsibility to the family, suggesting that fathers do not perceive domestic time availability simply by differences in the couple’s paid work hours.
      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-06-15T11:19:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241262218
       
  • The Health Benefits of Extended Union Membership Among Women: A Family
           Status Perspective

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      Authors: Clifford Ross
      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.
      Workers in labor unions have better access to high-quality health insurance plans, better pensions, and higher wages leading to increased lifetime earnings likely leading to better health. Additionally, much of the gendered hiring, promotion, and wage discrimination faced by women in the workplace is dependent on social characteristics (marital status and/or their status as a mother). While many of the benefits associated with union membership can potentially buffer the gendered workplace inequalities that lead to poorer health outcomes, unions have been largely ignored in health disparities literature. Using 28 waves of data (N = 3,409) from The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, this study creates a lifetime “union tenure” variable, tests its relationship to midlife physical and mental health, and tests ways in which motherhood and marital status may moderate this relationship. Findings suggest that long-term union membership is associated with better physical health among mothers but does not have a significant benefit for women without children. Further, in fully controlled models, this relationship is not dependent on marital status and both married and unmarried mothers see a union tenure health benefit. This study provides insight into how union membership may play a role in improving the midlife health of working mothers.
      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-06-14T02:16:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241262219
       
  • Corrigendum to Who Authors Social Science' Demographics and the
           Production of Knowledge

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-06-07T04:41:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241259238
       
  • Embodied Injustice: Comparing Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer and
           Heterosexual Women’s Accounts of Unwanted Sex

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      Authors: Jessie V. Ford, Aarushi Shah, Gloria Fortuna, Jennifer S. Hirsch
      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.
      Lesbian, bisexual, and queer (LBQ) women experience disproportionately high rates of unwanted sex, including sexual assault. The literature has noted LBQ women's elevated risk for sexual victimization compared to heterosexual women, but little research has compared LBQ women's processing of sexual violations to those of heterosexual women. To address this gap, this article examines accounts of unwanted sex among 20 LBQ and 38 heterosexual college women (57 cisgender; 1 transwoman). We use both studies of embodiment and queer theory to understand socially patterned differences between LBQ and heterosexual women’s accounts of unwanted sex. Our findings indicate that heterosexual women’s multiple experiences with men (violent and not) often lead to explanations of sexual violations focused on men’s individual characteristics, for example, certain men are better/worse than others. In contrast, LBQ women’s experiences with women/non-binary partners produce a broader critique of heterosexuality. We find suggestive evidence that this difference helps LBQ women move away from self-blame toward a position of naming injustice.
      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T06:03:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241254071
       
  • “Troubled” Meanings: An Affect Control Theory Exploration of the
           Conflict in Northern Ireland

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      Authors: Benjamin C. Fields, Justin Huft
      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.
      The Troubles in Northern Ireland ranks among the most violent periods in recent history. While social movements scholars have long sought to understand the conflict, often they do not include micro-level approaches. We use affect control theory and cultural meanings among Catholics gathered at the height of The Troubles to create prototypical group members and then simulate interactions across and between groups. Using cultural meanings gathered at a Catholic high school in Belfast in 1977, we find that Catholic (in-group) identities hold more positive meanings than Protestant identities. This remains true for identities within the paramilitary organizations and non-combatant identities. However, we find that the meanings of combatant identities are much lower in evaluation—a measure of goodness—than non-combatant identities. Our simulations suggest that interactions between groups are expected to be relatively innocuous. However, we do find that, in simulations, combatants—on both sides of the conflict—are expected to interact negatively with others. These findings and the methods we use suggest future avenues for both researchers and policymakers to better understand conflict and peacemaking.
      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-05-15T05:03:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241254057
       
  • Who Authors Social Science' Demographics and the Production of
           Knowledge

