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  Subjects -> SOCIOLOGY (Total: 553 journals)
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Journal of Social Development in Africa
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1012-1080
Published by African Journals Online Homepage  [261 journals]
  • Editorial: Journal of Social Development in Africa Volume 36 No.1 School
           of Social Work (Midlands State University) Corner Chinhoyi & Grant Street,
           Harare

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      Authors: Victor N. Muzvidziwa
      Pages: 3 - 8
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Disaster Response Feasibility: Poverty and Inequality as Sources of
           Community Fragility during Covid-19 Lockdown in Zimbabwe

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      Authors: Kwashirai Zvokuomba, Itai Kabonga
      Pages: 9 - 32
      Abstract: Influenza pandemics of Covid-19 in nature are not a new phenomenon in the world today. Amongst many that affected many parts  of the world, the Spanish flue of 1918-1919 was more devastating and is argued to have similar characteristics with Covid -19  outbreak in 2020. The study sought to critically examine how urban communities which already had levels of fragility were affected and responded to the Covid -19. Deploying an ethnographic approach in the high density suburbs of Harare, guided by Giddens  theory of structuration and agency, we argue that due to the already existing level of fragility characterised by high poverty levels, overcrowded accommodation and other fragile systems, Covid-19 lockdown measures worsened the state of communities. Whilst residence of the low density suburbs responded differently to the lockdown, the high density suburbs were characterised by scrambling for water at communal water points, daily queuing for basic food thereby exposing themselves to infections and conflict with law enforcement agents. The paper argues that with the dominance of the informal economy as a source of livelihoods, the lockdown measures compromised not only people's livelihoods but the generic socio-political and economic frameworks. Thus the study concluded that Covid-19 lockdown measures were unbearable and unsustainable such that they forced people to deploy various strategies of survival as 'agency', hence, the lockdown pushed the urban poor into the margins.
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • The Socio-economic Effects Of Covid-19 Lockdown in Nigeria: Implications
           on Micro and Macro Economy

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      Authors: Francisca Nkemdilim Onah, Christopher Onyemaechi Ugwuibe
      Pages: 33 - 53
      Abstract: Many countries across the planet are facing unprecedented challenges as a result of COVID-19 infections. Nigeria, Africa's most populous country is no exception. The government has implemented a range of measures to curb the spread of the pandemic, including closure of international airports, shutting down of institutions, markets/stores etc. On March 29th, an initial four-week state-wide lockdown was declared in three major states, Lagos, Abuja and Ogun, halting all essential activities. Following this  Executive Order, state governments throughout the country took stringent measures such as restrictions on inter-state travel, instituting curfews, etc. Against this backdrop, the paper reviewed the socio-economic effects of COVID-19 lockdown in Nigeria and its implications on the micro and macro economy. The study adopted the systems theory. Due to safety protocols established by health experts on the COVID-19 pandemic, data for the study were drawn from participant observation, media commentaries and authentic secondary sources. The content analytical technique was used to review the literature on the subject matter. The study reported that the halt in business activities in the country has rendered many penniless and unable to provide for themselves the basic amenities needed for the duration of the lockdown. The study concluded that Federal Government of Nigeria should waive payments on personal and corporate income tax for the second quarter and third quarter of 2020, considering that the shock has affected the income and profits of households and businesses.
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Inequality among the informally wage-employed in South Africa –
           implications for the impact of exogenous shocks on lives and livelihoods

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      Authors: Derick Blaauw, Derek Yu, Rinie Schenck
      Pages: 55 - 92
      Abstract: South Africa's business cycle saw the end of a 99-month upswing in  November 2007. Average real GDP growth was three per cent between 1995 and 2005. However, the formal labour market was unable to absorb the increasing labour supply. Thousands of unemployed men resorted to informal wage employment as day labourers. Day labourers are particularly vulnerable to exogenous shocks such as the COVID 19 pandemic. We critically reflected on and analysed the spatial inequalities in the socioeconomic circumstances of day labourers at provincial level and contemplated the impact of exogenous shocks on their lives and livelihoods. We used the only nationally representative database on day labour activities in South Africa as well as the latest available micro-studies. Whilst the empirical findings indicated that gardening, loading and unloading, bricklaying assistance, construction and painting were the most common activities of these day labourers, focusing on provincial differences and inequalities, we found that day labourers in the Western Cape and Gauteng on average enjoyed shorter work hours, shorter tenure as day labourers, but higher wages than those in South Africa's economic weaker provinces. Since 2007, economic shocks and a new wave of migration have led to increased unemployment as well as declining real and reservation wages among day labourers across all provinces in South Africa. The COVID 19 pandemic's long-term implications are not yet clear but there may be a worsening of the livelihood and provincial inequalities of the day labourers. However, the short term implications for day labourers in the whole of South Africa are nothing short of disastrous. As a result of declining demand for their labour because of COVID 19, day labourers face economic hardships and even starvation. Government's relief efforts may not be sufficient in terms of their depth and reach. New  countrywide research is urgently required to provide coordinated policy responses to the plight of the informally wageemployed in South Africa.
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Social media and resource mobilisation for COVID- 19 pandemic related
           initiatives in Zimbabwe