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      Authors: Jeffrey W. Lockhart, Molly M. King, Christin Munsch
      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.
      Author demographics are of key epistemic importance in science—shaping the approaches to and contents of research—especially in social scientific knowledge production, yet we know very little about who produces social scientific publications. We fielded an original demographic survey of nearly 20,000 sociology, economics, and communication authors in the Web of Science from 2016–2020. Our results include not only details about gender and race/ethnicity but also the first descriptive statistics on social science authors’ sexuality, disability, parental education, and employment characteristics. We find authorship in the social sciences looks very different from other measures of disciplinary membership like who holds PhDs or faculty positions. For example, half of the authors in each discipline’s journals say that they are not a member of the discipline in which they published. Moreover, social science authors are considerably less diverse than other measures of disciplinary membership. In sociology, women constitute a majority of PhDs, faculty, and American Sociological Association members; by contrast, men make up a majority of sociology’s authors. Additionally, we include a wide array of descriptive statistics across a range of demographic characteristics, which will be of interest to inequality scholars, science scholars, and social scientists engaged in diversifying their disciplines.
      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-04-30T12:33:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241246805
       
  • Remote Work Penalties: Work Location and Career Rewards

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      Authors: Stephanie Moller, Jill E. Yavorsky, Leah Ruppanner, Joseph Dippong
      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.
      Remote, home-based work has long been devalued in the United States as it is associated with flexible work, disproportionately pursued by women, and a violation of ideal worker norms. The shutdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic created a scenario where a large proportion of professional/white-collar workers experienced remote work; and workers and managers witnessed the potential for continued productivity. This potentially shifted managers’ perceptions of remote work, no longer signaling deviance from the ideal worker norm. Conversely, it may still trigger workplace penalties, despite wider adoption during the pandemic. Understanding these perceptions is important, especially for workers with young children who disproportionately access remote work. This study tests competing explanations for productive employees with young children through a survey experiment that assesses whether managers perceive that managers (i.e., their peers) (1) are equally supportive of remote and in-person employment; (2) think that rewards should be allocated differently in light of work location; and (3) impose different performance expectations in light of work location. We find that managers perceive that peers allocate higher rewards to in-person workers. This is partially explained by different perceptions of leadership, work commitment, and to a lesser extent competence. We do not find gender effects.
      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T08:39:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241240784
       
  • Private Eyes, They See Your Every Move: Workplace Surveillance and Worker
           Well-Being

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      Authors: Paul Glavin, Alex Bierman, Scott Schieman
      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.
      Despite a surge in the number of organizations using surveillance technology to monitor their workers, understanding of the health impacts of these technologies in the broader working population is limited. The current study addresses this omission using a novel measure of an individual’s overall perception of workplace surveillance, which enables it to be asked of all workers, rather than only those in specific occupations or work contexts that have historically been vulnerable to electronic performance monitoring. Structural equation modeling analyses based on a national sample of Canadian workers (N = 3,508) reveal that surveillance perceptions are indirectly associated with increased psychological distress and lower job satisfaction through stress proliferation. Findings demonstrate that the negative consequences of surveillance are explained by its positive association with three secondary work stressors: job pressures, reduced autonomy, and privacy violations. In the case of psychological distress, these stressors fully mediate a positive association with surveillance. The relationship between surveillance and job satisfaction is more complex, however, with the indirect effects of stress proliferation balanced out by a positive direct effect of surveillance on satisfaction. These results support the use of a stress process framework to examine how surveillance impacts worker well-being through stress proliferation.
      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-03-28T11:08:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241228874
       
  • Love as a Low Priority: Gender and Relationship History Differences in
           Singles’ Value of Romantic Partnership

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      Authors: Hannah Tessler, Meera Choi, Grace Kao
      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.
      This study uses original data from the Dynamics of Social Life During COVID-19 Survey (DSL-COVID) to examine the importance of romantic partnership among heterosexual single adults in the United States. We find that almost 40 percent of single adults report that having a long-term committed romantic relationship is “not at all important” to their lives. However, the importance of finding a romantic partner varies by gender and prior relationship experience. Compared to women with no prior romantic relationships, women who have been in a committed romantic relationship or have been married before are more likely to report having a romantic partner is not at all important. In contrast, men who have been in a committed romantic relationship are more likely to report that having a romantic partner is at least somewhat important compared to men with no relationship experience. Prior experience with romantic relationships is associated with lower value of romantic partnership for women, but a higher value of romantic partnership for men. These results have implications for union formation, as singles exhibit heterogeneous romantic relationship preferences. Future research on union formation should consider how singles value traditional romantic partnership and further explore how gender relates to dating and relationship decisions.
      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-03-20T11:07:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241240781
       
  • The Downstream Consequences of Race-Related Managerial Job Insecurity:
           Insights From College Basketball Coaching

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      Authors: Scott V. Savage, Ryan Seebruck, Sloan Rucker
      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.
      We examine how in men’s college basketball coaching, race-related managerial job insecurity trickles down to negatively affect the careers of the subordinates who work for them. Using panel data from a randomly selected group of assistant basketball coaches working under the most prestigious and endowed governing body of collegiate sports in the United States—the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I (DI)—we find that, in men’s college basketball coaching, subordinate White coaches are less likely to be involuntarily dismissed than their non-White, predominantly Black, counterparts because non-White subordinates disproportionately work for racially minoritized, predominantly Black, head coaches who themselves face greater job insecurity. We also find involuntary dismissal correlates with whether assistant coaches leave the ranks of NCAA DI men’s college basketball coaching and explains the significant interaction between race and a teams’ performance relative to their respective conferences. These findings illustrate how race-related managerial job insecurity trickles down to negatively affect the job opportunities of their subordinates and, because of homophily, perpetuates racial disadvantage.
      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-03-04T05:33:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241237261
       
  • Cultures of Inequality: Labor, Social Finance, and the Swinging Pendulum
           of Trust in Capitalism

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      Authors: Elisabetta Magnani
      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.
      Social finance, an arena of international finance comprising social banking, impact investing, and microfinance, offers a powerful conceptual lens through which to interrogate the interface of finance and labor in financial capitalism. This article investigates social finance’s development at the crossroad of two processes. Social finance emerged in the context of a process of laboring finance, an often-coercive inclusion of workers and households into financial circuits of accumulation and expansion made possible by labor market changes that began in the 1970s. The global financial crisis occasioned the growth of social finance, which, by means of financing labor, placed the reproductive needs of labor—the needs of society’s most disadvantaged agents, the poor, the homeless, the marginal, and unemployed workers—at the center of financial accumulation. By informing an oscillatory movement between laboring finance and financing labor, and, affectively, between trust and distrust, social finance primes and cultivates financial market participants’ belief in purported solutions to the social problems financial capitalism has contributed to create. As a critical investigation of the complex interface between finance and labor that animates social finance’s operations, this article aims to provide conceptual resources that can contribute to releasing labor’s social cooperation from finance’s hegemony.
      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-02-28T12:09:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241235136
       
  • Ruled by the Demons' Exploring the Relationship Between Belief in Demons
           and Public Attitudes Toward Donald Trump and Joe Biden

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      Authors: Fanhao Nie
      Abstract: Social Currents, Ahead of Print.
      Beliefs in supernatural evils are prevalent among many religions. Prior research has shown that beliefs in supernatural evils were tied to various social and health outcomes. However, much less is known about the political implications of beliefs in supernatural evils. To fill this research void, a national survey of 1,092 adults with oversamples of respondents of Asian or Hispanic heritage was conducted in March 2023. The findings suggest that a stronger belief in demons or evil spirits was associated with more negative views toward President Joe Biden. This demonic effect was robust even after controlling for a variety of religious and sociodemographic variables. Besides being robust, the demonic effect was the strongest among all religiosity measures. In contrast, a main relationship between a stronger belief in demons and greater support for Donald Trump was found. However, this demonic effect was explained by Christian nationalism. Finally, these demonic effects vary based on one’s political party identity.
      Citation: Social Currents
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T03:49:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23294965241228875
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
Showing 401 - 382 of 382 Journals sorted alphabetically
Tla-Melaua : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Tracés     Open Access  
Trajecta : Religion, Culture and Society in the Low Countries     Open Access  
Transatlantica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Transposition : Musique et sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Travail et Emploi     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
TRIM. Tordesillas : Revista de investigación multidisciplinar     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Valuation Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Vlast' (The Authority)     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
World Future Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Religion, Gesellschaft und Politik     Hybrid Journal  

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