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      Authors: Shupikai Kembo
      Pages: 93 - 123
      Abstract: Social media has transformed communication processes in society and presented individuals and organisations with a myriad of platforms to access and disseminate information, exchange views and opinions, network and form online communities. Studies have proven the effectiveness of social media use in different settings. One area in which social media has played a critical role is in mobilising resources for charitable causes. With the COVID-19 pandemic wreaking havoc throughout the world and affecting livelihoods of individuals and families as well as economic fortunes of countries around the globe, social media has played a significant role in the mobilisation of resources for various COVID-19 related social causes. Through the lens of the social influence theory, this study examined how social media was utilised to promote, mobilise, drive support, and persuade the public to donate towards COVID-19 related charitable initiatives in Zimbabwe. The study also ascertained the prospects and challenges as well as the
      effectiveness of social media in galvanising support for health pandemic related social causes. Methodologically, data was gathered through a combination of virtual ethnography and in-depth interviews. Overall, the study found that social media was effective in publicising charitable initiatives, inspiring the public to action and encouraging donations even in an economically unstable country.
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Effects of the mining legal framework on women participation in Artisanal
           and Small Scale Mining : Lessons from Taita Taveta County (Kenya)

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      Authors: David Mugo , Florence Ondieki-Mwaura , Miriam Omolo
      Pages: 125 - 148
      Abstract: Artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) is increasingly the focus of the national efforts to effectively regulate the sector as an  initiative to ameliorate national benefits by increasing women participation in the sector while seeking to address challenges that they face. Despite women's participation in the ASM sector being estimated at nearly 50% in the mining areas, their significant participation has largely been overlooked. Therefore, this study aimed at evaluating the level of women participation in the ASM industry as a result of the legal  framework undertaken in the mining sector and provide appropriate policy and legislative recommendations for future benefits of women. To achieve this, the study used data from a cross-sectional survey of 215 women working at different nodes of the ASM sector in Taita Taveta County. Descriptive statistics, linear regression and Probit regression model were employed in data analysis. The descriptive statistics reveal that most women who participate in ASM business are the main breadwinners in their households; therefore, ASM business plays an important role in their livelihoods. On average, women spend more than eight hours in a day working in the ASM activities. However, their operations are mainly relegated to subordinate roles of less paying jobs with only a few lucky women working in the mines as traders or owners of the mining sectors. The linear regression  results indicated that there was a positive correlation between women participation in the ASM and legal   framework at 1% level of significance. The study therefore, recommends policy frameworksthat facilitate easy access to mining licenses by women in the ASM sector and encourage and sensitize women to take up   leadership positions to ensure that their voices counts on the decision table.
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Analysis Of The Impediments To The Realisation Of The Right To Access To
           Adequate Housing In South Africa

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      Authors: Katlego Mashiane, Kola O. Odeku
      Pages: 149 - 176
      Abstract: In South Africa, the right to access to adequate housing is one of the socio-economic rights guaranteed in the 1996 Constitution and every citizen is entitled to this right. Legislation and policies were enacted to realise and fulfil the constitutional mandate of  providing access to adequate housing to the poor, disadvantaged, and the vulnerable people in the country. Government is mandated under the Constitution to provide and deliver adequate housing to needy citizens. Those entrusted with the responsibility to deliver adequate housing should do the right thing and be corrupt free. This article seeks to analyse the impediments to the realisation of adequate housing guaranteed in the Constitution. To address this problem, the article sourced and used qualitative literature review research approach such as journal articles, government policies to address the problem. The paper found that corruption, nepotism and maladministration are impediments to the realisation of the right to access to adequate housing by the poor, indigents and vulnerable people. It was recommended that there should be proper oversight and that corrupt officials should be brought to justice.
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Climate justice approaches and effectiveness of flood response
           interventions on women in Chikwawa District, Malawi

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      Authors: Deborah Tambulasi, David D. Mkwambisi, Judith Kamoto
      Pages: 177 - 208
      Abstract: Climate change that is translated to floods has caused enormous impacts on women. With focus on the 2015 floods, the study's  objective was to analyse preand post- flood response interventions from different stakeholders on women where the effectiveness of the use of Climate Justice Approach in interventions to enhance women's resilience during 2015 floods in Malawi was also examined. The study had household interviews, focus group discussions (15 men and 15 women) and key informant interviews (2 experts). Through climate justice approach, the study adopted a qualitative method. However, where necessary some quantitative data was provided. Qualitative data was analysed through Thematic Content Analysis while quantitative through SPSS. The results indicated that women received response, recovery and resilience interventions. Though women received the response interventions (response, recovery and resilience) the study found that they did not fully benefit culture and tradition, rigid gender roles and stereotypes, increased workload and Gender Based Violence. However, the interventions that had climate justice lens proved to enhance women's resilience than the one without climate justice lens.
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Influence of Household Wealth Status on Uptake of Short-Acting and
           Long-Acting Contraceptives among in-Union Women in Nigeria, 2003-2018

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      Authors: Onipede Wusu
      Pages: 209 - 228
      Abstract: Uptake of short-acting and long-acting contraceptives among in-union women stagnated in Nigeria in the last two decades. Little information is available about how household wealth status has influenced this stagnation. Hence, this study analysed the 2003, 2008, 2013 and 2018 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) data to address this gap. The analysis involved descriptive and logistic regression techniques at bivariate and multivariate levels. The results suggest the uptake of short-acting and long-acting contraceptives did not improve between 2003 and 2018. Long-acting contraceptive uptake was much lower during the period. Both bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses indicated that household wealth status significantly and positively predicted uptake of short-acting and long-acting contraceptives in Nigeria (p<0.05). Women in wealthier households had higher odds of reporting short-acting and long-acting contraceptives than their counterparts in households with lower wealth status. Therefore, to realise  sustainable improvement in family planning uptake in Nigeria, it is imperative for the government at all levels to adopt an integrative family planning policy. This type of policy is predicated upon the symbiotic  relationship between social development to enhance economic and social development to leapfrog poor households into better wealth statuses and promote both family planning and social development.
      PubDate: 2021-10-13
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 1 (2021)
       
 
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